Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly Love
Location: Taggery, North East Victoria, Australia
November 18, 2014 2:31 am
Just thought you might be interested in theres, i think they ate egg laying?
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Bluets Mating

Damselflies Mating

Dear Cait,
These are Damselflies, not Dragonflies, but your mistake is understandable because they are classified in the same insect order, Odonata.  When we have more time, we will try to identify the species on the Brisbane Insect website.  They are in fact mating and in the act of depositing eggs.

Thank you for the response, I’ll have to tell me parents what is living in their dam. They’ve let it go seminative so there are at least 5 types of frogs and so many more insects. I recently just bought the book advertised on the website and am starting to read it. It’s all very fascinating!

Jessica M. Schemm, Cait O'Pray, Amy Gosch, Kathy Haines liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these
Location: Byron bay australia
November 12, 2014 11:24 pm
These guys are absolutely everywhere in my garden. What are they?
Signature: Rob

Immature Red Eyes Bugs

Immature Red Eyes Bugs

Dear Rob,
We believe we have identified this aggregation as a group of immature Red Eyes Bugs,
Leptocoris tagalicus, that includes one winged adult, the lowest individual in the image.  We matched your image to images posted on the Brisbane Insect website where it states:  “The bug can be found on different type of plants. From the reference information, bugs in genus Leptocoris are seed predators of plants in family Sapindaceae. They are also known as Soapberry Bugs. This bug is common in Brisbane garden and backyards. They feed on plant seeds. Usually they do not do noticeable harm to the host plant. “

Thanks Daniel, I think that’s the one.
Rob

Jen Moody liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny mantis nymphs in Melbourne
Location: Melbourne, Australia
November 4, 2014 6:55 pm
Hello,
I found these two little mantis nymphs on a capsicum plant in my little boy’s veggie patch yesterday. They would have been no more than 10mm in length. I guess they’re juvenile Garden or False Garden Mantises, but I’ve not seen black/brown ones before, or ones with a curled abdomen.
My little boy is a budding entomologist, so we’re going to have a lot of fun watching these guys grow up. :)
(Apologies for the quality of the photos – I only had my phone handy!)
Signature: Jen

Mantis nymph

Mantis nymph

Dear Jen,
We hope to get additional images as these hatchling Mantids grow and mature.

Hatchling Mantids

Hatchling Mantids

Teri Stinson, Racheal Sedmack, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Kathleen Travis Perin, Vanessa Simone liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: East Gippsland Australia
October 23, 2014 12:44 am
Gday, sorry to bug you man. Cool bug, spring time, coastal dunes, banksia closest trees.
Signature: Aaron

Wattle Pig Weevil, we believe

Wattle Pig Weevil, we believe

Dear Aaron,
This is a Broad Nosed Weevil, and we believe we have identified it as a Wattle Pig Weevil in the genus
Leptopius thanks to the Brisbane Insect Website.  You can also find images on Project Noah.

Probably Wattle Pig Weevil

Probably Wattle Pig Weevil

Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange red lumps
Location: Styx Valley, Tasmania, Australia
October 23, 2014 4:21 am
Hi there,
I would like an ID on both the insect (a crane fly?) and the strange red lumps on its thorax. Are they mites? I found this specimen on the car after a drive through a forestry logging track. Its body (excluding the legs) was probably around 2cm long.
Thanks for the help.
Signature: Curious

Crane Fly with Mites

Crane Fly with Mites

Dear Curious,
You are correct that this is a Crane Fly, and we don’t know if we are going to be able to provide you with a more specific identification beyond the Infraorder Tipulomorpha.  The red lumps do appear to be Mites, and we do have several images in our archives of Crane Flies with Mites.  We found an example from UK on The Ranger’s Blog.  We suspect the Mites are phoretic, but we are not certain.

Crane Fly with Mites

Crane Fly with Mites

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Bulldog Ant

Bulldog Ant

Subject: an insect & an arachnid
Location: melbourne, australia; auckland, new zealand
October 6, 2014 4:22 am
hi folks! you helped me with a bug once before, & i absolutely love your site – hoping you can ID these two critters from my trip to australia & new zealand this month.
the ant is about 5/8″ long & was found on the great ocean road, about 170 miles west of melbourne, australia.
the 1/2″ long spider was found on my neck in auckland, new zealand. :)
the third ant i believe i’ve correctly ID’d as a bulldog ant, but the photo came out so nice that i figured i’d submit it, too.
keep up the great work, you wonderful people.
Signature: lish d

Unknown Australian Ant

Unknown Australian Ant

Dear lish d,
We love your image of a Bulldog Ant.  According to National Geographic Magazine:  “Fearless and belligerent, the inch-long bulldog ant of Australia uses her sharp vision and venomous stinger to track and subdue formidable prey.  Picture a wasp with its wings ripped off, and you’ll have a good approximation of a bulldog ant. The resemblance is no coincidence: Ants are believed to have evolved from wasplike ancestors some 140 million years ago. The bulldog ant has long been considered one of the oldest ant lineages. But some recent studies suggest that bulldogs appeared no earlier than 100 million years ago, along with an explosion of other ant species that may have accompanied the rise of flowering plants. ”  We are unable to identify the creatures in your other two images, and we are posting the unidentified and rather forgetable other Ant which one of our readers may eventually be able to identify.
  We will not be adding the spider image to this posting as they are not categorized together in our archives, they are not from the same country, and we don’t want to speculate if they met one on one.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination