Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny black bugs under bed
Location: Sydney, Australia
February 22, 2014 11:59 pm
We have found lots of tiny black bugs under our bed, they crawl around the floor and sometimes crawl into the crack between the floor and skirting board. They are about as big as ants. They sometimes crawl into the chipboard at the back of our bedside tables. They do not jump or bite us, only crawl. They look black but when you look closer they are dark brown.
Signature: Sarah

Powder Post Beetles

Powder Post Beetles

Dear Sarah,
We believe you have Powder Post Beetles in the subfamily Lyctinae.  According to BugGuide:  “powder-post beetles refer to the propensity of the larvae to reduce sapwood into a powdery frass.”
  BugGuide also notes several other items of interest, including the range of Powder Post Beetles being “worldwide (easily spread with commerce), more diverse in the tropics” and regarding food, that the “larva feeds mainly on the sapwood of hardwoods; species are polyphagous.”  Perhaps the most significant bit of information for you is that “The destructiveness of lyctid beetles to wood and wood products is second only to that of termites.”  If this is a new bed, it is possible that the wood was infested with Powder Post Beetle larvae which emerged in the new location.  Catseye Pest Control provides this information:  “Adult Powder Post Beetles range from a 1/8th of an inch to 1/4th of an inch in size and larvae are usually less than a 1/4th of an inch long. When fully matured, Powder Post Beetles slender and flattened in shape with short antennae and are reddish brown to black in color. The larvae, which are left behind in the cracks of the wood by the adults, are cream colored and slightly C-shaped.  The long, narrow, flat bodies of the mature adults allow them to easily bore into wood surfaces, the first place to look during powder post beetle control procedures. They prefer the sapwood of hardwoods, especially oak, hickory and ash and creates small, round holes. Common household places to find these holes are in hardwood floors, furniture, molding and fixtures. These pinhole openings are a tell tale sign of an infestation. Powder Post Beetles lay their eggs in cracks of wood and the larvae tunnel into the surface filling it with a very fine powder-like dust, hence the name Powder Post Beetles.”

Powder Post Beetles

Powder Post Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hawk Moth
Location: Sydney
February 28, 2014 4:37 pm
Hi guys. In the past few weeks we’ve had a hawk moth on your from verandah (in northern Sydney NSW). Last night we had another similar one and i wanted to see if they were the same? I know one is a coequosa australisiae, not sure if maybe ones a female and the other a male? Or the same one thats matured? The plainer one is from 3 weeks ago and the orange one is from last night. Thanks!!
Signature: Libby

Hawkmoth:  Coequosa australasiae

Hawkmoth: Coequosa australasiae

Hi Libby,
Both of your moths are the same species, and your identification is correct.  They are both
Coequosa australasiae.  Hawkmoths tend to be long lived as moths go, and they might even both be the same individual.  Like many moths, Coequosa australasiae has underwings that are more brightly colored than the upper wings which serve as camouflage.  You can see a matching image on Csiro.

Hawkmoth:  Coequosa australisiae

Hawkmoth: Coequosa australisiae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ??
Location: Wollongong, NSW, Australia
February 20, 2014 3:58 am
I’ve lived here for 30 years and have seen this insect for the first time. It is summer here.
Signature: Cheryle

Sphinx Moth:  Theretra queenslandi

Sphinx Moth: Theretra queenslandi

Dear Cheryle,
This is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, and it is in the genus
Theretra.  There are several species that look quite similar, but we believe this is Theretra queenslandi, which is found in New South Wales according to Butterfly House

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bioluminescence in Pilbara, Western Australia
Location: Pilbara, WA, Australia
February 17, 2014 2:47 am
Hi!
Does anyone know of any insects in the Pilbara, WA that glow in the dark? I was out walking near Jarndunmunha the other night and I found three insects each on a corner of what appeared to be a web flashing in the dark.
Any ideas?
Signature: Jap Tom

Pilbara, Australia, we presume

Pilbara, Western Australia, we presume

Dear Jap Tom,
We are presuming that the attached image is of Pilbara, Western Australia, where the bioluminescent  sighting occurred.  According to Wet Tropics:  “The glow worm isn’t a worm at all, but the larvae or maggot of a mosquito-like fly. Only three glow worms have been described in Australia .”
  North American Glowworms are beetle larvae, so we already have conflicting information based on common names in different hemispheres.  We will attempt to research this topic more, but in the interim, we are posting your letter so our readership can participate in the dialog.  We wish you had been able to supply an image of the actual insects.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth? with transparent wings
Location: Tocumwal NSW 2714 Australia
February 16, 2014 1:10 pm
Hi,
This little lovely is 6cm long from tip to tip.
Body is ‘furry’
Wings are transparent and iridescent with small black and grey markings.
Location is Tocumwal, NSW on the Murray River.
Hope you can help identify.
Signature: Sue Trewhella

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Sue,
Your mystery insect is an Antlion, and we believe it is
 Heoclisis fundata  based on the photo on Atlas of Living Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large brown grasshopper/locust in the Pilbara
Location: Pilbara, Australia
February 8, 2014 7:02 pm
Hi there, I spotted this chap in the car park recently. About 6/8cms in length hand 1-1.5 in width.
Signature: Griffo

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Hi Griffo,
We quickly located a visual match on The Northern Myth blog where is it tentatively identified as being in the genus
 Urnisiella.  The individuals identified online as being in the genus Urnisiella do not look like your individual in our mind.  See FlickR and Superstock.  At this time, we are unable to provide a conclusive identification.  

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your reply. I’ll have a read of the info. I did try to get a side profile photo, but I got spotted and he flew away.
All the best
Ian

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination