From the monthly archives: "October 2005"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

moth
One day in June (in North Carolina), this moth got trapped inside our tent and later we were swarmed by others trying to get to it. Can you tell us what it is? Thanks!
P.S. Love your site!

Moths in the genus Anisota are known as Spiny Oakworm Moths. Both males and females are reported to release pheromones and frenzied mating orgies follow. Guess you witnessed one. BugGuide is attempting to sort out the genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

our spider
Thank you for your info on the interesting spider…I’d never seen a spider “catch” a snail…thought you might like this: Thanks for such a wonderful website.
Jen

Hi Jen,
Not only do we love your photo, we want some of the offspring of your Araneus Orb Weaver in our garden where the snails are currently devouring our sprouting lettuce.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Can you help?
Every year in August in Michigan( all through michigan), I see this web like mass in trees. I asked the locals, they had no clue what they were, they didn’t even notice them. Do you know what it is?
Yvette

Hi Yvette,
This is a Fall Webworm, Hyphantria cunea, nest. In the fall, these social caterpillars can build enormous webs that cover the leaves. Here is a site with more information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I am delighted by the wonderful pictures. My neighbor here in the campground found the attached caterpillar in a box of garlic sent from B.C. Canada. She does not know if it crawled into the box after it was opened in her tent or it it is a stowaway from Canada. It stung her and though concerned did not want to destroy it. Can you help us identify it?
Thanks
Gery

Hi Gery,
Luckily, the sting of the Io Moth Caterpillar only results in mild discomfort.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s that bug?
I was just websurfing with a ‘cool site finder’ when I found that one. I never thought of searching a website to identify a bug before… And I think it’s pretty cool. I would be glad if you could help me identify this insect, which I found not too far from my home. Please see the attached files.
Bye,
Stephane

Hi Stephane,
We knew this was exotic for us here in southen California, but your letter gave us no hint as to where your home is. Luckily, the pod caused us to search Australian insect sites and we located your Cotton Harlequin Bug, Tectocoris diophthalmus. They are also called Hibiscus Harlequin Bugs. The patterns vary between individuals. You other photo shows a cluster of nymphs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination