Currently viewing the tag: "unnecessary carnage"
Insects are prone to unnecessary slaughter, be it from an overzealous homemaker who doesn't want to see bugs, or from a strapping he-man who is a closet arachnophobe, or from a youngster who likes to torture. At any rate, we get a goodly amount of photos of poor arthropods whose lives ended prematurely. In an effort to educate, we present Unnecessary Carnage. This page is not intended for the squeemish.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
What killed the Hanging Thief???

What killed the Hanging Thief???

Subject: large Mosquioto like thing
Location: Mobile Bay, Mobile, AL
October 10, 2014 10:59 am
Do you have any idea what this guy is? I would hate for it to bite me.
Signature: tonyh

Hi Tonyh,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, and members of the genus are commonly called Hanging Thieves.  We personally think that Hanging Thieves look much better living than dead.  Hanging Thieves are adept predators that take prey on the wing, and they often feed on large stinging insects like wasps.  Though we would not discount the possibility of being bitten by a Hanging Thief, we have never received any reports of such a bite and from all we have read, Hanging Thieves are not interested in biting humans.  Because it appears that this Hanging Thief has met with an unnatural end at human hands, we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage and we hope that should you encounter a Hanging Thief again in the future, that it be allowed to fly off to live a full life preying on other flying insects.

Thank you for the reply.  This guy managed to get into the bar at the local yacht club and a frightened member read a page of the local news paper to him.  Too bad since he is a predator of the bugs that pester us the most down on the water.  I will post the info from below to the yacht club web site in hopes of educating the membership and saving the next hanging Thief we encounter.
Thank you again for the info.
Tony Hines.
here is a link to the post on FB.  We will try to do better next time:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/48034636865/

MaryBeth Kelly, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green and red metallic beetle?
Location: Warm wet area/ texas
October 6, 2014 8:49 pm
I found this bug in my living room. It had a black body with yellow legs and the body color in a flashlight is a emerald color. I hit it really hard on the floor with a thick hard yellow pages book. And when I thought I killed it, it took off running really fast and hid behind my TV Stand table. I got this really powerful roach and beetle killer but the insect didn’t die and kept running until it slowed down 8 minutes later. Please help.
Signature: Brook

image too blurry

Here is a better picture.

Tiger Beetle, we suppose

Tiger Beetle, we suppose

Dear Brook,
This might be a Tiger Beetle, and in our opinion, these beautiful beetles, which you observed look like emeralds, are much more attractive alive than dead.

 

MaryBeth Kelly, Jessica M. Schemm, Dicoyta Di liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Michigan Funnel Web Spider
Location: Millington Michigan
October 4, 2014 1:54 pm
Will you please help me identify this spider for my sister? She was pulling tall-ish (around 2′ tall) weeds when this spider jumped at her. She told me that a thick, funnel web was located close to where the spider came from. I would like to be able to give her more information than “It’s a funnel-web spider sis.” . Especially since spiders have the ability to scare the bejeebers out of her! No one should have to go through life without their bejeebers. Thanks for your help.
Signature: SuziQ

Possibly Funnel Web Wolf Spider

Possibly Carolina Wolf Spider

Dear SusiQ,
With all due respect, we find it somewhat odd that your sister had the bejeebers scared out of her, but the spider appears to have died because of the encounter.  We actually think this looks more like a Wolf Spider than a Funnel Web Spider, and in trying to research its identity on BugGuide, we are struck with the similarity of its appearance to members of the genus
Sosippus, the Funnel Web Wolf Spiders.  BugGuide only has reports of the genus Sosippus from Florida and California, so we don’t really believe this spider is a Funnel Web Wolf Spider.  Our money is on this being a Carolina Wolf Spider, Hogna carolinensis, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Orange paturons (chelicera) and black around the the “knees” ventrally are characteristics of the species.(Jeff Hollenbeck)” and your individual does appear to have the orange chelicerae or fangs.  BugGuide also notes:  “Considered to be the largest wolf spider in North America.”  Large Wolf Spiders may bite, but they are considered harmless.  Somehow, no matter what we have to say about the harmless and beneficial attributes of spiders, we would not be able to convince your sister to attempt peaceful cohabitation.  If our suspicions about how this individual met its fate are correct, our Unnecessary Carnage tag is duly warranted.  If we are wrong and this spider met with a natural death, let us know and we will remove the tag.  

Possibly Funnel Web Wolf Spider

Carolina Wolf Spider we believe

This was definitely an “Unnecessary Carnage” incident.  My sister has been excessively frightened by spiders her whole life.  Thank-you for the I.D.  I have let her know what the result was and that she should not kill them in the future.  Hopefully she will just run away if she encounters any other creepy crawlies.

 

Gwen Skinner, Jennifer Smith liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this
Location: Warwickshire England
September 2, 2014 2:53 am
I found a bug in my home and have never seen this before , please can you identify it it was found in rugby Warwickshire ,on 31st of August 2015
Thanks in advance
J Powell
Signature: J Powell

Rove Beetle

Rove Beetle

Dear J Powell,
Wow, is Warwickshire a portal to the future???  Found in 2015???  This is a beneficial Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  According to BNHS YounGnats:  “There are over 1100 different rove beetles in UK.”  According to the Empire Pest Control site:  “This casual intruder is associated with the forest environment for the whole of it’s life, however they do enter homes seeking shelter. Common in UK around field and forestry areas. Are not known for feeding on regular household food stuffs. Despite their somewhat aggresive appearance they pose no threat to people.”  The description continues with:  “What this predator is really looking for are insects, small invertebrates. It also catches maggots and other insect larvae. Will also feed on old decaying forest mushrooms and escaping sap on tree trunks.”
  We don’t really want to know why your individual appears bent into an unnatural position, though we suspect Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying Scorpion? Panorpa nuptialis?
Location: Fort Collins, CO
August 22, 2014 2:30 pm
I found this yesterday in an old pot.
Live in Fort Collins, CO.
I am afraid I killed it, even though it bothered me to do so, but it looked somewhat dangerous!
Have never seen anything like this! A friend in Mexico sent me news of Panorpa nuptialis… “flying scorpion” but I am not sure it is enough similar…
Ideas?
Signature: mes

American Pelecinid

American Pelecinid

Dear mes,
This is an American Pelecinid,
Pelecinus polyturator, the only member of its family in the continental United States.  This parasitic wasp uses its long abdomen to deposit eggs underground in the proximity of Scarab Beetle Grubs which the larval wasps eat.  American Pelecinids are not known to sting, but whenever we write that an insect is harmless, or not aggressive, someone writes in to dispute us.  In our opinion, this beneficial insect was killed unnecessarily, and we are tagging the posting as Unnecessary Carnage and we hope that you will be understanding if you encounter another American Pelecinid.  This is most definitely not a Scorpionfly, which is how Panorpa nuptialis is classified.

THANK YOU for this post, and for the education.
I am generally not squeamish around insects (having lived 17 years of my adult life in Mexico) and I sincerely regret falling into the “ew” category with this American Pelecinid. I was feeling mother bear I think…
Thank you so much for the identification which I will post around to try to atone for having lost this one!
Thanks for the good work you do
Mes

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: El Paso, Texas – blocks away from the Rio Grande River
August 16, 2014 2:31 am
I live in the southwest. El Paso, Texas to be exact. i was walking up to my house which is very dark at night, i was dressed very lightly and immediately felt a web all over the front of my body. It was very thick. the thickest that i have ever felt in my life, more thick than that of a black widow. i quickly started pulling the web off of me which was very thick and sticky, was very worried it was a black widow which is very common in el paso. i used the light of my phone to light up a gourd vine that i walked under to find a large gray spider that i have never seen before. unfortunately i have elder people and children that would be walking through there shortly so i had no choice but to pray the spider which was the last thing that i wanted to do :( i am worried that this spider is dangerous. please can you identify this spider for me. it was larger than a black widow and had a huge web taller then me. i am 5-11.
Signature: Nathan D

Orbweaver Carnage

Orbweaver Carnage

Dear Nathan,
We are awed that you chose to “pray” in an effort to dispatch this harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.  See BugGuide for more information on these beneficial spiders.  Orbweavers build orb-shaped webs and a member of this family was the inspiration for the classic children’s tale “Charlotte’s Web”.
  Orbweavers are rarely found outside of their webs, and they tend to build webs in the same locations day after day.  Orbweavers snare many harmful insects in their webs, and noctural species undoubtedly kill numerous mosquitoes which we believe you will agree is a positive attribute.  Try to educate your visitors about the presence of Orbweavers on your property and let them know that these are harmless and beneficial spiders.  For the record, Black Widows do not spin such organized webs and they do not spin out in the open.  Because we believe this harmless Orbweaver was unnecessarily killed, albeit with prayer, we are tagging this as Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination