Currently viewing the tag: "unnecessary carnage"
Insects are prone to unnecessary slaughter, be it from an overzealous homemaker who doesn't want to see bugs, or from a strapping he-man who is a closet arachnophobe, or from a youngster who likes to torture. At any rate, we get a goodly amount of photos of poor arthropods whose lives ended prematurely. In an effort to educate, we present Unnecessary Carnage. This page is not intended for the squeemish.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornet? Wasp?
Location: Holly Springs, NC
August 13, 2016 1:54 pm
Dear bugman,
What is this? Found a nest, was stung!
Signature: Ouch

Paper Wasp

Paper Wasp

We believe based on the image on Dick Locke’s site and this BugGuide image that this Paper Wasp may be Polistes dorsalis.  This is not an aggressive species, but they will defend the nest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beatle/cockroach looking monstrosity
Location: northern new jersey suburbs
July 25, 2016 1:10 pm
Dear bugman,
Hello old sport was wondering if you could help me I.d. this scoundrel. Only have seen them at night, mostly seen flying into my garage from the outside. My brother says they fly sort of upright rather than parallel to the ground. Summer time in Northern New Jersey Suburbia. Checked numerous bug data bases of new jersey insects and came up empty handed. Thanks!
Signature: Gene Jefferson

Dead Brown Prionids

Dead Brown Prionids

Dear Gene,
These are Brown Prionids,
Orthosoma brunneum, and according to BugGuide:  “Breeds in poles, roots(?) in contact with wet ground” so they may be emerging from dead stumps you have in the vicinity.  They are also attracted to lights.  We are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage as these two Brown Prionids do not look like they died of natural causes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identify bug
Location: plymouth mass
July 17, 2016 10:18 am
Just wondering what type of bug this is
Signature: lara killen

Caterpillar Hunter Carnage

Caterpillar Hunter Carnage

Dear Lara,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, one of the Ground Beetles in the genus
Calosoma.  It looks like someone killed it, so we are tagging this posting with Unnecessary Carnage.  Many people kill insects with which they are unfamiliar out of irrational fear.  This is a beneficial species and we hope that should you encounter another in the future, you will let it survive to eat caterpillars.  Caterpillar Hunters are important natural control agents for Gypsy Moths and others.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen a bug like this in my 32yrs.
Location: Northern illinois
July 23, 2016 8:33 pm
At first glance I thought it was an ant….and so did my 3yr old who was freaking out yelling about it climbing on the chair in the house by her.
We live in northern Illinois. Its hot, and humid currently.
After killing said big I looked at it and realized its like no ant I’ve seen before. In fact I’ve never seen this bug before. I’ve searched the depths of the internet high and low trying to identify it.
I think it may be a beetle of some sort?
It is the only one we have seen here at home.
Any information you can give would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: Amber Johnson

Checkered Beetle Carnage

Checkered Beetle Carnage

Dear Amber,
This is a beneficial Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, and we believe we might have correctly identified it as
Enoclerus ichneumoneus thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  Of the family, BugGuide notes:  “predaceous on other insects, larvae mostly on wood- and cone-borers; some adults feed on pollen; a few species are scavengers.”  We hope that should you encounter a Checkered Beetle in the future, you would not allow your child’s “freaking out yelling” to cause another incident of what we consider to be Unnecessary Carnage.  We shudder to think of the carnage that would occur if every parent quickly dispatched every creature that ever caused a child to cry, be it a beetle, a baby deer or a person who might just appear to be different.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Shiny beetle found in my garden
Location: Galveston county, Texas
July 10, 2016 2:34 pm
I was watering my garden and this bug came out of the mud/dirt. It reminds me of a Japanese beetle and a grasshopper mixed together. I’ve seen two of the same kind of bug very close to my tomatoes and in no other part of my garden. Both times it was about mid-day (summer time) near Galveston, Tx. I just want to know what it is and if it’s bad.
Signature: All my thanks, Morgan

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle Carnage

Dear Morgan,
Not only is it beautiful, this Tiger Beetle is a beneficial predator that will help control the number of insects in your garden naturally.  We believe we have correctly identified this beauty as a Pan American Big Headed Tiger Beetle or Carolina Metallic Tiger Beetle,
Tetracha carolina, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Sandbanks of rivers, pastures, open, disturbed areas. Often found near water. Nocturnal, found under boards, rocks, trash, etc. during day.”  We hope you will tolerate this gorgeous predator in the future, but for now we have to tag your submission as Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Wasp ID
Location: Southeastern Washington State
July 9, 2016 12:32 pm
First time these 2″ monsters in South Eastern Washington State. Attracted to all bushes and trees, with or without fruit or flowers. attracted to water also
Signature: Tracey- Washington State

Western Cicada Killer Carnage

Western Cicada Killer Carnage

Dear Tracey,
No insect winds up on our Unnecessary Carnage page more than the Eastern Cicada Killer, because these solitary wasps are large and frightening looking, however they are not aggressive, and though a female is capable of stinging, they do not seem at all interested in stinging people.  You have submitted an image of the Eastern Cicada Killer’s western cousin, the Western Cicada Killer, and we don’t generally get Unnecessary Carnage images of the Western Cicada Killer because we just get far fewer images of them.  Like the eastern cousin, the Western Cicada Killer is a solitary wasp and it is not aggressive.  It was likely searching your trees and bushes for Cicadas because female Cicada Killers sting and paralyze Cicadas, and then drag them back to the nest they have constructed underground.  The female lays an egg on the paralyzed Cicada which then acts as food for the developing larva.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination