Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gem on legs
Location: Teresopolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
March 2, 2014 9:19 am
We spent about half an hour chasing this beauty with our camera, randomly shooting and battling the autofocus sabotage system.
It was parading on the main paved road of the Serra dos Orgaos National Park, Teresopolis.
The colours remind me of a pest beetle from my youth, an American import which was harmfull to our European crops during the 80’s.
But the form and texture of its shield are more complex.
Signature: LickaFoot

Stink Bug Nymph

Stink Bug Nymph

Dear LickaFoot,
This is an immature Stink Bug nymph in the family Pentatomidae, or possibly a nymph of a Shield Bug in a closely related family Scutelleridae.  We are posting the image and we hope to be able to provide you with a species identification soon.  Shield Bugs are sometimes called Jewel Bugs because of their bright metallic coloration.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant mimic true bug
Location: Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica
February 28, 2014 7:16 am
My husband and I found this early instar bug while in Corcovado NP, Costa Rica in February 2014. It was definitely mimicking an ant. It was one of the neatest insects we saw during our trip. Thank you!
Signature: Laura

Ant Mimic

Ant Mimic might be Peanut Headed Bug

Hi Laura,
This is such a strange looking creature.  We wonder if it might be an immature Peanut Headed Bug.  We have a photo of hatchling Peanut Headed Bugs on our site, but no early instar nymphs.

Thank you! It does look like an early instar peanut-headed bug! Interesting that the early instars are ant mimics. We thought it was an ant at first until we took a closer look.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Costa Rican moth no. 2
Location: Arenal Observatory Lodge, Costa Rica
February 26, 2014 7:50 pm
This is the second most impressive moth that I was unable to identify. Also at about 600 meters, Caribbean slope. Fairly large, wingspan was probably 2-3 inches, maybe a bit more. Thanks.
Signature: Ben Jesup

Unknown Moth

Unknown Moth

Hi Ben,
We are posting your unidentified Moth and we hope that you might eventually get an identification.  We frequently get comments many years later, and when that much time has elapsed, it is rare for us to be able to email back to the original querant with an ID, so we would urge you to provide a comment on the posting with any additional information that will be helpful so that the marvels of the internet will compensate for the shortcomings of the WTB? editorial staff.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large black bug in North Brazil
Location: North Brazil
February 24, 2014 5:19 am
Hello! I am really struggling to find out what species of beetle I have seen. It was very large (the size of my palm) but isn’t a titan beetle. It was black with very long antennae and sharp mandibles which the guide said was used to cut through wood, and it made a horrendous noise when it was picked up.
Here’s hoping you can help!
Signature: Poppy

blurry image of beetle:  Longicorn

blurry image of beetle: Longicorn

these images are too tiny and the detail is too poor to provide species information.  Do you have larger files?

Only the two attached I’m afraid – it’s really low res!
Sorry!
Poppy Riddle

Hey,
Might it be a type of root borer beetle? My friend has sent me some better res images of it!

Longicorn

Longicorn

Hi Again Poppy,
Thanks for sending the much better resolution images.  This is definitely a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and we are also confident that it is in the subfamily Prioninae, the Root Borers.  We are creating a posting and we will attempt a species identification, however, this will need to wait until later as we must dash off to work.

Root Borer

Root Borer

Thank-you! I think the fact it was found in Northern Brazil keeps throwing me. I don’t know of any that look like that in that area?
Poppy

Hi again Poppy,
It looks like it might be a male
Ctenoscelis acanthopus which is pictured on the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery and on Insects and More.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large NZ caterpillar
Location: Langs Beach, Northland, New Zealand
February 16, 2014 1:40 pm
Hi, found this today at Langs Beach, Northland, NZ. 60 mm long, approx 8-10 mm wide. Smooth appearance, ridged but no hairs, grey green, with yellowish stripes in the underpart of it’s body and also leading to a distinctive pronounced spike at the “tail” end. It doesn’t correspond to any of the large NZ caterpillars I know of because of the lack of other colours.
Signature: Marianne

Hornworm from New Zealand

Hornworm from New Zealand

Hi Marianne,
This caterpillar is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  We are not certain of the species and we wish you had included a lateral view of the caterpillar.  If you scroll down the page on the Adur Hawkmoths page, you will see an image of the Convolvulus Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Agrius convolvuli, that looks remarkably like your caterpillar.  The image is from Corbyn Crescent, UK, but this is a very far ranging species that can be found in New Zealand and Australia.  The Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic website has several drawings that illustrate the variability of the caterpillar coloration and markings, but more importantly, there is a map that shows New Zealand in the range.  While we may not have the species correct, we can assure you that this Hornworm is in the family Sphingidae.

Hi
Thanks so much for your very prompt reply!  I’m sure you’re right that it’s one or other of those. The one we saw looks pretty much like this (so far as I can tell from the website picture):
http://www.glaucus.org.uk/PoplatMothCaterpillar131.jpg
Interesting – we’ve never seen anything like it in NZ before (but then we’re complete novices on caterpillar identification!).
Kind regards, and thanks again.
Marianne

Hi Marianne,
In our opinion, your Hornworm is a different species than the one in the link you provided, however, both insects are in the same “pose” which may have acted as an influence for you.  Again, a lateral view would be helpful for identification purposes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 8mm Thornbush-Bug
Location: Limpopo, South Africa
February 13, 2014 12:25 pm
I photographed this bug at Mabula Lodge, Limpopo.
It’s about 8mm long.
It carries it’s tail, which looks like dry twigs, above it’s back.
When relaxed and no movement about the tail relaxes and gets let down behind it.
Signature: Johann

Subject: 8mm Thing
Location: Limpopo, South Africa
February 15, 2014 12:40 pm
Photographed this thingy at Mabula Lodge, Limpopo, South Africa.
It’s about 8mm long and carries it’s, dry twigs type tail above it’s back.
Signature: Johann Clements

Possibly Leaf Beetle Larva

Possibly Leaf Beetle Larva

Dear Johann,
Thank you for resending your request.  Though we have not been able to identify your insect, we can provide you with some information.  Due to the absence of pro-legs, we believe this is a beetle larva and not a caterpillar.  What you believe to be dry twigs is actually the cast off skin that occurs during the molting process.  There are many species of Leaf Beetle Larvae that exhibit this behavior, so we believe this might be the larva of a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  Is the thorn bush an acacia?  Knowing the food plant should aid in the identification process.

Hi Daniel
Thanks for the feedback, greatly appreciated.
Sorry, the “thorn bush” was only a name I gave the photo.
I did not identify the plant that it was on.
Thanks a lot!
Johann

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination