Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Of the Strangest Appearance
Location: Gold Coast, QLD, Australia
May 24, 2016 5:27 am
Dear Bugman,
I was meditating on the porch today when I noticed a small orange object. It turned out to be the (exoskeleton?) of a strange little creature. I had simply never seen anything that alien looking in the insect kingdom so I thought it definitely necessary to send in a photo.
I’m on the Gold Coast, QLD Australia and it’s Autumn here at the moment.
Thank you very much, appreciate the site immensely.
Signature: Christopher Royce

Remains of a Cotton Harlequin Bug

Remains of a Cotton Harlequin Bug

Dear Christoper,
We can’t tell by the remains what killed this Hibiscus Harlequin Bug or Cotton Harlequin Bug,
Tectocoris diophthalmus, but we believe it was eaten by something.  The Cotton Harlequin Bug is a highly variable species, and your remains, like this individual on Flicker, are mostly orange while other individuals have a preponderance of metallic blue-green markings.  According to the Museum of Tropical Queensland:  “The Hibiscus Harlequin Bug sucks sap from hibiscus plants, bottle trees and related species. Its main foodplant is the native Beach Hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus). It is also a minor pest of cultivated cotton, a member of the hibiscus family Malvaceae, leading to its other common name, the Cotton Harlequin Bug.”

Thanks so much for getting back to me, you guys run an awesome service!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s in my sister’s roses?
Location: Sydney, Australia
May 21, 2016 7:55 am
My sister lives in northern Sydney, Australia, and is a photographer. She doesn’t know what beastie it is hiding in her roses but she’d like to! I have been unfortunately useless. Lots of people are suggesting earwig, but it doesn’t look like an earwig to me at all. Any help greatly appreciated!
Signature: Natalie Lyndon

Raspy Cricket

Raspy Cricket

Dear Natalie,
Though they often take refuge in rose blossoms, this is definitely NOT an Earwig.  We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae.  This image from Dave’s Garden looks very similar, and you can find additional information on the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “They usually spend the daytime in burrows or in leaves shelters. Both adults and nymphs produce silks by their mouthparts. They lay silk to line burrows wall or hold leaves together. Some build burrows or leaves retreats similar to those made by spiders.”

Fantastic! Thanks, Daniel. My sister will be pleased to know!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cocoon identification
Location: Melbourne
May 10, 2016 10:17 pm
I found this on my Magnolia tree today. I am in Melbourne, Australia. I am interested to know what it is. I have removed it from the tree. It is currently Autumn.
Signature: Regards Sharon

Bird Dropping Spider Egg Sacs

Bird Dropping Spider Egg Sacs

Dear Sharon,
These look like the Egg Sacs of a Spider.  We found a matching image on Museum Victoria where it states:  “Another interesting feature of this spider is its egg sacs. Bird-dropping Spiders can produce up to 13 egg cases. They are dark brown with black markings and, when suspended in the web, look like a bunch of dark grapes. The female keeps watch over the egg cases until the young emerge, usually in late winter to early spring.”  The scientific name of the Bird Dropping Spider is
Celaemia excavata.  The adult Bird Dropping Spider is pictured on the Australian Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bristle tail with wings?
Location: Northern NSW, Australia
April 30, 2016 2:19 pm
Hi,
Any idea what this is? Spotted at night in northern NSW, Australia on the 29th April. Approx 2.5 inches long.
Looks like it has small wings.
Signature: Martin

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Martin,
This Mole Cricket is a subterranean insect that uses its front legs to burrow quickly through the soil.  Mole Crickets are among our most frequent identification requests, and we get submissions from all over the world, not just Australia.  Some species are capable of flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fascinating Spider
Location: Fairlight NSW Australia
April 28, 2016 7:05 pm
Have been observing this little guy building silk bridges between our tables and chairs on the balcony this morning and wondered if i should stay calmly seated and curious or run around screaming and flailing my arms in the air because its a man eater. What kind of spider is it please?
Signature: Curious Mich

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Curious Mich,
Fear Not.  This Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae is perfectly harmless.  Jumping Spiders do not build webs in which to snare prey, but rather they jump great distances, pouncing on their prey.

Thank you so much. I will continue observing it spinning silk threads to build bridges between my balcony furniture at a longer distance. Appreciate your time and help.
Curious Mich

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this moth
Location: Ballarat, Australia
April 26, 2016 12:50 am
Hi bugman,
This moth appeared in my house on 1st April 2016. It stayed for the day and then disappeared. Could you please tell me what is its name?
Thanks,
Signature: Eddie R

Satin Moth

Satin Moth

Dear Eddie,
Why did you wait nearly an entire month to submit your images?  It took us a bit of time to identify your Orange Trimmed Satin Moth,
Thalaina selenaea, though we did notice several similar members of the genus on Butterfly House.  Not until we found this FlickR posting were we convinced our ID was correct, and we verified its identity on ipernity.

Satin Moth

Satin Moth

Thank you so much Daniel! I tried searching the internet myself but couldn’t find this Orange Trimmed Satin Moth. It didn’t occur to me that there would be a website dedicated to identifying bugs until a few days ago.
I had never seen a moth like this before and it also just happened to appear on my 10th Wedding Anniversary so it made it extra special because the colours reminded me of my wife’s wedding dress.
Thanks again and I appreciate the rapid response!
Cheers,
Ed.

Hi again Ed.  Thanks for letting us know about the memories this Orange Trimmed Satin Moth triggered for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination