Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified flying insect in Cancun, Mexico
Location: Cancun, Mexico
February 14, 2014 10:09 pm
Seen this insect in pools and crawling around walls. Haven’t actually seen it flying but it looks
like it does. Please help identify it. Thanks!
Signature: Bran

True Bug

True Bug

Dear Bran,
The best we are able to provide at this time is a general identification.  This is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but we have not had any success in providing a species identification.  It appears as though it might be in the family Lygaeidae, the Seed Bugs.  It is not represented on BugGuide which is devoted to North American species.

Thanks very much for the information Daniel !
Kind regards
Brandon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Guyana butterfly
Location: Guyana rainforest
February 12, 2014 5:46 pm
I saw the butterfly in the attached picture in Guyana in January. Any idea what it is?
Thank you.
Signature: KRB

Diurnal Moth we believe

Mantus Metalmark

We don’t believe this is a butterfly, but we do believe it is a member of the same order, Lepidoptera.  We believe this is a diurnal moth, but our famous search engine which begins with a G does not work as well any longer and we have not been able to find any matching images.

Probably Diurnal Moth

Mantus Metalmark

Correction Courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and KRB:
Although it does look rather moth-like, this is actually a butterfly. It’s a Mantus Metalmark, Nymphidium mantus, another of those amazing neotropical Metalmark butterflies (Riodinidae). The subfamily is Riodininae, and according to the Butterflies of America site the species ranges from Costa Rica to Venezuela & Brazil. Regards.  Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth id request
Location: Cancun Mexico
February 11, 2014 10:27 am
Spotted this cool moth near Cancun Mexico Feb 4, 2014.
Signature: John

Furry Mexican Moth

Furry Mexican Moth

Dear John,
This is truly an amazing moth, and we haven’t had any luck identifying it.  We are not dismayed, because we believe a moth this distinctive will be identified soon by one of our readers if we cannot discover its identity ourselves.

Possibly Lasiocampid or Megalopygid

Possibly Lasiocampid or Megalopygid

Based on our familiarity with other members in their respective families, we believe this resembles a Flannel Moth of the Megalopygidae or a Lappet Moth of the Lasiocampidae.  We are also going to try to contact Julian Donahue to see if he has a clue to the family.

Thanks Daniel
Some pretty good moth-ers are hitting a brick wall on this one. Surprising since you would think this beauty would of attracted some attention. I am not discouraged though. Thanks for your efforts.

What's That Moth???

What’s That Moth???

Julian Donahue Responds
It’s a lasiocampid. Don’t have time to picture-book it in Seitz.
jpd

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: orange caterpillar
Location: Lakeland, FL
February 10, 2014 12:53 pm
We found several of these crawling around on rocks. They’re very fast movers, but curl up if you touch them. They’re about 1 to 1 1/4″ long. We didn’t see them on any plants, just the rocks. We’re in Central Florida, inland and found them on 2/10/14. I’ve never seen anything like this before and after trudging through the interweb, don’t see any pics that match. As you can see in the 2nd fuzzy pic, they have black heads. He was on the move and hard to catch.
thanks for any help.
Signature: Cindy & Jim

Orange Larvae:  Caterpillars or Sawflies???

Orange Larvae: Caterpillars or Sawflies???

Dear Cindy & Jim,
We are very rushed this morning and our initial attempts at identification did not produce any results.  We are posting your photos as unidentified and we hope to return to this later when we have more time.  Meanwhile, perhaps one of our readers wants to take up the challenge.  We are not certain if these are caterpillars or Sawfly Larvae.

Sawfly Larva or Caterpillar???

Sawfly Larva or Caterpillar???

Thanks for your quick reply. We’ve never seen anything like it.

Considering your Florida location, this could easily be a new exotic import from a faraway land.

I was afraid of that. I feel like we should go hunt them down and hold on to them until we know what they are. We have too many exotics here.
thanks

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Salt Marsh Beetle
Location: San Diego County (San Elijo Lagoon)
February 4, 2014 6:04 pm
Dear Bugman,
I was exploring a spartina dominated salt marsh in southern California and found this little guy tucked within rolled up leaves of dead spartina plants. I was hoping you could help provide me some information on these guys.
Thank you!
Sincerely,
Signature: Shelby Rinehart

Ground Beetle

Beetle

Hi Shelby,
Your photos are quite excellent.  Thanks for showing so many views.  This looks like a Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae to us.  We will check with Eric Eaton so see if he agrees before we pursue trying to identify the species.  How large was this individual?

Beetle

Beetle

I don’t have the specimen in front of me, but if I recall it was less than 5mm in length.

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
This looks more like something in the Anthicidae (Antlike Flower Beetles) to me.  Nice series of images considering how small the subject is.
Eric

Ed. Note:  See BugGuide for more information on Antlike Flower Beetles.

Beetle

Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I’m pretty sure it’s in the stinging slug caterpillar family
Location:  Malaysian Borneo
February 6, 2014
Spotted Jan 2014 in Malaysian Borneo.  I’m pretty sure it’s in the stinging slug caterpillar family but would love to know more
Namaste,
Jennifer

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Hi Jennifer,
We agree that this is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  It is different from the individuals in our archives from Malaysia, and our web search did not turn up any visual matches.  Perhaps we will be able to determine the species in the future.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination