Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
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Tsingy Bemaraha Katydid
Location: Western Madagascar
April 10, 2012 6:45 am
Hi there
I recently found this on the Bemaraha plateau at the village of Bevero in Madagascar. Have you any idea if it has been seen before? A designation down to species would be appreciated if possible. What possible advantage could there be in this shocking green and pink combination? Your thoughts please, Thank you. Len
Signature: Len deBeer

Raspy Cricket from Madagascar

Hi Len,
We will contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can identify this species which is possibly an immature specimen since it is lacking wings.  We don’t have a theory on the advantage of the coloration of this Katydid.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
This is not a katydid but a nymph of a gryllacridid, also known as a leaf-rolling or raspy cricket. But it would be difficult to ID the genus at this stage as this is a very young nymph.
Cheers,
Piotr

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Lovely…but what is it?
Location: Maryland
April 3, 2012 1:02 pm
This one has me stumped. I’ve checked my Audubon guide and typed the description into search engines…so far, nothing that is an exact match. Location: Maryland.
Signature: Barbara Thurlow

Ichneumon Wasp

Dear Barbara,
This truly is a gorgeous photo of a beautiful parasitic Hymenopteran.  We were pretty certain it is classified as an Ichneumon Wasp, and upon browsing BugGuide thoroughly, we believe we have found a match in an unidentified species in the genus
Melanichneumon.  This unidentified species of a male Ichneumon posted to BugGuide also looks similar, but it is only identified to the subfamily level.

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Odd spider in the house
Location: Joplin, Missouri
April 2, 2012 4:12 pm
Hi Bugman!
I cam home from work today to find this spider in the house. More to the point, I found this spider attempting to crawl around on a balloon in the house, which looked pretty strange. I picked up the balloon with its spider passenger and let it go on the porch. That’s where I got these pictures.
The spider is fairly small, but very long and thin. Not at all the kind I’m used to seeing in nooks and crannies around the house. It has a brownish black body and a white abdomen with a design on it. I was unable to find any pictures on the web that looked like it. Could you help me figure out what kind of spider it is? Thanks!
Signature: Whitney

Unknown Spider

Hi Whitney,
We did a bit of searching, and like you, we were not very successful at finding an identification.  Your spider somewhat resembles the Orchard Spiders pictured on BugGuide, but we know that is not the correct identification.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist.

Unknown Spider

Thank you so much for your quick response! The spider does look a lot like the orchard spider you mentioned and the long-jawed orbweaver Bugophile mentioned in the comments, with some obvious differences from both. (namely the very dark coloring of the body)
I went out to check the porch and the yard, hoping to find the spider again to maybe snap more pictures, but didn’t have any luck. I instead found something pretty amazing. Ladybugs! Ladybug larvae seem to be crawling all up the fenceline and surrounding rocks, planting themselves and then hatching. It’s pretty amazing to see and the yard is already filling up with ladybugs. I attached some pictures to share with you.
Thanks!
Whitney

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Nevada. West Tech insect survey
Location: Wheeler Camp Spring in Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, Blue Diamond, NV
March 25, 2012 6:49 pm
This spider was among many on rocks in a riparian pool. Researching books and bugguide takes me to Dolomedes sp, a fishing spider.
If it is Dolomedes, can you direct me to a key to species for NV or southern CA?
Signature: Bruce Lund

Nursery Web Spider

Hi Bruce,
BugGuide has records of
Dolomedes Fishing Spiders from Arizona, but not Nevada nor California.  In the past, we identified what we thought was a Fishing Spider from Nevada, but Karl who frequently assists in identifications thought it was a Nursery Web Spider in a different genus, specifically Tinus peregrinus.  Eric Eaton has a nice profile of that species on his Bug Eric blog.  Your spider does look remarkably like a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, but we cannot provide you with any information on how to key out the specimen.  Perhaps on of our readers will be able to provide additional information.

Nursery Web Spider

 

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Help with ID?
Location: Mexico City
March 25, 2012 2:39 pm
I have 2 pictures of butterflies taken December 1, 2011 just north of Mexico City. I have been unable to identify these two.
For other views, please see

https://picasaweb.google.com/karlp17201112December?authuser=0&feat=directlink

Can you help?
Signature: Karl

Mexican Silverspot

Dear Karl,
We cannot for certain identify either of your Brush-Footed Butterflies in the family Nymphalidae to the species level, or even the genus level.  One resembles the common Gulf Fritillary shown on BugGuide in both wing shape and markings, so it may be a related species.  We are posting your photos in a rush prior to leaving for work.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to supply an identification.  One place to try searching is the Nymphalidae of the Americas website.  The link you provided does not work.

Brush Footed Butterfly, a Crescent perhaps

Update:  March 27, 2012
Thanks to some research by Bugophile who provided us with a few comments, we now know that the butterfly that resembles the Gulf Fritillary is a Mexican Silverspot,
Dione moneta, which can be verified on the NABA website.  Seems the Mexican Silverspot also feeds on passionflower vines as a larval host.  The Butterflies and Moths of North America also has some information.

 

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Some kind of Cicada?
Location: Carlingford (western sydney), Australia
March 18, 2012 8:49 pm
While out photographing some bugs in my backyard, i stumbled onto this guy sitting on one of my window sills, i have no idea what he is. Looks a little bit like a cicada, but quite a bit smaller (probably 1/3 the size?). I didnt get many photos of him before he jumped, and i didnt see where he went after that.
Signature: Paul J R

Treehopper

Dear Paul,
The reason this Leafhopper reminds you of a Cicada is that they are in the same insect order, Hemiptera.  We have not been able to find a matching image for your individual, however, it reminds us of the Gum Tree Hoppers in the subfamily Eurymelinae that are pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination