Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Kind of Flea is This?
Location: Ontario Canada
January 22, 2013 11:45 am
Hi, we’ve had a flea issue lately although our cats do not go outside. My cats have been given advantage twice since December 15th and I vacuum almost every day. I’ve been unsuccessful at finding fleas on them. But it seems like we have two different kinds of fleas going on.
I’ve found a few on chairs that jump and appear to be cat fleas. They are small and dark brown and are very fast.
But every now and then I will get a bite and take my shirt or pants off and find a litter brown flea that doesn’t crawl as fast and doesn’t jump away when I try to catch it! Very disgusting to find a flea in your pants! I inspects my clothes every time I put them on and don’t see any on our beds. I wear white socks and never do I have any on them. It’s not like they are jumping all over us but every now and then there’s one biting me or my son but not my husband!
Could this be a squirrel flea?
Signature: Ali

Flea

Dear Ali,
We apologize.  Despite your excellent photomicroscopy, we haven’t the necessary skills to properly identify your Flea to differentiate it from other Fleas.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this matter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need insect identified
Location: East London, Eastern Cape, south Africa
January 14, 2013 3:51 am
Hi there!
I’m a huge entymology enthusiast, and I’ve been doing some photography and research of insects around my garden
I found this bizarre insect on a a lemon tree, it’s the middle of summer here, and I’m in East London South Africa
The weather was overcast, and after I got these two decent pictures, it started to rain. I would appreciate any help with regards to what this thing is, name, family, anything, my insect guide has no information on it, and I can’t find anything on Google as I have no leads. Thanks in advance!!
Signature: Simon Robinson

Immature True Bug

Dear Simon,
This is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, and we strongly suspect it is in the family Coreidae, the Leaf Footed Bugs or Big Legged Bugs.  It appears to be an immature nymph, which might make identification to the species level more difficult as most identification guides contain images of adult insects and nymphs can change appearance prior to maturity.  The head on view might also complicate identification to the species level.  We will continue to research this when time permits.  Please let us know if you learn anything additional.

Yes, that would make the most sense! As I have many species of Coreidae in my garden, mainly Carlisis Wahlbergi (According to my insect guide, they are found in Limpopo, but I think it’s perfectly possible for them to have migrated down here, as there are many on The Gardenia) There are also few Holopterna alata and Anoplocnemis. and I agree that it is most likely a nymph of sorts, but from the nymphs I’ve seen, it doesn’t look related to any of the above mentioned. Otherwise, I appreciate the help!
I did some more research of my own, and I have suspicions that this may be the nymph of Leptoglossus Membranaceus, as that species of Coreidae, is a pest to Citrus trees, among other plants, given the fact that this was found on my lemon tree, I’d say the chances are pretty high that it is. But due to an inability to find pictures of a nymph of this species, I’m afraid I cannot say for sure. This has been lots of fun, and I hope we can come to a conclusion soon!
Kind regards
Simon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chrysalis?
Location: Rachel, NV
January 8, 2013 4:40 pm
I know it’s not a bug, but it might be bug related! We found this in the desert in Rachel, NV on December 27, 2012. We don’t know if it is botanical in nature or some sort of chrysalis and were hoping you could help.
I emailed the Biology department of the University of Nevada and haven’t had a reply so we were hoping you (and your vast readership!) might be able to help us identify what it is.
The object is very lightweight almost papery in consistency. It is aproximately 70cm x 40cm.
Signature: Completely Baffled Kara

Desert Thing

Subject: Plant or Insect origin?
Location: Rachel, Nevada
January 9, 2013 9:00 am
I sent a request to you yesterday with a description and several photos of an object that we found in Nevada. I attached one of the same photos so you will know which submission yesterday was mine.
I made a mistake with the submission, specifically with the measurements. That should have been mm not cm so 70mm x 40mm or 7cm x 4cm. If you could please take note and correct it! Sorry!
Signature: Still Baffled Kara

Desert Thing

Hi Kara,
We haven’t a clue what this thing is, but we have some thoughts.  We do not believe it is a Chrysalis, but it might be some type of nest.  The grooved interior appears to us to have been the means by which this thing was attached to some other object, like perhaps a metal cable of some type like the cables that are part of some fences.  This does not look like any insect nest that we recognize.  Certain wasps create nests made of chewed wood that has a paperlike quality, but this doesn’t resemble any that we can think of.  Some insects like Preying Mantids attach an ootheca or egg case to twigs and possibly a fence cable, but again, this does not resemble a Mantis ootheca.  If it is an insect nest, out best guess would be some solitary bee or wasp.  Perhaps our readers will be able to offer some suggestions.  Please let us know if the University of Nevada provides a response.

Desert Thing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified hairy caterpillar from the Sharjah Deserts
Location: Sharjah, UAE
January 9, 2013 1:31 am
Hi,
I keep finding this hairy and brilliantly colored (for a desert species) caterpillar in the Sharjah deserts feeding on Haloxylon salicornicum every Jan – Mar cycle. In fact, I’m seeing it now for the 3rd straight year in a row. Any ideas on id. Some kind of moth caterpillar perhaps as most of the butterfly caterpillars are identifiable on the Arabian peninsula???
Signature: Ajmal

Unknown Caterpillar

Hi Ajmal,
We have been trying unsuccessfully to identify your caterpillar, which we suspect is either a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the subfamily Arctiinae (see BugGuide for North American examples) or possibly in the Tent Caterpillar family Lasiocampidae (see BugGuide for North American examples).  Many caterpillars in those groups have utricating or stinging hairs, and that might be the reason for the orange warning or aposomatic coloration.  We did find this somewhat similar photo of Ad-dud ar-rabie (literally in Arabic “the spring worm”) on the Initiating a Response to the Degradation of Al Badia website, but it is not an exact match.

Unknown Caterpillar

Interestingly, the two visual matches we did locate were inquiry postings you made on Project Noah here in January 2012 and here with your 2011 sighting.  We will continue to research this matter and perhaps one of our readers will stumble upon an answer.

Unknown Caterpillar

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What spider is it?
Location: Ranca Upas, Ciwidey, West Java, Indonesia
January 7, 2013 8:03 am
Hello Daniel,
Way back on 2010 I took this spider pic, but I haven’t got any clue what spider is it. Hope that you can help.
This guy have some interesting silver & black pattern abdomen.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Possibly Longjawed Orbweaver

Hi Mohamad,
This spider reminds us of the North American spiders in the family Tetragnathidae, commonly called the Longjawed Orbweavers.  We cannot substantiate that with any photos from Indonesia in our brief attempts at an identification.  You can compare your photo to the North American Longjawed Orbweavers on BugGuide.

Possibly Longjawed Orbweaver

Hi Daniel,
Thanks a lot for the info, after reading info from BugGuide, especially this line:
“They vary in appearance, but those most commonly found are long-legged, thin-bodied spiders. When at rest, they may cling lengthwise along a twig or blade of grass, holding on with the short third pair of legs. The long pairs of legs are extended.”,
and comparing the images to orchard spider that I found in Indonesia I’m more assured that this one is an Long-jawed Orb Weavers (Tetragnathidae).

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fire Bug
Location: VUng Tau, VIetnam
January 6, 2013 7:10 am
Dear Bugpersonnel,
Is this a firebug, a cotton stainer or a red? It was found in Vung Tau, Vietnam feeding and mating on some rather large red seed pods with large black bean-like seeds inside of them. One strange thing is that the bugs are the exact same color as the seed pods. I’ve searched the Internet and have found similar bugs which are called fire bugs. However, there are some important differences. These bugs have completely red legs and the markings are unique. I attached 2 adult matings and 1 juvenile.
Signature: William Allen

Mating Red Bugs

Hi William,
The family Pyrrhocoridae is commonly called the Red Bug family, and the family includes the Cotton Stainers as well as the Firebugs, so Red Bugs is the more general family name that includes the other genera and species.  With that said, we are having difficulty identifying your Red Bugs to the species level.  We found some family members that are found in Viet Nam, but any with these exact markings are eluding us. 
Dindymus rubiginosus which we found on Bugs for Amateurs as well as FlickR lacks the spots.  Pyrrhopeplus posthumus which we located on BiotaTaiwanica is a close match.  The drawing of the wing pattern for Dysdercus cingulatus which we found on http://psybugs.biota.biodiv.tw/book/export/html/385 is pretty accurate, but once we found a photo of the insect on Forestry Images, the spots seem too high on the wings and the black triangular scutellum is missing on your specimens.  Project Noah did not provide us with anything conclusive.  After spending some time trying in vain to provide a species identification, we have decided to post you images and we hope one of our readers might be able to assist.  We feel confident that you can use the general term Red Bug to describe your individuals which are in the family Pyrrhocoridae.

Red Bug Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination