Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: please help me identify this bug.
Location: south australia
August 6, 2014 12:08 am
Hey. I was walking home with my friend today and we walked pasted a shrub or a ungrow tree and there was this black bug on it with white spikes. I’m not sure exactly whether it was a spider or an insect but when I wobbled the branch it kind of moved like an octopus. It almost the end of winter and temperature was about 17-20 degrees celsius if the climate helps. The picture I am showing might not be completely clear or from the best angle so I apologise. Hopefully you can identify this bug. Cheers.
Signature: molly

Steel Blue Sawfly Larvae

Steel Blue Sawfly Larvae

Dear Molly,
When taking images of bugs, it is best to focus on the subject and not the background.  You mistook this aggregation of larvae for a single creature, when it is actually a grouping.  We could tell the branch was some type of Eucalyptus, so we searched for both caterpillars and sawflies that feed on Eucalyptus, and we quickly located an image of Steel Blue Sawflies on the Australian Native Plants Society site, but sadly, only a common name was provided.  The site states:  “Another chewing pest that can appear in large numbers are steel-blue sawfly larvae. They do most of the damage to a tree’s foliage during the night and in daylight hours they gather into groups around small branches. If they are accessible at these times they can be removed by cutting off the branches where they cluster together.”
  Armed with that common name, we next located an image on the Australian Museum site where we learned a genus name Perga and the information that “The Steel-blue Sawfly can sometimes cause extensive damage to trees.”  Our third stop was the Museum Victoria site where the Steel Blue Sawfly was Bug of the Month in July 2012.  There we reinforced the common name Spitfire for a Sawfly Larva and we got the species name Perga dorsalis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any Idea?
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
August 2, 2014 5:13 am
Hey,
I found this 2cm big guy near a salt water river in Sydney, Australia. I have no clue if its a spider/scorpion thing or just a bug or whatever. I am not even sure if there a 4, 6 or 8 legs …
I googled a lot but cant find anything helpful…
(sorry for my english ;) )
Signature: Ben

Crab Spider:  Sidymella species

Crab Spider: Sidymella species

Dear Ben,
Your English is perfectly fine.  Your confusion is well founded.  Both Spiders and Scorpions are classified in the zoological class Arachnida, the Arachnids, so they share many physical similarities.  Insects and Arachnids, including Spider and Scorpions, are classified together in the phylum Arthropoda, and again, they all share certain physical characteristics.  With that stated, this is a Spider in the order Araneae, and Spiders are identified because they have two body parts, the cephalothorax (combined head and thorax) and abdomen, and eight legs.  This particular Spider is holding its two front pairs of legs together, which makes it a bit difficult to count.  The two front pairs of legs are considerably longer than the rear two pairs, and this is a physical trait shared by Crab Spiders in the family Thomisidae.  Once we got to that level of identification, we turned to one of our favorite sites for identifying Australian Arthropods, the Brisbane Insects and Spiders, where we found a very similar looking Crab Spider identified as being in one of two genera:
Tmarus or Sidymella.  The site author coined the name Peak Crab Spider “ because its abdomen rises to a dorsal peak.  Its two front pairs of legs are much longer than the hind two pairs.”  Scroll to the bottom of the page to see the Peak Crab Spider.  Armed with that information, we found other representatives in the genus pictured on Spiders of Australia, and the closest matches are not yet fully identified, and are given the names Sidymella ZZ477 and Sidymella ZZ592.  Those letter and number identifyers indicate that the Spiders have yet to be described in a published paper at which time they can be given species names by the describer.  This is a very exciting posting for us and we are featuring it in our scrolling featured posting bar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grub like – perth Australia
Location: perth, Australia
May 17, 2014 5:03 am
Hi,
Found 3 of these larvae/grub like thing in my back yard perth Australia. Don’t know where they came from had one first put him out in a grass area and the next day I found two more. Seem to have a mouth that retracts into the body when startled.
Its almost like a big caterpillar.
Just want to know if they are dangerous. Just got a new puppy so want to be safe.
Thanks graham
Signature: thanks for your help

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Hi Graham,
This is the caterpillar of a Vine Hawkmoth or Gabi Moth,
Hippotion celerio, and it is perfectly harmless.  More information on the Vine Hawkmoth can be found on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Valanga irregularis
Location: Perth, Western Australia
May 13, 2014 7:12 am
Just commented on a post on your website about a giant grasshopper found last November in Perth, Western Australia. We also found one in a bougainvillea outside our window (under the eaves, which would have sheltered it from the recent rains), but the websites I’ve seen put these as living in our tropical top end, not here in the temperate south. We are in Autumn, just heading into winter. Are they lost???
Signature: Helen

Grasshopper

Giant Grasshopper

Dear Helen,
Your identification appears to be correct.  According to the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, the Giant Grasshopper or Hedge Grasshopper is “Very large – Australia’s biggest grasshopper.”  According to Csiro, the Giant Grasshopper is found in Western Australia, but it does not indicate if it ranges as far south as Perth.  Perhaps this is another symptom of global warming.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I can’t find this one anywhere please help
Location: I think Australia
May 4, 2014 4:34 pm
Hey bugman buddy, I was wondering if you could help me identify this colorful bug. Thanks for all your help I will try to also make a donation soon. Thanks again
Signature: Brandon

Cotton Harlequin Bug

Cotton Harlequin Bug

Hi Brandon,
We didn’t notice until we were actually creating a posting that this photo was taken in “I think Australia” which leads us to think you did not take the image.  Please clarify where the image came from if you did not take it as our submission clearly states:  “Also, you swear that you either took the photo(s) yourself or have explicit permission from the photographer or copyright holder to use the image.”  This is a Cotton Harlequin Bug,
Tectocoris diophthalmus, and it is indeed from Australia.  You can read more about it on the Brisbane Insect website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug
Location: South west Sydney, Australia
May 4, 2014 3:21 am
I found this in my hallway today. Never seen anything like it before and nobody else knows what it is. Can you help?
Signature: Laura

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Laura,
This is a Mole Cricket, and we field identification requests for Mole Crickets from all over the world.  We just responded to a query from Florida, but as the image was quite blurry, we did not create a posting.  We are creating a posting from your request and image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination