From the monthly archives: "June 2004"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello Bugman,
I have to tell you just how interesting I have found your website. It has become quite habit forming. I am attaching 3 photos of a bug in various stages. These army of creapers have taken over my Weeping Willow Tree and are eating it up. Can you please tell me what they are and the best way to get rid of them. I live in NorthEast Arkansas.
Thanks so much for your time and knowledge.
Cathy Smith

Hi Cathy,
Despite being called the Cottonwood Leaf Beetle, Chrysomela scripta Fabricius, this pest can also be found on willow trees, as you know. I would check with local agricultural experts regarding control, now that you know what you have. Both the adult on the left, and the larva on the right will eat leaves from the host trees. We found some information on this site.
Good Morning,
Thanks so much for emailing me back so quickly. I am very happy to know exactly what kind of bug this is that is bugging me and my willow tree. I will get in touch with the Agricultural department today. Thanks so much for your time. I hope this email finds you having a wonderful day. Best Regards,
Cathy Smith

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

(12/26/2005)
” Oh, my! Neither one. I’d be willing to bet it is the larva of an owlfly (Ascalaphidae). Overall appearance, and behavior, are right for that family. Hesitate to be conclusive because there are other families of Neuroptera in that part of the world that are not represented in North America. Still, I”m reasonably confident that is what it is. Cool! Eric”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I was hoping that you could help me Identify a new bug that we’ve recently found in our yard. I’ve never seen this bug before and this summer it is all over our yard. I live in South Texas . It’s not very long, about 1⁄2 an inch or so, and looks like it has under developed wings on it’s back. Thanks for your help.
Tonia

Hi Tonia,
You have sent in a beautiful photo of an Assassin Bug nymph, Family Reduviidae. I cannot give you an exact species. These bugs are friends of the gardener. They have ravenous appetites and will help control harmful insect pests in your yard naturally. There is a minor downside. Treat them with respect. They can inflict a painful bite with that sucking mouth of theirs. There is an irritant that is released when the bug bites, probably associated with digestion, but the effect is mild. Once again, the bite is painful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi I found your site after looking through about 50 websites trying to identify two bugs that I found in my backyard. I’m from Amarillo, Texas if that helps. I have attached pictures of these bugs. I have never in my life seen anything that resembled these two bugs! They are about 3-4 inches long with large antennae. They have pincher like mouths and are hard bodied. They can also fly but I don’t think they can go far because they are so large and heavy. Please help me figure this out because I have a young son and I’m afraid to send him out in the backyard thinking he might get bit by one of these. Thank you so very much for you help in my search!
Lisa

Dear Lisa,
You have Cottonwood Borers. They are beetles from the long-horned beetle family Cerambycidae. These are very large black and white beetles. We have several photos on our beetle page from last year. Adults are common around cottonwood and poplar trees and the grubs bore into the wood of those trees. They will not harm your children, but a huge infestation may harm your trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Peculiar looking moth/caterpillar?
Hi,
I HAVE to find out what this is! I’m attaching some pictures I took today — I have lots more if needed! Please email me back if you have any idea! I am located in Marshfield, Massachusetts which is a coastal community, however, I live in a very woodsy area with mostly pine tree’s surrounding, however there are some others in the yard that are different. I don’t know if that has anything to do with what this creature is!
Thank you for your help!!
Christina L. Sheehan

Hi Christina,
I must compliment you on some stunning photos of an Eyed Tiger Moth, Ecpantheria deflorata. It has a beautiful black wooly bear caterpillar with black hairs and bands of crimson at the body segments. According to Holland: “The Eyed Tiger Moth ranges from southern News England, where it is rare, through the southern parts of the united States into Mexico. It is quite common in the Carolinas.” The larvae feed on plantain, Plantago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I found this bug on an egg plant leaf outside late last night it is approx 1 1/2 in long and 1/2 in thick we put it into a clear container with a small worm/caterpillar and this morning we watched it suck it dry. it looks like a giant stink bug with a snout like a butterfly for sucking and horned back.

(ed. note: The only way we were able to access these images was to rephotograph them from our computer screen, so the quality is poor.
You have a Wheel Bug, Arilus cristatus, a member of the Assasin Bug Family Reduviidae. These large true bugs can be recognized by the cog like wheel on their backs. They are friends of gardeners since they eagerly feed on many garden pests, like the caterpillar you put in the jar. Those sucking mouthparts can deliver a painful bite if the bug is carelessly handled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination