Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Micro Mantidfly
Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 3:59 PM
Hi guys,
found this tiny mantidfly on my back door. Its only about 12mm long but really liked the patterns which became visible in the close up. Order Neuroptera, Family Mantispidae, apart from that I can’t go further with the ID. Hope you like it.
aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Mantidfly from Australia

Mantidfly from Australia

Hi Trevor,
As always, we love getting your contributions from Australia.  The Mantidfly is a nice addition.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

STRANGE AUSSIE HEMIPTERAN
Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 3:25 AM
what is this odd looking thing? found in eastern Australia.
cheers,
Olga

????????? from Australia
Ledromorpha planirostris (Donovan) from Australia

Hi Olga,
This is a mystery. We have had no luck after about an hour of internet searching. We will post and hope to get an answer from someone. There is a resemblance to the Fulgorid Planthopper known as the Peanut Headed Bug, Fulgora laternaria , but it lives in the new world.

????????? from Australia
Ledromorpha planirostris (Donovan) from Australia

Unknown Australian Fulgoroid
Sun, Nov 16, 2008 at 7:51 PM
Hi Daniel,
Eastern Australia is a pretty big place, similar to saying Eastern United States really. A location and a size reference may be helpful. Just to give you an idea, here is the list of fulgoroids from one Eastern state, New South Wales, alone. Many of the links on this page open up to lists about the same size just for variations of that one type.
http://www.agric.nsw.gov.au/Hort/ascu/fulgor/
If you can get some more information about location, time when it was found, eg did it come to a light at night or was it on a shrub during the day, and approximate size. I may be able to get an ID for you. It may be a lanternfly also.
regards,
Trevor

There is a tribe of plant hoppers called Thymbrini, the largest of which is Rhotidus which is brown with a triangular head. Could be . . .? These sites might help make the identification:
http://www.agric.nsw.gov.au/Hort/ascu/leafhop/ledrinae/thym00.htm
(an online key to identification)
http://www.geocities.com/brisbane_cicadas/Ledrinae.htm

http://www.agric.nsw.gov.au/Hort/ascu/leafhop/cicaspp/rtelefor.htm (one of those horrible photos of a pinned dead insect, but might help
Grev

Unknown Leafhopper from Australia
Ledromorpha planirostris (Donovan) from Australia

Hi Daniel,
It flew into my fathers windscreen while he was driving around a very bushy area near Jarvis Bay. Thats down the coast from Sydney. This was in the early afternoon. I have attached some more detailed pictures for aid in identification. Unfortunately the little bugger has since died and will now be preserved in a collection. I hope someone will be able to identify it! :)
Cheers,
Olga

Unknown Planthopper from Australia
Ledromorpha planirostris (Donovan) from Australia

Hi Olga,
Thanks for sending additional information and images. You should bookmark our posting and continue to check as people can provide comments. Our newly metamorphosed website allows for comments to be sent to the originator of the posting when that post is sent using a form. Since you contacted us through regular email, you will not receive those updates. We expect that one day, this truly unique Planthopper will be identified to the species level.

Unknown Planthopper from Australia
Ledromorpha planirostris (Donovan) from Australia

Hullo Daniel,
I think the mysterious bug is leafhopper Ledromorpha planirostris. No male has ever been photographed, only males. Is it parthenogenic the scientists ask?
I’ve posted link in the comments box.
Kind regards,
Grev

By George Grev,
We do believe you’ve got it right.  What an awesome addition to our website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Orange and black bugs
Fri, Nov 14, 2008 at 6:33 PM
Hi, I live in Western Australia, and recently moved house, finding these bugs in the backyard right after moving in.. What are they? and are they useful or harmful? (There’s a ton of them in the lawn…)
DN
Perth, Western Australia

Gutta Bug

Gutta Bug

Hi DN,
You have photos of a winged adult and immature nymph of the Gutta Bug, Physopelta gutta.  We located images on the Geocities Australian Insects page. The Gutta Bug is a Seed Bug in the family Largidae.

Gutta Bug Nymph

Gutta Bug Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Flat Yellow Insect from the backyard
Tue, Nov 11, 2008 at 1:25 AM
Dear Bugman,
We hope you can help us identify an insect that my son found in the backyard in a paved area. It is about the size of a 5 cent coin, flat and yellow in colour with a black spot in the middle if its back and a thin black line around the edge of its body. It has black and yellow stripes on the antennae. it does not appear to have any wings and is happy to sit and walk around on my sons hand. He thinks it is lovely and want to keep it as a pet and find out what it eats!
Bug lovers
Australia (Gold Coast)

Bronze Orange Bug Nymph

Bronze Orange Bug Nymph

Hi Bug Lovers,
The reason your Bronze Orange Bug, Musgraveia sulciventris, doesn’t have wings is that it is an immature nymph.  We found matching images on the Geocities website where the text indicates that they suck the sap from citrus tree leaves and twigs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please identify this spider – from australia
Tue, Nov 11, 2008 at 5:32 PM
This spider came out at night (on the outside of our glass door) – it is about the size of a disposable coffee cup lid (including its legs) and I have tried to identify it from australian spider charts with no luck.
The bands on the legs were already bright though the flash from the camera made them a bit brighter. Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks, Alex
NSW Central coast, Australia

Banded Huntsman Spider

Badge Huntsman Spider

Hi Alex,
We believe this is a Banded Huntsman Spider in the genus Holconia. We found an Australian government website with some photos of Huntsman Spiders, but they don’t show the Banded Huntsman Spider on the ventral surface like your photo. Ventral surface photos for identification are not that common.

Correction:
This spider looks like a Badge Huntsman in the genus Neosparassus (formerly Olios). Brunet, in “Spiderwatch: A Guide to Australian Spiders”,says that Badge Huntsman, with 25 species, “have blue, yellow, black and white bands and spots on their legs, and often a brilliantly coloured ‘badge’ design on the ventral surface of their abdomens…” Most of them are harmless, but there are two species that can produce a brief illness if they bite humans.
Grev

Thanks Grev,
WE are having a difficult time finding a ventral surface view that shows the “badge” but we did find another nice Huntsman Spider page.

Daniel, Here’s a nice one, showing both aspects:
http://www.riddellscreeklandcare.org.au/Spiders/BadgeHuntsmanNdiana.ph
And another from the same site.
http://www.riddellscreeklandcare.org.au/Spiders/BadgeHuntsmanNpatellatus.JPG
Grev

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for getting back to me re my spider.
I have had feedback from another source also saying it is a banded (or badged) huntsman and completely harmless.  It is nice to know what it is and its presence is very appreciated (apparently disposes of mosquitos and cockroaches).
Many thanks,
Alex

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

A spider with a pearlescent back decorated with an indented line and 2 spots on each side, and a brown underside decorated with yellow markings.
Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 4:12 PM
Hiya, I found this spider on our now flowering Floribunda Iceberg. What a beautiful spider with a pearlescent back decorated with very subtle markings (that look like engraving of a line in the middle and 2 spots on each side), and a brown underside decorated with yellow markings. It was sitting in the centre of a round web. My husband doesn’t like spiders, so my first thought was to pick it up and toss it out of the garden… which is why I have photographed it on this dried branch. But I know that spiders can be a good friend to have in the garden too, and so I am in a dilema. What should I do? I attach 3 photos offering the top, underside and side views. I hope these help. As I do not know how they should be measured, the side view photo is against a ruler. I am zero on spiders as you can see… hahaha… thanks very much!
Intrigued
Leederville, Perth, Western Australia

Argiope protensa

Argiope extensa

Dear Intrigued,
When we first read your letter, we read the word Floribunda and somehow thought you were in Florida. We were going to say that this was probably a light Banded Garden Spider, Argiope trifasciata, which is well represented on BugGuide. Sometimes we see very light specimens of this species. Once we realized we had erred and that you were in Australia, we tried to identify your Argiope. Seems the Argiope trifasciata we found on a Brisbane Insect website is a different species entirely and we suspect it is misidentified. We then found the Thumbnails of Australian Spiders website and there are several Argiopes pictured. We believe this may be Argiope extensa.  There are some good images of this species on the Find a Spider Guide of Australia.

Argiope protensa

Argiope extensa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination