Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful bug!
Location: Las Barracas, B.C.S. Mexico
November 27, 2013 3:59 pm
Hi Mr. Bugman,
This beautiful bug was on the ledge of my kitchen window several nights ago. I was fascinated by his front feet which looked feathery or as if he was wearing furry gloves. I am located in the state of Baja California Sur, Mexico. Thanks for any info. you can provide.
Signature: Bajabirdbrain

Longicorn

Longicorn

Dear Bajabirdbrain,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and we are relatively certain it is is the subfamily Lamiinae. We tried searching BugGuide, but we could not find a conclusive match.  We will continue to try to identify the species for you.  Your individual looks similar to
Acanthoderes giesberti from Cerambycidae Species Details, so we suspect it might be a close relative.  We will seek out an additional opinion.  We simply cannot resist posting identification requests with such positive subject lines like your “Beautiful bug!” subject and we agree with you fully that this Longicorn is a comely specimen.

Longicorn

Longicorn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: Lalibela, Ethiopia (NW)
November 24, 2013 7:24 am
Found this beauty while on a birding trip to Ethiopia, specifically, in a field outside the town of Lalibela, NW ETH This last month, Oct., ’13. Elevation ca. 5-6,000’
Can you tell me what it is?? I can’t seem to get it to paste into your image spots below (other than to give address on my computer, which is no help to you), so I uploaded it to a Picasa Web Album and the following address should get you to it. I’m anxious to know and to send the ID info to my local guide there, who is working on bird and insect ID.
Signature: Romney Bathurst

Hornworm from Ethiopia

Hornworm from Ethiopia

Dear Romney,
This is a Hornworm, a caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, and we will try to identify the species later today.  It reminds us of caterpillars in the genus
Hyles.

Wow, that was fast!!!  Thanks so much – will hold off sending info to Ethiopia to see if you can come up with anything more.  Regardless, I do so appreciate your help!  Isn’t it amazing how such gorgeous caterpillars often turn into the most drab moths.  On the other hand, of course, this guy blends very, very well with his background – once we put him down in a safe place, we could hardly find him again!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Worms in Chile’s Atacama Desert sand dunes
Location: Atacama Desert, Chile
November 20, 2013 6:16 am
In the sand dunes of the Atacama Desert, near the city of Copiapo (Chile), I found strange lines near the crest of the dunes. When I looked closer I saw that some of them at one end were advancing. Digging with the finger into the sand I found little worms, not more than 1 cm long.
These dunes only receive some moisture from the coastal fog.
I was wondering what these worms live of and what species they are?
Signature: Gerhard Huedepohl

Mysterious Dune Tracks

Mysterious Dune Tracks

Hi Gerhard,
We have prepared all of your images for posting prior to doing any research, and we are not certain if we will find an answer, but we really wanted to post your request prior to leaving for work.  We couldn’t find anything quickly, but perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a comment with a link that helps to solve this mystery.

Dune Worm

Dune Worm

Hi Daniel,
thank you very much for this message. I have also tried to find information on the web, but without success so far. That’s why I hope really to find out some information with your help.
Lets see, if something comes up.
Best regards,
Gerhard

Hi again Gerhard,
You might want to post a comment to the posting in the event the answer doesn’t come for several years. 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant Beetle ?
Location: Balung River Eco Resort, Tawau, Sabah, Borneo.
November 18, 2013 6:27 am
Dear Mr. Bugman, I am glad to be able to return to this site again.
This time I have found a tiny ant-like beetle which I could not identify.
It’s length is smaller than 15mm. Could it be a Cleridae species?
Signature: C. X. Wong

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Dear C. X. Wong,
Your beetle does resemble a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, but we cannot say for certain that is a correct family identification.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to confirm the family and provide some more specific information.

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Possibly Checkered Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Insect
Location: San Antonio, Texas
November 10, 2013 9:56 pm
Hello,
I saw this little bug jumping around at my work in November. It was pretty small but it’s long legs caught my attention. I couldn’t figure out what it was. Let me know what you think.
Thanks a lot.
Signature: Arlyne

Katydid Nymph

Katydid Nymph

Hi Arlyne,
This is an immature male Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae, but we are not certain of any further classification.  We believe it is a Shieldbacked Katydid in the subfamily Tettigoniinae, but we are not certain.  We are posting your photo and we will try to get something more substantial from Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide information or a comment.  You can see some possible Shieldbacked Katydids pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Jamestown, Tennessee
October 10, 2013 10:56 am
I’m a high school senior this year and currently enrolled in a Biology II class. We recently did an experiment where we placed decomposing leaves in a mesh bag and let our leaf packs sit in water for three weeks. When we opened our leaf packs today, this bug was in our packet. No other group had anything like it, and our teacher could not identify it. Do you know what this could be?
Signature: Alex

Unknown Larva

Unknown Larva might be a Hellgrammite

Hi Alex,
Unlike your Biology teacher, we do not have a background in natural sciences.  We are very curious what this experiment was supposed to produce.  What kind of water were the leaf packs sitting in?  Was it distilled water or were the packs tossed into a lake?  Since the packet was under water, this larva must be aquatic.  At first we thought it was a Hellgrammite, but upon enlarging the thumbnail that was attached to the email, we realized that the appendages typically present along the abdomen of Hellgrammites, the larval form of Dobsonflies, appear to be absent.  The head of your larva does appear quite similar to the head on this Hellgrammite posted to BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our more knowledgeable readers will correct us, but we are still leaning toward this being a Hellgrammite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination