Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dead Multicolored Centipede found in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 26, 2014
Yesterday, we wa
lked out onto the patio and saw the Argentine Ants surrounding something on the concrete.  We were surprised to see a small, two inch long, Multicolored Centipede in the genus Scolopendra.  Though Hogue writes about them, we have never in our 34 years in Los Angeles seen one.   Since our garden is kind of wild, we hope more may be lurking under stones and logs.

Dead Multicolored Centipede

Dead Multicolored Centipede

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Alligator Lizards
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 5, 2014 & July 12, 2014
While these are not the largest Alligator Lizards we have seen, the two individuals were between 10 and 12 inches long.  The first individual was repelling down the logs and the second larger individual was sunning in the late afternoon rays.

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Remains of a Swallowtail Exuvia on Avocado Tree
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 29, 2014 12:13 PM
We noticed this shell of a Swallowtail Chrysalis in the avocado tree, and we tried to research which species of local Swallowtail has a caterpillar that will feed on the leaves of Avocado.  We have Western Tiger Swallowtails, Giant Swallowtails and Anise Swallowtails in the garden, but none of them feeds on avocado, to the best of our knowledge.  The only Swallowtail listed as eating avocado on the Easy Butterfly Garden website is the Magnificent Swallowtail,
Papilio garamus.  Perhaps this will remain a mystery.  Can the Magnificent Swallowtail have ventured this far north?  Here are additional images of the Magnificent Swallowtail from Animal PHotos.

Shell of a Swallowtail Chrysalis

Shell of a Western Tiger Swallowtail Chrysalis

Julian Donahue provides some input.
Hi Daniel,
The Spicebush Swallowtail is recorded as feeding on another species of Persea, but Tietz’s Index to Described Life Histories…. lists the only swallowtail feeding on Persea americana as Papilio rutulus, the Western Tiger Swallowtail. The BAMONA website doesn’t mention avocado as a hostplant.
Hope this helps,
Julian

The Western Tiger Swallowtails have been seen flying near that avocado tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  June 27, 2014
Most every year, we get at least one visit from a Walnut Underwing, and since the endangered California Black Walnut Trees in the yard are growing nicely, we hope we will see an increase in the moth population.  About a week ago, a tattered individual was on the porch light and for the past several days, this beauty has been seen at night and is generally on the screen door the next morning.  Last night, a huge commotion in the kitchen turned out to be our feisty feline Boris trying to catch this Walnut Underwing which was on the other side of the glass window.  Thought it landed with its underwings visible, it flew before we could get the camera.  These dorsal and ventral (somewhat showing the patterns on the underwings) views will have to suffice for now.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillars defoliate Golden Chain Tree
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Saturday, June 28, 2014 2:33 PM
Several years ago, Mom gave us some tiny seedlings from the Golden Chain Tree,
Laburnum anagyroides, that she has growing in her yard in Ohio.  See GoBotany for images of the Golden Chain Tree.  Well, for many years they have languished, growing very slowly.  Earlier in the week, we noticed brown leaves on the largest one, now grown to about four feet in height.  Caterpillars were feeding on the leaves, skeletonizing them, and spinning loose webs.  We suspect this is some caterpillar in the Ermine Moth superfamily Yponomeutidae, and we thought we might be getting close when we discovered this BugGuide posting of the Laburnum Leaf Miner Moth, Leucoptera laburnella, however our caterpillars seem too big to be Leaf Miners.

What's Eating the Golden Chain Tree???

What’s Eating the Golden Chain Tree???

Some similar looking caterpillars include these Ailanthus Webworm Caterpillars on BugGuide and these Ermine Moth Caterpillars from BugGuide.

Ermine Moth Caterpillars perhaps???

Genista Broom Moth Caterpillars

BINGO!!!  The Scenic Hills Nursery has an image of the Genista Caterpillar, Uresiphita (=Tholeria) reversalis, and according to the site, they are:  “A web producing caterpillar that attacks Texas laurel, crape myrtle, honeysuckle, and Laburnum. Larvae defoliate as well as spin webs.”  Now we realized why it looked so familiar.  We have images of the Genista Broom Moth Caterpillar in our archives and BugGuide has a substantial page devoted to it.

Caterpillars on Golden Chain Tree

Genista Broom Moth Caterpillars on Golden Chain Tree

The Genista Broom Moth Caterpillar is also called the Sophora Worm.

Write if you have an idea what these are.

Genista Broom Moth Caterpillars

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Western Pygmy Blue
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 24, 2014 5:00 PM
While taking some images of the California Harvester Ants, we noticed a butterfly so small it could only be a Western Pygmy Blue.  Our images are not as nice as Anna’s are, but they do document this lovely diminutive butterfly in Mount Washington.

Western Pygmy Blue

Western Pygmy Blue

The Western Pygmy Blue is the smallest butterfly in North America.

Western Pygmy Blue

Western Pygmy Blue

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination