Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bristle tail with wings?
Location: Northern NSW, Australia
April 30, 2016 2:19 pm
Hi,
Any idea what this is? Spotted at night in northern NSW, Australia on the 29th April. Approx 2.5 inches long.
Looks like it has small wings.
Signature: Martin

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Martin,
This Mole Cricket is a subterranean insect that uses its front legs to burrow quickly through the soil.  Mole Crickets are among our most frequent identification requests, and we get submissions from all over the world, not just Australia.  Some species are capable of flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fascinating Spider
Location: Fairlight NSW Australia
April 28, 2016 7:05 pm
Have been observing this little guy building silk bridges between our tables and chairs on the balcony this morning and wondered if i should stay calmly seated and curious or run around screaming and flailing my arms in the air because its a man eater. What kind of spider is it please?
Signature: Curious Mich

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Curious Mich,
Fear Not.  This Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae is perfectly harmless.  Jumping Spiders do not build webs in which to snare prey, but rather they jump great distances, pouncing on their prey.

Thank you so much. I will continue observing it spinning silk threads to build bridges between my balcony furniture at a longer distance. Appreciate your time and help.
Curious Mich

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this moth
Location: Ballarat, Australia
April 26, 2016 12:50 am
Hi bugman,
This moth appeared in my house on 1st April 2016. It stayed for the day and then disappeared. Could you please tell me what is its name?
Thanks,
Signature: Eddie R

Satin Moth

Satin Moth

Dear Eddie,
Why did you wait nearly an entire month to submit your images?  It took us a bit of time to identify your Orange Trimmed Satin Moth,
Thalaina selenaea, though we did notice several similar members of the genus on Butterfly House.  Not until we found this FlickR posting were we convinced our ID was correct, and we verified its identity on ipernity.

Satin Moth

Satin Moth

Thank you so much Daniel! I tried searching the internet myself but couldn’t find this Orange Trimmed Satin Moth. It didn’t occur to me that there would be a website dedicated to identifying bugs until a few days ago.
I had never seen a moth like this before and it also just happened to appear on my 10th Wedding Anniversary so it made it extra special because the colours reminded me of my wife’s wedding dress.
Thanks again and I appreciate the rapid response!
Cheers,
Ed.

Hi again Ed.  Thanks for letting us know about the memories this Orange Trimmed Satin Moth triggered for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar Vic australia
Location: Victoria Australia- bayside
April 20, 2016 5:58 pm
Hi, I found this on the ground in Victoria Australia. It’s as long as my palm. What is it?
Signature: Thanks

Convolvulus Hawkmoth Hornworm

Convolvulus Hawkmoth Hornworm

Your Hornworm is the caterpillar of a Convolvulus Hawkmoth, Agrius convolvuli , and you can verify our identification on ButterflyHouse where it states:  “The caterpillar may walk up to 300 metres from the food plant to pupate. It pupates in a cell in the soil. The pupa has a long looped compartment for the developing haustellum.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help me identify this monster moth
Location: Brisbane, Australia in autumn
April 19, 2016 12:26 am
Hi bugman,
I finished work the other day and stumbled upon this moth on a stair. I was wondering if you could please help me identify it as I have never seen an insect quite so large in my life.
P.s. If this is an undiscovered species I would like it to be called the Margotmoth
Signature: Sincerely Margot, aka the founder of the Margotmoth

Hawkmoth: Coequosa australasiae

Hawkmoth: Coequosa australasiae

Dear Margot,
First we do not have the authority to name newly discovered species.  There is a lengthy process for determining a name.  Your moth is not new to science, nor to our website.  Your Hawkmoth is
Coequosa australasiae.  You may read more about the species on Butterfly House.

Hawkmoth from Australia

Hawkmoth from Australia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth looking like a bee?
Location: Pearcedale, Victoria, Australia
April 12, 2016 2:19 am
Hello! This lepidopteran was found in Pearcedale, Victoria, Australia on April 12th 2016 in the Autumn. Looks like a moth but I am having troubles getting an ID from searching the internet. Could you please help?
Signature: Caity

Unknown Moth

Boisduval’s Autumn Moth

Dear Caity,
Despite looking at hundreds of images on Butterfly House, we have not had any luck identifying your distinctively marked, newly eclosed moth.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

Unknown Moth

Boisduval’s Autumn Moth

Update:  April 12, 2016
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash who brought our attention to a Boisduval’s Autumn Moth posting on our site as well as on Butterfly House, we now have an identification.

Thank you for your efforts, I have since had some luck online with finding an id: Boisduval’s Autumn Moth (Oenosandra boisduvallii) – a newly emerged female before her wings have expanded :)

Karl also provides an ID with a link to our own archives.
Hi Daniel and Caity:
It looks like a Boisduval’s Autumn Moth (Oenosandra boisduvalii). You actually have it in your archive from a year ago, posted by Furry moth lover. Regards, Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination