Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
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Subject: hemipteran nymph
Location: Valley View, South Australia
February 27, 2015 9:58 pm
I found thousands of tiny bugs climbing my back fence from the ground upwards this morning and wondered what they were. I took the attached micrograph using a USB microscope. The background grid is 5mm squares
Signature: Geoff Smith

Possibly Seed Bug Nymphs

Possibly Seed Bug Nymphs

Hi Geoff,
Since these Hemipterans are immature nymphs, they may be difficult to identify to the species or genus level.  We believe they are Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae, and they do not look too dissimilar than these unidentified nymphs from Australia, and they also resemble these nymphs from California.
  Whenever a species appears in a heretofore new location, we suspect it may be an invasive, exotic, introduced species without natural predators.  The climate in California and Australia are similar enough that species from either location can easily adapt, so they may be native, or introduced, and since they look so similar to the California sighting, it is possible they are the same species, and that one or the other, or both, are introduced.

Many thanks Daniel
I agree with what you’ve said – interestingly the block behind my house has recently been cleared and the bugs are swarming all over the fences around this newly bare ground. They are all still there today and the ants don’t appear to like them, although I noted that a small spider had eaten just a few of them overnight. I accidentally squashed a few against my hand when I first noticed them and they smell unpleasant.
Regards
Geoff

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Subject: Strange bug
Location: Pyramid hill, Victoria, 3575, Australia
February 28, 2015 7:34 am
I have never seen anything like it! This bug looks like a bug cream coloured wasp! Please help me identify it… By the way i am in Australia, Victoria, Pyramid hill.
Signature: Abi

Katydid

Katydid

Dear Abi,
This is a harmless female Katydid, and we suspect you mistook her for a wasp because of the stinger-like ovipositor which is used to deposit eggs.  We are not certain of the species, but you may be able to identify it on the Brisbane Insect website.

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Subject: Grasshopper (?)
Location: South West WA
February 16, 2015 5:40 am
I have not seen this type of grasshopper (?) on my farm in 15 years – is it something ‘exotic’ or have I just been missing them?
I found two of them earlier today (Mon 16 Fed 2015) in a wisteria that is creeping over the fencing in my driveway entrance.
They seem to be able to fly quite well – and make quite a bit of noise doing it! The noise is what alerted me to their presence.
Thanks
Signature: John

Our Robo-Response
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can.

I have managed to identify the insect in the query I submitted earlier – it is a CRUSADER BUG

Crusader Bug

Crusader Bug

Dear John,
We are happy you identified your Crusader Bug prior to our response, and we are thrilled to be able to add a new Big Legged Bug or Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae from Australia to our archives as our existing images of the species are all of immature nymphs.  More about the Crusader Bug,
Mictis profana, can be found on the Brisbane Insect website.

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Subject: Is this a fan horn?
Location: Kununurra Wa
February 14, 2015 2:30 pm
So we found this fella in the washing up pile. We live in the kimberley region of WA and no one we knew had seen this before, can you please tell us some more!
Signature: Ben

Featherhorned Longicorn

Featherhorned Longicorn

Dear Ben,
We are relatively certain your beetle is a Featherhorned Longicorn,
Piesarthrius marginellus, which is relatively well represented on our site compared with the rest of the internet.  Your Western Australia sighting is beyond the sighting range reported on The Atlas of Living Australia.

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Subject: Unusual nest?
Location: Childers, Queensland Australia
February 14, 2015 4:46 am
Hello Bugman,
I was hoping that you would be able to tell me what insect this ‘nest’ might be from. I found it attached to my Queensland Lace Tree and I am intrigued by the intricacy and the absolute neatness of the weave, to me it is a masterpiece of engineering, it looks and feels like a ‘loofah’.
Any help would be very much appreciated
Signature: Cheers, Dianima

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Hi Dianima,
We are quite certain this is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Mantis.

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

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Subject: Beetle ID
Location: Childers, Queenslad, Australia
February 14, 2015 4:59 am
Hi Bugman
My husband found this bug, unfortunately drowned in our rain gauge after a heavy downpour, I wondered if you could tell us what it s called, I absolutely loved the vivid green markings on its back.
Signature: Cheers, Dianima

Fiddler Beetle

Fiddler Beetle

Dear Dianima,
This beautiful Scarab Beetle,
Eupoecila australasiae, is called a Fiddler Beetle because of the patterns on its dorsal surface.  We often receive several images of Fiddler Beetles from Australia each year.  Though you didn’t ask, you other images appear to be of the ootheca of a Mantis.

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