Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Parasitic larvae explode from lizard a la Alien
Location: Gainesville, Fl
August 25, 2013 8:49 am
So my friend found an ailing lizard (Anolis carolinensis) yesterday in north-central Florida. He thought it might die, so he took it with him in some sort of rescue attempt. Anyway, he looks at it an hour later, the lizard was dead, and the small black dot behind the lizard’s front leg had exploded into a gaping hole filled with large wriggling larvae of some sort. It certainly appears as though they were trying to escape after their host had died. He knew I’m into reptiles, so he showed it to me. The lizard was quite familiar, but the parasites less so. They look kind of like maggots to me, but most fly maggots are in dead things, when these were clearly inside the living lizard and killed it.
Signature: lizard guy

Lizard with Maggots

Lizard with Maggots

Dear lizard guy,
We agree that these look like maggots, but we do not know of any flies that parasitize lizards.  We will continue to do some research, but we are posting your letter and photos in the hope that one of our readers can come to our assistance.

Maggots emerge from Lizard

Maggots emerge from Lizard

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’m guessing it’s a robber fly. Am I right or wrong?
Location: Little River, Va
July 28, 2013 4:46 pm
This is the first time I have encountered this insect.
It flew into our cabin & would not leave.
I was scared to mess with it too much because it looks like it could fight back.
After some googling, I am guessing it is a robber fly.
Am I right or wrong?
Thank you.
Signature: Heather

Robber Fly, we presume

Robber Fly, we presume

Dear Heather,
We apologize for the tardy response.  We spent a bit of time trying to identify your insect, which we also believe to be a Robber Fly, but we were unable to find an identification prior to leaving town for two and a half weeks.  Then time just got away from us and we never created the posting which we have now remedied.  We will send this image to Eric Eaton to see if he can provide any information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a fly?
Location: Western Washington state
July 8, 2013 4:13 pm
If so, I can’t seem to find it under North American flies. It certainly wasn’t skiddish like regular flies, as I held the phone not more than a foot from it. Nor did my movement scare it.
Thanks in advance.
-Chris
Signature: Chris

Possibly Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Hi Chris,
This is a true Fly, and it reminds us of a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, but we are unable to find a matching image on BugGuide.  We are seeking assistance from Eric Eaton on this ID.

Eric Eaton Concurs
Daniel:
It is indeed a bee fly, probably a species of Villa, though I’m not a certified expert on that family.
Eric

Without finding a common name for it, I did find out via google that it
is  indigenous to the PNW, though very difficult to find on the net with
maybe two photos. Though I’m not into entomology, I feel very fortunate
to have seen and photograph this elusive creature. Thanks for your help.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown (to me) bugs 1,2,3
Location: hungary, south shore of lake balaton
July 7, 2013 12:07 am
hallo,
1 – this brown-winged thing populates my willow tree in may. what is it and is it harmful to fruit trees e.g. cherry, plum, apricot, pear? or is it harmful to anything else?

Unknown Scarab

Cockchafer

2 – this ladybird-like thing – is it a ladybird and does it damage my grapes or anything else?

Unknown Beetle

Leaf Beetle:  Clytra quadripunctata

3 – found this in wood i was about to chop up
i like bugs and i have a redstart with babies at the moment so i do not want to destroy anything he might want to eat, am just curious about the critters. i can look them up on the net once i know what they are called.
thanks
sue
Signature: sue

Unknown Longicorn

Longicorn:  Cerambyx scopolii

Hi Sue,
Beetle #1 is a Scarab in the family Scarabidae, but we do not know the species.  Beetle #3 is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but we do not know the species.  Beetle #2 is striking in color and markings, but we cannot determine its family.  It somewhat resembles the Pleasing Fungus Beetles in the family Erotylidae, but your photo does not reveal enough of the physical characteristics to be certain. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Modernist Bug
Location: Vail, AZ
July 4, 2013 11:28 am
This is the first of this kind I have noticed. Was photographed on the Arizona Trail near Three Bridges. Landed in front of me like a grasshopper.
Signature: Carl

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Hi Carl,
This is a Robber Fly and your individual is one impressive looking predator.  We are not certain of the species, but it does resemble members on the genus
Polacantha pictured on BugGuide where the information provided states that Polacantha arctuata is found in Arizona.  All of the photos on BugGuide of the species are males and we cannot locate any photos of females.  We believe your Robber Fly is a female.  We cannot locate any other images of Polacantha arctuata on the internet.  Your individual appears to lack the striped abdomen found on Promachus sackeni which is pictured on BugGuide.  While we cannot be certain of the species, we can tell you that Robber Flies are very adept predators and they often take large winged prey in flight.  Many species feed on large bees and wasps.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with a species identification.

Wow! Thank you!

Eric Eaton Responds to our request
Daniel:
Eric Fisher is the go-to person for robber flies.  I’m sorry, I don’t have his e-mail address in my contact file….
This one appears to be a male in the genus Proctacanthus, if I know anything at all (which is sometimes suspect with asilids!).
Eric 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: yes
June 30, 2013 11:04 am
I live in Winnipeg Manitoba and I found this Beetle on our
garage this morning. I took a snap shot of the insect I haven’t
had time to take a proper photo of the insect so far. I used my
Nikon D3100 & SB-400 flash with TTL cord & my 40mm f2.8
micro lens.
Signature: Normally ?

Longhorned Borer, we believe

Longhorned Borer:  Stenocorus schaumii

Dear Normally ?,
We believe this is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we are not certain.  We base that guess on the width of the elytry at the base as well as the spine on the thorax.  We have not been able to locate a species identification and we hope our readership can assist.

Update
Thanks to a comment from Mardikavana, we now agree that this looks like the Cerambycid
Stenocorus schaumii which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination