What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hickory Horned Devil Relative?
This roughly two inch bugger was hanging out on a rock under a mesquite tree in our yard in Tucson, AZ. It was quite regal with all the shiny silver spots down it’s back. I was looking at the home page and it seems like this guy might be related to the HHD perhaps? Just ran across your site last week after my pregnant wife yelled out from our bathroom, “Aaaagh! Hey get in here! What are these giant sized maggot things crawling all over the bathroom floor.” I’m still not 100% sure if they were hornets or yellow jackets, but had to remove them. (They were nesting in the bathroom vent ductwork and the larvae were crawling down the pipe and then falling from the ceiling.) Keep up the great work! By the by, it’d be great if there was a way to leverage all the data to create a self-identification process. I recall from my Microbiology days constructing decision trees for identifying bacteria species. Similar idea here for snakes.
http://www.spiritone.com/~brucem/garter.htm
It’d be cool if a user could answer a few rule-based questions and then get photos and names to compare as “potentials”. Sorry for the detail, just the geek in me thinking too hard. Cheers,
Timo

Hi Timo,
We needed to research this guy, but we quickly were lead to a photo of Sphingicampa hubbardi, the Mesquite Moth Caterpillar. The moth is also known as Hubbard’s Silkmoth. The caterpillar is gorgeous, and it is one of the Saturnidae and the same subfamily, Citheroniinae, as the Royal Walnut Moth or Hickory Horned Devil. We did find a website with some information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

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