From the monthly archives: "October 2006"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Larvae of what?
Hi Mr. Bug Man, I came across these critters eating away at this tree by the hundreds of thousands. The Angeles Crest forest floor was strewn with thousands of leaves with the same lace-like damage done to them. This photo is of a leaf still on the tree with some of the culprits on board. Any idea which species this larvae belong to? Best regards,
H. Markarian

PS I’ve also attached a beautiful photo of a mantis gorging on a frog.

Dear H,
We wish you had included additional information on both of your images. The larvae look like Leaf Beetle Larvae in the family Chrysomelidae. We did a google search for California and came up with the Willow Leaf Beetle, Chrysomela aeneicollis. That is a guess. You did not provide size information which would have been helpful. We will see if Eric Eaton can correctly identify these larvae. Here is Eric’s input: “I am pretty certain you are correct, at least to family level. Without knowing the host tree, genus and species identification probably can’t be accomplished. Eric”. Also, did you shoot the Mantis photo with the Tree Frog? Was it shot in the wild or in captivity? Where was the photo taken if in the wild? So many unanswered questions on a beautiful image.

Thanks for such a prompt reply to my last email. Regarding the larvae, they were about as long as a fingernail. It wasn’t a willow tree they were munching on, but i looked up willow leaf beetle online and the larvae definitely resembled the ones I saw in the wild. I came across the larvae on a trail in the Angeles National Forest in Southern California. As regards the mantis eating the tree frog, both were caught from the wild separately and placed in the same container temporarily. We had no idea the mantis would be able to catch, hold and eat an animal much stronger and heavier than it was. I took the photo while the critters were in captivity. Thanks for your time and feedback. You have a fascinating website. Best Regards,
H. Markarian

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

This may help
Dear Bugman,
I sent an e-mail yesterday asking for a bug identification. I noticed on your site today that you posted a picture from Stephanie from Austin, Tx. The picutre was kinda blurry but the bugs looked a lot like the pic I took. I will send it again for you and hope this clears it up for Stephanie and myself. Thanks,
Brent

Hi Brent,
Before we contacted Eric Eaton, we suspected Stephanie’s creatures might be Zelus Assassin Bug hatchlings. Eric dispelled that suspicion by pointing out that Assassin Bugs do not lay eggs in rows. Eric believes the hatchlings are Coreid Bugs. Your photo is of a Zelus Assassin nymph, the original suspicion we had about Stephanie’s hatchlings. Your specimen is Zelus longipes, the Milkweed Assassin Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Larvae of what?
Hi Mr. Bug Man,
Best regards,
H. Markarian
PS I’ve also attached a beautiful photo of a mantis gorging on a frog.

Dear H,
We wish you had included additional information on both of your images. Also, did you shoot the Mantis photo with the Tree Frog? Was it shot in the wild or in captivity? Where was the photo taken if in the wild? So many unanswered questions on a beautiful image.

Thanks for such a prompt reply to my last email. As regards the mantis eating the tree frog, both were caught from the wild separately and placed in the same container temporarily. We had no idea the mantis would be able to catch, hold and eat an animal much stronger and heavier than it was. I took the photo while the critters were in captivity. Thanks for your time and feedback. You have a fascinating website. Best Regards,
H. Markarian

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

a picture for you
Can you please tell me which of the sphnix moths this will be? I have found several feeding on a small wild euphorbia in a vacant lot near my house in central Texas. I don’t believe this is as large as it will grow as I’ve seen larger ones. It must be one of the many sphnix moths but I can find it neither in my book or on your excellent website. Thank you,
Carol Wadley

Hi Carol,
The caterpillar from the Leafy Spurge Hawkmoth, Sphinx euphorbiae, an introduced species that feeds on leafy spurge, Euphorbia esula. The caterpillar has several color variations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

scarey african spider
Hi
We have just got back from Africa where in Kenya we just stopped ourselves from running in to this little beauty which had its web spun at head height across a foot path in the bush. Do you know what it is and is it poisonous? I know all spiders are poisonous but how poisonous is the question? Thanks
Gary

Hi Gary,
While we would need considerable time to research the species, we are relatively certain this is a Spiny Orb Weaver in the genus Gasteracantha. There are several species in North America, and they are not a threat to humans.

Update: (06/08/2007)
About the African Spiny Orb Weaver image from Kenya, sent in on 10/27/2006? I think it is the Horned Orb Weaver spider, Gasteracantha falcicornis. Take a look at: http://photographersdirect.com /buyers/stockphoto.asp?imageid =866122 Best,
Susan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

butterflys
This was feeding in my yard,can you tell me if it is a butterfly,or a moth…my son says moth..I did not care it was so pretty. thank you,
Sue Moore
Silsbee,Texas

Longtailed Skipper Buckeye

Hi Sue,
We have combined your two letters together as both images were of butterflies. The one your son thought was a moth is a Longtailed Skipper and the other is a Buckeye.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination