From the monthly archives: "February 2006"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Caterpillar in Madagaskar
Hallo Bugman,
I read, that you are interested in the animals of Madagaskar. Here ist a picture of a nice caterpillar.
Christian

Hi again Christian,
We suspect this caterpillar will sting if you come into contact with those spines.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Venezuela Caterpiller
Hallo Bugman,
I saw this interessting Caterpiller in Merida / Venezuela. The yellow stripes were much more flashy in the sunlight than at the picture.
Christian

Hi again Christian,
This one we know. This is a Tetrio Sphinx Caterpillar, Pseudosphinx tetrio.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dear Bugman,
Any help with an ID for this interesting spider found in my yard here in Dili, East Timor ?
Thanks for your help
Nick Hobgood

Hi Nick,
While we are not familiar with Indonesian species, we do know this spider is one of the genus Argiope.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Western Conifer Seed Bug?
Hi! I love your site! I’ve used it to identify at least 2 crawlys in the house already. I found this guy today on a houseplant…I’ve seen them before, and until looking them up on your site I’ve been calling them the King Box Elder Bugs, although I doubt they’re related. Is this a Western Conifer Seed Bug? I’m in Salt Lake City, UT. Thanks!
Pax

Hi Pax,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis, is native to the Pacific Northwest, but has migrated east. BugGuide shows a map that indicates sightings in Utah.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bugs of the caribean Island Antigua
Hallo,
these bugs i found on the carribean Island Antigua. I think it belongs to the Pyrrhocoridae.
Christian

Hi again Christian,
We agree with you that these true bugs are in the Red Bug family Pyrrhocoridae.

Update:  January 22, 2017
St Andrew’s Cross Cotton StainersThanks to a comment, we are confident that these are , a species we have identified on our site numerous times since this posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

foreign bugs
Hi Bugman –
Your site is great! It looks like you are getting many foreign bugs now – so here are some from my recent trip to Costa Rica, bug paradise. A really cool spider that I think is a Micrathena, a huge wolf spider that I found in my bed when I woke up one morning (first I screamed, then I grabbed my camera) and one of the many beautiful moths I saw. Thanks again for all your great work,
Allison

Hi Allison,
All of your photographs are stunning. We agree with your Micrathena identification. The Wolf Spider might be a Wolf Spider, and we do not recognize the beautiful Moth.

Update: Eric Eaton just provided us with the following information. ” Ok, the spiders from Ecuador and Costa Rica: They are most likely NOT wolf spiders, but wandering spiders, either in the family Ctenidae or Sparassidae. They tend to be more common, and even larger than, wolf spiders in the tropics. At least one species, Phoneutria fera, is extremely aggressive, with potentially deadly venom. Do not mess with large spiders in Central and South America! The venomous types are very difficult to distinguish from harmless species, and in any event, a bite is going to be really painful. These spiders sometimes stow away in bananas, houseplants, and other exported goods, so they can show up in odd places. Be careful where you put your hands:-) Oh, the lovely yellow moth is probably some kind of noctuid, which narrows it down to only several thousand species. Just thought I’d help you out there:-) Take care. Eric”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination