Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
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Subject: What’s this spider
Location: Regional Victoria, Australia
August 10, 2015 3:55 am
Found this scary looking thing on a piece of wood. Wondering what it is? Looks like a huntsman on steroids
Signature: :)

Huntsman Spider in Threat Position

Huntsman Spider in Threat Position

Dear :),
This is certainly a Huntsman Spider and it is in a classic threat position.  Because of the striped legs, we believe this may be a member of the genus
Holconia and there are similar looking images on Arachne.org and the Brisbane Insect site.  Your image is quite amazing.

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Subject: HELP! what’s that bug?
Location: Brisbane, Australia.
August 8, 2015 5:46 am
Hi, I was laying in bed when I noticed this small thing moving along my bed sheet. So I grabbed it with a bit of tissue and took it to the toilet where I was to dispose of it. But I was interested and wanted to know what it was so I took it out of the tissue and noticed its back was flaking off like a weak piece of bark.
It is currently winter (Augest)
I also was in the garden earlier that day.
I also moved and cleaned everything in my room.
in the third photo the bug is upside down.
Thank you for your time.
Signature: sebastian

Neuropteran Larva

Neuropteran Larva

Dear Sebastian,
This is a predatory Neuropteran larva, and we suspect it was a hitchhiker from your day in the garden.  What flaked off might have been a piece of bark or other plant detritus that the larva used for the purposes of camouflage.  You can read more about Australian Neuropterans on the Brisbane Insect site.

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Subject: Can you please name my bug
Location: Mandurah Western Australia
July 28, 2015 1:25 pm
Can you please identify this little fly
Thank you Tracey Marinkovic
Signature: Just a name

Bristle Fly

Bristle Fly

Dear Tracey,
We are more than prepared to supply you with a response, and we hope you respond to our questions as well.  This looks very much like a Bristle Fly,
Amphibolia vidua, a species in the family Tachinidae from Australia that has caused a bit of confusion on our site in the past.  According to the head of Entomology of Csiro regarding a previous posting:  “Its larvae feed as a parasite internally on other insects.  On sunny days in summer the adults often rest on smooth eucalypt tree trunks, and similar structures such as poles and pipes.”  We also know that adult Tachinid Flies frequently visit flowers.  We are very curious for you to explain why you titled your images “snail parasite” and we hope you can provide us with an explanation. 

Bristle Fly

Bristle Fly

The only reason my bug had Snail Parasite written on it was I seen the pic of one on the Internet and thought it looked like one. I was just guessing cheers and thank you

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Subject: Bettle or Fly
Location: South Australia
July 27, 2015 8:26 pm
Hi, My friend has found this in her backyard in South Australia. The inscet is around the same size or a bit bigger than a Wine cork. The two pictures attached, we could not get any help from down here. My friend went to collect it but it took off (Dissapeared.)
Signature: Mary

White Beetle:  Real or Fake???

White Beetle: Real or Fake???

Dear Mary,
Is your friend a practical joker?  This looks like a fake beetle to us.

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Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Central Victoria, Australia
July 24, 2015 7:54 pm
Hi, just curious about what this little guy might be – and I do mean little – I could barely see him with the naked eye. It is maybe 3mm long, and was found on a gum leaf, with what MIGHT have been eggs embedded in the leaf. Or not. Thanks :-)
Signature: Ann Jeffree

Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ann,
This is a Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar,
Doratiphora oxleyi, one of the Slug Caterpillars in the family Limacodidae.  Many members of this family have stinging spines and there is a really nice image on FlickR.  You can read more about the Painted Cup Moth Caterpillar on the Butterfly House website where it states:  “Each shield bears four tubercles. Yellow stinging hairs are protruded from these when the Caterpillar is disturbed. These fold into triangular pockets when the Caterpillar is relaxed.  Along the sides of the caterpillar are fleshy spikes, like a skirt. There is also a flap covering the head. The spikes are translucent, and can be reddish or yellowish. The front pair are especially likely to be red. The caterpillars move like slugs because their legs are reduced.  The caterpillars feed on a variety of: Gum Trees.”  Though we have no shortage of family members on our site, your image is a new species for our archives.

Thanks very much for your reply Daniel. I’m pleased to have been able to send
you a new family member for your files. I will look out for a Painted Moth in
the Spring and see if I can add further to your database.

:-) Ann

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Subject: unknown bug species
Location: melbourne, Victoria, Australia
May 12, 2015 1:20 am
Hi,
I’m wondering what this insect is. I have found several outside my house. Do they fly? Are they harmful? What are they?
Regards,
Signature: Sharon

Flightless female Soldier Fly

Flightless female Soldier Fly

Dear Sharon,
Your unusual insect is
Boreoides subulatus, a flightless female Soldier Fly in the family Stratiomyidae, subfamily Chiromyzinae, and the last image we posted of this unusual insect was allegedly sighted in the UK.

Thank you so much for getting back to me. Very interesting.
Warm regards,
Sharon

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