Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BEE IDENTIFICATION
Location: Stanwood WA USA
April 12, 2013 11:12 am
Hello Bugman! I am an adiv gardener in Stanwood WA, USA about 50 miles north of Seattle. I love flowers but I have really become passionate about photographing critters that grace my garden, especially Bees. I was hoping if I include some photos, you could tell me what they are. Photo 1 has extremely long antennae and I have not seen this critrer since i took the picture, two years ago.
Photo #2 is a an almost triangle shaped bee that I call the Guard bee. This bee seems territorial and chases other bees away. Agressive even.
Phto# 3 is a larger bee that I named mickey mouse due to their large eyes and funny shaped wings. I have so many more! Let me know if you would like to see them! ~ Tracy
Signature: Tracy Sellers

Longhorned Bee

Longhorned Bee

Dear Tracy,
Your first photo of the bee with the long antennae is a Longhorned Bee in the tribe Eucerini which you can view on BugGuide.  We have several photos in our archive of male Longhorned Bees roosting communally in a formation commonly called a Bachelor Party.  Your third photo might be a Leaf Cutter Bee. 

Bee

Bee

We will continue to research that.  Your second photo, the one you called a Guard Bee, however is not a bee.  It is a Drone Fly, a nonstinging fly in the family Syrphidae.

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

Daniel, Thank you for the identifications. The Drone Fly was a surprise , but now that I think about it, it’s behavior does more closely resemble a fly.  I am excited to be able to put a name to  the Critters that grace my garden!
~* BEE Happy
Tracy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: fishing spider
Location: costa rica
March 27, 2013 12:30 am
I found on your amazing website it’s Dolomedes.
Do you have a latin name for it?
fred
Signature: fred from belgium

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Hi Fred,
This does appear to be one of the Nursery Web Spiders, but we cannot say for certain if it is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  We are postdating this submission to post live to our site in the coming week as we will be away from the office a few days for the holidays.

Hi Daniel!
I hope you had a good holiday… a time ago…
Do you remember my question about a (probably) fishing spider?
I’ll put is again on the website, ok?
thanks a lot
bye
fred

Hi Fred,
We did have a nice holiday and we were never able to determine a more accurate identification for your spider.  It does remind us more of
Trechalea gertschi than the Dolomedes species we are used to posting.  We will contact Mandy Howe to see if she can provide an identificaton.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spider
Location: Gunung Manglayang Cilengkrang 40615, Indonesia
March 26, 2013 12:34 am
Hello Daniel,
3.24.2013. I met this guy hiding under a leaf at night hunting photo at Manglayang Mountain, West Java, Indonesia, first time seeing this one. The size is not more than 2 cm from toe to toe and this guy had a lovely abdomen color and pattern.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Spider

Spider

Hi again Mohamad,
Thanks to the nice facial view, someone with more experience at spider eye arrangements might be able to provide you with a family on this Spider.  See BugGuide for Spider Eye Arrangements.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What insect is this?
Location: Mpumalanga
March 8, 2013 12:51 am
Hi there
I came across this insect while holidaying in Marloth Park – Mpumalanga Dec 2012.
Signature: unsure

Orthopteran

Orthopteran

Dear unsure,
This is some species in the order Orthoptera that contains Katydids, Crickets and Grasshoppers.  We are unsure of its identity.  A head on view is not the ideal vantage for trying to identify an unknown creature.  A lateral view would be highly preferred.  It also appears that this is a Longhorned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera.  We were unsure of your location, but we now know that Marloth Park and Mpumalanga are in South Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Beetle
Location: Taman Hutan Raya Insiyur Haji Juanda, Bandung, West Java. Indonesia
March 4, 2013 8:26 pm
Hello Daniel,
I got this photo from 2010, this beetle have this strange flat antennae and his/her eye is also strange.
The size is not more than 3 cm, and it’s a lone individual.
Hope that you could help.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Weevil

Weevil

Hi Mohamad,
This is some species of Weevil, we believe, though we have not had any luck with a matching image.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with a species or genus identification.

Weevil

Weevil


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hibernating Moths
Location: Seattle WA
February 21, 2013 10:33 pm
I was cleaning the Garage, and when I opened the barbecue grill (to fix the handle) I found that it had become a ”den of choice” for hibernation. I think these are Ectropis crepuscularia – Small Engrailed. There are a lot of them, dozens, all through the garage, and they move only very slowly, but I thought this grouping amusing.
Signature: George

Winter Geometrid Moths

Hibernating Winter Geometrid Moths

Dear George from Washington,
These are Geometrid Moths in the family Geometridae.  They are also commonly called Measuring Worm Moths or Inchworm Moths.  We located on JSTOR an online article called Bat predation and flight timing of winter moths,
Epirrita and Operophtera species (Lepidoptera, Geometridae) by Mats G. E Svensson, Jens Rydell and Richard Brown,  when we searched for “hibernating Geometrids.”  We then searched those names and found additional information, but the photos are all of rather drab and unremarkable looking moths shaped similarly to your beauties, but without the intricate markings on your moths.  These must be hibernating male Winter Geometrid Moths, and we don’t really know how to tell them apart for certain based on the markings found in photos of individuals online.  BugGuide has some pictures of several species from the genus Operophtera found in North America and all three species are found along the West Coast.  The markings on the Espirrita species pictured on BugGuide are more defined, but different from the markings on your moths.   We love your photo.  We rotated it and cropped it to a square prior to sizing for the internet.  Moth PHotographers Group has nice photos of the Autumnal Moth, but they do not look like your moths.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination