Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: USA, Central CA, 4,000’ elev.
April 22, 2013 7:37 pm
This flying Bottlebrush is fast and acrobatic. Keeps tripping my night security camera. I wanted to see if the lynx was coming around, but this critter keeps turning the ’record’ on the camera all night. It doesn’t seem to have any head, just a thin rod-like ’body’ with many circular rows of bristle-like ’wings’. I turned the red LED’s off on the camera to see if that will stop him. I do have recorded video of him zipping around, if that would help. I’ve never seen or heard about anything like this in this area; however, the insects at this elevation are quite unique to me. The photos are with infrared illumination.
Signature: Tom

Bug in Flight

Bug in Flight

Dear Tom,
We believe this is a moth or some other nocturnal insect.  We also believe the slow shutter speed has captured its movement rather than accurately recording its shape.  What you are viewing is several flaps of the wings as the insect moves forward.  We would suggest a net if you want a more accurate identity.

Flying Insect

Nocturnal Flying Insect

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Jewel Beetle?
Location: North of Portugal
April 18, 2013 1:35 am
Hello Mr Bugman. I’ve found this little bug while walking around a mountain in the North of Portugal.
Can you help me telling me if this is a jewel scarab and if it is a rare one?
Thank you! :)
Signature: Ana

Jewel Scarab

Earth Boring Scarab Beetle Beetle

Dear Ana,
This is certainly a Scarab Beetle, and we believe it is one of the Dung Beetles revered by the ancient Egyptians and memorialized in their jewelry, art and heiroglyphics.  We have never seen a Dung Beetle with such spectacular coloration and we have not had any luck finding any matching images on the internet.  Here is what we did find.  Though we are certain it is far from comprehensive, the Scarabaeidae Europe site on FlickR has nothing that even looks remotely similar.
  A search for the term Jewel Scarabs brought us to the Daily Croissant blog and a photo of a collection with a note it came from a February 2001 National Geographic Magazine article which refers to Central American beetles, so we can with some certainty speculate that your beetle is not one of the Jewel Scarabs from the article.  Encyclopaedia Britannica states:  “Scarab beetles are one of the most popular families with insect collectors because of the large size and beautifully coloured, hard, highly polished forewings of many species.”  We cannot believe we are having such a difficult time identifying such a gorgeous beetle.  We have requested assistance from Eric Eaton and perhaps one of our readers will be able to supply us with a comment, identification or correction.

Hello Daniel! Thank you! Ill send you a video that I captured. :) It is really beautiful! Never thought I would like an insect so much. :D

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Yes, it is a type of “earth-boring dung beetle,” family Geotrupidae.  Looks like Trypocopris vernalis, or something very similar.  I thought it was a Geotrupes sp., but that genus has apparently been split.  Lots of species in Europe, Russia, not so many here in the U.S.
Nice find.
Eric

Update
Thanks to comments from Dave and Jacob H., we now know that this is an Earth Boring Scarab Beetle in the family Geotrupidae, and the species is
Trypocopris pyraneaus coruscans, with a matching photo on FlickR.  Even though this is not a Dung Beetle as we originally thought, BugGuide notes of the family that:  “These beetles spend most of their lives in burrows one to four feet down, often under dung or carrion” and “Larvae feed on dung or carrion. Adults feed on dung or fungi, or do not feed at all.”

Karl also provides the same identification
Hi Daniel and Ana:
It looks like an Earth-boring Dung Beetle (Geotrupidae) in the genus Trypocopris (=Geotrupes), probably T. pyrenaeus.  There are a number of subspecies and the distribution is Mediterranean Europe, particularly Portugal to Italy. Regards Karl.

Ana writes:  Exactly on the same spot I saw mine ahah :) thank you!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BEE IDENTIFICATION
Location: Stanwood WA USA
April 12, 2013 11:12 am
Hello Bugman! I am an adiv gardener in Stanwood WA, USA about 50 miles north of Seattle. I love flowers but I have really become passionate about photographing critters that grace my garden, especially Bees. I was hoping if I include some photos, you could tell me what they are. Photo 1 has extremely long antennae and I have not seen this critrer since i took the picture, two years ago.
Photo #2 is a an almost triangle shaped bee that I call the Guard bee. This bee seems territorial and chases other bees away. Agressive even.
Phto# 3 is a larger bee that I named mickey mouse due to their large eyes and funny shaped wings. I have so many more! Let me know if you would like to see them! ~ Tracy
Signature: Tracy Sellers

Longhorned Bee

Longhorned Bee

Dear Tracy,
Your first photo of the bee with the long antennae is a Longhorned Bee in the tribe Eucerini which you can view on BugGuide.  We have several photos in our archive of male Longhorned Bees roosting communally in a formation commonly called a Bachelor Party.  Your third photo might be a Leaf Cutter Bee. 

Bee

Bee

We will continue to research that.  Your second photo, the one you called a Guard Bee, however is not a bee.  It is a Drone Fly, a nonstinging fly in the family Syrphidae.

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

Daniel, Thank you for the identifications. The Drone Fly was a surprise , but now that I think about it, it’s behavior does more closely resemble a fly.  I am excited to be able to put a name to  the Critters that grace my garden!
~* BEE Happy
Tracy

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Subject: fishing spider
Location: costa rica
March 27, 2013 12:30 am
I found on your amazing website it’s Dolomedes.
Do you have a latin name for it?
fred
Signature: fred from belgium

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Hi Fred,
This does appear to be one of the Nursery Web Spiders, but we cannot say for certain if it is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  We are postdating this submission to post live to our site in the coming week as we will be away from the office a few days for the holidays.

Hi Daniel!
I hope you had a good holiday… a time ago…
Do you remember my question about a (probably) fishing spider?
I’ll put is again on the website, ok?
thanks a lot
bye
fred

Hi Fred,
We did have a nice holiday and we were never able to determine a more accurate identification for your spider.  It does remind us more of
Trechalea gertschi than the Dolomedes species we are used to posting.  We will contact Mandy Howe to see if she can provide an identificaton.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spider
Location: Gunung Manglayang Cilengkrang 40615, Indonesia
March 26, 2013 12:34 am
Hello Daniel,
3.24.2013. I met this guy hiding under a leaf at night hunting photo at Manglayang Mountain, West Java, Indonesia, first time seeing this one. The size is not more than 2 cm from toe to toe and this guy had a lovely abdomen color and pattern.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Spider

Spider

Hi again Mohamad,
Thanks to the nice facial view, someone with more experience at spider eye arrangements might be able to provide you with a family on this Spider.  See BugGuide for Spider Eye Arrangements.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What insect is this?
Location: Mpumalanga
March 8, 2013 12:51 am
Hi there
I came across this insect while holidaying in Marloth Park – Mpumalanga Dec 2012.
Signature: unsure

Orthopteran

Orthopteran

Dear unsure,
This is some species in the order Orthoptera that contains Katydids, Crickets and Grasshoppers.  We are unsure of its identity.  A head on view is not the ideal vantage for trying to identify an unknown creature.  A lateral view would be highly preferred.  It also appears that this is a Longhorned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera.  We were unsure of your location, but we now know that Marloth Park and Mpumalanga are in South Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination