Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is it??
Hello there
Found this in Sydney Australia. Any idea of what it is? Thanks
Stuart

fOUND IT!!!!!! thanks!
Fiddler Beetles
Eupoecila australasiae
These beetles emerged from cocoons found in a pot of daffodils in Randwick. Other locations around Sydney where Fiddler Beetles have been recently found include Ingleburn, St Mary’s, Kellyville and Faulconbridge. They are common in heath and woodlands in south-eastern Australia. Adult beetles emerge from soil in early summer and feed on the nectar of flowers. The beetles lay eggs in rotting logs or in the damp soil under logs. The grubs feed on rotting timber and build cocoons of soil and debris in which they pupate. These attractive beetles are harmless to humans.

Hi Stuart,
We are thrilled that you identified your Fiddler Beetle. This is the third specimen we have posted this week and your letter is the first to arrive in February. It is time to post a Bug of the Month for February 2007, and since we have so many fans in Australia, we have decided to that this month we will feature the Fiddler Beetle. This will be the first Bug of the Month not found in the U.S.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is it??
Hello there
Found this in Sydney Australia. Any idea of what it is? Thanks
Stuart

fOUND IT!!!!!! thanks!
Fiddler Beetles
Eupoecila australasiae
These beetles emerged from cocoons found in a pot of daffodils in Randwick. Other locations around Sydney where Fiddler Beetles have been recently found include Ingleburn, St Mary’s, Kellyville and Faulconbridge. They are common in heath and woodlands in south-eastern Australia. Adult beetles emerge from soil in early summer and feed on the nectar of flowers. The beetles lay eggs in rotting logs or in the damp soil under logs. The grubs feed on rotting timber and build cocoons of soil and debris in which they pupate. These attractive beetles are harmless to humans.

Hi Stuart,
We are thrilled that you identified your Fiddler Beetle. This is the third specimen we have posted this week and your letter is the first to arrive in February. It is time to post a Bug of the Month for February 2007, and since we have so many fans in Australia, we have decided to that this month we will feature the Fiddler Beetle. This will be the first Bug of the Month not found in the U.S.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

beauiful bright green bug !
Hi there
I happened to find this beautifull thing outside of my door and I live in Sydney, Australia. I’d love to know what it is! Great site by the way.
Keiko Okemi

Hi Keiko,
We just posted another image of a Fiddler Beetle, Eupoecila australasiae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

green bug from Brisbane, Australia
Hi Bugman!
I found this little bug buzzing around inside my house earlier and managed to nab a picture of it. The picture doesn’t really do justice to how bright the green colouring was, but I hope it will suffice. Maybe you can identify it? Thanks
(ps. if this one gets published, please just identify me as Scott. thanks.)

Hi Scott,
This beautiful Scarab Beetle is commonly called the Fiddler Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

HELP
Hello,
Can you please help me. I have attached a photograph taken in my mothers backyard and was wondering if you could identify the bug that was eating yes eating the huntsman spider. It is an Australian animal (sydney, australia). We have children around the house and wanted to know if it was harmfull the the children and the name of the insect. Any help would be fantastic. Thank you in advance.
Sonia

Hi Sonia,
This is the fourth example of a Spider Wasp, Cryptocheilus bicolor, preying on a Huntsman Spider we have received in the last month. The wasp does not eat the spider. She digs a hole and buries the spider after laying an egg. The larval wasp then has a fresh meal of paralyzed spider meat since the spider is alive and in a coma. Spider Wasps have a painful sting, but they are not aggressive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is it?
Found by a friend in her garden in cygnet, AR Australia
Dee Stephen

Hi Dee,
We are relatively certain this is some species of Tachinid Fly, but sadly, we cannot find a species match on the awesome Geocities Tachinid Page. All Tachinid Flies have larvae that are internal parasites on insects, especially caterpillars, beetles, true bugs, grasshoppers and stick insects.

Update: November 29, 2010
A new set of images of this lovely Tachinid or Bristle Fly has allowed us to clean up this previous unidentified posting.

Update:  January 25, 2014
Some recent comments on this posting by John Morgan have caused us to question the possibility that this might NOT be
Amphibolia vidua.  The black markings on the white abdominal area on this fly appear to be different than the 2009 Bristle Fly posting we created and the 2010 Bristle Fly posting we created that we have identified as Amphibolia vidua.  Does this represent individual variation, a different subspecies, a different species or a completely different genus?  We cannot say for certain.  Perhaps an expert in Tachinid Flies will be able to sort this out.  We are still awaiting John Morgan’s photograph for comparison.   

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination