Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
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Subject: please identify this monster insect
Location: Hetauda, Central Region, Nepal
July 21, 2015 11:00 am
Hi I shot this today evening on my garden. it has two huge muscular rear legs. (my english is so poor i can’t explain it further please see the pic). from Nepal. thank you.
Signature: Suman Acharya

Big Legged Bug

Big Legged Bug

Dear Suman,
Your English is perfectly descriptive.  This is a member of the family Coreidae, and some common English names for members of the family include Big Legged Bug, Leaf Footed Bug, Flag Footed Bug or Twig Wilter.  Many members of the family have greatly exaggerated tibiae on the hind legs which is apparent in several of the common names.  Members of the family have sucking mouthparts that they use to obtain nourishment from plants.  Alas, tried though we did, we were unable to locate a species identification for your magnificent looking Big Legged Bug, and we hope our readership might be able to provide some assistance.  We did locate this similar looking species on the India Biodiversity Portal.

Big Legged Bug

Big Legged Bug

 

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Subject: What are these?
Location: Elwood, IL
July 13, 2015 6:10 am
I found these caterpillar/larva on my dill and am not able to identify them. Can you help? I have swallowtaill caterpillars on my dill and am hoping these won’t kill the caterpillars.
Signature: Penny

Unknown Caterpillars on Dill

Unknown Caterpillars on Dill

Dear Penny,
We are still working on this identification.  The internet is filled with Black Swallowtail Caterpillars feeding on dill, but we are having problems identifying your caterpillars.  They remind us of the Sophora Worm, but we cannot find any record of them feeding on dill, their diet being confined to members of the legume family.  We suspect this is some species of moth, and we don’t believe you need to worry about them killing Swallowtail caterpillars.

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Subject: Burrowing spider black/orange
Location: Albany, TX
July 17, 2015 12:31 pm
I found this spider with a 1′ deep burrow in a dry rocky soils area. I am unsure what spider it is as I have never seen it before
Thanks so much!
Signature: Jonathan

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Jonathan,
This is one gorgeous and impressive Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae, but we cannot be certain of the exact species.  We are leaning toward a member of the Burrowing Wolf Spider genus
Geolycosa which is well represented on BugGuide.  There is an image on the Arco Digital Images site from Wolfsspinne, Texas that looks very similar to your individual.  We also found a very entertaining posting on the Bugs In The News website from Harker Heights, Texas, and the author indicates that Geolycosa is a possible identification.  We would not discount the possibility that this is a member of the genus Hogna either.  Perhaps one of our readers can assist with this identification.

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

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Subject: wasp or bee or something else??
Location: rochdale england
June 26, 2015 6:39 am
never seen one of these…cant find any pictures on the web!! what is it please??
Signature: gary b

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Dear Gary,
This looks to us like some species of Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, and we discovered a British Hoverflies site.  The closest match we could find on the site is a member of the genus
Eristalis, but nothing looks exactly right.  If you find a closer match, please let us know so we can correct the posting.

Update:  July 4, 2015
We received a comment that Volucella pellucens was a good match, and this image on the British Hoverflies site supports that possibility.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unique Insect
Location: Western India
June 3, 2015 11:19 am
Today evening, I spotted am extremely unique insect in my apartment. Due to there being a forested area near my residence, insects are frequently visitors.
However I have never seen anything like this before. I have been unable to locate anything similar online.
I would like to bring your attention to it. It may be an undiscovered species.
The insect was roughly 5 cm long. It was not moving, even when I blew air on it. When I picked it up using a piece of paper, if clung to it. I dropped him back into the forested area.
I would really like if you could identify it for me. Looking forward to hearing from you.
Signature: PD

Unknown Weevil

Unknown Weevil

Dear PD,
This is some species of Weevil, a member of a very large family of beetles.  We tried unsuccessfully to identify it online, and we hope to get some assistance from our readership, but we are postdating this submission to go live in mid June while we are out of the office.

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Subject: Wasp?
Location: Tokyo
June 10, 2015 6:25 am
Hello Bugman,
I’ve searching the internet for two hours trying to ID this bug but I can’t find it at all…
I found it in the playground where my 2 year old loves to play everyday but now Im not sure if I should let her play there anymore!
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: Paula

Clearwing Moth from Japan

Clearwing Moth from Japan

Dear Paula,
Though we have not been able to determine the species, this is a Clearwing Moth in the family Sesiidae, a family with many members that mimic stinging wasps as a defense.  This individual is not pictured in the Clearwing Moths of Japan pdf we located, and it also bears an uncanny resemblance to the female Peach Tree Borer,
Synanthedon exitiosa,  a species that is native to North America and an excellent example of pronounced sexual dimorphism.  We cannot at this time determine if this is a species native to Japan, or if the North American Peach Tree Borer has been accidentally introduced to Japan.  This moth poses no threat to your daughter.

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