Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mating pair
Location: Singapore
May 18, 2014 3:01 am
Hi Daniel
I was wondering if you could help me with an ID for this mating pair. I found them in rainforest habitat on the trunk of a tree. They’d shuffle to the opposite side of the trunk when I approached them with my camera. They look like little mouse heads :-)
Thanks,
Signature: David

Mating Big Eyed Bugs, we believe

Unknown Mating Bugs

Hi David,
Our first thought is that these might be mating Big Eyed Bugs in the family Geocoridae, based on images posted to BugGuide of North American species.
  We will try to get a second opinion.  Do you by chance have an image that shows the antennae?  That can often be a helpful identification feature.  If we are correct, this is a new subcategory for our site.

Eric Eaton provides some input
Oh, lord, I have no idea.  Maybe Rhopalidae for family?  That is at best an educated guess.  I really don’t do well outside of North America for most things.
Eric

Hi Daniel
I’ve attached another photo (and Flickr link) of the same pair but from a slightly different angle. You can see the antennae a bit better on the left bug. Let me know if this helps with your identification.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/davegball/14181986096/
David.

Or perhaps Mating Scentless Plant Bugs

Unknown Mating Bugs

Thanks David,
Eric Eaton suggested perhaps Scentless Plant Bugs in the family Rhopalidae.  Your Bugs are not represented on the Bugs & Insects of Singapore website, nor did we find them on ThaiBugs.

Thank you Daniel.
By the way you might want to bookmark this site below. It has IDs for a lot of South East Asia insects that you might encounter from whatsthatbug.com subscribers.
http://www.natureloveyou.sg/Minibeast.html

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Tentacled Mountain Snail
Location: Mulu National Park, Borneo
May 18, 2014 7:16 am
On my recent climb to the Pinnacles limestone formation at the Mulu National Park, I encountered this strange grey and red snail displaying two long grey tentacles emerging from its back at an elevation of about 1000 metres above sea level. I have not seen this snail elsewhere and I see it turn up again and again in pictures from blogs of other folks who have climbed the Pinnacles – but till date, no one was able to give a positive ID.
Signature: Yours sincerely, Kok Sen Wai

Terrestrial Snail

Terrestrial Snail

Dear Kok Sen Wai,
We can’t believe we are posting two requests for very unusual Terrestrial Snails in the same day.  The markings on the shell of your Snail are very similar to this example of
Naninia obiana from Indonesia that is posted to FlickR.  We did find a matching example on FlickR that is unidentified and Eric Hunt who posted the image made this observation:  “The snail had two structures that it rapidly wiped over the shell like it was cleaning it.”  There is also an image on Laura Loves It’s Blog and another example on FlickR.  We will try contacting Susan Hewitt who frequently assists in the identification of Molluscs on our site to see if she has any ideas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cerambycidae – ? Longhorn, but what kind of?
Location: Sri Lanka
May 16, 2014 9:10 am
Hi!
We are trying to identify this longhorn-like bug. We spotted it today and Yesterday in Belihuloya, Sri Lanka. Thanks for the help!
Signature: Jeroen & Petra

Longicorn

Longicorn

Dear Jeroen & Petra,
You are correct that this impressive beetle is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae.  We cannot provide anything more specific at this time, but perhaps one of our readers will write in with additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Grasshopper in Kenya
Location: Kijabe, Kenya
May 6, 2014 5:36 am
Can you identify this grasshopper? It was found in May in the mountains of Kenya (7,000 feet).
Signature: Matt

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Dear Matt,
This is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, but we are having difficulty finding a species identification.  We have located a matching image on FlickR that is called a Clown Grasshopper, but we don’t believe that name has any importance.  That individual was found on Mount Kenya, so we suspect this might be a high altitude species.
Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck today with a species identification.

Could it be the nymph of the phymateus viripedes as seen at
http://thesmallermajority.com/2012/09/18/dangerous-candy/
It looks very similar.
Thanks for what you’re doing. It makes this fun!
Matt

Hi Matt,
While we would not entirely rule out that possibility, we believe the markings on the abdomen of the individuals in the two images are quite different.  Your Grasshopper has a dusting of small yellow spots over the entire body, while the example on The Smaller Majority has very different markings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: GOAT INSECT
Location: Encarnación, Paraguay
May 3, 2014 1:00 pm
Hi, my name is Clara Müller and I’m from Paraguay. One day, in February of this year I found this insect I’ve never seen before walking through my garden. So I wanted to know if anyone recognizes this kind of insect or knows the name of it. As you can see in the picture I took, it was light gray with little black dots with long horns and shiny eyes. It was like the size of a cockroach. It was wet and kind of hurt because of the rain. It looks like a “goat insect” to me. I’ve just seen it once and I’m curious.
I would be happy if you reply to this letter.
Thanks in advance!
Clara :)
Signature: Clara Müller

Capricorn Beetle

Capricorn Beetle

Hi Clara,
While we do not have the time right now to research the identity of your Goat Insect, we can tell you what we do know.  This is a Capricorn Beetle or Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we never really understood why they were called Capricorn Beetles until we received your request.  Capricorn is the zodiacal sign of the goat and your Capricorn Beetle really does resemble a goat, so we think Goat Insect is a perfectly acceptable common name for your particular species, which we hope to be able to identify after we return to the office.

Goat Insect is Capricorn Beetle

Cacao Beetle

Update:  May 4, 2014
Hi again Clara,
We believe your Capricorn beetle bears a strong resemblance to the images of
Steirastoma breve that are posted on the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery.  We found additional images on PaDil where it is called a Cacao Beetle and there it is noted:  “S. breve has been recorded as the most serious cerambycid pest of cocoa in the New World.”  Steirastoma breve appeared on a postage stamp from Argentina in 2002 and you may see an image of that stamp on Colnect.  There is also a nice image on FlickR that looks close to your Goat Insect, but part of the illusion is the camera angle and the shape of the head, which we cannot find duplicated in other images online.  There is one image that we located in a google image search, but alas, we cannot access the site at http://www.scielo.org.co/scielo.php?pid=S0120-04882008000200003&script=sci_arttext though we can see there is a reference to “La ‘gota’ del cacao, Steirastoma breve (Sulzer, 1776) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).”  We can’t help but to wonder if “gota” is a Spanglish name for goat, but that search has turned up a dead end since “gota” translates to “drop” or “gout” in English and “goat” in Spanish is either “chiva” or “cabra”.  We are not fully convinced that there might still be some relationship between the words “gota” in Spanish and “goat” in English, since searching the term “La ‘gota’ del Cacao” led us to yet another reference to the family Cerambycidae in the Biblioteca Naciional de Venezuela catalog and an article on Biblioteca Virtual – FUNDESYRAM that is specifically about Steirastoma breve.  Perhaps one of our readers with better Spanish language skills that our own can shed some light on this intriguing cross-linguistic word puzzle.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for your fast response, I can see the resemblance in the pictures. There isn’t any cocoa plants in my yard or (I think) in my town, but I still believe this Goat Insect is one of them .. Since my native language is Spanish I can tell you for sure that the words “Gota” and “Goat” are not related, but I still wanted to know why it’s called like this. So I searched for “La gota del cacao” on Google and I found this website: http://www.fundesyram.info/biblioteca/displayFicha.php?fichaID=3798. There is some useful information for farmers who grow cocoa and how to prevent the damages caused by our little friend. They say that the most harmful things are the Steirastoma breve larvae because they eat the bark of the plant, cut its wood and cause the death of the plant. They also say that the larvae excrete a white liquid in little “drops” which makes easier for farmers to see them. (gota = drop).
If this information is correct I think we already have our answer. Anyway if you have another information to share I would like to hear it.
Thanks for your time and have a nice week!

Thanks for writing back Clara.  We really appreciate the etymological information as language, especially when translation is involved, can be quite confusing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Carlos
Location: Costa Rica
April 29, 2014 6:10 pm
Este insecto no lo había visto antes y lo encontré en un pueblo llamado Zarcero de Costa Rica.
Signature: CarlosAS

Cicada

Cicada

Hola CarlosAS,
Este insecto es una CHICHARRA.  The Cicadas are very vocal insects, and they are considered among the loudest insects in the world.  According to the Book of Insect Records:  “The African cicada,
Brevisana brevis (Homoptera: Cicadidae) produces a calling song with a mean sound pressure level of 106.7 decibels at a distance of 50cm. Two species of North American cicadas, Tibicen walkeri Metcalf and T. resh (Haldman), produce an alarm call with a mean sound pressure level of 105.9 dB(50cm). Brevisana brevis is likely the loudest insect species on record. Cicada songs are species-specific and play a vital role in communication, reproduction, and possibly defense.”  We will attempt to identify your species of Cicada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination