From the monthly archives: "April 2005"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

luna moth pics
hi,
i love the site.
i thought i’d send you a couple of great pictures of a luna moth that came to visit us a few years ago in the laurentian mountains about an hour’ drive north of montreal, canada. he/she had teh eyes of shiva on her back and stared deep down into our souls…. we found the answers there. somebody may have put something in the kool-aid though
keep it up….
michael bailey

Thanks so much Michael.
We always like getting Luna Moth photos.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

We have been trying to get a good photo of an elusive Mourning Cloak Butterfly, Nymphalis antiopa, for several weeks. On sunny days, we see one flying around our Mt. Washington offices, and they are also frequently seen in Elyria Canyon. Needless to say, the camera is never handy, or charged. Today, we were removing a fuschia from a hanging basket and noticed a dried leaf. Lo and behold, it was actually a Mourning Cloak Butterfly still asleep. We charged the camera and were rewarded with this image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Help, gross bugs
I’m hoping you can identify these two bugs for me. The small brown and tan ones are suddenly everywhere in my house, but mostly in my kitchen drawers and in the bathtub.

The black and red ones are just mean looking, and these two were found dead in the bathtub, although I have seen them around other areas of the house. We live in an old farmhouse, and am hoping you are not going to tell me they are eating my house!!
Paula
Stockton, IL

Hi Paula,
Your small beetle is a type of Pantry Beetle, but we will write to Eric Eaton for more information. He just got back and writes: “The top two specimens are Galerita janus, a false bombardier beetle, family Carabidae. The other is the larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius, a frequent pest of stored, dried meat if I recall correctly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Any clue?
Hi Bugman!
In desperate need of your assistance. I’ve looked at every image on your site without any luck in identifying these bugs. Attached are a couple of pics. They are located in our backyard in Austin, TX (everywhere you look you see them crawling around. They seem to be located mostly in small piles of dead leaves and on our wooden fence). Although the two pics look a bit different, I think the “blacker” one is just older because they all “hang out” and run around together. When they are first born, they are all grouped together and start out as a bright red-orange and finally begin mostly black. I also haven’t seen them fly. I want to guess their size to be 1⁄4” to 1⁄2”. They seem pretty harmless, but my daughter won’t go outside because they freak her out. Not sure if this is enough information, but I will provide any necessary info, if at all possible. Any ideas or help would be greatly appreciated!
Yvette

Hi Yvette,
You probably only checked out the images on our homepage. If you go to the two True Bug pages by clicking the links in the alphabatized list on the left side of the www.whatsthatbug.com homepage, you will find lots of great photos and information on Boxelder Bugs. Your photos are fantastic.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

would appreciate info on this bug
Hi,
I’ve been finding about 4 of these critters a week under my bed for a few years. On a couple of occasions, I’ve found them where I work, so they may be parasitic, and living off of me. The pictures show one 3 mm long by 1.5 mm wide, which is as big as they get. On three very rare occasions I’ve seen one (of a different sex, I imagine) which is twice as long, less round, and more conical, and with long hairs on its tail. All are brown on top, tan on the bottom, with 2 rows of legs, about 20 legs each.
They are very inactive, and quite robust, being able to survive 24 hours in the freezer, or 2 weeks without food. I’ve made a short movie that shows one using it’s many legs to flip over, and run away. It’s in Real Player format, and can be found on the web at http://www.angelfire.com/scary/redcom/bug.rm
Here are four pictures, next to a penny, with the last picture being of the rarer sex. Flipped over so can see legs underneath. Diff sex, looks smaller coz of camera distance, but is twice as long, conical, and with hairs on tail
Thx in advance for your help.
Luis.

Hi Luis,
Only one of your photos arrived, actually four copies of the same image. Based more on your description than your blurry photo, it seems you have Carpet Beetle larvae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Help, gross bugs
I’m hoping you can identify these two bugs for me. The small brown and tan ones are suddenly everywhere in my house, but mostly in my kitchen drawers and in the bathtub. The black and red ones are just mean looking, and these two were found dead in the bathtub, although I have seen them around other areas of the house. We live in an old farmhouse, and am hoping you are not going to tell me they are eating my house!!
Paula
Stockton, IL

Hi Paula,
Your small beetle is a type of Pantry Beetle, but we will write to Eric Eaton for more information. He just got back and writes: “The other is the larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius, a frequent pest of stored, dried meat if I recall correctly.”

Wonderful. Thank you. We just found a bunch of cat food that had been pushed under the microwave cabinet, so we are going to clean that up along with getting rid of some “trophys” that my sons and husbands have hanging, hopefully that will take care of the problem. Thank you for getting back to me so quickly!
Paula

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination