Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug living on Citrus Tree
Location: Sydney Australia
December 27, 2013 1:50 am
Hi Bugman,
My 3 yo spends a lot of time in the garden with insects. He has me stumped on this bug we’ve found on a citrus tree leave in Southern Hemisphere summer (Dec). Can u help?
Signature: Aranchii

Bronze Orange Stink Bug

Bronze Orange Stink Bug

Hi Aranchii,
We did a web search of “stink bug citrus Australia” and we found an image of your Bronze Orange Stink Bug,
Musgraveia sulciventris, on the Butterfly House website where we frequently search for Australian caterpillars.  Seems they have a page devoted to the lemon tree.  According to the Brisbane Insect website:  “They suck sap from young shoots of of the plants. The first and second pictures above show the bugs sucking the juice from the new shot of the Citrus plant. Notice their sucking mouth-parts and the wilted tips of the plant. …  After mating the females lay eggs on leaf for the next generations.”

Thanks for the quick response Daniel!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: hairy Slater bug?
Location: Albany, western Australia
December 25, 2013 9:41 pm
I’ve got a bug about the size of a pinky finger nail on top of its eggs sitting beneath the hand rail of the verandah. It’s eggs are hairy as is the body of the animal. Very strange, its body shape looks like a cross between a Slater and a giant flea and the front half of a moth with its legs at the front near its nose.
Signature: here

Flightless Female Tussock Moth with Eggs

Flightless Female Tussock Moth with Eggs

We were struck by the resemblance between your photo and an image in our archive of a flightless female Western Tussock Moth with her egg mass, and we quickly learned that the genus Orgyia is represented in Australia as well.  Birds on the Brain pictures a flightless female Tussock Moth in the genus Orgyia, but she is not identified to the species level.  Butterfly House indicates that Orgyia australis is found in Australia, but does not even indicate that the female is flightless.  The Brisbane Insect website indicates the common name is the Painted Pine Moth and pictures a flightless female.  The Government of South Australia has an excellent pdf on the life cycle of Australian Tussock Moths.  Your photograph pictures a flightless female that has laid her eggs in and on the cocoon she emerged from.  Since she is flightless, she cannot move about in search of a mate, but since she releases a pheromone upon emergence, a winged male can locate her to mate.  The pdf states:  “On hatching, the female remains clinging to the outside of the cocoon where she mates and lays eggs. The eggs are laid in a mass amongst the hairs on the outside of the pupal cocoon. Each female may lay up to 700 eggs. The eggs hatch into tiny caterpillars which swarm over nearby twigs and needles.”

That’s fantastic and interesting! Thanks a lot, I’m so glad you got back to me! Hope you have a wonderful new year!
Linton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of wasp is this?
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
December 16, 2013 8:28 pm
Hello,
I found this in our backyard and was wondering exactly what it is and is it dangerous. We live in Adelaide, South Australia. Thanks.
Signature: Jacob

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Hi Jacob,
This is some species of Ichneumon, a large and diverse group of parasitoid wasps that are not considered dangerous to humans.  The female uses her ovipositor, which is visible in your photo, to deposit her eggs, often directly into the body of the host insect or arthropod.  Most Ichneumons are very host specific, and the prey include many different orders, including butterflies and moths, true bugs and other wasps.  We hope to eventually determine a species identification for this unusual Ichneumon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what type of bug in south australia is this?
Location: South australia
December 16, 2013 3:39 am
Hey ive found this bug and trying to figure out what sort it is. is it dangerous? They keep arriving. Thanks Matt
Signature: Att Matt

Eucalyptus Borer

Eucalyptus Borer

Dear Att Matt,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and though the markings on the elytra or wing covers are not typical of what we are used to seeing, we believe it is a Eucalyptus Borer in the genus
Phoracantha.  We did find a photo posted to a Russian Coleoptera website that looks very similar to your individual.  We are quite familiar with the Eucalyptus Borer in Southern California because without any natural enemies, it is considered to be a significant pest to the eucalyptus trees that are so common in our area.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug!!!!
Location: Sydney
December 12, 2013 5:54 pm
Howdy,
My wife took a photo of this and after a bit of searching, could it be a Spider Wasp?
I have 2 kids under the age of 2 who love to play outside, are they a pest and should i try to exterminate them?
Signature: Michael

Spider Wasp stalks Spider

Spider Wasp stalks Spider

Dear Michael,
You are correct that this is a Spider Wasp, and it is stalking a Spider in one of your photos.  You do not need to fear this Spider Wasp attacking your children unless they look like spiders, which we highly doubt.  Female Spider Wasps are more concerned about providing food for their broods than they are about stinging innocent children, though we would not entirely discount the possibility of getting stung if the Spider Wasps are handled or stepped on.  Again, we want to stress that they are not aggressive toward humans and we don’t believe there is any need to take the steps to exterminate them, which would probably be nearly impossible anyways.  Social Wasps pose a much greater threat because they try to defend their nests, while solitary wasps like Spider Wasps do not have the same defense instincts.  We will try to identify both the wasp and the spider after we do some yardwork in our own neglected garden.  Alas, you photo does lack critical detail, but the spider appears to be a Wolf Spider.  We have nice photos in our archive of a Spider Wasp preying upon a Wolf Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Who is this cute little guy?
Location: Gladstone in Central Queensland Australia
December 13, 2013 4:47 am
This little fellow came to visit my cousin in Gladstone, Queensland , Australia, just a few days ago. We googled all sorts of feather horned creatures but didn’t find anything quite the same. What’s this bug?
Signature: Sue

Featherhorned Longicorn

Featherhorned Longicorn

Dear Sue,
Though you used a good key word, it is understandable that you had trouble identifying this Featherhorned Longicorn,
Piesarthrius marginellus, since there are not many good photos of it online.  We have several nice images of the Featherhorned Longicorn in our own archives, and your image might be the best of them.  We also located a beautiful image of the Featherhorned Longicorn on The View from Vinegar Hill blog.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination