From the monthly archives: "June 2005"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Pair of Dobsonflies!!!
(06/29/2005)
What type of bug is this?
Hi. I was wondering if you could help identify these bugs
for me. I live in the Poconos region of Pennsylvania, about
45 miles west of Scranton. Based on the difference in body
sizes and how the pinchers look I’m guessing that they’re
most likey a male and a female. The one with the long crossed
pinchers is about four inches long (from the end of the wings
to the end of the pinchers), with two inch antennae and one
inch pinchers. The one with the short pinchers is about three
inches long, with one inch antannae and maybe 1/4 inch pinchers.
They’re both very docile and didn’t try to fly away when I
had them in the tupperware with the lid off.
Thanks!
Ben

A Pair of Dobsonflies

A Pair of Dobsonflies

Hi Ben,
We have been getting plenty of Dobsonfly photos lately and
when they are in season, we always try to keep a photo on
our homepage. We currently have several that you would have
seen had you scrolled down a bit. Your photo is exquisite
and will have a permanent spot at the top of our Dobsonfly
page. Your are correct in that they are male and femaLe of
the same species and the male has the long mandibles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

new bug
I found this guy very early this AM about 5:25 on my morning walk. I had to put him in a paper towel to bring him home as he has nasty large pinchers. Look at how he is pinching the paper towel, I’m glad that wasn’t my fingers. Anyways, I looked on the web to see what kind of a bug he is and the closest I can find is a dobsonfly, snakefly and a fishfly, but yet he doesn’t look quite like them and he seems bigger than they are? I’m going to send a pix into the "what kind of bug is this" website and see what they say. I brought him home and put him in the fridg, they get cold and can’t move then you can take pix of them. 🙂 found that out the with moths, they become quite docile when cold.
Judy Schrader
Wildlife Paintings and Nature Art

Hi Judy,
You are a tricky photographer. You don’t have a guy, but a gal. You have a female Dobsonfly. We linked to your site so people can see your fabulous artwork.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some Kinda Swallowtail
Hi there,
This beauty was on my Chicago area butterfly bush this morning. Do you know which variety this is?
Many thanks,
Joe

Hi Joe,
This is a Black Swallowtail, a female judging by her small yellow spots. This is a common butterfly found in open meadows. The larval food include parsley, carrots, celery and Queen Anne’s Lace.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big Ugly Worm
Hi. We have been enjoying your site very much since we discovered it a few days ago. Now we have found a weird ugly bug we would like to have identified. We live in northeastern PA. Our area is heavily woodedbut we are not near water. This THING was seen “inching” along on the concrete pad by my pigeon lofts. It moves by bending itself up into a bow shape, then reaching out with the front. It’s like an inchworm, only much bigger and uglier. It has 4 caterpiller-like feet (my son says they are pseudopods) on the back end, and about 8 claw-like feet on the front. It SCARED us! What is it?
Thank you,
Sue and David

Hi Sue and David,
You can stop being scared of your Spanworm or Inchworm, one of the Geometrid Caterpillars. They are very difficult to positively identify. Our best guess is the Oak Besma, Besma quercivoraria, which eats a wide variety of forest trees besides oaks including conifers. There are conspicuous wartlike swellings that help it to mimic a twig that has had the leaves drop off, especially when the caterpillar rests by streching straight out at an oblique angle. Here is a page full of Geometrid Caterpillars from the Caterpillars of Eastern Forests website.

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tentacled moth?
I know a bit about bugs, certainly enough, to know this bug certainly defies classification in any normal group. Sadly it was already dead when I found it, and I actually caught it thinking it was simply a plant wisp caught in the breeze. Upon further inspection I found a very little insect body attatched to all the wispys. I’m of the mind that it is some kind of moth with incredibly strange wings (which are quite sticky, its a very hard bug to put down). Please let me know if you have any idea what this creature is, I haven’t had any luck. The pictures aren’t the best, but on the close up you can see it has legs and a head. I figure with the strange wing wisps it shouldn’t be hard to either identify or recognize as a new critter.
Thanks, Duncan
West Chester, PA

Hi Duncan,
Eric Eaton helped us to correct this one. He writes: This is a “woolly aphid of some kind. There aren’t that many species, but you have to link them to the host tree to conclude what they are.”

Update:
(01/11/2007) bug images on WTB
Dear Bugman,
I enjoyed visiting your site. It really doesn’t compete with BugGuide.net, since you have posted lots of foreign insects that they bar from that site. For example, you have some really nice photos of the primitive treehopper Aetalion (which is tropical). I thought you might like to know about the following:
(4) The “woolly aphid” is actually an insect infested by a fungus, that has sent out long fungal filaments.
Thanks for helping to spread an interest in Homoptera. We need to encourage the amateur.
Andy Hamilton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

pantry beetle?
In my bedroom along the floorboard, underneath a window, about 20 of these, ranging in color from light white/yellow to dark brown red. At first I thought it was rice, till i picked one up with tweezers and squeezed it. Big mistake. I live in an apartment that recently had big time exterminators out for Carpenter ants. Since then, no ants, but now this? and in my bedroom? what can I expect? The house is very old, split into apartments so I am use to bugs of all sorts, but these, I don’t know, the fact that I found them in my bedroom, I am a little freaked out. Thanks in advance.
Stephanie

Hi Stephanie,
The good news is you do not have Pantry Beetles. The bad news is you will soon have a Fly invasion. It looks like Flies got into rotting organic matter somewhere (Forgot to take out the garbage? Dead mouse in the walls?) and laid eggs. The maggots developed unnoticed and some wandered to a dry place to pupate. You have Fly Pupae, or more correctly, Fly Puparia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination