Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs on deer netting
Location: Northeastern Massachusetts
September 18, 2013 2:04 pm
Many groups of eggs have been deposited on my deer netting this year. I’d like to know what kind of insect they are. For size reference, the netting is one-half inch per square.
I live in northeastern Massachusetts. Groups of eggs were deposited throughout this summer. The photo shows one group, but there are about a hundred groups over 30 feet of netting. The colors are various shades of beige to medium brown. Several groups have either hatched or been eaten. I have been using using deer netting for 4 years, but this is the first year for eggs.
Thanks!
Signature: Pam

Eggs on Fence

Eggs on Fence

Hi Pam,
We can’t say for certain what type of eggs these are, but our initial guess is Moth Eggs of some type.  Perhaps one of our readers will have an idea.

Possibly Moth Eggs

Possibly Moth Eggs

More information:  The deer netting with the egg clusters is in full sun.  The netting that is in partial shade has no eggs.  Thanks for your help!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: scary bug
Location: campground in San Jacinto, CA
September 16, 2013 11:17 pm
found hiding under the rain fly of our tent
Signature: your choice

Shield-Backed Katydid

Shield-Backed Katydid

The sharp, upturned curve of the ovipositor on this female Shield-Backed Katydid is quite distinctive, yet we cannot match it to any photos posted to BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Spider
Location: Perth, Western Australia
September 16, 2013 12:02 am
Hi,
I would love an ID for this spider if possible – I think it is a Lynx spider, but having looked through various guides online, I can’t see a similar looking one? I found it on my cat’s scratching post on my verandah in Perth, Western Australia. Body length approx. 8-10mm.
It has an interesting mosaic pattern on the abdomen.
He was released unharmed after the photo :)
Many thanks
Tanya
Signature: Tanya

Possibly Male Orbweaver

Possibly Male Orbweaver

Hi Tanya,
The eye pattern on this spider looks most like that of the Orbweavers in the family Araneidae (see BugGuide).  The large pedipalps indicate this is a male spider.  The body pattern also reminds us of Orbweaver Spiders, so our initial guess is that this is some male Orbweaver, but we haven’t had any luck matching it to an images online.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with an ID.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Caterpillar – Australia
Location: NSW Australia
September 10, 2013 8:02 pm
Hey Bugman,
Came across this quirky looking caterpillar yesterday and have never seen one like this before.
I am in the Hawkesbury region of NSW, Australia.
The caterpillar is about 5cm long. Would love to know what he or she will eventually become.
I also have a video of him if you would like to see it, he is just adorable.
http://youtu.be/8cbvojLG5n4
Thanks
Signature: Tracy

Unknown Caterpillar

Sparshalli Moth Caterpillar

Hi Tracy,
We did a quick scan of Butterfly House, but we didn’t have any luck identifying your caterpillar.  We really must go to bed now.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist us in identifying your distinctive caterpillar.

Update:  September 26, 2013
One of our readers supplied a comment indicating this might be the caterpillar of the Sparshalli Moth,
Trichiocercus sparshalli, and based on photos on the Brisbane Insect Website and Butterfly House, we agree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Parasitic larvae explode from lizard a la Alien
Location: Gainesville, Fl
August 25, 2013 8:49 am
So my friend found an ailing lizard (Anolis carolinensis) yesterday in north-central Florida. He thought it might die, so he took it with him in some sort of rescue attempt. Anyway, he looks at it an hour later, the lizard was dead, and the small black dot behind the lizard’s front leg had exploded into a gaping hole filled with large wriggling larvae of some sort. It certainly appears as though they were trying to escape after their host had died. He knew I’m into reptiles, so he showed it to me. The lizard was quite familiar, but the parasites less so. They look kind of like maggots to me, but most fly maggots are in dead things, when these were clearly inside the living lizard and killed it.
Signature: lizard guy

Lizard with Maggots

Lizard with Maggots

Dear lizard guy,
We agree that these look like maggots, but we do not know of any flies that parasitize lizards.  We will continue to do some research, but we are posting your letter and photos in the hope that one of our readers can come to our assistance.

Maggots emerge from Lizard

Maggots emerge from Lizard

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’m guessing it’s a robber fly. Am I right or wrong?
Location: Little River, Va
July 28, 2013 4:46 pm
This is the first time I have encountered this insect.
It flew into our cabin & would not leave.
I was scared to mess with it too much because it looks like it could fight back.
After some googling, I am guessing it is a robber fly.
Am I right or wrong?
Thank you.
Signature: Heather

Robber Fly, we presume

Robber Fly, we presume

Dear Heather,
We apologize for the tardy response.  We spent a bit of time trying to identify your insect, which we also believe to be a Robber Fly, but we were unable to find an identification prior to leaving town for two and a half weeks.  Then time just got away from us and we never created the posting which we have now remedied.  We will send this image to Eric Eaton to see if he can provide any information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination