Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
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Subject: Smiley-Faced Bug
Location: Sans Souci, Sydney Australia
January 24, 2015 9:00 am
Hi, I was hoping you might be able to identify this smiley faced bug from Nsw, Australia.
Regards
David Miller
Signature: David Miller

Leafminer Beetle

Lantana Leafminer Beetle

Dear David,
This sure looks to us like a Leafminer Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, probably a Lantana Leafminer Beetle,
Octotoma scabripennis, which we found pictured on the Brisbane Insect Website where it states:  “Lantana Leafminer Beetles are easily found on Lantana. Their larvae mine in the middle layers of leaves and pupate there. The adult beetles feed on the leaf surface. “  We also learned:  “Lantana Leafminer Beetles are introduced to Australia as a biological control to the weed Lantana Lantana camara.  The beetle’s feeding activities reduce plant vigour and suppress flowering.”  The Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Biosecurity Queensland site has an excellent Fact Sheet on the Lantana Leafminer Beetle where we learned:  ”  Octotoma scabripennis occurs naturally from Mexico to Nicaragua.  Cultures of Octotoma scabripennis originated from Mexico.  The insect was first released in Australia in 1966.”  The Lantana Leafminer Beetle is also pictured on the American Insects site.

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Subject: Large moth caterpillar in Australia
Location: Canberra, Australia
January 22, 2015 4:05 am
Hi, we found this on the side of our house about a year ago (5th January 2014) in Canberra, Australia. It was a huge caterpillar, about 5″ (15cm) long, for size reference you can see standard house bricks it’s resting on.
Signature: Dug

Batwing Gum Moth Caterpilar

Batwing Gum Moth Caterpilar

Hi Dug,
We believe we have correctly identified your Caterpillar as a White Stemmed Gum Moth Caterpillar or Batwing Gum Moth Caterpillar,
Chelepteryx collesi, in the family Anthelidae thanks to the Butterfly House website where it states:  “This Caterpillar is a great hazard to people climbing Gum trees. Scattered over its skin are tufts of long stiff reddish hairs, which are strong enough to penetrate human skin. When they do, they are very painful, and difficult to remove because they are barbed and brittle. if one should lodge in the eye, it can cause serious sight problems.” The site also notes:  “It is also one of the largest Caterpillars in Australia, growing in length to about 12 cms. Some trees where they may be found most years in Leichhardt are known by local school-children as ‘sausage trees’ because the Caterpillars look from the ground like sausages growing in the trees.”  According to Zip Code Zoo:  “Anthelidae is a family of Australian lappet moths in the Lepidoptera order. It was previously included in the Lasiocampoidea superfamily, but a recent study resulted in reincluding the family in the superfamily Bombycoidea.”

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Subject: Locust identification
Location: Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
January 21, 2015 3:31 am
Hi,
I took these photos of a locust/grasshopper in a suburb of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia about 2 weeks ago and would be interested in knowing what it is. It was around 5-6 inches (125-150mm) in length. I was thinking it was a female spur-throated locust but now I’m not so sure as they apparently do not grow this big. Any idea?
Signature: Chris

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Dear Chris,
The profile image of this Grasshopper is positively gorgeous, and the detail in the hind leg showing the red spines is so technically excellent that we are also including a close-up of that significant detail.  We wonder if this might be a Giant Grasshopper,
Valanga irregularis, which we located on the Brisbane Insect site.  According to the site:  “The Giant Grasshoppers are the largest grasshoppers in Australia. They also commonly known as Giant Valanga and Hedge Grasshoppers. They are native to Australia. The adult size vary from 60-90mm. They are common in Brisbane bushes and backyards. We found these grasshoppers easily on every board leaf plants in our backyard. They eat almost all kinds of leaves. In the early morning, we usually found them sun-bathing on leaf. At that time they are slow-moving. After they have been warmed up, they jump and fly away quickly. Notice the spines on their hind legs, if they are caught by birds or by spider web, they will attack their predators by their hind legs.  Their body colour and patterns are vary between individuals. Usually adults are greyish green and brown in colours with black dots pattern on forewings. The colours resemble the plant stem where they hide.” 

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Hind Leg of a Grasshopper

Hind Leg of a Grasshopper

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Subject: chlorobapta frontalis
Location: Forbes, NSW
January 20, 2015 8:10 pm
Hi guys,
I found this little guy sneaking into my house, did a google search and found your page – http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2011/03/02/green-fiddler-beetle-from-australia/
I live in Forbes NSW and have just released it back into the garden. I just wanted to send you the photos i took.
Regards,
Signature: Bri

Scarab Beetle:  Chlorobapta frontalis

Scarab Beetle: Chlorobapta frontalis

Dear Bri,
When we originally created that posting, we misidentified this Fruit Chafer,
Chlorobapta frontalis, as a Green Fiddler Beetle, but we were corrected by Karl.  Karl always provides links with his comments, and we can’t help but to wonder if the links have been broken in the intervening years.  There is a photo on iNaturalist and a link from there to this lovely FlickR image.  Project Noah has the correct scientific name, but interestingly calls it the common name Fiddler Beetle, which is generally used to describe Eupoecila australasiae.

Scarab Beetle:  Chlorobapta frontalis

Scarab Beetle: Chlorobapta frontalis

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your reply.
Please feel free to use the photos on your site if you wish, though the quality isn’t great because i used my phone camera and didn’t want to harm the little guy by trying to get better shots!

Hi again Bri,
We really like your images, and we posted all three, though we did increase the contrast and employ conservative digital sharpening.

Fruit Chafer

Fruit Chafer

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Subject: Mystery Eggs – Australia
Location: Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia
January 17, 2015 11:50 pm
Hi Guys,
Found this under the awning on my back patio. Found another pic of this on this site from 2006 which hasn’t yet been identified (now 2015). Location – Coffs Harbour NSW.
Looks very similar to lacewing but in this odd configuration.
A fine hair/filament radiates outwards from each “node” and support the structure roughly 10mm from the surface. Another set of hairs support each “node” vertically, from surface to egg. Each filament looks as if it has “droplets” attached along the length, in the same way a spider leaves sticky drops along their sticky strands.
Please note, the eggs are solid white, with the filaments being transparent. All dark areas in the pictures should be considered shadows cast by the cameras flash.
Signature: Grey

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Dear Grey,
Interestingly, the person who submitted those Neuropteran Eggs in 2006 was named Grev.  Your submission has led us to an identification of Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs,
Nymphes myrmeleonides, thanks to Project Noah. There are also images on the University of Sydney Entomology page and the Brisbane Insect website.  The larvae of Lacewings are predators with ravenous appetites, and this type of egg configuration helps to ensure that the hatchlings do not devour one another as they must first climb away from the other eggs. 

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

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Subject: Odd bug
Location: Ringwood East, Vic
January 16, 2015 2:34 am
Hello bugman,
I found this insect in my lawn after it was cut. We don’t know what it is! Do you?
We live in Ringwood East, Victoria.
Thank you for your help!
Signature: Oscar Edwards

Backswimmer

Backswimmer

Dear Oscar,
Do you have a pond or swimming pool in your yard or nearby?  This is an aquatic True Bug known as a Backswimmer in the family Notonectidae.  Though they are aquatic, adult Backswimmers can fly from one body of water to another.  They are predators that feed on other small water insects and invertebrates, even feeding on small fish and tadpoles.  LIke other True Bugs, they have mouths designed to pierce and suck, and they can deliver a painful bite, causing them to be called Water Wasps in North America.  See the Australian Museum for more information, including:  “Backswimmers get their name because they are great at backstroke. Using their legs they swim upside down at the surface of the water.”

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination