From the monthly archives: "February 2005"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello.
I want to compliment you on a great site. Attached i sent you a pic, a little blurry sadly, of one big bug that i found near Cancun, Quintana Roo, Mexico. The insect was big around 10cm or between three and four inches. It could fly and the people there (the Ak tunche cave) told me it was a wasp, but I have not been able to find any information on the web. I would really appreciate your help and thanks in advance.
Pablo Kaufer
Argentina

Hi Pablo,
Your wasp is a Tarantula Hawk. The female wasp picks a fight with a tarantula, and if she wins, she stings it, paralyzes it, lays an egg on it and buries it. When the egg hatches, the young larval wasp has a nice supply of fresh meat because it eats the paralyzed tarantual alive. She will sting you painfully if you don’t respect her.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Colorful Spider
Would like to know what this colorful fellow is. Took the picture on Maui , Hawaii on the way to a little waterfall. Then I saw it on a Hawaii travelogue but they didn’t identify it.
Bill

Hi Bill,
Your Crablike Spiny Orb Weaver, Gasteracantha elipsoides, ranges throughout the continental United States, being most common in Florida and other parts of the South. Obviously, it also lives in Hawaii. They build enormous webs, expecially considering that the spiders are a mere 1/2 inch in size. Thank you for the beautiful photograph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider in Alabama
Hi Bugman,
I live in Alabama, and have recently found 3 spiders in my home in the last 2 days. Two of them were the same type, and one (the one I have the picture of) was of a different type. I wish I had a picture of the first type because it was the frightening looking one, about the size of the quarter, not hairy, didn’t look like a wolf spider to me, but what do I know? I’ll be on the lookout and if another one comes along I’ll be sure to snap a picture of it (but hopefully won’t have to do so). Anyway, here is the picture of the second one. The two pictures are of the same spider; they look different because one I used the flash and it washed all the color out and made the spider look gray. It’s actually colored more like the orange looking picture. Sorry the pictures aren’t great quality; my digital camera doesn’t do macro work too well. Can you tell me what kind it is? Thanks!
Anna

Hi Anna,
The spider in your photo is a type of crab spider, Family Thomisidae, possibly the Elegant Crab Spider, Xysticus elegans. It does not build a web and is often seen running along fences. It ranges from Maine to Georgia and west to Arizona and north to Alberta. It is harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi Bugman!
I was going to email you with my pictures of this bug that I have found twice on the walls of my home in Southern California but fortunately found the ‘Case Bearing Moth’ email on your site. Thanks for solving my riddle! Here are my pictures if you’d like them for your database
Jason Roberts

Thanks Jason,
We like the dime for scale.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Daddy long legs
I have seen several references to the bug known as "daddy longlegs" and most of them say that this is not a spider, but a true bug.
The bugguide has them under arachnids and I just wanted to clear this up. My daughter is trying to identify bugs in her collection.
Thanks,
jeff

Hi Jeff,
What an awesome photo or Daddy Long-Legs or Harvestmen from the Order Opiliones. They are arachnids, and related to spiders, but are not true spiders. They have no fangs and do not bite. They use crushing mouthparts to feed primarily on the carcasses of invertebrates that have recently died.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please help me identify this bug !!!
hi there !! I’ve caught two bugs here but i can’t find their family name , genus, order and scientific name … i came across your website today and was wondering whether you can help me identify them ?? thanks alot .. !!! sorry i forgot to tell you that im writing from kuala lumpur , malaysia. i caught the stick-like insect near a pond somewhere around my house. it camouflages itself n looks like a grass. while the other bug was caught from a place call genting highlands. i found it in a carpark near a hotel. i think it came from the forest somewhere near the hotel. thanks alot. your help is very much appreciated. if you cant identify them then its ok.
angeline

Hi Angeline,
We thought Eric might be more help with the beetle. I thought it might be a Cerambycid, one of the Long-Horned Borers, but Eric is not convinced. Hope that helps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination