Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grub like – perth Australia
Location: perth, Australia
May 17, 2014 5:03 am
Hi,
Found 3 of these larvae/grub like thing in my back yard perth Australia. Don’t know where they came from had one first put him out in a grass area and the next day I found two more. Seem to have a mouth that retracts into the body when startled.
Its almost like a big caterpillar.
Just want to know if they are dangerous. Just got a new puppy so want to be safe.
Thanks graham
Signature: thanks for your help

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Hi Graham,
This is the caterpillar of a Vine Hawkmoth or Gabi Moth,
Hippotion celerio, and it is perfectly harmless.  More information on the Vine Hawkmoth can be found on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Valanga irregularis
Location: Perth, Western Australia
May 13, 2014 7:12 am
Just commented on a post on your website about a giant grasshopper found last November in Perth, Western Australia. We also found one in a bougainvillea outside our window (under the eaves, which would have sheltered it from the recent rains), but the websites I’ve seen put these as living in our tropical top end, not here in the temperate south. We are in Autumn, just heading into winter. Are they lost???
Signature: Helen

Grasshopper

Giant Grasshopper

Dear Helen,
Your identification appears to be correct.  According to the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, the Giant Grasshopper or Hedge Grasshopper is “Very large – Australia’s biggest grasshopper.”  According to Csiro, the Giant Grasshopper is found in Western Australia, but it does not indicate if it ranges as far south as Perth.  Perhaps this is another symptom of global warming.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I can’t find this one anywhere please help
Location: I think Australia
May 4, 2014 4:34 pm
Hey bugman buddy, I was wondering if you could help me identify this colorful bug. Thanks for all your help I will try to also make a donation soon. Thanks again
Signature: Brandon

Cotton Harlequin Bug

Cotton Harlequin Bug

Hi Brandon,
We didn’t notice until we were actually creating a posting that this photo was taken in “I think Australia” which leads us to think you did not take the image.  Please clarify where the image came from if you did not take it as our submission clearly states:  “Also, you swear that you either took the photo(s) yourself or have explicit permission from the photographer or copyright holder to use the image.”  This is a Cotton Harlequin Bug,
Tectocoris diophthalmus, and it is indeed from Australia.  You can read more about it on the Brisbane Insect website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug
Location: South west Sydney, Australia
May 4, 2014 3:21 am
I found this in my hallway today. Never seen anything like it before and nobody else knows what it is. Can you help?
Signature: Laura

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Laura,
This is a Mole Cricket, and we field identification requests for Mole Crickets from all over the world.  We just responded to a query from Florida, but as the image was quite blurry, we did not create a posting.  We are creating a posting from your request and image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this other than a giant scary horned caterpillar
Location: Perth Western Australia
April 24, 2014 3:31 am
Hi! Hoping you can help me out. Saw this creature/monster crawling across my lawn late this afternoon. Its the second one we’ve seen and we’re really curious as to what it will be! It was about 3 inches long (maybe slightly more) and slightly furry looking. Almost like felt. The pics make it look purple but it was more of a beige colour with a bit of red/tan. And those horns!!! Any ideas?
Signature: Nicole

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Hi Nicole,
We struggled a bit on this identification, but we eventually found some images of your Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar,
Entometa fervens, on the Butterfly House website where it states:  “This is a large fleshy Caterpillar with soft downy hairs. It is sometimes smooth, sometimes rough, sometimes brown, and sometimes mottled with cream and grey. The variable nature of the caterpillars suggests that the name Entometa fervens is being applied to a complex of several species. More investigation is needed to clarify this.  The caterpillar has a prominent projection on the back near the posterior end, and a pair of fleshy filaments behind the head. It is solitary, and feeds at night on a variety of Gum Trees.”  The image on the Queensland Museum site through us off as it looks so different from your images.  It is also pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Gum Snout Moth Caterpillar

Hi Daniel
Thanks very much for taking the time to identify this. Not knowing was killing me J
I have never heard of one of those and have never ever seen anything like this beauty before.
Thanks again for the wonderfully prompt service.
Kindest regards
Nicole J

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What insect is this?
Location: Centennial Park, Sydney, Australia
April 20, 2014 6:04 am
Hi there,
I came across this insect by some flowers in Centennial Park, Sydney, Australia. I can’t say I’ve seen anything like it, so I thought I’d see if you know. Thanks.
Signature: Chris

Possibly Carrot Wasp

Possibly Carrot Wasp

Dear Chris,
Of this we are certain:  This is a parasitic wasp that is classified as Parasitica or Parasitic Apocrita, which is not a true taxonomic category, but it is a means to group parasitic wasps together.  We believe it is a Carrot Wasp in the family Gasteruptiidae, which we identified on BugGuide, and then verified on the Atlas of Living Australia as being a family that is found in Australia.  We may be wrong, but the look of the hind legs and the antennae as well as the ovipositor are good indications that we are correct.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are predators or predators-inquilines (consume larval food, not the larvae) of other Hymenoptera that nest in twigs and in wood.”  The Atlas of Living Australia notes:  “Females oviposit in the nests of solitary bees (Apidae) and wasps (Vespidae) , where the larvae are predator-inquilines, eating the host egg or larvae and consuming the pollen store. Adult gasteruptiids may be seen on flowers or hovering near bare ground, logs or trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination