Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Successful Identification
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 21, 2014
Tobacco hornworm according to whats that bug! Can’t believe how much it likes hot peppers. There were two of them and they decimated the leaves and chomped a couple of hot peppers. Yuck.
That was a big ugly bug! I’m glad it’s identified, but there were two of them. What if there are more?!?
Sent from outer space.

Tobacco Hornworm

Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Lisa Anne,
We are happy you were able to make use of the extensive WTB? archive to identify your Tobacco Hornworm.  We generally get several on our tomato plants toward the end of the season and we allow them to eat as many leaves as they want, and the do occasionally eat unripe tomatoes, but since we cannot possibly eat all the tomatoes we grow, we don’t fret.  If you find you cannot abide these Tobacco Hornworms eating your pepper leaves, you can try transferring them to native Datura that grows in nearby Elyria Canyon Park.  The adult Carolina Sphinx is a large and impressive moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Western Tiger Swallowtail
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 16, 2014 11:59 AM

We had to stop pulling weeds long enough to clean our hands and grab the camera.  Several Western Tiger Swallowtails were flying about the garden and nectaring from the plumbago on the neighbor’s hill.  It wasn’t so long ago that we lamented that we couldn’t get a decent image of the large Swallowtails sailing about as they never seemed to alight.

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

We even managed to get shots showing both ventral and dorsal surfaces.

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dead Multicolored Centipede found in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 26, 2014
Yesterday, we wa
lked out onto the patio and saw the Argentine Ants surrounding something on the concrete.  We were surprised to see a small, two inch long, Multicolored Centipede in the genus Scolopendra.  Though Hogue writes about them, we have never in our 34 years in Los Angeles seen one.   Since our garden is kind of wild, we hope more may be lurking under stones and logs.

Dead Multicolored Centipede

Dead Multicolored Centipede

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Alligator Lizards
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 5, 2014 & July 12, 2014
While these are not the largest Alligator Lizards we have seen, the two individuals were between 10 and 12 inches long.  The first individual was repelling down the logs and the second larger individual was sunning in the late afternoon rays.

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Remains of a Swallowtail Exuvia on Avocado Tree
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 29, 2014 12:13 PM
We noticed this shell of a Swallowtail Chrysalis in the avocado tree, and we tried to research which species of local Swallowtail has a caterpillar that will feed on the leaves of Avocado.  We have Western Tiger Swallowtails, Giant Swallowtails and Anise Swallowtails in the garden, but none of them feeds on avocado, to the best of our knowledge.  The only Swallowtail listed as eating avocado on the Easy Butterfly Garden website is the Magnificent Swallowtail,
Papilio garamus.  Perhaps this will remain a mystery.  Can the Magnificent Swallowtail have ventured this far north?  Here are additional images of the Magnificent Swallowtail from Animal PHotos.

Shell of a Swallowtail Chrysalis

Shell of a Western Tiger Swallowtail Chrysalis

Julian Donahue provides some input.
Hi Daniel,
The Spicebush Swallowtail is recorded as feeding on another species of Persea, but Tietz’s Index to Described Life Histories…. lists the only swallowtail feeding on Persea americana as Papilio rutulus, the Western Tiger Swallowtail. The BAMONA website doesn’t mention avocado as a hostplant.
Hope this helps,
Julian

The Western Tiger Swallowtails have been seen flying near that avocado tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  June 27, 2014
Most every year, we get at least one visit from a Walnut Underwing, and since the endangered California Black Walnut Trees in the yard are growing nicely, we hope we will see an increase in the moth population.  About a week ago, a tattered individual was on the porch light and for the past several days, this beauty has been seen at night and is generally on the screen door the next morning.  Last night, a huge commotion in the kitchen turned out to be our feisty feline Boris trying to catch this Walnut Underwing which was on the other side of the glass window.  Thought it landed with its underwings visible, it flew before we could get the camera.  These dorsal and ventral (somewhat showing the patterns on the underwings) views will have to suffice for now.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination