Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant Beetle ?
Location: Balung River Eco Resort, Tawau, Sabah, Borneo.
November 18, 2013 6:27 am
Dear Mr. Bugman, I am glad to be able to return to this site again.
This time I have found a tiny ant-like beetle which I could not identify.
It’s length is smaller than 15mm. Could it be a Cleridae species?
Signature: C. X. Wong

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Dear C. X. Wong,
Your beetle does resemble a Checkered Beetle in the family Cleridae, but we cannot say for certain that is a correct family identification.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to confirm the family and provide some more specific information.

Possibly Checkered Beetle

Possibly Checkered Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Insect
Location: San Antonio, Texas
November 10, 2013 9:56 pm
Hello,
I saw this little bug jumping around at my work in November. It was pretty small but it’s long legs caught my attention. I couldn’t figure out what it was. Let me know what you think.
Thanks a lot.
Signature: Arlyne

Katydid Nymph

Katydid Nymph

Hi Arlyne,
This is an immature male Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae, but we are not certain of any further classification.  We believe it is a Shieldbacked Katydid in the subfamily Tettigoniinae, but we are not certain.  We are posting your photo and we will try to get something more substantial from Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide information or a comment.  You can see some possible Shieldbacked Katydids pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Jamestown, Tennessee
October 10, 2013 10:56 am
I’m a high school senior this year and currently enrolled in a Biology II class. We recently did an experiment where we placed decomposing leaves in a mesh bag and let our leaf packs sit in water for three weeks. When we opened our leaf packs today, this bug was in our packet. No other group had anything like it, and our teacher could not identify it. Do you know what this could be?
Signature: Alex

Unknown Larva

Unknown Larva might be a Hellgrammite

Hi Alex,
Unlike your Biology teacher, we do not have a background in natural sciences.  We are very curious what this experiment was supposed to produce.  What kind of water were the leaf packs sitting in?  Was it distilled water or were the packs tossed into a lake?  Since the packet was under water, this larva must be aquatic.  At first we thought it was a Hellgrammite, but upon enlarging the thumbnail that was attached to the email, we realized that the appendages typically present along the abdomen of Hellgrammites, the larval form of Dobsonflies, appear to be absent.  The head of your larva does appear quite similar to the head on this Hellgrammite posted to BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our more knowledgeable readers will correct us, but we are still leaning toward this being a Hellgrammite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Trapdoor Species I.D
Location: South Okanagan, BC, Canada
October 8, 2013 8:34 pm
I have identified this to be a male Trapdoor Spider but am interested in getting more info with regards to the particular species. This one was very aggressive and jumpy, was hard to trap and when I put a BBQ skewer stick into the jar to get some good body pics and get him moving, the spider launched itself at it, clamped on with its fangs and would not let go.
I was able to lift his entire body up to the rim of the jar, approx 12” while he hung on with his fangs. I found the spider making its way into my house at 4:30am, he attempted to run inside once I opened the door. While trying to place a jar over him, he reared and made small charging attempts at the jar with his fangs extended. I have several more pictures if you need more to properly identify this spider. Thanks!
Signature: Luiza

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Hi Luiza,
We are very late and haven’t any time to research this at this moment, but we are posting your photos and we hope to get some input from our readership today.  Your photos should be very helpful for identification purposes.

Ed. Note October 14, 2013:  This spider somewhat resembles the Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spiders in the genus Aptostichus as pictured on BugGuide.

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Cat
Location: Andover, NJ – backyard
September 24, 2013 7:33 am
I’m totally stumped by this one and hope you can help. It is a distinctive orange color with some yellow spots just above the face. The face is black/white and the tail has a point. It has some fine hairs, but is mostly hairless. It was making its way across a pavered walkway in our garden, apparently heading for the mulched area? Length, approximately one inch.
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Unknown Moth Caterpillar

Clear Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Hi Deborah,
Other than figuring that this is a Moth Caterpillar, we haven’t a clue either.  We will post your photos and we hope someone will write in with a closer identification.  We cannot even provide a family at this time.

Unknown Moth Caterpillar

Clear Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Thanks for getting back to me,  Daniel.  I’ve also sent the photos to several local naturalists and so far ,  no one can identify it.  Quite a mystery.  I will drop you a note if I learn anything.

Update:  September 25, 2013
Thanks to a comment from one of our readers, we now know that this is a Clear Owlet Moth Caterpillar, Acronicta clarescens.  There are matching photos on BugGuide.

Hi again,
Just wanted to let you know that I found a local naturalist who identified this as a Clear Dagger Moth caterpillar (Acronicta clarescens).  Mystery solved…
Debbi

 

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Subject: Strange Bug!
Location: Harare, Zimbabwe
September 22, 2013 11:16 am
Hi,
We saw this bug yesterday at around 20:00, in a house yard at Harare, Zimbabwe.
The size was about 1 cm for the body and 2 cm for the tail.
What is that???
Signature: African S.

Longhorned Orthopteran

Longhorned Orthopteran

Dear African S.,
This appears to be a member of the order Orthoptera, and it is probably a Shieldbacked Katydid.  Judging by the ovipositor, it is a female.  We hope by posting your photo, one of our readers may be able to assist with a species identification.

Dear Daniel Marlos,
Thank you for your quick and interesting answer!
I’ll keep following,
Yours,
Shira

Hi Shira,
One of our readers supplied a comment suggesting this might be a Blattid with an Ootheca, which translates to a Cockroach with an Egg Capsule.

Update:  Septmeber 27, 2013
After receiving a few comments, we agree that this is a Cockroach, but we have not had any luck finding any similar looking images on the internet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination