Currently viewing the tag: "WTB? Down Under"
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Subject: australian beetle or bug
Location: Maryborough, Queensland, Australia
November 18, 2014 4:03 am
Dear Bugman
I don’t even know if this site is still running or tended regularly, so I will just send this and hope for the best.
I live in Australia, the land of Poisonous Things. I am wary of anything that looks like it might bite me, and this insect has me horrified.
It can fly. It reminds me of a weevil, but bigger – almost as long as an adults thumb. Hard, dark brown, shiny shell with thick legs and antenna. Long body.
And the most awful looking pincer type arrangement at the head.
It looked awful and I had my husband remove it from the house. I have never seen anything quite like it – can you help?
I have attached the clearest picture I could take without getting too close!
Signature: Warm regards, Carly Philp

Possibly Acacia Longicorn

Possibly Acacia Longicorn

Dear Carly,
This is a Longhorned Borer or Longicorn in the subfamily Prioninae, and we believe, based on images posted to BushCraftOz that it might be an Acacia Longicorn,
Eurynassa australis.  According to BushCraftOz :  “Found under eucalypt bark, with head protruding. Larvae live in dead wood of acacia species. Large beetle ~40 mm.”  Beetles in the family Cerambycidae have powerful mandibles, and large individuals, like the one you found, might deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled, and the bite might even draw blood.  Though a nip might be painful, it is not dangerous as the Longicorns are not venomous.

Hi Daniel
Thank you for the information. I just couldn’t find any details on a native species with such big pincers!
I really appreciate your email, and the time to look into it for me.
Cheers
Carly

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Subject: Bug in Dam
Location: Taggerty, North East Victoria, Australia
November 18, 2014 2:26 am
Hi there,
I was taking photos of dragonfly over my parents dam when I noticed this guy staring at me.
This photo was taken in Taggerty, (north east) Victoria, Australia. We’re at the end of spring but it’s been quite a hot spring. Never seen anything like it before and it was about an one maybe one and a half inches long.
Thanks for your time
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Subject: Bug In Dam Update
Location: Taggery, Victoria, Australia
November 19, 2014 2:03 am
I sent a ID request yesterday about a bug i saw laying on a lillypad that i’d never seen before. Well today i went back to take a look and i think it’s shed it’s skin?? Thought it might help to ID it if you get the time.
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Dragonfly Exuvia

Dragonfly Exuvia

After having had a look on line i think this might actually be a dragonfly nymph! i did notice what i think is a red dragonfly, yesterday i only noticed one red one and today there was definitely two bright red ones.

Dear Cait,
You are correct that is a Dragonfly Naiad, and your second image is of the exuvia or cast off exoskeleton.  Dragonfly Naiads are aquatic predator, and when the time for metamorphosis nears, the naiad leaves the water and climbs a vertical surface, like the grasses depicted in your second image, and there it molts for a final time, flying off as an adult Dragonfly.

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Subject: Dragonfly Love
Location: Taggery, North East Victoria, Australia
November 18, 2014 2:31 am
Just thought you might be interested in theres, i think they ate egg laying?
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Bluets Mating

Damselflies Mating

Dear Cait,
These are Damselflies, not Dragonflies, but your mistake is understandable because they are classified in the same insect order, Odonata.  When we have more time, we will try to identify the species on the Brisbane Insect website.  They are in fact mating and in the act of depositing eggs.

Thank you for the response, I’ll have to tell me parents what is living in their dam. They’ve let it go seminative so there are at least 5 types of frogs and so many more insects. I recently just bought the book advertised on the website and am starting to read it. It’s all very fascinating!

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Subject: What are these
Location: Byron bay australia
November 12, 2014 11:24 pm
These guys are absolutely everywhere in my garden. What are they?
Signature: Rob

Immature Red Eyes Bugs

Immature Red Eyes Bugs

Dear Rob,
We believe we have identified this aggregation as a group of immature Red Eyes Bugs,
Leptocoris tagalicus, that includes one winged adult, the lowest individual in the image.  We matched your image to images posted on the Brisbane Insect website where it states:  “The bug can be found on different type of plants. From the reference information, bugs in genus Leptocoris are seed predators of plants in family Sapindaceae. They are also known as Soapberry Bugs. This bug is common in Brisbane garden and backyards. They feed on plant seeds. Usually they do not do noticeable harm to the host plant. “

Thanks Daniel, I think that’s the one.
Rob

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Subject: Tiny mantis nymphs in Melbourne
Location: Melbourne, Australia
November 4, 2014 6:55 pm
Hello,
I found these two little mantis nymphs on a capsicum plant in my little boy’s veggie patch yesterday. They would have been no more than 10mm in length. I guess they’re juvenile Garden or False Garden Mantises, but I’ve not seen black/brown ones before, or ones with a curled abdomen.
My little boy is a budding entomologist, so we’re going to have a lot of fun watching these guys grow up. :)
(Apologies for the quality of the photos – I only had my phone handy!)
Signature: Jen

Mantis nymph

Mantis nymph

Dear Jen,
We hope to get additional images as these hatchling Mantids grow and mature.

Hatchling Mantids

Hatchling Mantids

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Subject: bug
Location: East Gippsland Australia
October 23, 2014 12:44 am
Gday, sorry to bug you man. Cool bug, spring time, coastal dunes, banksia closest trees.
Signature: Aaron

Wattle Pig Weevil, we believe

Wattle Pig Weevil, we believe

Dear Aaron,
This is a Broad Nosed Weevil, and we believe we have identified it as a Wattle Pig Weevil in the genus
Leptopius thanks to the Brisbane Insect Website.  You can also find images on Project Noah.

Probably Wattle Pig Weevil

Probably Wattle Pig Weevil

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination