Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Florida land snails
Location: Florida
January 25, 2014 2:35 pm
My sister was given two land snails to care for. She said that they were collected in Florida. That’s all I know. I want to be sure these are not pest species, and secondly, if she decides to care for them I need to know what they might eat. Thanks.
Signature: Bruce

Snail From Florida

Snail From Florida

Hi Bruce,
We can post this request this morning, but we haven’t the time to research it right now, but we will try to identify your Snails later.  We have to confess that we don’t know much about Molluscs, but we do have a reader, Susan J. Hewitt, who frequently identifies Snails for us.  Perhaps she will read the posting and provide a comment.

Snail From Florida

Snail From Florida

Another Snail from Florida

Another Snail from Florida

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider – Vietnam
Location: Vietnam (Phong Nha Ke Bang National Park)
January 26, 2014 9:33 am
Dear Bugman,
I’ve been trying to identify this spider I saw in Vietnam (the Phong Nha Ke Bang area) in 2012, but have not yet succeeded. Is the photo of enough to identify it? As a fairly new bug enthusiast any information you can help with would be great.
Thank you!
Signature: Sarah

Unknown Spider

Unknown Spider

Hi Sarah,
Do you have any additional images of this Spider?  This is not the ideal camera angle for an identification, but it is sure an interesting looking Spider.  We will post your photo and try to research its identity.  It reminds us of a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.  Unfortunately, it is difficult to make out the eye pattern arrangement which is one of the best means of identifying the different spider families.

Spider closeup

Spider closeup

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for looking at the picture so quickly!
Unfortunately this was the only angle I got – it was peeking out of a hole under the path I was walking on (also was before I knew what was needed to identify spiders).
The closest I thought too was a Huntsman but the colouring on this one seemed quite distinct – I love the distinct black feet (must learn the technical terms!) on this spider.
Thanks for the assistance, I’ll keep researching and fingers crossed too.
What a wonderful site WTB is.
Kind regards,
Sarah

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wasp and Spider
Location: Malaysia
January 22, 2014 2:45 pm
Dear Mr Marlos,
This is the stream in which that spider was found. Incidentally just for your interest as i was standing on one of these boulders this blue winged insect (perhaps a wasp?) the size of my big toe landed, when if flew off it left this carcass of a large spider it had been carrying about underneath.
N.Sathesh

Wasp

Wasp

Hi again N. Sathesh,
Your new images have us very intrigued and we are creating a brand new posting.  This blue winged creature is most definitely a wasp, but we are not certain if it is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompillidae.  The situation with the spider is very interesting.  We believe the Wasp bit the legs off the Spider to make it easier to transport.  In situations like this where a Wasp preys on a Spider or other insect, the prey is generally paralyzed to provide a food source for a larva.  We will try to identify this fascinating Wasp.  It resembles this Spider Wasp from Borneo on Alex Hyde’s website.

Spider with legs Amputated

Spider with legs Amputated

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scorpions in house
Location: Edenvale, South Africa
January 16, 2014 12:29 am
Hi,
I live in Edenvale South Africa and this is the 5th scorpion we found in our house. I stepped on one (I think its the same one on the photo) about two years ago and it burnt like hell but I managed to sort it out with a bit of aloe.
I found this little dude (a baby one) in my drawer this morning – would love to know more about them.
Signature: MaddyZA

Scorpion

Scorpion

Dear MaddyZA,
This is one of the most beautiful Scorpions we have ever seen.  We will attempt to identify it tomorrow.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – What’s This Egg?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
November 7, 2013 2:13 pm
Hi Daniel,
When I was out looking for Monarch Caterpillars on the Mexican Milkweed the other day, I spied these eggs on the bottom of a leaf. Can you please identify what laid them? I’m hoping something beneficial.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Moth Eggs, we believe

Moth Eggs, we believe

Hi Anna,
We just discovered this unanswered request that dates to our return after a short holiday.  The shape of the eggs and the quantity leads us to believe these are Moth Eggs.  Biophotonics has a photo of Milkweed Tiger Moth Caterpillars,
Euchaetes egle, that is attributed to Kailen Mooney of the University of California, Irvine, however, to the best of our knowledge, the Milkweed Tiger Moth is an eastern species.  See the BugGuide range map for confirmation.  We have not had any luck locating any moths that feed on Milkweed in California.

Hi Daniel,
I think these may have been Mourning Cloak eggs.  They all hatched out at once, ate their egg sacs, and left.  I thought it very strange that they would be on milkweed and  noted that these caterpillars sometimes feed on rose leaves.  There are rosebushes on either side of the milkweed plant in question, but I never spied any activity there.  I guess it will remain a mystery.
Thank you,
Anna

Eggs

Eggs

Hi again Anna,
According to Backyard Nature and BugGuide, Mourning Cloak eggs are yellow and ribbed.  We don’t think your eggs are Mourning Cloak eggs.

Hi Daniel,
I still think these are Mourning Cloak eggs, but have been known to be wrong on more than one occasion.  This picture was taken the day before they hatched and, now that I think back, they did not eat the egg sacs.  Here’s a photo of them just after hatching.
Anna

Hatchling Caterpillars

Hatchling Caterpillars

Hi Anna,
It might be very difficult to identify these Caterpillars from a photo, but they still look like hatchling Tiger Moth Caterpillars to us.  Mourning Cloak Caterpillars will stay together as they grow.  Too bad you lost track of them.  We may never know for certain.

Now I see that you are most likely correct.  I am confused, though because you say the Tiger Moth is an Eastern species.  I’ll try to do some research into this.  These caterpillars definitely did not stay together.  They disappeared, never to be seen again.
Anna

Hi again Anna,
Tiger Moths are a subfamily Arctiinae, not a single species.  See Bugguide.  There are many western species, but the Milkweed Tiger Moth (see BugGuide) is an eastern species.  We have numerous western species.  Perhaps it was a Painted Tiger Moth
The Painted Tiger Moth is a general feeder, but we don’t think it would feed on milkweed.  Female Painted Tiger Moths often lay eggs on buildings, but the caterpillars will not eat the buildings.  Upon hatching, the caterpillars soon disperse and begin feeding on a wide variety of plants in yards.
P.S.  We will be away for a week.  This entire correspondence is postdated to go live on January 20.  We will return to the office late next week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar from Peru
Location: Central Peru
January 9, 2014 6:26 pm
Dear Bugman,
today I am sending you a pic of a caterpillar from the cloudforest of Central Peru. Would you be able to identify the species? Thanks you in advance for your always great help!
Signature: Frank

What's That Caterpillar???

What’s That Caterpillar???

Hi Frank
We don’t recognize your caterpillar, but we can tell you that it will metamorphose into a moth rather than a butterfly.  We will be out of the office in mid January, and we like to postdate some submissions so that there are daily updates in our absence.  Your request will go live sometime next week.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in its identification.

Of course! I hope it is ok with you that I am sending you so many ID requests. I am well aware how popular your site is and that you cannot attend every request. But I still have a lot of unresolved (bug) issues, haha! And maybe some of my submissions will also be interesting for you.
So thank you very much, Daniel, and have a good trip, wherever you’re going!
Frank

Your photos are lovely Frank, and they are a marvelous addition to our site.  January is the slowest time of the year for us, so right now, we are not troubled by the additional time it takes us to do some of your identifications.  Summer would be a totally different situation, as we sometimes get nearly 150 identification requests in a single day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination