Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scary bug!
Location: NSW, Australia
January 8, 2014 12:59 am
Hi!
I found this bug in my bathroom just the other day thinking it was a piece of fluff or dust i just left it be. Although the next day when i noticed it walking i was a little worried. It seems to have rather large fang looking things?
And chance you know what he may be?
Signature: Emma

Camouflaged Neuropteran Larva:  Owlfly, Antlion or other???

Camouflaged Neuropteran Larva: Owlfly, Antlion or other???

Dear Emma,
What we know for certain is that this is the camouflaged larva of a Neuropteran, a member of the order that included Lacewings, Antlions and Owlflies.  In North America, there are many Lacewing Larvae that utilize this style of camouflage, but the mandibles on your individual look much larger.  We found this previously posted, but still unidentified camouflaged Neuropteran Larva in our archives.  The Owlfly Larvae pictured on the Brisbane Insect website have similar mandibles, but no camouflage.  The Antlion Larva pictured on the Brisbane Insect website also has similar mandibles, but again, no camouflage.
  The best we can provide at this time is that this is the camouflaged Larva of an insect in the order Neuroptera.  Hopefully, we will eventually determine a family, genus or even species identity.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pilbara Beetle
Location: South Hedland, Western Australia
December 31, 2013 3:10 am
Hi, we recently had a cyclone in the Pilbara region of Western Australia and on cleaning up the debris, I found this little guy. I have found a couple of photos on the net, but the name of the beetle continues to elude me. I hope you might be able to help identify this beetle. Thanks in advance.
Signature: Thanks, Anthony

Unknown Scarab Beetle

Flower Beetle:  Eupoecila inscripta

Hi Anthony,
We thought a beautiful and distinctive beetle such as this would be much easier to identify, but alas, a species or genus is eluding us.  We believe it may be a member of the Scarab Beetle subfamily Cetoniinae, known as the Flower Beetles in Australia.  This group includes the equally dramatic and beautiful Fiddler Beetle.  Perhaps we will have more luck later or perhaps one of our readers will come to our rescue with this identification.

Update:  Eupoecila inscripta
Thanks to a comment from Jacob, we were directed to Bowerbird where there is a nice set of images of the Flower Beetle, Eupoecila inscripta, and it looks like a perfect match to this lovely Scarab.  We also found a photo on FlickR.  The Atlas of Living Australia has sightings along the northern portion of West Australia.  We have already noted the similarity to the Fiddler Beetle, and our observation has some merit since the Fiddler Beetle, Eupoecila australasiae, is in the same genus that this Flower Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: aussietrev
Location: Queensland, Australia
December 30, 2013 11:13 pm
Hi guys,
All the best for the festive season and a fantastic new year. Hope you like this shot of the Blue Tiger Butterfly, seems a bit under represented on the site. They pass through my property on their migratory journey each year but it is rare to get one sitting still long enough for a shot.
Keep up the good work, till next year then,
best wishes
Trevor
Signature: aussietrev

Blue Tiger Butterfly

Blue Tiger Butterfly

Hi Trevor,
Thanks for sending in your beautiful image.  We have to admit that for the past few days, we have been mostly fielding requests to identify Household Intruders and many of those images have been blurry and lacking in critical detail.  While cellular telephones allow folks to document things they encounter, the bottom line is that the quality of the images produced on the best portable communication devices pales when compared to the fine digital images that are produced with professional cameras when they are in trained artistic hands.  As the relevance of teaching photography comes under scrutiny due to budget cuts at the college level in America, we can’t help but to ponder the ubiquity of the photographic image and the importance good photographs play on successful websites.  Excellent quality images like your Blue Tiger Butterfly,
Tirumala hamata, help to make our humble website a more exciting place to visit.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug unidentified
Location: Victoria, Australia
December 30, 2013 1:11 am
Hi,
My name is Ivan, i live in Victoria, Australia , recently they stared to build a house behind my home, since then these unidentified bugs have migrated to my backyeard.
There all over my windows and trying to get into my house, i have googled this unidentified bug and can not find anything on it, there are similar ones but not the same. I got pest control to come over ande see the bugs but they told me they were Springtail bugs because they have two antenas when he left i googled this Springtail bug and it doe not look like it at all.
I have taken photos and measured two of them a small one and a large one, the sizes are the smallest one 3mm and the larger one is 6mm.
Please help with identifing this bug. I dont want this bug to hurt my family especially my 5 month old daughter.
regards
Signature: Ivan

Unknown Nymph

Unknown Heteropteran Nymph

Dear Ivan,
All three images you submitted are True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera, and they are definitely NOT Springtails.  Two of your photos appear to be the same species and they are immature.  Due to their small size, we are speculating that they are either Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae, or Chinch Bugs in the family Blissidae.  It may be difficult to determine the exact species as they are immature specimens.

Unknown Heteropteran Nymph

Unknown Heteropteran Nymph

The third photograph appears to be a different species, and it most closely resembles the Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs in the superfamily Pentatomoidea, but due to its small size, we cannot be certain.  It is a winged adult.  Compare your but to this North American Shield Bug Sphyrocoris obliquus that is pictured on BugGuide.  We are posting your photos and tagging them as unidentified.  We will attempt further research if time permits and perhaps one of our readers will be able to contribute some helpful information.  In our opinion, both species may present a nuisance due to their large numbers, but we don’t believe either species poses a direct threat to your family.

Unknown True Bug

Unknown True Bug

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pyramid Head
Location: Central Coast, Australia
December 30, 2013 5:25 am
Hey, I found this bug on the side of my house and (obviously) have no idea what its is
I dubbed it pyramid head, named after the monster from silent hill.
thank you in advance.
Signature: Amber

Leafhopper

Leafhopper

Dear Amber,
While we have not been able to quickly find a conclusive species match for your Free Living Hemipteran, we are relatively confident that it is a Leafhopper in the family Cicadellidae, and probably a Flatheaded Leafhopper in the subfamily Ledrinae.  The Brisbane Insect website has a few photos of immature specimens that bear a resemblance to your insect.  PaDIL, the Pests and Diseases Image Library has a page on the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter and other native insects is can be confused with, and though many of those look similar, none seems to be an exact match either.  We continued to search and then we discovered the World’s Largest Leafhopper,
Ledromorpha planirostris, back on the Brisbane Insect website, and we are relatively confident that is your species.  We don’t understand how we missed it the first pass we made on the Brisbane Insect website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug living on Citrus Tree
Location: Sydney Australia
December 27, 2013 1:50 am
Hi Bugman,
My 3 yo spends a lot of time in the garden with insects. He has me stumped on this bug we’ve found on a citrus tree leave in Southern Hemisphere summer (Dec). Can u help?
Signature: Aranchii

Bronze Orange Stink Bug

Bronze Orange Stink Bug

Hi Aranchii,
We did a web search of “stink bug citrus Australia” and we found an image of your Bronze Orange Stink Bug,
Musgraveia sulciventris, on the Butterfly House website where we frequently search for Australian caterpillars.  Seems they have a page devoted to the lemon tree.  According to the Brisbane Insect website:  “They suck sap from young shoots of of the plants. The first and second pictures above show the bugs sucking the juice from the new shot of the Citrus plant. Notice their sucking mouth-parts and the wilted tips of the plant. …  After mating the females lay eggs on leaf for the next generations.”

Thanks for the quick response Daniel!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination