Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
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Subject: Petite, with long legs, seeks same…
Location: Andover, NJ
October 12, 2016 3:55 pm
I am hoping you can help me narrow this down to a family. Pretty certain it’s a crane fly, although quite a bit smaller than what I’m accustomed to seeing. This one’s body was about 1/2-3/4 inch in length. I was only able to get one view of it before it took off. It had landed on some hostas, but our property is surrounded on 3 sides by woods (hickory, oak, maple, new growth).
Hope you help me out!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Crane Fly we believe

Crane Fly we believe

Dear Deborah,
We agree this is most likely a Crane Fly, and it reminds us of the members of the Liminid Crane Fly or Meadow Crane Fly family Limoniidae, though we didn’t find any images on BugGuide that look like your individual.  For now, we are posting it as unidentified and we will attempt to contact Dr. Chen Young who is a specialist in Crane Flies.

Thanks for getting back to me.  I, too, was thinking Limoniidae, but was also unable to find a match on BugGuide or elsewhere.  Hope your expert will be able to shed some light!
Kindly
Deborah

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red, blue, yellow and green grasshopper
Location: Morelos, Mexico
October 3, 2016 7:38 pm
Hi. I was travelling in and around Mexico city and photographed this very brightly coloured grasshopper and wondered if anyone could identify it for me please. Found in tropical dry forest.
Signature: Andrew

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

Dear Andrew,
This is such a beautiful Grasshopper that we thought it would not be too difficult to identify, however, we spent a bit of time searching for its identity yesterday to no avail, so we are posting it as unidentified and we hope to elicit some assistance from our readership.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grass hopers of 3 different patterns in the same plant
Location: Peña de Bernal, Queretaro, Mexico
October 2, 2016 6:05 pm
Dear bugman,
This summer I found 3 grasshopers morphologically similar but with different color patterns.
The grasshopers where feeding in the same plant in central méxico, The ecosystem where i found them is shrubland with wet summers.
¿Do you know what kind of grasshopper this is?
Signature: Juan Sebastian Ramirez

Painted Grasshopper

Painted Grasshopper

Dear Juan,
The most colorful Grasshopper image you submitted, the black and red individual, is a Painted Grasshopper,
Dactylotum bicolor, a species that, according to BugGuide, is found in:  “Western Great Plains of United States (and southern Canada), southward to Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and into northern Mexico.”  It is the only species in the genus listed on BugGuide, and of the tribe Dactylotini, BugGuide indicates:  “Most genera included in tribe Dactylotini occur only in Mexico.”  It is entirely possible that all your Grasshoppers are in the same tribe.  We have not been able to locate a Mexican site devoted to insects quite as comprehensive as BugGuide, so we cannot say for certain if your green Grasshopper and your brown Grasshopper, which we suspect might be color variations on the same species, are closely related to the Painted Grasshopper.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with identifying your other two images.

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green mini ? fly
Location: Nayarit, Mexico
September 30, 2016 6:31 pm
I’m in the west coast tropics of Mexico. You published my picture of a tailless whip scorpion a few years back. I’m amazed by the diversity of new bugs that show up after each rainstorm down here.
Every time I show a new bug to a local friend, he just shrugs his shoulders (if he’s not terrified by the bug :-)) and says nueva lluvia nuevo animal!
Anyway, this one is the only example I have ever seen, so I hope you can let me know what it is.
Thanks!
Signature: Steve in the tropics of Nayarit.

Free-Living Hemipteran: Planthopper or Other???

Free-Living Hemipteran: Planthopper or Other???

Dear Steve,
This is a Free-Living Hemipteran from the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, a group that includes Cicadas, Leafhopper, Treehoppers and Planthoppers.  Though it resembles a small Cicada, we believe it is a Planthopper in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  We will continue to research its identity.

Free-Living Hemipteran

Free-Living Hemipteran

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Challenge to our Readers:  Help us identify this striking looking Fly

Subject: Giant Malaysian Fly
Location: Malaysia
October 2, 2016 8:03 am
Hi,
I’ve seen this fly on occasion and am unable to identify it. It’s the largest fly I’ve ever seen, around the size of a large deer fly, around 1.5 inches in size. Though I think I’ve even seen as big as 2 inches.
They have shiny, bluish backs, and about 1/4 of the end of their abdomen is yellow. They are generally slow.
Signature: Alex

Horse Fly, we believe

Horse Fly, we believe

Dear Alex,
We have not had any luck finding similar looking images online, but we believe this is a female Horse Fly in the family Tabanidae.  Interestingly, our searches did bring up images of a “gold butt” Horse Fly that was captured in 1981 in Australia and has recently been named after pop diva Beyonce.  According to Asian Scientist:  “A previously un-named species of horse fly with golden hair on its lower abdomen has been named in honor of pop diva, Beyoncé – a member of the former group Destiny’s Child.  AsianScientist (Jan. 13, 2012) – A previously un-named species of horse fly with golden hair on its lower abdomen has been named in honor of pop diva, Beyoncé – a member of the former group Destiny’s Child, that recorded the 2001 hit single, Bootylicious. According to the Australian National Insect Collection researcher responsible for officially ‘describing’ the fly as Scaptia (Plinthina) beyonceae, CSIRO’s Bryan Lessard, the fly’s spectacular gold color makes it the ‘all time diva of flies.'”  The site also notes:  “‘It was the unique dense golden hairs on the fly’s abdomen that led me to name this fly in honor of the performer Beyoncé as well as giving me the chance to demonstrate the fun side of taxonomy – the naming of species,’ Mr Lessard said.”  Weekly World News also picked up the story and notes:  “CANBERRA, Australia — A newly discovered horse fly in Australia was so ‘bootylicious’ with its golden-haired butt, that entomologists named it: Beyonce.  Previously published results from Bryan Lessard, a 24-year-old researcher at Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, were recently announced on the species that had been sitting in a fly collection since it was captured in 1981 – the same year pop diva Beyonce was born.”  Though your fly shares the striking gold butt, your individuals blue body and black wings make it an even more striking looking fly.  We hope our readers will take up this challenge and write to us with their findings.

Hi Daniel!
I appreciate the quick reply!  I did a Google search with the “gold butt” Horse fly name, and saw what you’re referring to.  It’s similar in appearance, but not identical.  I don’t know if that means they’re related?  The main difference is that the fly I found is completely hairless.   If you guys want, I can capture one (next time I see one… I see them once every few months) and send it to you.   I sometimes find them dead, and can prepare a specimen for you (if you let me know how. 🙂 ).
Thanks!

Hi again Alex,
Let’s let our readership attempt to identify your fly before we resort to capturing a specimen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp ID and damage?
Location: North East NJ
September 4, 2016 9:49 pm
Hi Bugman, love the site, always informative and always entertaining. I cam across this wasp today. At first I thought perhaps it was a sand wasp and the protrusion on its face would help it dig, but the more I did research, the more I think it was some type of damage it received, (Not from me!)
Any idea of ID and if this was inflicted damage or a weird clypeus perhaps?
Signature: Thank you!!

Unknown Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Weevil Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Do you have any other images of this individual?  Perhaps a shot of the entire insect and a dorsal view?

Hi and thanks for the response!  I have two other shots, all from the side. I could not get a front shot due to the leaf and I did not want to disturb the wasp. Not knowing what type it was, I didn’t know it’s aggressiveness or habits. I will say the wasp was alive and did move slightly but not much at all for as close as I was. Perhaps dying? I could not find any other damage, or distinguishing features. I hope I attached the photos correctly. Thank you again!

Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Weevil Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Thanks for sending additional images.  We wanted to get an idea of the entire body structure of this unusual Hymenopteran.  Though we have searched for some time, including using the word “cowcatcher” to describe what appears to be an unusually structured clypeus, which we needed to look up on BugGuide, we have not had any luck locating anything similar looking.  We do not believe any damage or injury is evident.  The symmetry is too perfect.  We have written to Eric Eaton for assistance.  We are posting your submission and tagging it as unidentified and we hope to get back to you soon with an identification.

Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Weevil Wasp with unusual Clypeus

You rock! And I didn’t get intellectual enough to try ”Cowcatcher”. I did however try bee horn or wasp snout.  😊 Thank you for all your help. I love a mystery and your help is very appreciated. I also wondered if there was some kind of parasite that crawled out of there.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
It is a species of Cerceris.  The females hunt weevils or jewel beetles as food for their larval offspring.
Eric

Ed Note:  Though Eric Eaton has provided us with the genus name Cerceris for the Weevil Wasps, we have not been able to verify a species identity based on the images posted to BugGuide which notes:  “The faces of females are modified with unusual projections on the clypeus and clypeal margin.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “Most Cerceris species prey on adult beetles, but some also prey on bees and wasps. At least one species, C. halone, preys exclusively on acorn weevils (Curculio nasicus).”  According to InsectIdentification.org:  “”Members of the genus Cerceris are hunters and gatherers of weevils and other beetles.  Females dig nests in the ground along roads or in areas with loose sand or soil like basevall fields, parks and beaches.  They compact the material and create cells where they lay a fertilized egg.  They fly off, in search of future food for their larvae.  Female Weevil Wasps bite their prey and paralyze them.  The weevil or beetle is then brought back to the nest and stuffed inside a cell where they will remain paralyzed.  A hatching wasp larva will immediately begin feeding on the living, paralyzed weevil or beetle.  Once the wasp has grown, it will pupate into its adult form and leave the nest.  This BugGuide image looks close, but it is not identified to the species level.  After finding this BugGuide image, we are going to speculate this is Cerceris clypeata.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination