Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unindentified Flying Insect
Location: Belgrade, Serbia, Europe
May 9, 2013 2:28 pm
Hello,
I caught this insect a this evening, and can not find it on Google, so I’m wondering if you could help me. I never saw an insect like this, not even remotely similar.
Insect was caught on May 9th, weather has been unseasonably warm for 3 weeks, I live less than a mile from the river. Insect is little over 1 inch long (from head to the end of the body, without antenna).
I hope you can help me find out what species is this,
thank you in advance,
Janja
Signature: Janja Bobic

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Hi Janja,
This is a Crane Fly in the family Tipulidae, and judging by those beautiful plumose antennae, this is a male.  Crane Flies are true flies with a single pair of wings.  We will contact Dr. Chen Young of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History to see if he can identify the species.  It looks similar to the
Ctenophora species on Diptera Info.

Thank you so much for your answer, I really appreciate it. This beautiful insect sparked a huge interest in my class today.
sincerely,
Janja Bobic

Hi Janja,
We got an “out of office” reply from Dr Chen Young, but we might get an update from him in a few weeks.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Clumsy mountain bee
Location: Ola, Idaho
April 29, 2013 10:16 pm
Here is a bee I photographed in a patch of Mule’s Ear. There were two other varieties of bee out that day, but these are the only ones that would stay still for a photo. I took these in late April at an elevation around 4000 feet near Ola, Idaho.
Signature: Buck Rekow

What's That Bee???

What’s That Hymenopteran???

Dear Buck,
We do not recognize your Bee and we haven’t time to research its identity prior to posting.  Perhaps one of our readers can supply a comment regarding the identity of this Solitary Bee.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee or Sawfly???

Update:  Probably a Sawfly
Thanks to a comment from Austin, we took a closer look, and while we still cannot provide a species, we believe Austin is correct that this is a Sawfly.  The clubbed antennae seem pretty convincing.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Accidental Photo of What May be an Exposed Bird-Dropping Moth
Location: Coryell County, central Texas
April 27, 2013 5:23 pm
I was photographing this honey bee on the wild milkweed today (may be Antelope Horn Milkweed?) and I later noticed a tiny fly (bee?), an ant, and what may be an Exposed Bird-Dropping Moth in the photo. No, I didn’t make up that name. :-) Here is a reference I found online: http://www.outdoornatureclub.org/Moths/content/9136_Exposed_Bird-Dropping_Moth_20100801_large.html
Warm, cloudy weather with scattered showers.
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Honey Bee and Moth on Milkweed

Honey Bee and Moth on Milkweed

Dear Ellen,
There are many moths that have coloration and markings that seem to mimic bird droppings, and when we first saw your subject line, we thought you must have meant one of the Wood Nymphs in the genus 
Eudryas.  Your moth does resemble the Bird Dropping Moth, however, we don’t believe it is the same species.  You were focused on the Honey Bee, so the details in the moth are not as sharp.  We did find another good image of a different species called the Small Bird Dropping Moth, Tarachidia erastrioides, on the Fontenelle Nature Association Nature Search website, but again, we don’t think it looks like an exact match to your moth.

What's That Moth???

What’s That Moth???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: USA, Central CA, 4,000’ elev.
April 22, 2013 7:37 pm
This flying Bottlebrush is fast and acrobatic. Keeps tripping my night security camera. I wanted to see if the lynx was coming around, but this critter keeps turning the ’record’ on the camera all night. It doesn’t seem to have any head, just a thin rod-like ’body’ with many circular rows of bristle-like ’wings’. I turned the red LED’s off on the camera to see if that will stop him. I do have recorded video of him zipping around, if that would help. I’ve never seen or heard about anything like this in this area; however, the insects at this elevation are quite unique to me. The photos are with infrared illumination.
Signature: Tom

Bug in Flight

Bug in Flight

Dear Tom,
We believe this is a moth or some other nocturnal insect.  We also believe the slow shutter speed has captured its movement rather than accurately recording its shape.  What you are viewing is several flaps of the wings as the insect moves forward.  We would suggest a net if you want a more accurate identity.

Flying Insect

Nocturnal Flying Insect

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Jewel Beetle?
Location: North of Portugal
April 18, 2013 1:35 am
Hello Mr Bugman. I’ve found this little bug while walking around a mountain in the North of Portugal.
Can you help me telling me if this is a jewel scarab and if it is a rare one?
Thank you! :)
Signature: Ana

Jewel Scarab

Earth Boring Scarab Beetle Beetle

Dear Ana,
This is certainly a Scarab Beetle, and we believe it is one of the Dung Beetles revered by the ancient Egyptians and memorialized in their jewelry, art and heiroglyphics.  We have never seen a Dung Beetle with such spectacular coloration and we have not had any luck finding any matching images on the internet.  Here is what we did find.  Though we are certain it is far from comprehensive, the Scarabaeidae Europe site on FlickR has nothing that even looks remotely similar.
  A search for the term Jewel Scarabs brought us to the Daily Croissant blog and a photo of a collection with a note it came from a February 2001 National Geographic Magazine article which refers to Central American beetles, so we can with some certainty speculate that your beetle is not one of the Jewel Scarabs from the article.  Encyclopaedia Britannica states:  “Scarab beetles are one of the most popular families with insect collectors because of the large size and beautifully coloured, hard, highly polished forewings of many species.”  We cannot believe we are having such a difficult time identifying such a gorgeous beetle.  We have requested assistance from Eric Eaton and perhaps one of our readers will be able to supply us with a comment, identification or correction.

Hello Daniel! Thank you! Ill send you a video that I captured. :) It is really beautiful! Never thought I would like an insect so much. :D

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Yes, it is a type of “earth-boring dung beetle,” family Geotrupidae.  Looks like Trypocopris vernalis, or something very similar.  I thought it was a Geotrupes sp., but that genus has apparently been split.  Lots of species in Europe, Russia, not so many here in the U.S.
Nice find.
Eric

Update
Thanks to comments from Dave and Jacob H., we now know that this is an Earth Boring Scarab Beetle in the family Geotrupidae, and the species is
Trypocopris pyraneaus coruscans, with a matching photo on FlickR.  Even though this is not a Dung Beetle as we originally thought, BugGuide notes of the family that:  “These beetles spend most of their lives in burrows one to four feet down, often under dung or carrion” and “Larvae feed on dung or carrion. Adults feed on dung or fungi, or do not feed at all.”

Karl also provides the same identification
Hi Daniel and Ana:
It looks like an Earth-boring Dung Beetle (Geotrupidae) in the genus Trypocopris (=Geotrupes), probably T. pyrenaeus.  There are a number of subspecies and the distribution is Mediterranean Europe, particularly Portugal to Italy. Regards Karl.

Ana writes:  Exactly on the same spot I saw mine ahah :) thank you!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BEE IDENTIFICATION
Location: Stanwood WA USA
April 12, 2013 11:12 am
Hello Bugman! I am an adiv gardener in Stanwood WA, USA about 50 miles north of Seattle. I love flowers but I have really become passionate about photographing critters that grace my garden, especially Bees. I was hoping if I include some photos, you could tell me what they are. Photo 1 has extremely long antennae and I have not seen this critrer since i took the picture, two years ago.
Photo #2 is a an almost triangle shaped bee that I call the Guard bee. This bee seems territorial and chases other bees away. Agressive even.
Phto# 3 is a larger bee that I named mickey mouse due to their large eyes and funny shaped wings. I have so many more! Let me know if you would like to see them! ~ Tracy
Signature: Tracy Sellers

Longhorned Bee

Longhorned Bee

Dear Tracy,
Your first photo of the bee with the long antennae is a Longhorned Bee in the tribe Eucerini which you can view on BugGuide.  We have several photos in our archive of male Longhorned Bees roosting communally in a formation commonly called a Bachelor Party.  Your third photo might be a Leaf Cutter Bee. 

Bee

Bee

We will continue to research that.  Your second photo, the one you called a Guard Bee, however is not a bee.  It is a Drone Fly, a nonstinging fly in the family Syrphidae.

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

Daniel, Thank you for the identifications. The Drone Fly was a surprise , but now that I think about it, it’s behavior does more closely resemble a fly.  I am excited to be able to put a name to  the Critters that grace my garden!
~* BEE Happy
Tracy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination