Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown bug species
Location: melbourne, Victoria, Australia
May 12, 2015 1:20 am
Hi,
I’m wondering what this insect is. I have found several outside my house. Do they fly? Are they harmful? What are they?
Regards,
Signature: Sharon

Flightless female Soldier Fly

Flightless female Soldier Fly

Dear Sharon,
Your unusual insect is
Boreoides subulatus, a flightless female Soldier Fly in the family Stratiomyidae, subfamily Chiromyzinae, and the last image we posted of this unusual insect was allegedly sighted in the UK.

Thank you so much for getting back to me. Very interesting.
Warm regards,
Sharon

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Subject: Feather Horned Beetle
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
May 2, 2015 11:34 pm
My daughter found this beetle in our backyard. We did have a smaller beetle without the fancy antennae but by the time I got the camera the smaller beetle had disappeared.
We were able to identify it from your site and thought that you may be interested.
Signature: Chris McMillan

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

Dear Chris,
Your images of a Feather Horned Beetle,
Rhipicera femoralis, are an excellent addition to our archive.

Feather Horned Beetle

Feather Horned Beetle

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Subject: Identify Chrysalis
Location: Australia
May 2, 2015 6:14 pm
I hope that you can help me to identify this chrysalis. It was photographed by a friend in Australia and he has no idea. I was asked to help but find most search engines take me off at a tangent and I have been unable to get a decent photographic library from which to identify this one. I really appreciate any help you might be able to give.
Signature: Corrie

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Cabbage WhiteChrysalis

Dear Corrie,
We were mistaken into thinking that the silken girdle supporting this chrysalis in an upright position indicates that it is a Swallowtail in the family Papilionidae.  We are not certain of the exact species, but you may compare this image to images of Australian Swallowtail Chrysalides posted to Butterflyhouse.  We received a comment with a correction from Ben indicating that this is the chrysalis of a Cabbage White.

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Subject: Beetle larvae?
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
April 28, 2015 3:53 am
Hi, I came across this strange insect in my yard ( Adelaide Metropolitan area). It followed me, definately turning around several times each time I stepped over it. It had 6 legs, long antennas, small whitish green & black spotted wings behind its head, but a very bold orangey-red & black spotted large grub-like shaped body. It was large – over an inch long in total. My yard is totally paved, but it is over hung by big yellow scented gum trees. I have searched for beetles that look similar & beetle larvae but drawn a blank. Wondered if anyone had any ideas?
Signature: Thanks, Gill

Newly emerged Black and White Tiger Moth

Newly emerged Black and White Tiger Moth

Dear Gill,
This colorful creature is a newly emerged Black and White Tiger Moth,
Spilosoma glatignyi, and its wings have not yet expanded.  According to the Butterfly House website:  “The species may be found over the whole of the southern half of Australia.”  The Esperance Fauna site provides this interesting information:  “From the Arctiidae family, Spilosoma glatignyi is a stunning looking moth which despite its beauty, apparently tastes pretty awful in order to discourage predators. It sports bright red colors to visually signal its distasteful nature, but apart from predators that may find it roosting during the day, it would serve little purpose and possibly has another function. However to advertise to potential predators at night, it uses a high pitched vocalisation to warn them (particularly bats) that they are not worth eating. The larvae protect themselves with a covering of irritating hairs and feed from a wide variety of plant species.” 

Hi Daniel,
Thank you very much for sharing your expertise.
Much appreciated!
Gill

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Subject: Hard Shelled, Flightless Beetle
Location: 3 hours North-east of Alice Springs
April 24, 2015 4:37 pm
I have found this beetle three hours North-east of Alice Springs trying to burrow into the sand. He’s dark brown and has a really hard shell and when I tapped him with my finger he stuck his bottom up in the air with his head on the ground as if trying to scare me off with the small spikes on his back. He’s got antennas and six legs with really grippy ‘claws’. I was also wondering (for if you can find out what type of beetle he is) If you knew what he eats and how to look after him properly. I don’t know how to attach a photo to the website so if I could get an email address to send the photo to you, That would be really good. I’ve called him ‘Bob’ for now.
Signature: Thanks, B McKnight

Weevil

Weevil

Dear B McKnight,
This is some species of Weevil, and we found a similar looking, but not identical individual from Alice Springs pictured on LirraLirra.  Another similar looking individual is pictured on Nature’s Windows, Photos of the Month, and it is identified as
Leptopius areolatus, but though it looks similar to your individual, we do not believe it is the same species, but possibly in the same genus.  Other similar looking Weevils in the genus Leptopius are pictured on FlickRiver.  Another similar looking member of the genus is represented by this image on FlickR.

Weevil

Weevil

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Subject: what is this
Location: Melbourne Australia
April 13, 2015 8:56 pm
what is this bug
Signature: Julie

Bulldog Ant Alate

Bulldog Ant Alate

Dear Julie,
This is a Bulldog Ant or Bull Ant in the genus
Myrmecia, and it is a winged reproductive individual known as an Alate.  According to the Australian Museum site:  “Bull ants are large, alert ants that can grow up to 40 mm  They have characteristic large eyes and long, slender mandibles and a potent venom-loaded sting. They have superior vision, able to track and even follow intruders from a distance of 1 metre. Many species of bull ants have bright red or orange colours on the head or abdomen.”  The site also states:  “These ants can deliver painful stings and are aggressive. An ice pack or commercially available spray may be used to relieve the pain of the sting. If there is evidence of an allergic reaction, medical attention should be sought.”  There is also an image on Oz Animals.

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