From the monthly archives: "August 2006"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hickory Horned Devil Relative?
This roughly two inch bugger was hanging out on a rock under a mesquite tree in our yard in Tucson, AZ. It was quite regal with all the shiny silver spots down it’s back. I was looking at the home page and it seems like this guy might be related to the HHD perhaps? Just ran across your site last week after my pregnant wife yelled out from our bathroom, “Aaaagh! Hey get in here! What are these giant sized maggot things crawling all over the bathroom floor.” I’m still not 100% sure if they were hornets or yellow jackets, but had to remove them. (They were nesting in the bathroom vent ductwork and the larvae were crawling down the pipe and then falling from the ceiling.) Keep up the great work! By the by, it’d be great if there was a way to leverage all the data to create a self-identification process. I recall from my Microbiology days constructing decision trees for identifying bacteria species. Similar idea here for snakes.
http://www.spiritone.com/~brucem/garter.htm
It’d be cool if a user could answer a few rule-based questions and then get photos and names to compare as “potentials”. Sorry for the detail, just the geek in me thinking too hard. Cheers,
Timo

Hi Timo,
We needed to research this guy, but we quickly were lead to a photo of Sphingicampa hubbardi, the Mesquite Moth Caterpillar. The moth is also known as Hubbard’s Silkmoth. The caterpillar is gorgeous, and it is one of the Saturnidae and the same subfamily, Citheroniinae, as the Royal Walnut Moth or Hickory Horned Devil. We did find a website with some information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Art deco critter
Hi.
I’m in Maryland and scooped this little creature out of my pool yesterday. Can you tell me what it is? It’s about the size of a ladybird / ladybug. Thanks.
Sharon.

Hi Sharon,
This is the first posting to our site of a Whitecrossed Seed Bug, Neacoryphus bicrucis, but we noticed another letter with the name in the subject header.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth
This large moth, about 1.5 inches, came to sleep on a sage plant in my herb garden this past July. He stayed all day but slipped away when we were not watching in the evening. Very pretty and fuzzy. Photos courtesy of my wife Nancy.The stripes are alternating orange and gray-green. A cream color completes the wardrobe. I have looked at all the moths on your web site without finding a match. We see Luna Moths about every other year and this had a similar size body but not so big a wingspan. We live in Apex, NC, a suburb of Raleigh and Research Triangle Park. Our back yard is wooded and the houses across the street are heavily wooded. We can see a large lot with a small field and a small pond. So there is a mix of habitats. No farming in the area, mostly homes and shopping. We feed birds and keep baths and several types of feed going. We get lots of cottontail rabbits and squirrels, the occasional owl comes through and we now have a couple of pairs of resident hawks in the area. We do have a lot of flowers in front and see hummingbird moths often in late summer. We are hoping you can help us.
Robert and Nancy Bickle

Hi Robert and Nancy,
It sounds like you have an enviable domicile. This is a Regal Moth or Royal Walnut Moth. The caterpillar is the Hickory Horned Devil and is going to be our featured bug for September.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

fours and fives in PA
Hello!
We are a class of 4 and 5 year olds in PA. You have helped us before identifying bugs and we hope you can help again. We search our playground daily for bugs, photograph them and then hang them on our wall [we included a photo]. We have then been using your site to help us identify what we find. We have figured out most of them now [hopefully correctly] but are stumped on a couple. THANK YOU VERY VERY MUCH BUGMAN!
Fours and Fives in PA

Hi again Fours and Fives,
Both of these photos are of Mayflies. The photos look so nice together. Your BugWall is pretty awesome.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Red Legged Grasshopper /W picture
Hello,
First I just wanted to say that I love you web page, I spend so much time getting lost in the pictures. I have been chasing these red legged grasshoppers all over my garden for a almost a week trying to get a shot of them. i Finally caught one today, took a few shots, and let the fellow go. It was about an inch and a half long, and the diagonal stripe on its side is actually light yellow (it looks white in the pictures) I think it might be a type of Melanoplus. I live in Boston MA, and I hope you enjoy the pictures.
Laura

Hi Laura,
We believe you are correct with your Melanoplus identification. We do not feel confident enough to take this to the species level. BugGuide has a nice match.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

painted grasshopper photos
Hello Bugman,
We found this painted grasshopper in our yard, Chino Valley AZ. Was looking for information about it when we found your site. Wish I’d used a tripod but the pictures are still pretty sharp
David

Hi David,
My that Rainbow Grasshopper is letting its freaky flag fly. We can’t help but wonder how conservative dressers would view that rainbow of colors. Perhaps they would call out the fashion police.
.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination