Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
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Subject: Creepy centipede-like insect
Location: Cavite, Philippines
May 24, 2015 1:13 am
Hi! My brother found this odd looking centipede in our house. Definitely, this is not a centipede because it only got 6 legs. I tried doing some research but can’t find any match. We’ll really appreciate it if you can help us identify this creature.
Thanks, WTB!
Signature: Jop

Beetle Larva

Beetle Larva

Dear Jop,
Without doing any research, we suspect this is a Beetle Larva, most likely the larva of a Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae.  Carabidae of the World has some very similar looking images of a species identified as
Carabus (Morphocarabus) karpinskii.  This most resembles larvae of the Caterpillar Hunters, a group of large predatory Ground Beetles.  We have not had any luck matching your images to online images from the Philippines.

Probably Ground Beetle Larva

Probably Ground Beetle Larva

Hi Daniel,
Wow! It’s a larva. It must be a very big beetle then when it matures because this larvae measures around 2 and a half inches.
Thanks Daniel for your response!
We appreciate it.

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Subject: big crowd of caterpillars.
Location: Phuket, southern Thailand
May 16, 2015 4:08 am
Found these motionless near the foot of a tree. About 100 of them. they are about 2 inches/5 cm long and were all facing in the same direction. Though they were well camouflaged, a big pile if droppings below was a bit of a giveaway.
Signature: Alasdair

Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillar Aggregation

Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillar Aggregation

Dear Alasdair,
We found what appears to be a good visual match to your caterpillars on Shutterstock, but alas, it is only identified as a “blue spotted caterpillar”.  We believe your images depict an aggregation of Lappet Moth Caterpillars from the family Lasiocampidae, but we have not had any luck with a conclusive identification.  Several similar looking caterpillars identified only as Lasiocampidae are pictured on Thai Bugs

Aggregation of Caterpillars:  Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillars

Aggregation of Caterpillars: Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillars

Update from Alasdair
Dear Daniel,
Thai friends have identified it. Eupterote tertacea (Walker). Not much on the web and all of it in Thai. It’s a well known pest here – moves in gangs, infests and destroys sugar cane. When touched can cause severe itching.
Cheers.
Alasdair

Thanks for that information Alasdair.  We found a few listings in Thai with that spelling, including this Thai site, but there are more hits with the spelling Eupterote testacea.   We do not believe that is the correct identification.  We found images of the Caterpillar of Eupterote testacea on Insects of Thailand and they look nothing like those in your images, and images on Stock Photo appear to be an even different species.  An image on Guzjung Story does resemble your caterpillars.  Since we cannot really locate a reputable site with images, we are still classifying this as unidentified.

Wise decision!
Thanks for trying. Really impressed by the work you chaps are doing.
Alasdair

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Subject: Huge black funnel web spider need identification
Location: Tumbaco, Ecuador
May 9, 2015 11:23 am
This pretty spider lives outside my brother’s house (came with the house). She’s black and the size of his hand (+_ 8 in / 20 cm). He tried getting it identified with no luck. Any help identifying what type is highly appreciated and welcome! They call her “viper” and she’s the guardian dog 😉
PS: I was told it could be in the Dipluridae family, either a Diplura or Linothele. It looks a lot like the spanish funnel web spider except it’s 3 times larger…
Signature: buglady

Large Spider

Unknown Tarantula

Dear buglady,
The size you have stated seems to indicate a Tarantula.  Those spinnerets at the end of the abdomen are impressively long, and that is probably going to be a significant indication of the proper identification, though this image of an Ecuadorean Tarantula with long spinnerets from our archive has never been properly identified.  A close-up of the eye pattern would also be of tremendous assistance.
  Unless we hear otherwise, we are going to speculate that this is some species of Tarantula.  According to the American Museum of Natural History, the family Dipluridae is classified with the Mgyalomorphs, primitive spiders that include Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders.  Tarantulas can live for many years, so Viper may be with your brother for a long time.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the information I love your site :)
I’ll try to get my brother to get a close up of the eye pattern but I’m not sure he’ll be up to it as he is quite intimidated by it…
The image of the unidentified tarantula looks like a Linothele Megatheloides:
http://www.dipluridae.de/wiki/index.php/Linothele_megatheloides
Cheers!

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Subject: Lepidoptera Madagascar
Location: Masoala, Madagascar
April 30, 2015 8:11 am
Dear Bugman,
Besides the ladybug from last week I found a lot of other interesting creatures. Another one is this Lepidoptera, also from the jungle of Masoala, Madagascar.
Do you have any ideas? I was thinking in the direction of the Arctiinae (erebid moths) ?
Thanks!
Signature: Dennis

Moth: a Riot of Color

Moth: a Riot of Color

Wow Dennis,
Your image is a riot of primary, saturated color.  Our first impression is also Arctiinae, and more specifically the Lichen Moths in the tribe Lithosiini, and you can view numerous North American species on BugGuide.
  Our initial search turned up nothing, and we really need to get some sleep after a long, hard day.

Update:  We still haven’t located a species identification for this spectacular moth, and we are enlisting the assistance of our readership.

Christy Harris, Melissa Dilts, Tynisha Koenigsaecker, Kathy Haines, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Piroska Farkas, Jacob Helton, Jaye Ridet, Jessica Sory, Feelya Felicia, Lia Schae, Amy Gosch, Jessica M. Schemm, Anna Fletcher liked this post
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Subject: Confused in Alaska!
Location: Fairbanks, AK
April 27, 2015 7:18 pm
Hello! Hope your spring has brought all sorts of buggy critters your way. My son found the strangest bug crawling across the leaf mould beneath some willows. My first thought was, could this be a half-pupated butterfly? She had a body like a short fat fuzzy grub (I could see pale green flesh in between the abdomen ridges when she flexed), butterfly-looking legs that pranced, and what appeared to be little fuzzy wing nubs. She had a very tiny head with no proboscis or discernible features, only spindly antennae.
What is she?
Thanks for your help!
Signature: Rebecca Frenzl

Flightless Female Moth

Flightless Female Moth

Dear Rebecca,
What we know for certain is that this is a flightless female moth, and we have done considerable research, and though we do not have a definitive response, we believe we are close.  The Moth PHotographers Group has a page devoted to flightless female moths.  Our first research took us to the possibility that this might be one of the females in the genus
Orgyia, the Vapourers or Tussock Moths, and the Douglas Fir Tussock Moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata, is found in Western Canada, so we thought that might be a good candidate, but based on the images posted to BugGuide, the legs and antennae are much shorter than your individual.  Though images of flightless female moths can be difficult to find online, a look at the mounted pair of Douglas Fir Tussock Moths on Forestry Images confirmed our belief that it was not your species or genus.  We next turned our attention to the genus Lycia in the Spanworm family Geometridae, and the Stout Spanworm seemed like a good candidate as it is found in Western Canada, according to BugGuide, but alas, BugGuide only has images of males with wings pictured.  The Belted Beauty, Lycia zonaria, which is pictured on the Highland Butterflies UK site looks like a good match physically, but it is an old world species and the markings are different.  Except for the markings which are different, the Belted Beauty pictured on UK Moths also looks quite similar to your individual.  We are concluding that since the genus Lycia is represented in Canada by two species according to BugGuide, and both the Stout Spanworm and the Twilight Moth, Lycia rachelae, are reported from western Canada, that one of those species is most likely your flightless female moth, but alas, we had no luck finding any online images of females to compare.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had.

Flightless Female Moth

Flightless Female Moth

Flightless Female Moth

Flightless Female Moth

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Subject: Smurfapillar?
Location: San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico
April 27, 2015 4:09 pm
Hi,
I found this bright blue little guy in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico. I tried to look him up online, and couldn’t seem to find anything remotely similar. He was crawling on the ground in a high desert area where I was walking my dog and taking pictures of Prickly Pear blossoms. The area had been fired, to kill weeds and pests, probably in January or February. The grasses and weeds are coming back pretty well, now, but there’s still a lot of ash and charred ground. I took a bunch of photos, but the guy was moving at a good clip…head and tail going like crazy.
Thanks for your time!
Signature: Tabitha

Unknown Blue Caterpillar

Unknown Blue Caterpillar

Dear Tabitha,
Like you, we were unable to locate any images of blue caterpillars from Mexico.  We believe this is a moth caterpillar.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had regarding an identity.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Lesa Joel DeCuir liked this post
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