Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please identify this spider – from australia
Tue, Nov 11, 2008 at 5:32 PM
This spider came out at night (on the outside of our glass door) – it is about the size of a disposable coffee cup lid (including its legs) and I have tried to identify it from australian spider charts with no luck.
The bands on the legs were already bright though the flash from the camera made them a bit brighter. Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks, Alex
NSW Central coast, Australia

Banded Huntsman Spider

Badge Huntsman Spider

Hi Alex,
We believe this is a Banded Huntsman Spider in the genus Holconia. We found an Australian government website with some photos of Huntsman Spiders, but they don’t show the Banded Huntsman Spider on the ventral surface like your photo. Ventral surface photos for identification are not that common.

Correction:
This spider looks like a Badge Huntsman in the genus Neosparassus (formerly Olios). Brunet, in “Spiderwatch: A Guide to Australian Spiders”,says that Badge Huntsman, with 25 species, “have blue, yellow, black and white bands and spots on their legs, and often a brilliantly coloured ‘badge’ design on the ventral surface of their abdomens…” Most of them are harmless, but there are two species that can produce a brief illness if they bite humans.
Grev

Thanks Grev,
WE are having a difficult time finding a ventral surface view that shows the “badge” but we did find another nice Huntsman Spider page.

Daniel, Here’s a nice one, showing both aspects:
http://www.riddellscreeklandcare.org.au/Spiders/BadgeHuntsmanNdiana.ph
And another from the same site.
http://www.riddellscreeklandcare.org.au/Spiders/BadgeHuntsmanNpatellatus.JPG
Grev

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for getting back to me re my spider.
I have had feedback from another source also saying it is a banded (or badged) huntsman and completely harmless.  It is nice to know what it is and its presence is very appreciated (apparently disposes of mosquitos and cockroaches).
Many thanks,
Alex

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

A spider with a pearlescent back decorated with an indented line and 2 spots on each side, and a brown underside decorated with yellow markings.
Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 4:12 PM
Hiya, I found this spider on our now flowering Floribunda Iceberg. What a beautiful spider with a pearlescent back decorated with very subtle markings (that look like engraving of a line in the middle and 2 spots on each side), and a brown underside decorated with yellow markings. It was sitting in the centre of a round web. My husband doesn’t like spiders, so my first thought was to pick it up and toss it out of the garden… which is why I have photographed it on this dried branch. But I know that spiders can be a good friend to have in the garden too, and so I am in a dilema. What should I do? I attach 3 photos offering the top, underside and side views. I hope these help. As I do not know how they should be measured, the side view photo is against a ruler. I am zero on spiders as you can see… hahaha… thanks very much!
Intrigued
Leederville, Perth, Western Australia

Argiope protensa

Argiope extensa

Dear Intrigued,
When we first read your letter, we read the word Floribunda and somehow thought you were in Florida. We were going to say that this was probably a light Banded Garden Spider, Argiope trifasciata, which is well represented on BugGuide. Sometimes we see very light specimens of this species. Once we realized we had erred and that you were in Australia, we tried to identify your Argiope. Seems the Argiope trifasciata we found on a Brisbane Insect website is a different species entirely and we suspect it is misidentified. We then found the Thumbnails of Australian Spiders website and there are several Argiopes pictured. We believe this may be Argiope extensa.  There are some good images of this species on the Find a Spider Guide of Australia.

Argiope protensa

Argiope extensa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Creepiest bug/insect i have ever seen!!
Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 4:30 AM
Hi i came across your website whilst looking for information on a bug/insect that had crawled across our hardwood floors, My first instinct was to squash it, however i picked it up with a dustpan and after analizing it for at least 20 minutes, i decided to toss it outside over our verandah(i am a total girl when it comes to bugs etc) Anyhow i am from rathmines in lake macquarie, nsw Australia. Im hoping you can help me idenify it, i have attached a picture, it seemed to be gentle and moved slowly and did not try to scurry away when it was touched with my shoe LOL also when it walked the back end of its body seemed to sway from side to side, I would like to know if it is harmful to my family if so what can i do to prevent them from coming inside the home? I get he creeps just thinking about it…..
Kimberley :)
Rathmines, Lake Macquarie NSW Australia

Potato Bug?  In Australia???

Potato Bug? In Australia???

Hi Kimberly,
If you were writing from the American Southwest, we would say this is a Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket in the family Stenopelmatidae without a second thought. The closest relatives to Potato Bugs are in Australia and are known as Wetas. This doesn’t look like a Weta, it looks like a Potato Bug. Since there are so many Australian insect species established in Southern California, we wouldn’t discount that this is a North American Potato Bug that somehow invaded Australia. Since we must dash off to work, we really don’t have time to research if Potato Bugs have become established in Australia right now, but we are very curious. The more people travel the globe, the more chances that plants, insects, diseases and other species will be spread far from their native ranges along with people. Eventually we may have globally homogenized ecosystems.

Daniel:
Gee, I think your commentary is perfect. I have no idea, either! It just about ‘has’ to be a weta, “king cricket,” or “Cooloola Monster.” Someone at CSIRO could help, maybe. This one is beyond my state-side expertise I’m afraid….
Eric Eaton

Hullo Kimberly, Your bug looks like a King Cricket from the Stenopelmatidae family, subfamily Deinacridinae, genus Australostoma. They live in borrows  and tend to come out at nght when it is wet. Found in coastal NSW north to Brisbane. According to  David Rentz (“Grasshopper Country”), “when handled, they produce foul-smelling anal secretions that deter predators,” so perhaps you were wise to persuade it to go outside.
BTW I am just around the lake from you at Wangi and found a huge cricket last week when moving compost onto the vegie garden, so perhaps the big crickets are on the move!
Grev

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant Robberfly Foodchain Picture
Wed, Nov 5, 2008 at 11:07 PM
HI Guys,
Just had an encounter with the biggest robberfly I’ve ever seen. To give you a sense of scale the perch it has chosen is as thick as a mans index finger. It seemed to have some orange colouration under the wings but I couldn’t get close. This was taken with a telephoto lens in a very shady spot so please excuse picture quality.
Aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Hi Trevor,
As always, thank you for another awesome submission to our site. If you identify the species of Robber Fly, please let us know.

ID for that Giant Robberfly
Hi Guys,
That giant robberfly is exactly that apparently, thanks to Eric Fisher at diptera.info for the ID,  the Giant Yellow Robberfly Blepharotes coriarius
Here are two links that show some more detail of the guy, nearly 2 inches long!
http://www.thebegavalley.org.au/1622.html
http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane_robbers/LargeRobberFly.htm
regards
aussietrev

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Australian Caper Gull
Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 1:17 AM
Hi guys,
Had my first photo opportunity with this Australian Caper Gull (Cepora perimale scyllara ) when it got interested in the Basil in my garden. There are a few of them around but they are usually very flighty and hard to get close to. Hope you like it.
aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Australian Caper Gull

Australian Caper Gull

Hi Trevor,
Once again, thanks for contributing a new species to our expanding selection of Bugs Down Under.  We are linking to a James Cook University website with additional information on the Australian Caper Gull, a butterfly in the family Pieridae that includes Whites and Sulfurs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Whip Spider
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 9:39 PM
My friends came over for breakfast the other day and while I was talking I noticed a little spider hanging off the side of a plant pot. I told my friends but as soon as they turned around the spider coiled up its legs and looked exactly like a small stick. They thought I was mad! But eventually they saw it move and became very interested in the little fellow.
It’s about 2 to 3 cm long and I think it looks a little bit like a miniature face-hugger form the film Alien!
Today I searched online and discovered that it is a whip spider. I know that the pictures I took of it aren’t too amazing, but it was so difficult to get a picture of it with its legs spread out that I thought images of them un-camouflaged would be quite rare.
Bonnie
Melbourne, Australia

Whip Spider

Whip Spider

Hi Bonnie,
Thanks for contributing photos of the fascinating Whip Spider, Argyrodes colubrinus, to our website archives.  We are linking to the Australian Museum Online website that states:  “Whip Spiders get their name from their elongate, worm-like body shape – up to about 20 mm long but only about 1 mm wide. They are common in forest habitats and can readily be seen in gardens on summer nights, suspended on delicate silk lines in spaces among shrubbery.
They specialise in feeding on wandering spiders, usually juveniles. The Whip Spider sits at the top of a few long silk threads that run downs below it among foliage. When a wandering spider walks up one of these handy silk `bridges’ it gets a nasty surprise. The waiting Whip Spider uses toothed bristles on the end segment of the last leg to comb out swathes of entangling sticky silk from its spinnerets. These rapidly entangle the struggling victim so that it cannot escape. “

Whip Spider

Whip Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination