Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

Subject:  Sand Wasps attracted to Mint
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 20, 2016
The mint is continuing to attract Honey Bees as well as Skippers, Marine Blues, Syrphid Flies and some gorgeous wasps, like this Sand Wasp in the genus
Bembix.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is “Usually sandy areas; nest holes are dug in the sand; best opportunity to observe individuals is on dunes or where vegetation is sparse.”  BugGuide continues:  “Females provision their nest with flies which the larvae feed on (a single developing larva may eat more than twenty flies)” and “Provisioning is progressive. The females provide a greater number of prey over subsequent days during larval growth. Adults are excellent diggers and can disappear below the surface of loose sand within seconds.”

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Scarab Hunter Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Subject:  Female Scarab Hunter Wasp
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 18, 2016 9:30 AM
Just as we were leaving the office today to gawk at the guerilla art Donald Trump sculpture at Wacko (see LA Times or LAist ), we had to make a slight delay to take some images of this gorgeous female Scarab Hunter Wasp,
Campsomeris tolteca, nectaring on the flowering peppermint.  We first identified this species four years ago in Elyria Canyon Park.  Alas, the statue was in for the night, so we will have to return to Wacko during business hours.   Our identification of the female Scarab Hunter Wasp can be verified on BugGuide.

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ten-Lined June Beetle
Location: Glendale, California
July 15, 2016 6:41 am
My sister sent me this image while at a railroad museum in Glendale. She said a little boy was harassing it when she came across it, which is why its wings are like that, I assume. Your site helped me identify it as a male. I think its beautiful.
Signature: JB from Vegas

Ten Lined June Beetle from Glendale

Ten Lined June Beetle from Glendale

Dear JB,
You are correct that this is a male Ten Lined June Beetle, but we wonder if the railroad museum you mentioned is Traveltown in Griffith Park which is in Los Angeles near the Glendale Border.  We are also including an image of a Ten Lined June Beetle we shot last night on our screen door with this posting.  Last year was the first time we have found a Ten Lined June Beetle in Mount Washington in the 21 years we have lived here, and it is now our third sighting of this year with the other two being females.  These sightings at our office represent either a range expansion, or a reintroduction of a previously extirpated species.

Ten Lined June Beetle from Mount Washington

Ten Lined June Beetle from Mount Washington

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Brown California Mantis nymph on Palo Verde
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 11, 2016 6:30 PM
We have been monitoring the California Mantid hatchlings in our yard after finding five oothecae on the same butterfly bush occupied by a California Mantid late last summer.  There is a forest of primrose with many 7 foot tall plants in a small patch of our yard, and we have observed at least six green California Mantid nymphs there over the past few weeks.  The California Mantid can be either green or brown, and there is some evidence that the coloration is tied to the surroundings, though one might counter that both green and brown Mantids might exist in the same location, and those that are better camouflaged avoid predators and consequently survive to pass on their genes as opposed to the notion that the Mantid will change color depending upon the surroundings.  The Palo Verde is currently blooming and its blossoms are bright yellow.  We just spotted our first brown California Mantid on the Palo Verde.  Though we acknowledge that cannibalism is most likely occurring with the larger mantids devouring the smaller ones, nonetheless, there are far more this year than we have ever seen in the past.  Thankfully we spotted those five oothecae last season while trimming dead branches.

California Mantid nymph on Palo Verde

California Mantid nymph on Palo Verde

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing flashes its colors in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 10, 2016 10:30 PM
Though we have managed to get images of Walnut Underwings several times each year, getting a good glimpse at the gorgeously marked underwings responsible for the common name is not that easy.  This beauty was quite cooperative tonight.  After startling it when we walked out onto the porch to dump a pot full of water into the garden, it remained “posing” on the ground until we had time to run for the camera and we got a few images using the on-camera flash.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Carolina Sphinx
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 8, 2016
We stepped out onto the porch after sunset and saw a huge shadow cast by a flying critter, and when it finally landed, we were thrilled to see this Carolina Sphinx.  We moved it to the primrose patch and away from the disorienting porch light.  Unlike some home gardeners, we generally allow the larval Tobacco Hornworms to continue munching on tomato leaves, but we haven’t seen any yet this year.

Carolina Sphinx

Carolina Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination