Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red eggs?
Location: Wahroonga, NSW, Australia
January 20, 2016 8:54 pm
Hey there,
I work in bush regeneration near the headwaters of the Lane Cove River in NSW. We’re in a fairly rainy sort of area.
One of my colleagues sent me this picture of what appear to be red insect eggs. I searched through your egg posts for several pages, but the closest thing to these seemed to be ladybeetle eggs, however those are only yellow.
Unfortunately I don’t know what plant these eggs have been laid on. It actually looks like a weed.
Cheers :)
Signature: Frances

Possibly Phasmid Eggs

Assassin Bug Eggs

Dear Frances,
Eggs can be very difficult to properly identify.  The color looks like an exact match and the general shape is very close to this egg cluster pictured on Getty Images that is identified as a clutch of Stick Insect or Phasmid eggs.  We have not been able to locate any other corroborating images.

Update:  Assassin Bug Eggs
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we researched Assassin Bug Eggs and we found this image that exactly matches on FlickR.  No particular species is identified, but the eggs were found in Australia.  BunyipCo supports that ID.  Assassin Bugs are beneficial predators.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Sydney Australia
January 19, 2016 1:56 am
Is that a Nursery Web spider?
Interesting web addition in the direction of the legs.
Signature: Walter

St. Andrews Cross Spider

St. Andrews Cross Spider

Dear Walter,
This St. Andrew’s Cross Spider,
Argiope keyserlingi, is an Orbweaver, not a Nursery Web Spider.  According to the Australian Museum:  “The role of the cross-like web decoration, called the stabilimentum, has long been a puzzle. At first thought to strengthen or ‘stabilise’ the web, more recent ideas associate it with capturing prey or avoiding predators. The ribbon-like silk reflects ultra-violet light strongly. Such light is attractive to flying insects, which use it to locate food sources like flowers and to navigate through openings in the vegetation. If the stabilimentum silk attracts insects it may increase the web’s prey catching efficiency. The silk decoration could also make the web and its owner more obvious to day-active predators like birds and wasps. However, the variability of the shape of the cross decoration (a complete cross; a partial cross with from one to three arms; or sometimes absent altogether) could make web recognition confusing for the predator. Another possibility is that the stabilimentum advertises a warning to predators like birds to stay away – after diving through the sticky web, the effort required to clean silk off plumage may deter birds from trying again.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flower Wasp ID?
Location: Blyth, SA
December 25, 2015 8:13 pm
Can you a specific ID for this wasp. Just turned up 130km north of Adelaide – about 8 of them. Dec 2015. Thanks for your help. Lovely little creature & seems oblivious to us – was burrowng in sand & bark litter.
Signature: Ian Roberts

Blue Flower Wasp

Flower Wasp

Hi Ian,
This is definitely a Flower Wasp or Mammoth Wasp in the family Scoliidae.  It looks very similar to this individual we believe we correctly identified as a Blue Flower Wasp,
Scolia (Discolia) verticalis.  There is a similarly marked individual on Bold Systems, and this FlickR posting from Western Australia looks like your individual, but it is only identified to the genus level.  Bower Bird has a Flower Wasp identified as Laeviscolia frontalis that has the two spots evident on the abdomen of your individual, and an image on Ipernity supports that ID, but another image on Bower Bird does not appear to have the yellow color near the head.  So, we cannot be certain of the species, but we are confident with the family Scoliidae.

Hi Daniel
Thanks for that – nice to have them zipping around.
Regards
Ian Roberts

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth-like creature
Location: Sydney, Australia
December 30, 2015 2:32 pm
Hi Bugman!
Last night we saw a large moth-like creature on our wall outside. This morning we see it has left behind a very interesting chain of eggs(?) that are attached to our ceiling with insect like legs. I didn’t get a picture of the insect itself, just the eggs. If you have any idea at all please let me know!
Signature: Tom Shamrock

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Dear Tom,
These are Neuropteran Eggs, quite possibly the eggs of a Blue Eyes Lacewing.  See these images on the Brisbane Insect site for verification.

Thanks Daniel! You are definitely right, many thanks for that we just couldn’t work it out!
Tom

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Western Australia Bug
Location: western australia
January 12, 2016 7:23 am
Just saw one of these little guys in my living room and wife got panicked…
couldn’t find anything similar on-line… initial thought was that it is a centipede or a small scorpion.
would love to know what it is, as we already stumbled across them in the yard, and if it is poisonous or not.
cheers
Signature: creepy insect terrorize

Earwig

Earwig

This is an Earwig and you have no cause for alarm.  You may read about Australian Earwigs on Bunyipco where it states:  “Earwig biology can be complex. Females of some species look after the eggs and young. Males have pinchers that are larger than those of the females that are probably used in male combat. Although earwigs live in tight places, the chances of one entering a persons ear while sleeping at night, are very slight. But it can happen!  Briefly there are 85 described Australian species in seven families. It is estimated that three times that number probably exist on the continent. Australia is a hotspot for earwigs but generic endemism is low with only about 10% of the genera endemic to the continent.”  According to the Queensland Museum:  “Earwigs are easily identified by the stout pair of pincers at the tip of the abdomen. These are used to capture prey, for defense and also to help fold up the semicircular hindwings under the short, hard wing covers. Some species are predatory, others are herbivorous. They live in concealed places during the day.”

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Subject: Big boy caterpillar
Location: Albany, Western Australia
January 11, 2016 6:05 am
Hi bug man!
Just found this beauty romping around in my Spanish moss and no one can figure out what it is!
What is he?!?!
Signature: Curious caterpillar carer

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Dear Curious Caterpillar Carer,
Your caterpillar has two fleshy, forward facing horns that should make identification somewhat easy.  We believe we have correctly identified your caterpillar as
Entometa fervens, the Common Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar, thanks to the Butterfly House website where it is described as:  “The caterpillar has a prominent projection on the back near the posterior end, and a pair of fleshy filaments behind the head. It is solitary, and feeds at night on a variety of Gum Trees” , but we would not discount it being another member of the genus.  The Spotted Gum Moth caterpillar, Entometa guttularis, is described on Butterfly House as being:  “The Caterpillars of this species are brown. sometimes mottled, and sometimes plain brown. The caterpillars have a pair of erectable fleshy howns behind the head, and a floppy knob on the tail. The caterpillars have been recorded feeding on the foliage of of various members of Myrtaceae.”  It is described on iNaturalist as being:  “a large fleshy Caterpillar with soft downy hairs. The caterpillar has a prominent projection on the back near the posterior end, and a pair of fleshy filaments behind the head.”

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Hi Daniel,
Thanks very much for taking the time to reply to my msg,
He must of been very happy indeed in my air plant because now I’ve got a cocoon
How exiting!
Cheers mate
-Sally

Yeah no worries, hopefully I’ll catch him hatching that’d be great!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination