Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
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Subject: GOAT INSECT
Location: Encarnación, Paraguay
May 3, 2014 1:00 pm
Hi, my name is Clara Müller and I’m from Paraguay. One day, in February of this year I found this insect I’ve never seen before walking through my garden. So I wanted to know if anyone recognizes this kind of insect or knows the name of it. As you can see in the picture I took, it was light gray with little black dots with long horns and shiny eyes. It was like the size of a cockroach. It was wet and kind of hurt because of the rain. It looks like a “goat insect” to me. I’ve just seen it once and I’m curious.
I would be happy if you reply to this letter.
Thanks in advance!
Clara :)
Signature: Clara Müller

Capricorn Beetle

Capricorn Beetle

Hi Clara,
While we do not have the time right now to research the identity of your Goat Insect, we can tell you what we do know.  This is a Capricorn Beetle or Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we never really understood why they were called Capricorn Beetles until we received your request.  Capricorn is the zodiacal sign of the goat and your Capricorn Beetle really does resemble a goat, so we think Goat Insect is a perfectly acceptable common name for your particular species, which we hope to be able to identify after we return to the office.

Goat Insect is Capricorn Beetle

Cacao Beetle

Update:  May 4, 2014
Hi again Clara,
We believe your Capricorn beetle bears a strong resemblance to the images of
Steirastoma breve that are posted on the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery.  We found additional images on PaDil where it is called a Cacao Beetle and there it is noted:  “S. breve has been recorded as the most serious cerambycid pest of cocoa in the New World.”  Steirastoma breve appeared on a postage stamp from Argentina in 2002 and you may see an image of that stamp on Colnect.  There is also a nice image on FlickR that looks close to your Goat Insect, but part of the illusion is the camera angle and the shape of the head, which we cannot find duplicated in other images online.  There is one image that we located in a google image search, but alas, we cannot access the site at http://www.scielo.org.co/scielo.php?pid=S0120-04882008000200003&script=sci_arttext though we can see there is a reference to “La ‘gota’ del cacao, Steirastoma breve (Sulzer, 1776) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).”  We can’t help but to wonder if “gota” is a Spanglish name for goat, but that search has turned up a dead end since “gota” translates to “drop” or “gout” in English and “goat” in Spanish is either “chiva” or “cabra”.  We are not fully convinced that there might still be some relationship between the words “gota” in Spanish and “goat” in English, since searching the term “La ‘gota’ del Cacao” led us to yet another reference to the family Cerambycidae in the Biblioteca Naciional de Venezuela catalog and an article on Biblioteca Virtual – FUNDESYRAM that is specifically about Steirastoma breve.  Perhaps one of our readers with better Spanish language skills that our own can shed some light on this intriguing cross-linguistic word puzzle.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for your fast response, I can see the resemblance in the pictures. There isn’t any cocoa plants in my yard or (I think) in my town, but I still believe this Goat Insect is one of them .. Since my native language is Spanish I can tell you for sure that the words “Gota” and “Goat” are not related, but I still wanted to know why it’s called like this. So I searched for “La gota del cacao” on Google and I found this website: http://www.fundesyram.info/biblioteca/displayFicha.php?fichaID=3798. There is some useful information for farmers who grow cocoa and how to prevent the damages caused by our little friend. They say that the most harmful things are the Steirastoma breve larvae because they eat the bark of the plant, cut its wood and cause the death of the plant. They also say that the larvae excrete a white liquid in little “drops” which makes easier for farmers to see them. (gota = drop).
If this information is correct I think we already have our answer. Anyway if you have another information to share I would like to hear it.
Thanks for your time and have a nice week!

Thanks for writing back Clara.  We really appreciate the etymological information as language, especially when translation is involved, can be quite confusing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Carlos
Location: Costa Rica
April 29, 2014 6:10 pm
Este insecto no lo había visto antes y lo encontré en un pueblo llamado Zarcero de Costa Rica.
Signature: CarlosAS

Cicada

Cicada

Hola CarlosAS,
Este insecto es una CHICHARRA.  The Cicadas are very vocal insects, and they are considered among the loudest insects in the world.  According to the Book of Insect Records:  “The African cicada,
Brevisana brevis (Homoptera: Cicadidae) produces a calling song with a mean sound pressure level of 106.7 decibels at a distance of 50cm. Two species of North American cicadas, Tibicen walkeri Metcalf and T. resh (Haldman), produce an alarm call with a mean sound pressure level of 105.9 dB(50cm). Brevisana brevis is likely the loudest insect species on record. Cicada songs are species-specific and play a vital role in communication, reproduction, and possibly defense.”  We will attempt to identify your species of Cicada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this bug? a kind of Fly?
Location: Saudi Arabia_Madinah
April 21, 2014 8:45 am
Can you please identify this bug?
I’ve found it sitting on a leaf, in the morning in 21/4/2014.
I couldn’t take any pictures, except for this one.
and thank you.
Signature: M.A

Possibly a Sawfly

Unknown Wasp

Dear M.A.,
We wish your image had more detail.  At first we thought this might be a Fly in the order Diptera, but the antennae look decidedly unflylike.  We now believe this is a Hymenopteran, the order that includes bees and wasps, and we believe it might be a Sawfly.  We wish we were able to tell if there is one pair of wings or two pairs.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Only curiosity…
Location: Jarabacoa, Dominican Republic
April 15, 2014 7:24 am
Many warm greetings from the Dominican Republic. I saw this beautiful insect resting over the ceiling at the country house of a friend. All the time we spent on the terrace, this curious insect remained in that position. If it’s possible, can Whatsthatbug can give me any information on this peculiar insect.
Thanks in advance
Signature: Alejandro

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Hi Alejandro,
Your file name was correct.  This is a Stick Insect or Walkingstick in the order Phasmida.  It appears a Stick Insect appeared on a Dominican Republic stamp in 1999 according to Asahi-net.  We will continue to attempt to identify the species of Stick Insect you submitted.

Daniel, many thanks for your information and your support.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A fuzzy scarab?
Location: Hudson, Florida
April 14, 2014 7:28 pm
This one was interesting! It was very sleepy when we found it and not very interested in going back outside. Haha. We tried to research what it could be and narrowed it to some kind of scarab but we were lost after that point. Any ideas?
Signature: Madde and Michaela

Scarab Beetle

Scarab Beetle

Hi Madde and Michaela,
WE agree that this fuzzy little guy is a Scarab Beetle, but we have not had any luck identifying the species on BugGuide either.  We will try to get some assistance in this identification.

Scarab

Scarab

Update:  We just approved a comment suggesting this might be a Bumble Bee Scarab in the family Glaphyridae, and we had considered that possibility, but we thought it didn’t look exactly like the individuals posted on BugGuide. We wrote to Eric Eaton to see if he can provide an identification.  At this time, we have not yet heard back from Eric.

Scarab

Scarab

Eric Eaton provides an broad identification
Daniel:
At least you correctly identified it as a scarab!  I was confounded by a similar beetle here in Colorado a couple years ago.
I’m pretty certain this is a May Beetle of some kind, genus Phyllophaga, but I can’t find a match in Bugguide or anywhere else, either.  I’ll see if I can get something more specific if I have permission to post the images to a Facebook group or two?
Still no word on the Dolerus sawfly swarm mystery, sorry.
Eric

Oh yes! Go ahead and post it. I hope we can figure out what it is eventually! It was such a friendly little guy too. =P Good luck and let us know if you find anything!
-Michaela and Madde

 

 

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Subject: moth identification help
Location: Benicia, California
April 10, 2014 10:18 pm
My kids and I love bugs. We found an egg sac in our yard that we have not seen before. We have been keeping an eye on it for a about a month (although I don’t know for sure how long it had been there before we found it). It hatched this morning and we found a beautiful moth (which we also have not seen before). I’m hoping you can give us some more info about what kind of moth it is exactly. Thanks so much.
Signature: Christie

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth:  Grammia ornata

Hi Christie,
This is a beautiful moth.  It is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, and it looks like a member of the genus
Grammia, however we are having difficulty finding a visual match on BugGuide because of the black base on the underwings and the intricate pattern on the forewings. We also find the cocoon to be unusual in that no caterpillar hairs have been incorporated in its construction.  We have decided to contact our friend and Arctiid expert Julian Donahue for his opinion.

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth:  Grammia ornata

Hi again Christie,
We emailed Julian and then telephoned, but he is running errands.  We now believe this is
Grammia ornata, and you can see a selection of images on BugGuide including this image on BugGuide which shows the black base to the underwings.  The species is found in California.  We are awaiting confirmation from Julian.  We could not locate an online image of the cocoon of Grammia ornata for comparison. 

Cocoon

Unidentified “Cocoon”

Julian Donahue Confirms Identification:  Grammia ornata
You’re right on, Daniel. Grammia ornata is a western North America species, occuring from Ventura Co., California north through the Pacific Northwest to southern British Columbia, Canada, east to northern Utah, and western Wyoming and Montana. (South of Ventura Co., California, it is replaced by the similar G. hewletti, described from San Diego Co., California).
Attached is a copy of Chris Schmidt’s revision of Grammia, which has color plates illustrating all the species. Both species are illustrated on p. 578, figs. 36 & 37.  Schmidt_2009_Grammia
Julian

Thank you so much for your reply. I was wondering about the cocoon/egg sac as well. It looked like thousands of tiny oval eggs inside a silk web, but in the shape of a caterpillar. This one was on our deck under a planter, but we found two more on the underside of leaves  on a  nearby plant with the web curling the leaf around it. We have not seen any actual caterpillars in the garden, so now I’m wondering the sac and the moth were coincidental occurrences?? I would love to know more about the cocoon/sac if possible.
Thanks again!
Christie

Hi Christie,
In your original email, you implied that you were certain the moth emerged from the cocoon.  Now you don’t seem certain.  In our opinion, the moth and the cocoon are not related. 

Julian Donahue confirms our suspicions about the “Cocoon”
The “cocoon” doesn’t look like anything I’ve ever seen; almost 100% positive it’s not arctiid in origin (sorta looks like a sawfly larva to me, but that’s a wild guess and I have nothing to back it up).
Julian

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination