Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found this In my garage
Location: Connecticut
January 10, 2014 4:04 pm
After googling everything I could possibly think of to figure this out, no prevail. Hope your guys will know what it is. It would move but as soon as I got close to it it would stop.
Signature: Help me haha

Thing isn't Bug

Thing isn’t Bug

We cannot say for certain what this thing is, but we are very confident it is NOT a bug.  It looks like a seedhead or other part of a plant.  Perhaps the wind was moving it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID help needed
Location: Venus Drive , Singapore
January 11, 2014 1:16 am
Hi ! Im new to nature macro photography. I shot this tiny little furry thing which crawls. Can u help ID this ?
Thk you
Signature: Eric Lim

Possibly a Caterpillar

Possibly a Caterpillar

Dear Eric,
While your macro image is quite artful, it doesn’t really show many characteristics that would be helpful for an identification.  Do you have a more traditional angle, like a dorsal view or a lateral view of this creature?  Our best guess is that it is some type of Moth Caterpillar.

Update:  January 12, 2014
While researching a South African Caterpillar, we discovered these photos of a Lymantriinae Caterpillar from South Africa on ISpot that looks similar to this creature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Leaf Footed Bug
Location: Rietfontein, Pretoria, South Africa
January 9, 2014 12:00 am
In response to an earlier post I am sending two photos of a bug that I suspect is a Leaf Footed or True bug. It was observed in my garden during summer (November) 2013. Your identification help is highly appreciated.
Signature: Robert Erasmus

Immature True Bug

Immature True Bug

Hi Robert,
We are currently experiencing a technical situation that we don’t quite understand and that has caused us to contact our webmaster.  The comment you supplied to our old posting of Possibly Leaf Footed Bug Nymph from South Africa has appeared in our email account, but not to the posting itself, so we cannot approve the comment to the site.  We are happy you submitted your own photographs and we would like to address your questions.  It is interesting that you labeled one file as a Stink Bug and one as a True Bug.  We still believe the posting you originally commented upon is likely a Leaf Footed Bug, and we agree that your nymph appears to be a Stink Bug or Shield Bug nymph.  Nymphs can be notoriously difficult to identify as they often differ considerably from adults and it is generally the adult or imago that appears in identification guide books.  With that said, we will attempt to research your request.  In the meantime, we will go live and enlist the assistance of our readership, and we will follow our gut instincts and classify this as a Stink Bug or Shield Bug.

True Bug Nymph

True Bug Nymph

Update:
Your nymph looks similar to, but not identical to, this Stink Bug nymph from Pretoria that is posted to Project Noah.  We found a pretty good match on ISpot, but it is not identified beyond the Stink Bug family Pentatomidae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug from Peru
Location: Central Peru
January 5, 2014 2:40 pm
Dear bugman,
thanks for all the help with my previous posts! I still have quite a collection of unidentified insects/spider etc pics and am very glad I found your website, so I will keep them coming to you if you don’t mind…
This is a picture of a pretty tiny bug I also took in central Peru, at about 1.000m altitude. Any idea what it is? Thank you again, congratulations on your great website and best wishes!
Signature: Frank

Scarab Beetle from Peru

Scarab Beetle from Peru

Hi Frank,
This is a Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabidae.  If it is a small beetle, chances are not really great that we will be able to determine a species identification for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle from Peru
Location: Central Peru
January 2, 2014 7:08 pm
Please help me to identify this beetle from the cloudforest in Peru (photo taken at about 1.200 m Elevation on the eastern slope of the Andes). Thank you!
Signature: Frank

Tortoise Beetle

Tortoise Beetle

Dear Frank,
We are in awe of the bold, complimentary colors of this stunning Tortoise Beetle in the subfamily Cassidinae and tribe Cassidini.  This Peruvian Amazon relative pictured on FlickR bears a resemblance and we would would not doubt they might both be in the genus
Eugenysa, or this individual also on FlickR and also from Peru and also tentatively in the genus Eugenysa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug unidentified
Location: Victoria, Australia
December 30, 2013 1:11 am
Hi,
My name is Ivan, i live in Victoria, Australia , recently they stared to build a house behind my home, since then these unidentified bugs have migrated to my backyeard.
There all over my windows and trying to get into my house, i have googled this unidentified bug and can not find anything on it, there are similar ones but not the same. I got pest control to come over ande see the bugs but they told me they were Springtail bugs because they have two antenas when he left i googled this Springtail bug and it doe not look like it at all.
I have taken photos and measured two of them a small one and a large one, the sizes are the smallest one 3mm and the larger one is 6mm.
Please help with identifing this bug. I dont want this bug to hurt my family especially my 5 month old daughter.
regards
Signature: Ivan

Unknown Nymph

Unknown Heteropteran Nymph

Dear Ivan,
All three images you submitted are True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera, and they are definitely NOT Springtails.  Two of your photos appear to be the same species and they are immature.  Due to their small size, we are speculating that they are either Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae, or Chinch Bugs in the family Blissidae.  It may be difficult to determine the exact species as they are immature specimens.

Unknown Heteropteran Nymph

Unknown Heteropteran Nymph

The third photograph appears to be a different species, and it most closely resembles the Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs in the superfamily Pentatomoidea, but due to its small size, we cannot be certain.  It is a winged adult.  Compare your but to this North American Shield Bug Sphyrocoris obliquus that is pictured on BugGuide.  We are posting your photos and tagging them as unidentified.  We will attempt further research if time permits and perhaps one of our readers will be able to contribute some helpful information.  In our opinion, both species may present a nuisance due to their large numbers, but we don’t believe either species poses a direct threat to your family.

Unknown True Bug

Unknown True Bug

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination