From the monthly archives: "October 2004"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What are these playground bugs?
Hello!
We are so happy to have found your web site! We are a class of 4 and 5 year olds in PA. We take photos of bugs everyday but then we have no clue what they are. We used the photos on your site to identify some of the bugs we have photographed. Like the Wheel Bug that visited us last week. The second photo is of a bug we have not named yet so hopefully we can start off calling it the proper name. We like its funny "nose". Obviously we REALLY need a bug encyclopedia! THANK YOU VERY VERY MUCH!
Fours and Fives in PA

Dear four and five year olds,
I’m so happy to see you are budding entomologists. Your other insect is a Caddisfly. They are members of the order Trichoptera that begin life as aquatic larvae. The larvae construct homes from sticks and tiny pebbles which are cemented togethe, acting as both protection and camouflage. The larvae are sometimes called Caseworms.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What are these playground bugs?
Hello!
We are so happy to have found your web site! We are a class of 4 and 5 year olds in PA. We take photos of bugs everyday but then we have no clue what they are. We used the photos on your site to identify some of the bugs we have photographed. Like the Wheel Bug that visited us last week. The first photo included is of a roundish bug. We have ben calling it by the wrong name. Could you please give us the correct name for our playground bug friend? THANK YOU! Obviously we REALLY need a bug encyclopedia! THANK YOU VERY VERY MUCH!
Fours and Fives in PA

Dear four and five year olds,
I’m so happy to see you are budding entomologists. Your round bug is a Colorado Potato Beetle, once native to the Rocky Mountains, but now naturalized wherever potatoes and other solanaceous plants are cultivated. It is considered a pest and both adults and the fat grubs can do considerable damage to the leaves of potato plants and their relatives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I live in the central west coast of Florida (near Tampa bay) and I found this spyder in the bathroom high up in the corner. The wife says she thinks it’s a poisonous bananna spyder (we do have quite a few bannana trees) because she say’s they jump, I’ve never witnessed this. But this is not the first I’ve seen these. But never do I see a nest making me think it’s a "wolf" or a "fishing spyder". We do have large web making spyders and the one in question spins a web but, I’m still doubious.
The doubting spyder houser….
May the love of God be with you and yours,
Respectfully,
Glenn T. Ennis

Hi Glenn,
Your wife is partly correct. You have a Giant Crab Spider, probably Heteropoda venatoria, a female. They are sometimes called Banana Spiders because they are sometimes imported with bunches of bananas and people mistake them for tarantulas. The species if found worldwide in tropical regions, but is also common in Florida. They often enter homes where they are content to feed on cockroaches, hence they are beneficial. The female will carry her egg sac around with her until the spiderlings hatch. They are harmless to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what am I?
Hi,
Now that I have looked through your site and feel completely crawly, can you ID this awesome spider? My son found it and 2 others in our yard and has taken to tossing worms into the webs to feed them. This by the way is really cool to watch. Anyways, is it one I should be weary of? Thanks in advance.
Barbie
Wallingford CT

Hi Barbie,
Your Cross Spider is also known as a Garden Spider, Araneus diadematus. It is a harmless European import.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello,
I found this on my patio wall and it looks like one that I stepped on last month in Scottsdale, AZ. Any ideas?
Thanks,
Kelli Benne

Hi Kelli,
It is one of the Araneus species of Orb Weavers. Harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination