Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Mt. Washington"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 17, 2016 6:48 PM
Each year we look forward to the first appearance of a Walnut Underwing at our office.  We were pleasantly surprised by this especially gorgeous individual earlier in the week.  Perhaps we will try to get a good image with the colorful underwings revealed the next time it comes to the porch light.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Immature California Mantid
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 7, 2016
We continue to encounter young California Mantids in the garden.  This youngster was perched atop a primrose.

Immature California Mantis

Immature California Mantis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s That Katydid?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 7, 2016
While working in the garden we spotted this immature Katydid eating the leaves of a Primrose, and we were uncertain of its identity.  We believe it is a Bush Katydid in the genus Scudderia, possibly a Mexican Bush Katydid which is pictured on the Natural History of Orange County website.  Since it lacks an ovipositor, this
Scudderia nymph is definitely a male, and it looks very similar to this BugGuide image.

Immature Bush Katydid

Immature Bush Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gray Bird Grasshopper
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
April 5, 2016
Though the image is not the greatest, we did get a quick shot of this impressive Gray Bird Grasshopper before it flew from the paloverde to the pine tree.

Gray Bird Grasshopper

Gray Bird Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantis Ootheca hatches in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
April 5, 2016
Last August, we created a posting for a lost photo opportunity of a California Mantis and a Figeater together on a butterfly bush that we missed when the camera malfunctioned.  A few weeks ago, a branch on the butterfly bush was broken, and when we cut it free from the plant, we noticed three California Mantis oothecae, obviously deposited by the female we observed there.  We tied two of the oothecae to a nearby palo verde and the third to a plum tree in the back yard.  While out in the yard, we inspected the oothecae, and noticed that one appeared to have hatched out its brood.  Luckily we spotted one little Mantis hatchling, a mere 1/4 inch in length, scuttling away.

California Mantis Hatchling

California Mantis Hatchling

Hatched Ootheca of a California Mantis

Hatched Ootheca of a California Mantis

Update:  April 11, 2016
We did some gardening yesterday, and though we couldn’t be bothered getting the camera, we did find two additional oothecae on the butterfly bush, and as we were pulling weeds, we found two green 1/4 inch long green mantids scuttling around the low grass.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
February 28, 2016
We were shocked to see this bright yellow caterpillar meandering across the patio.  We immediately recognized a Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar,
Phoebis sennae, but we do not have any Cassia growing anywhere near.  Where did it come from?  We checked BugGuide and learned:  “Caterpillar: usually pale green and marked by a yellow stripe on each side and black spots in rows across each abdominal segment.  Above and below the yellow stripe there are usually small areas marked with blue.   There is also a yellow form that occurs when it feeds on yellow flowers of its host plants. The later instars of the yellow form have a dark transverse band across each segment” which means our Caterpillar was feeding on yellow blooms.  According to BugGuide:  “Caterpillar feeds most commonly on Cassia and some other woody and herbaceous legumes” and we do have an Acacia in the garden, another legume in the family Fabaceae , so we will check it out to see if there are any additional Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillars feeding upon it.

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

Cloudless Sulphur Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination