Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Melbourne Australia
December 6, 2016 5:53 am
Hi have never seen anything like this before can you identify it for me
Thanks Kelly
Signature: Bug person

Green Lacewing

Green Lacewing

Dear Kelly,
Because both adult Green Lacewings, and their larvae which are known as Aphid Wolves, consume large quantities of insects, including Aphids, they are considered beneficial insects in the garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This has bitten my daughter. Is it a type of Assasian Bug?
Location: Canberra, Australia
December 5, 2016 11:45 pm
Hello, thank you so much for your help in advance. This has just bitten my young daughter on her wrist. It’s left a red bite that has swollen into a huge welt very fast. She certainly screamed and screamed so it must have been very painful.
I think it is a type of Assasian Bug but I’m not quite sure. If it is .. is that dangerous? Ive given her some bite cream to use and an antihistamine tablet.
We live in Canberra, Australia.
Thank you
Signature: Fiona Crispin

Ground Assassin Bug

Ground Assassin Bug

Dear Fiona,
This is indeed a Ground Assassin Bug,
Ectomocoris patricius, a species we identified on the Brisbane Insect website where it states:  “We found those orange and black assassin bugs running very fast on forest floor. This bug will bite if handle by bare hand. The insect has very strong front pair legs. All its legs are orange in colour. Its orange colour body and black pattern are the standard assassin bug warning colours. ”  This appears to be a wingless female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Funky disco boots Spider Karijini
Location: Karijini, North West Western Australia
December 6, 2016 6:08 am
Hello,
Camping one night in the out back in WA we pitched up next to a cool spider. this guy lived in a hole about 20mm diameter. When he plucked up the courage he sat out, on top of his hole guarding it like a bouncer at flares, he was out in the evening and had a really vibrant party suit on. white and orange legs and a snow white body.
Any ideas?
curious to find out and haven’t seen anything similar before nor after.
Signature: Tim

Wolf Spider

Desert Wolf Spider

Dear Tim,
We have one previous submission in our archives of a Desert Wolf Spider,
Hoggicosa bicolor, from Western Australia, but that individual is much more yellow than your individual.  There is also an excellent image on FlickR where it states:  “Hoggicosa bicolor is arguably one of the most spectacular wolf spiders in Australia. It is fairly common in the arid zone and can be found in WA, NT, SA, Qld and western NSW. This photograph shows a penultimate male, and as all other Hoggicosa, the male will turn drab with the final moult (see the other photo of a male H. bicolor in this set).”

Thanks Daniel,
Really interested to find out.
Tim Barlow

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ident request
Location: 33°43′S 150°20′E
December 2, 2016 7:19 pm
David,
2 years ago I was in Leura, a small town in the Blue Mountains just west of Sydney Australia, when I saw a number of these bugs on a concrete driveway. Next to the driveway was a small bamboo grove which seemed to be the source of the bug. The maximum size was about 35 mm but most were about 20 mm long. None had any feelers/antennae. They tended to move towards a persons shoe if one went within a metre of them.
It was 11 am in mid April which is mid autumn (Fall) here. It was an overcast day, not raining, but with high humidity. Leura is 90 km (55 miles) from the Pacific ocean and is generally at 950 metres (3000 feet) above sea level. The vegetation is lush.
Any ideas?
Best Wishes
RobT
Signature: Robert T

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Dear Robert,
This is a flightless female Soldier Fly,
Boreoides subulatus, a species with pronounced sexual dimorphism, with the males being much smaller and winged.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia:  “Female Wingless Soldier Flies are seen on walls and fences, laying masses of long white eggs. Larvae live in damp soil or rotting vegetation, especially in or near compost.”

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Dear Daniel,
That is wonderful. I have lived here on the east coast of Australia for 30 years and prior to that in Southern Africa also for 30 years and was totally stumped.
Hope you and your family have a wonderful Christmas.
Regards
RobT

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian wasp
Location: Hornsby NSW
December 3, 2016 1:03 am
My wife captured this shot in our front garden. I wonder if the wasp removed the huntsman spiders legs for transport purposes?
Signature: Australian wasp

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

We get several very dramatic submissions from Australia each year of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae with Huntsman Spider prey.  The female Spider Wasps stings and paralyzes the Huntsman Spider and then drags it back to her burrow where she lays an egg on the paralyzed Spider.  When the egg hatches, the wasp larva feeds on the living but paralyzed Spider.  It appears that your Spider Wasp has removed the legs of the Huntsman Spider by biting them off in order to make transportation easier.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe your Spider Wasp is in the genus Fabriogenia.

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is it?
Location: Sydney, Australia
December 1, 2016 3:20 am
Hi, recently after bringing in the washing a giant moth like bug rose out of my washing. I wish I had taken a photo. It looked nearly as big as my hand.. like a big mottley black/greyish moth type creature. It’s wings moved a bit and it walked around. It’s body was dark and very solid from what I saw. I was hoping for a few suggestions? To lead me in the right direction. I’ve never seen a bug like that my whole life. The picture I put with it was similar, but the one I saw was darker.
Signature: Tiana

Wood Moth, we believe

Wood Moth, we believe

Dear Tiana,
This is either a Ghost Moth in the family Hepialidae (see ButterflyHouse) or a Wood Moth in the family Cossidae (see ButterflyHouse) and we believe it looks like the Wood Moth
Endoxyla secta that is pictured on Butterfly House.  We did make the Giant Wood Moth our Bug of the Month for December.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination