Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Bulldog Ant

Bulldog Ant

Subject: an insect & an arachnid
Location: melbourne, australia; auckland, new zealand
October 6, 2014 4:22 am
hi folks! you helped me with a bug once before, & i absolutely love your site – hoping you can ID these two critters from my trip to australia & new zealand this month.
the ant is about 5/8″ long & was found on the great ocean road, about 170 miles west of melbourne, australia.
the 1/2″ long spider was found on my neck in auckland, new zealand. :)
the third ant i believe i’ve correctly ID’d as a bulldog ant, but the photo came out so nice that i figured i’d submit it, too.
keep up the great work, you wonderful people.
Signature: lish d

Unknown Australian Ant

Unknown Australian Ant

Dear lish d,
We love your image of a Bulldog Ant.  According to National Geographic Magazine:  “Fearless and belligerent, the inch-long bulldog ant of Australia uses her sharp vision and venomous stinger to track and subdue formidable prey.  Picture a wasp with its wings ripped off, and you’ll have a good approximation of a bulldog ant. The resemblance is no coincidence: Ants are believed to have evolved from wasplike ancestors some 140 million years ago. The bulldog ant has long been considered one of the oldest ant lineages. But some recent studies suggest that bulldogs appeared no earlier than 100 million years ago, along with an explosion of other ant species that may have accompanied the rise of flowering plants. ”  We are unable to identify the creatures in your other two images, and we are posting the unidentified and rather forgetable other Ant which one of our readers may eventually be able to identify.
  We will not be adding the spider image to this posting as they are not categorized together in our archives, they are not from the same country, and we don’t want to speculate if they met one on one.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant Lion
Location: Buderim, Australia
October 6, 2014 8:35 pm
Hi,
I just found this bug on our garage wall (under the house). I live at Buderim, Queensland, Australia. It looks like an ant lion or lacewing in the larval stage. It has debris attached to it’s body and when moved rolls up into a ball as much as possible. It is just over 1 cm long.
Signature: Stuthie

Antlion covered in debris

Antlion covered in debris

Dear Stuthie,
Your images are positively gorgeous.  We hope you don’t mind that we color corrected them.  This larval Antlion is quite distinctive in that it is covered in debris.  Antlions are related to Lacewings, and some Lacewing Larvae, aka Aphid Wolves, also cloak themselves in debris that is composed of the carcasses of their prey.  Those mandibles, those the jaws of death, do not seem what one would expect on Doodlebugs, a common North American name for Antlion larvae that await, buried at the bottoms of cone shaped holes, for all hapless ants or other creatures to fall into their clutches.

Gaping Jaws of a Doodlebug

Gaping Jaws of a Doodlebug

 

MaryBeth Kelly, Gwen Skinner, Kathleen Travis Perin liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Clear Wing Coffee Bee Hawk Moth
Location: Australia
October 3, 2014 10:23 pm
Hi,
I have got a couple of shots of this moth feeding, a tricky creature to photograph, these photos taken the other afternoon in South West Queensland, Australia, I had never seen one of these before but have found it is a pest in South Africa.
Some info I have about this moth.
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Superfamily: Bombycoidea
Family: Sphingidae
Subfamily: Macroglossinae
Genus: Cephonodes
Species: hylas (Linnaeus, 1771)
Signature: Pat Lepinath

Coffee Bean Hawkmoth

Coffee Bean Hawkmoth

Hi Pat,
Thanks so much for submitting your images of a Coffee Bean Hawkmoth,
Cephonodes hylas.

Coffee Bean Hawkmoth

Coffee Bean Hawkmoth

Jacob Helton, Château Bettina liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: please help me identify this bug.
Location: south australia
August 6, 2014 12:08 am
Hey. I was walking home with my friend today and we walked pasted a shrub or a ungrow tree and there was this black bug on it with white spikes. I’m not sure exactly whether it was a spider or an insect but when I wobbled the branch it kind of moved like an octopus. It almost the end of winter and temperature was about 17-20 degrees celsius if the climate helps. The picture I am showing might not be completely clear or from the best angle so I apologise. Hopefully you can identify this bug. Cheers.
Signature: molly

Steel Blue Sawfly Larvae

Steel Blue Sawfly Larvae

Dear Molly,
When taking images of bugs, it is best to focus on the subject and not the background.  You mistook this aggregation of larvae for a single creature, when it is actually a grouping.  We could tell the branch was some type of Eucalyptus, so we searched for both caterpillars and sawflies that feed on Eucalyptus, and we quickly located an image of Steel Blue Sawflies on the Australian Native Plants Society site, but sadly, only a common name was provided.  The site states:  “Another chewing pest that can appear in large numbers are steel-blue sawfly larvae. They do most of the damage to a tree’s foliage during the night and in daylight hours they gather into groups around small branches. If they are accessible at these times they can be removed by cutting off the branches where they cluster together.”
  Armed with that common name, we next located an image on the Australian Museum site where we learned a genus name Perga and the information that “The Steel-blue Sawfly can sometimes cause extensive damage to trees.”  Our third stop was the Museum Victoria site where the Steel Blue Sawfly was Bug of the Month in July 2012.  There we reinforced the common name Spitfire for a Sawfly Larva and we got the species name Perga dorsalis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any Idea?
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
August 2, 2014 5:13 am
Hey,
I found this 2cm big guy near a salt water river in Sydney, Australia. I have no clue if its a spider/scorpion thing or just a bug or whatever. I am not even sure if there a 4, 6 or 8 legs …
I googled a lot but cant find anything helpful…
(sorry for my english ;) )
Signature: Ben

Crab Spider:  Sidymella species

Crab Spider: Sidymella species

Dear Ben,
Your English is perfectly fine.  Your confusion is well founded.  Both Spiders and Scorpions are classified in the zoological class Arachnida, the Arachnids, so they share many physical similarities.  Insects and Arachnids, including Spider and Scorpions, are classified together in the phylum Arthropoda, and again, they all share certain physical characteristics.  With that stated, this is a Spider in the order Araneae, and Spiders are identified because they have two body parts, the cephalothorax (combined head and thorax) and abdomen, and eight legs.  This particular Spider is holding its two front pairs of legs together, which makes it a bit difficult to count.  The two front pairs of legs are considerably longer than the rear two pairs, and this is a physical trait shared by Crab Spiders in the family Thomisidae.  Once we got to that level of identification, we turned to one of our favorite sites for identifying Australian Arthropods, the Brisbane Insects and Spiders, where we found a very similar looking Crab Spider identified as being in one of two genera:
Tmarus or Sidymella.  The site author coined the name Peak Crab Spider ” because its abdomen rises to a dorsal peak.  Its two front pairs of legs are much longer than the hind two pairs.”  Scroll to the bottom of the page to see the Peak Crab Spider.  Armed with that information, we found other representatives in the genus pictured on Spiders of Australia, and the closest matches are not yet fully identified, and are given the names Sidymella ZZ477 and Sidymella ZZ592.  Those letter and number identifyers indicate that the Spiders have yet to be described in a published paper at which time they can be given species names by the describer.  This is a very exciting posting for us and we are featuring it in our scrolling featured posting bar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grub like – perth Australia
Location: perth, Australia
May 17, 2014 5:03 am
Hi,
Found 3 of these larvae/grub like thing in my back yard perth Australia. Don’t know where they came from had one first put him out in a grass area and the next day I found two more. Seem to have a mouth that retracts into the body when startled.
Its almost like a big caterpillar.
Just want to know if they are dangerous. Just got a new puppy so want to be safe.
Thanks graham
Signature: thanks for your help

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Vine Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Hi Graham,
This is the caterpillar of a Vine Hawkmoth or Gabi Moth,
Hippotion celerio, and it is perfectly harmless.  More information on the Vine Hawkmoth can be found on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination