What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

some kind of Sphinx Moth???
Well this is one of our more colorful moths, is it some kind of Sphinx moth? I live in "upcountry" 2500 ft Hawaii in Waimea where it is often cooler and misty. In Nov and Dec, we get these moths. I have seen the larva and they are too creepy for me to pick up, but the moths are "all tuckered out" and lathargic. They will stay on one wall in a quiet place for at least 2 days. I like the shape of the wings and subtle coloration, and the little turned up tail. Reminds me of a sea plane for some reason. What are the pros and cons of such a critter?
Jock Goodman
btw I shot this with an old 3 Mp sony DSC S-70 digital camera that I still like best for macro even though I am on my 4 th camera after this dinosaur. I use a Nikon D-70s for sports,(surfing, rodeo, moto X races) and landscapes.

Hi Jock
Your Sphinx is an Oleander Hawk Moth, Deilephila nerii or Daphnis nerii, depending upon the author. According to Bill Oehlke’s site the range is: “the southern Mediterranean region, North Africa and the Middle East to Afghanistan” but the moth is included in the Hawaii section of his site since it was recorded as having established itself there in 1974. The host plant is oleander. If the lovely insect is to be accused of any bad behavior, it would come from oleander enthusiasts who are upset at loosing some blossoms and leaves due to the caterpillar’s ravenous appetites. We would love a caterpillar photo sometime.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

One Response to Oleander Hawk Moth

  1. Charlene says:

    I believe my friend caught an OleanderHawk Moth. Its very Big. I read that they are not from here. I would like you to confirm if thats what it is. Thank You

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