Currently viewing the tag: "unnecessary carnage"
Insects are prone to unnecessary slaughter, be it from an overzealous homemaker who doesn't want to see bugs, or from a strapping he-man who is a closet arachnophobe, or from a youngster who likes to torture. At any rate, we get a goodly amount of photos of poor arthropods whose lives ended prematurely. In an effort to educate, we present Unnecessary Carnage. This page is not intended for the squeemish.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: double winged, orange hornet?
Location: Massachusettes, USA
July 19, 2014 12:42 pm
Never seen this thing before. It has an orange body and legs. A yellow head with black eyes, antenae and half of the abdomen as well. The other half is orange. It has two sets of wings and burrows under ground. This one is exactly 25 mm long (one inch). Help identify!!
Signature: Devin

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Dear Devin,
This magnificent wasp is a Great Golden Digger Wasp,
Sphex ichneumoneus, and we can only presume that it is dead because of Unnecessary Carnage.  Great Golden Digger Wasps are solitary wasps and they are not aggressive towards humans.  As your email indicates, the female excavates a burrow and she provisions it with Katydids, Crickets and other Orthopterans to feed her brood.  This is a beneficial species and it should not be harmed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this thing I killed at work
Location: St. Louis, MO
July 10, 2014 1:06 am
this creature was flying around my head today at work. it must have gotten inside when a customer walked in the door. anyway, it flew like a wasp or maybe even a mosquito and it was about an inch or inch and a half in length. as soon as it landed where I could kill it, I didn’t hesitate. so I’m just curious as to what this thing is!
Signature: Nikki

Swatted Robber Fly

Swatted Robber Fly

Dear Nikki,
Even in its swatted state, this Robber Fly is a magnificent creature.  Robber Flies are beneficial predators and they will not attack humans, though they might bite if carelessly handled.  We believe your Robber Fly, a victim of Unnecessary Carnage, is a Hanging Thief.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a wasp or a bee?
Location: North Carolina
July 1, 2014 5:33 am
What kind of wasp or bee is this?
Signature: Devan Bodie

Flower Fly Carnage

Flower Fly Carnage

Dear Devan,
This is neither a wasp nor a bee.  It is a harmless and beneficial Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, a family that contains many species that mimic stinging insects as you can see on BugGuide.  It appears in your image that this Flower Fly was recently squashed, and since they are harmless and beneficial, we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looks like a crane fly but not sure?
Location: Denver, CO
June 8, 2014 7:28 am
What is this interesting looking insect? My mother in law found it in our backyard and stepped on it but it didn’t die just broke off most of the wings. We aren’t really sure what it is but someone said it looked like a crane fly. I couldn’t find any pictures of crane flies with the crazy long stinger things like this so that’s why we aren’t sure.
Thanks,
PS. We found it June 7, 2014
Signature: LW

Stump Stabber Carnage

Stump Stabber Carnage

Dear LW,
This magnificent parasitoid is a Giant Ichneumon commonly called a Stump Stabber because the female inserts her substantial ovipositor into dead or dying wood that has been riddled by the wood boring larvae of a Wood Wasp.  Though you were uncertain of the identity of the Stump Stabber when you first encountered it, and though it might appear quite frightful if one imagines that the ovipositor is a stinger, we are nonetheless tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage as we believe the Stump Stabber to be a beneficial insect.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug with long sting
Location: Hungary, Fót
May 20, 2014 6:27 am
Dear Bugman!
I have found this strange bug in my friend’s house in Fót, a small town near Budapest the capital of Hungary.
Sadly he has killed it, and took it’s head off for it to not suffer.
He was scared that it might be a tropical mosquito which came with a shipment of bananas.
Could you please tell me, what kind of bug is this, and if it’s any dangerous?
Signature: Tom

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Dear Tom,
This is a parasitic wasp, most likely an Ichneumon, and though it is quite frightening, Ichneumons are not aggressive and they do not attempt to sting humans.  What appears to be a stinger is actually an ovipositor, an organ that has evolved so that the female can deposit her eggs where they will hatch and the developing larva will have access to a food supply.  Your individual resembles the North American Stump Stabbers in the genus
Megarhyssa, and the female wasp uses her ovipositor to deposit eggs in stumps and branches that are infested with wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps known as Pigeon Horntails as the larvae of the Pigeon Horntail is the sole food of the larvae of the Stump Stabber.  Your Ichneumon looks very similar to this Perithous species that is pictured on FlickR.  Alas, the folks who post to FlickR never seem to provide a location for their images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: San Diego
May 16, 2014 9:26 pm
Dear BugMan,
What is this bug? He was FAST! Found him in an upstairs spare room. It’s been HOT here lately, 100+, not sure if that helps any.
Signature: Julie

Solifugid Carnage

Solifugid Carnage

Dear Julie,
Though it is an Arachnid, the class of creatures that includes venomous spiders and scorpions, this Solifugid is harmless as it does not have any venom.  That does not in any way inhibit the ability of a Solifugid to hunt prey, and they can help rid the home and yard of other undesirable creatures, including cockroaches and bed bugs.  We would encourage you to have more tolerance in the future and allow any Solifugids you encounter to live.  If found indoors, they can be trapped in an inverted glass and then taken outdoors by slipping a postcard under the glass to contain the creature inside.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination