Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gray Bird Grasshopper
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
April 5, 2016
Though the image is not the greatest, we did get a quick shot of this impressive Gray Bird Grasshopper before it flew from the paloverde to the pine tree.

Gray Bird Grasshopper

Gray Bird Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantis Ootheca hatches in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
April 5, 2016
Last August, we created a posting for a lost photo opportunity of a California Mantis and a Figeater together on a butterfly bush that we missed when the camera malfunctioned.  A few weeks ago, a branch on the butterfly bush was broken, and when we cut it free from the plant, we noticed three California Mantis oothecae, obviously deposited by the female we observed there.  We tied two of the oothecae to a nearby palo verde and the third to a plum tree in the back yard.  While out in the yard, we inspected the oothecae, and noticed that one appeared to have hatched out its brood.  Luckily we spotted one little Mantis hatchling, a mere 1/4 inch in length, scuttling away.

California Mantis Hatchling

California Mantis Hatchling

Hatched Ootheca of a California Mantis

Hatched Ootheca of a California Mantis

Update:  April 11, 2016
We did some gardening yesterday, and though we couldn’t be bothered getting the camera, we did find two additional oothecae on the butterfly bush, and as we were pulling weeds, we found two green 1/4 inch long green mantids scuttling around the low grass.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 28, 2016
We were shocked to see this bright yellow caterpillar meandering across the patio.  We immediately recognized a Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar,
Phoebis sennae, but we do not have any Cassia growing anywhere near.  Where did it come from?  We checked BugGuide and learned:  “Caterpillar: usually pale green and marked by a yellow stripe on each side and black spots in rows across each abdominal segment.  Above and below the yellow stripe there are usually small areas marked with blue.   There is also a yellow form that occurs when it feeds on yellow flowers of its host plants. The later instars of the yellow form have a dark transverse band across each segment” which means our Caterpillar was feeding on yellow blooms.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar feeds most commonly on Cassia and some other woody and herbaceous legumes” and we do have an Acacia in the garden, another legume in the family Fabaceae , so we will check it out to see if there are any additional Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillars feeding upon it.

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Emerald
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 18, 2016 10:50 PM
Upon arriving home from work tonight, this gorgeous green Emerald, possibly Nemoria leptalea which is pictured on BugGuide, was waiting on the front door.  According to BugGuide “Larva can be found on buckwheat” and we have three Buckwheat plants in the garden.

Emerald, possibly Nemoria leptalea

Emerald, possibly Nemoria leptalea

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Slender Salamanders
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 14, 2016
We decided to do some late afternoon gardening, and we occasionally overturn a log in the garden just to see what we can find.  We keep rotting logs in the yard for habitat, and we have also constructed our garden walls from broken concrete.  Decisions like that are important for providing habitat for native species.  Well, under the first log was a cute little California Slender Salamander in the genus
Batrachoseps, most likely the Garden Slender Salamander, Batrachoseps major major, which is found in Southern California.  According to California Herps Identifying Salamanders page:  “This is the small worm-like salamander commonly found in gardens and yards in coastal southern California. It is often seen under surface objects, especially in moist and shaded areas, but it may also be found under cover in open areas including coastal chaparral. This is a small, thin salamander, which might look like a worm on first sight, before the tiny limbs are noticed. Often they will be found coiled up under a surface object. When disturbed, they may spring up and writhe on the ground, wagging their tail, which sometimes is let loose as a distraction. It is also easily detached when a salamander is handled. Many of these salamanders will be found with an incompletely re-grown tail.  This is one of two small, slender salamander occuring in Southern California in the areas shown on the map below, but the second species is less commonly encountered and is found in the mountains. There are many other species of slender salamanders occuring throughout the state which all look so much alike that they are nearly impossible to identify without using a range map.” Upon overturning a neighboring log, we found two more Garden Slender Salamanders. All were about three inches long. We carefully replaced the logs after taking a few images.

Garden Slender Salamander

Garden Slender Salamander

Garden Slender Salamanders

Garden Slender Salamanders

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Sent Via Personal Email
Subject:  Moth on Door on Avenue 44
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
February 9, 2016 8:27 AM
hi, can you tell us the species, please?
and this one, from yesterday?
what happens if the porch light has attracted them and they stay all night…
will they die because they have not flown – or eaten?
c.

Geometrid Moth

Geometrid Moth

Dear Clare,
We believe both of your moths are in the family Geometridae and there are so many similar looking individuals in the family that we often have difficulty with species identifications.  The one with the elongated wings might be a Pug in the genus
Eupithecia based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Numbers By far the largest moth genus with over 1400 species worldwide. About 160 Eupithecia species are found in America north of Mexico.  62 species in Canada (CBIF). Several species are Holarctic.  Identification Many Eupithecia species require dissection for identification and there are many undescribed species.  Adults at rest often hold their long forewings (with hindwings hidden beneath) at right-angles to the body, giving a distinctive “soaring hawk” appearance.  Food Larvae feed mostly on Asteraceae and also other plant families.”  We would not eliminate that it might be Glaucina erroraria which is pictured on iNaturalist though according to BugGuide:  “Dissection often needed for this group.”

Pug

Pug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination