Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Western Australia Bug
Location: western australia
January 12, 2016 7:23 am
Just saw one of these little guys in my living room and wife got panicked…
couldn’t find anything similar on-line… initial thought was that it is a centipede or a small scorpion.
would love to know what it is, as we already stumbled across them in the yard, and if it is poisonous or not.
cheers
Signature: creepy insect terrorize

Earwig

Earwig

This is an Earwig and you have no cause for alarm.  You may read about Australian Earwigs on Bunyipco where it states:  “Earwig biology can be complex. Females of some species look after the eggs and young. Males have pinchers that are larger than those of the females that are probably used in male combat. Although earwigs live in tight places, the chances of one entering a persons ear while sleeping at night, are very slight. But it can happen!  Briefly there are 85 described Australian species in seven families. It is estimated that three times that number probably exist on the continent. Australia is a hotspot for earwigs but generic endemism is low with only about 10% of the genera endemic to the continent.”  According to the Queensland Museum:  “Earwigs are easily identified by the stout pair of pincers at the tip of the abdomen. These are used to capture prey, for defense and also to help fold up the semicircular hindwings under the short, hard wing covers. Some species are predatory, others are herbivorous. They live in concealed places during the day.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big boy caterpillar
Location: Albany, Western Australia
January 11, 2016 6:05 am
Hi bug man!
Just found this beauty romping around in my Spanish moss and no one can figure out what it is!
What is he?!?!
Signature: Curious caterpillar carer

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Dear Curious Caterpillar Carer,
Your caterpillar has two fleshy, forward facing horns that should make identification somewhat easy.  We believe we have correctly identified your caterpillar as
Entometa fervens, the Common Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar, thanks to the Butterfly House website where it is described as:  “The caterpillar has a prominent projection on the back near the posterior end, and a pair of fleshy filaments behind the head. It is solitary, and feeds at night on a variety of Gum Trees” , but we would not discount it being another member of the genus.  The Spotted Gum Moth caterpillar, Entometa guttularis, is described on Butterfly House as being:  “The Caterpillars of this species are brown. sometimes mottled, and sometimes plain brown. The caterpillars have a pair of erectable fleshy howns behind the head, and a floppy knob on the tail. The caterpillars have been recorded feeding on the foliage of of various members of Myrtaceae.”  It is described on iNaturalist as being:  “a large fleshy Caterpillar with soft downy hairs. The caterpillar has a prominent projection on the back near the posterior end, and a pair of fleshy filaments behind the head.”

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Hi Daniel,
Thanks very much for taking the time to reply to my msg,
He must of been very happy indeed in my air plant because now I’ve got a cocoon
How exiting!
Cheers mate
-Sally

Yeah no worries, hopefully I’ll catch him hatching that’d be great!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: horse fly
Location: Cairns Australia
January 10, 2016 4:11 pm
Hi. Could you please tell me what kind of horse fly this is.
I live in Cairns Australia next to the rainforest I’m used to the smaller black ones but not this..
Unfortunately i had to kill it as it was attacking my two little boys under three years of age!!
Thanks
Signature: Marc

Hover Fly, we believe

Horse Fly, we realize

Dear Marc,
This is not a Horse Fly, commonly called a March Fly in Australia.  We believe this is a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae.  Hover Flies mimic stinging bees and wasps for protection, but they are in themselves perfectly harmless.  We have not had any luck determining the species.  We hope that should you encounter additional Hover Flies in the future, you will learn to recognize them and not kill them as they pose no threat to your family.

Many thanks on the info..
I do feel bad exterminating it now but now know for future reference!!!!
Thanks again…

Correction:  Horse Fly is Correct
Dear Marc,
There was an exchange of comments initiated by Christopher that resulted in a determination that this really was a Horse Fly like the one pictured on the Queensland Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown ant/spider
Location: Sydney, Australia
December 14, 2015 2:09 am
Hi
These were found on my front verandah about to crawl into my daughters bedroom.
Never seen them before. Tiny in size so babies or just hatched – maybe quarter of an inch or half a centimetre long.
It’s summer here in Australia anf I live about 2km west of the harbour.
Would love to know what you think they are.
Kind regards
Signature: Michelle

Heteropteran Hatchlings

Heteropteran Hatchlings

Dear Michelle,
These are hatchling True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera, and we have not been able to quickly locate any matching images online, but we suspect they are in the Leaf Footed Bug or Twig Wilter family Coreidae.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in the identification.  We will be postdating your submission to go live during our absence from the office during the holidays.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What insect is this
Location: Melbourne Victoria
December 21, 2015 6:15 am
Hello
Found this little guy on my bathroom sink. Roughly the same size as an ant. Had a really good look and it appears to be on its own, couldn’t find anymore.
Signature: Anyhow

Aphid Wolf

Aphid Wolf

This is a beneficial Lacewing Larva, commonly called an Aphid Wolf because of the large numbers of harmful garden insects it will consume.  We have gotten numerous reports of folks being bitten by Lacewing Larvae, and though the bite is not considered dangerous, the itchiness does last some time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this
Location: Sydney
December 17, 2015 12:57 am
Just wanna know what bug is this I’ve never seen before
Signature: How ever

Plague Soldier Beetles

Plague Soldier Beetles

These are Plague Soldier Beetles in the genus Chauliognathus.  Despite the common name, they are not considered a threat to the plants, though large numbers might be considered a nuisance.  They are frequently found on flowering gum or eucalyptus trees because of the abundance of pollen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination