Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
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Subject: Giant Weevil
Location: Trinidad
April 5, 2015 1:47 am
This beetle was attracted to a light. It looked like a very large broad-nosed weevil to me, maybe 2 cm.
Signature: Steve Nanz

Weevil or Longicorn???

Fungus Weevil

Dear Steve,
We agree that this looks like a Weevil, though we have never seen a Weevil image with such long antennae.  That trait is more like a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  We have not been able to locate any matching images from either family from Trinidad, or any other place for that matter, so we are posting this beetle without identifying it and we hope to get a second opinion, and perhaps some assistance from our readership.

Unidentified Longhorned Weevil

Longhorned Fungus Weevil

Update
Cesar Crash of Insetologia, a Brazilian site similar to our own, provided us with a link to the Paraguay Biodiversidad site of the family Anthribidae that includes an image of Ptychoderes mixtus that looks identical to the image submitted by Steve.  A similar image can be found on the Coleoptera Neotropical site.  Anthribidae are commonly called Fungus Weevils.

Eric Eaton confirms
Daniel:
This is a fungus weevil, family Anthribidae.  Males of many species have really long antennae.
Eric

Thank you for the update and thanks to Cesar Crash for pointing me toward a possible ID. The descriptions for many in this genus are in German which I don’t speak. However I did find a key to some of the species:
Karl Jordan, 1907. Biologigia Central-America. Insecta. Coleoptera 5(6): 303
http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/583600#page/315/mode/1up
It appears that Ptychoderes mixtus is a good contender and may be in range. Ptychoderes rugicollis is also possible. Barcoding Life images show the latter with shorter antennae. There are no images of the former. So P. mixtus does seem like a reasonable tentative ID.
Best Regards,
Steve Nanz

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Subject: Which fly?
Location: Pune, India
March 27, 2015 9:39 pm
Hello,
I came across this fly on the bark of a Mahogany tree.
It’s got a single pair of wings and measures about 2cms or so.
Any clues much appreciated.
Thanks & Regards,
Signature: Rahul

Unknown Fly from India

Unknown Fly from India

Dear Rahul,
We do not recognize your colorful Fly, but we will post the image in the hope that one of our readers will be able to assist in the identification.

Thanks for trying Daniel!
Cheers,
Rahul

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Subject: On our burr oak, in Texas.
Location: Arlington, TX
March 27, 2015 10:49 pm
Hi,
My partner asked me to grab a picture of this and see if I could help him identify it. He’s been seeing these on our burr oak, here in North Texas, since the leaves started budding this week. He’s says there are “lots” of them. He seems to think they have been laying eggs, but I haven’t seen what they have been up to to confirm this impression (and, obviously, he’s not really a Bug Guy).
For the record, it is late March, and the weather has been warming up here for a couple of weeks. (it’s up to the 70’s and low 80’s this coming week, already.)
I have included both the closer detail crop, adjusted for clarity, and the wider shot for some idea of size. They are small, probably… a half-inch? Maybe? Those are very early leaf buds at the end of an almost twig-like branch that this one is sitting on. (Sorry it is not more clear, it was already evening when he asked me to take the photo.)
Thanks! I hope you can help us out!
Signature: Kelly in Texas

Sawfly, we believe

Sawfly

Dear Kelly,
We believe this is a Sawfly, a non-stinging relative of wasps and bees.  The theory that it might be laying eggs is valid.  The larvae of Sawflies are often confused for caterpillars, and if they are numerous, they can defoliate some plants.  We are going to continue to research this request and we are also going to try to get an opinion from Eric Eaton.
  The Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center website mentions “oak leafmining sawfly (Profenusa lucifex)” as an insect that feeds on Burr Oak, and though we could not find the species pictured on BugGuide, members of the genus look similar.

Eric Eaton confirms Sawfly and provides possible species identification
Yes, definitely a sawfly, perhaps Pristiphora chlorea.
Do you know how to do an “advanced search” in Bugguide?  That is often how I come up with answers for you.  Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the challenge of finding you an answer! :-)
Eric

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Subject: Bugs in Costa Rica
Location: Costa Rica
March 10, 2015 6:41 am
We saw these bugs on the side of the road in Manzanillo (Caribbean coast) in Costa Rica a few days ago (early March). I asked Tracie in Drake Bay as we did a tour with her but she said they are nymphs and without the adults around the chance of identification is slim. She told us to contact you. Any idea what they could be ? Thanks so much.
Signature: Sonia

Immature Hemipterans

Immature Hemipterans

Dear Sonia,
Tracie is correct, kind of.  Nymphs are often difficult to identify conclusively, however, these nymphs are very distinctive in color and markings.  Our initial gut instinct is that they are in the family Coreidae, and that they remind us somewhat of members of the genus
Thasus.  Our initial search did not provide any visual matches.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.  Cesar Crash may be able to come to our rescue on this.

Immature Hemipterans

Immature Hemipterans

Thanks so much for your quick reply, Daniel.. Please do let me know if you find out more. We thought they were very distinctive too and find it all quite exciting.

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Subject: Molting aquatic life form
Location: Lucas County, Ohio
March 6, 2015 12:37 pm
One of my volunteers found this insect (I think), molting in her collecting tub of vernal pool water in mid-July in NW Ohio. The pool is isolated, nowhere near a creek, pond, or lake. The attached pictures are 20x if I remember correctly (other option is 40x) and were taken in the field. We watched it struggle free of the larval skin under the microscope. The skin shape reminds me of a damselfly nymph. Could this possibly be the pupal form? I’ve tried to count legs of both larvae and the skin, magnify head shape etc, but I am still stumped.
Signature: Eileen

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

Dear Eileen,
We cannot say for certain what creature this is, but we have some thoughts.  If the tub collected rain water, any insects present would need to have either developed from an egg laid by a flying insect or been transported from another water source on the bodies of a bird or other creature that visited the pool.  This creature reminds us somewhat of an aerial view of a mosquito tumbler, the pupal form.  Most images online are side views, but BugGuide does contain an aerial view that looks similar.  We hope someone more skilled at aquatic identifications can provide some input.

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the reply. This was found in a collecting bucket, about a
quart of water taken from a huge vernal pool that has a wild egg bank
in the bottom of the pool when it is dry. I agree, it does resemble a
top view of a mosquito tumbler. It was definitely squirming out of the
nearby exoskeleton though, and the legs on that shell have spurs on
them – not found on mosquito larvae. It’s always possible that larvae
can get caught up in other exoskeletons as they’re wriggling about,
but in the one picture there are definite legs on the new critter.
Thanks very much for trying. I use this as an example for my
volunteers – there is always something new to be found in a vernal
pool and it can’t always be identified!
Eileen

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

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Subject: Pumpkin Beetle
Location: Thailand, Chiang Mai
March 2, 2015 8:01 pm
Hello Daniel,
thank you and you are right after searching for the name.
Here is something that might interest you:
This is an “orchid lover” … a real pest at orchid nurseries here in Thailand.
People call it “Pumpkin beetle” (Aulacophora abdominalis) but it isn’t one. Look at black legs and antennae.
And it’s neither Stethopachys formosa or Lema pectoralis, but close to them.
The bug and its larvae love orchid flowers, especially these of the Aeridinae group (Vanda, Rhynchostylis, Seidenfadenia and all of their hybrids), Dendrobium and Spathoglottis.
Regards … Ricci

Mating Leaf Beetles

Mating Leaf Beetles

Hi Ricci,
In the future, please submit new requests by using our standard submission form.  We realize it is easier for you to just attach additional images to a previous response, but it makes our postings so much easier if we are able to use the format of our submission form.  Thanks so much for sending us images of two phases of this Leaf Beetle.  We haven’t the time to research its identity this morning, but we are posting the images and we will provide additional feedback at a later time.
  We hope the eggs are not exported with the orchids because the introduction of a major orchid pest can wreak havoc on orchid nurseries around the globe as orchids are such a popular gift item.

Leaf Beetle Larva

Leaf Beetle Larva

Update:  March 4, 2015
We did locate this similar search for an identification on the Dokmai Dogma Drama In The Orchid Nursery posting.

Hi Daniel,
the orchid nurseries that export their plants use so much poison (most of it is forbidden in Europe) … no egg or Beetle will survive this.
When I asked a friend who own a nursery about this beetle, she answered:
“For bug (Pumpkin beetle) use Dicrotophos and Sticking Agent spray 5 days per time. And larva use Abamectin and Sticking Agent.”
Abamectin and Dicrotophos are highly toxic and dangerous for the environment.
Btw.:
– In Australia the black and yellow Dendrobium beetle (Stethopachys formosa) is a pest in orchid nurseries.
– Lema pectoralis has been reported from orchid nurseries in Thailand.

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