Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful Lacewing
Location: 1045m above sea level in Kundasang, Sabah, Malaysia.
August 11, 2012 4:37 am
Hello Mr Bugman.
I have brought another challenge for you. This is a strange lacewing that I have found almost 3 years ago but until now I have not been able to identify it yet. More about this lacewing in http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/12573523
Dysochrysa furcata on Google image shows a similar species, could that be it ? Similar one photographed in Singapore too. http://peacockroyal.blogspot.com/2009/08/nbgy-is-still-safe-punggol.html
I will be waiting for your identification. Thanks in advance.
Signature: C.X. Wong

Lacewing

Hi C.X. Wong,
This really is a beautiful Lacewing.  We cannot verify its identification at this time, but we are posting your photo so that our readership can appreciate the diversity of Lacewings in Malaysia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Isopod?
Location: Kejimkujik National Park, Nova Scotia Canada
August 6, 2012 8:58 am
Hi there – this looks like some sort of isopod, but I’ve not been able to find anything more specific. Perhaps it’s some sort of insect nymph instead? It’s maybe 1/2” long.
It was spotted in Kejimkujik National Park, Nova Scotia Canada in August.
Signature: Jim

Possibly Net-Winged Beetle Larva

Hi Jim,
This is a beetle larva, and even experts can have difficulty distinguishing a Net-Winged Beetle larva from a Firefly Larva.  Firefly Larvae are predators and most species feed on snails.  Net-Winged Beetle Larvae tend to feed on fungus, and the presence of the partially eaten mushroom in the background contributed to our speculation that this is most likely a Net-Winged Beetle Larva, though snails will also feed on mushrooms and this could always be a predatory Firefly Larva searching for snails at their food source.  Interestingly, we found this online posting on Myrmecos Blogof a larva that looks very much like your larva.  It was originally identified as a Net-Winged Beetle, but then changed to a Firefly Larva. 

Possibly Net-Winged Beetle Larva

Thanks Daniel!  You may see that I had resubmitted my photo with a follow up question about whether it was a firefly larva, and it was in part because I also saw that same blog post.
I hadn’t considered the net winged beetle possibility.  I certainly do see beetles of approximately this type here in NS.  Even the adults look pretty similar to fireflies, don’t they?
Anyway, mystery (mostly) solved.
Thanks!
Incidentally, have there been any reports of a lack of fireflies across the continent this year, as with bees, and as with cicadas in some years?  I haven’t seen any fireflies at all in Nova Scotia this summer.

Fireflies were very plentiful in Ohio this June, and Pearl, our contact in Ohio reports that Fireflies were very common this summer, though thankfully, Japanese Beetles were noticeably absent.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

rwandan dragonfly at lake kivu 2
location:  Lake Kivu, Rwanda, Africa
August 3, 2012
hi daniel, can you determine the species of this colorful insect? thanks! clare.

Magenta Dragonfly from Rwanda

Hi Clare,
Your photo is lovely as is this magenta Dragonfly.  Sadly, we cannot seem to locate our copy of the Field Guide to Rwandan Dragonflies on the book shelf.  That was a joke.  We often have tremendous difficulty distinguishing our numerous North American species from one another since so many species resemble one another.  We couldn’t find any color matches on Grag Lasley’s African Dragonflies and Damselflies Index.  There are nearly 5000 photos posted to Africa Dragonfly and 908 species are listed and classified, but we cannot envision having enough time to click through them all.  We typed dragonfly and Africa into a search engine and we were surprised to find a close visual match, but alas, it led us to a Texas website with an online article entitled Aerial Acrobats, but there is no information on the species in the photo, or even a location where the photo was taken, though the Dragonflies in the show are supposed to be Texas species.  We are sorry that we cannot offer anything more concrete.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Thursday, 2 August, 2012
We first noticed one of these 1 1/4 inch long Cerambycids last weekend when Loredana came to dinner and we made homemade ravioli filled with spinach and ricotta, in a butter sage sauce.
  There was no time to take a photo and Loredana was a bit freaked out when we picked up the lovely Bycid that was attracted to the porch light.  Then last night, another was spotted on the wooden door and it was captured for a few photos.  The beetle was carried on Daniel’s wrist to the porch light to improve the exposure.  We have posted photos of this unknown Mount Washington Bycid once before in 2007.  It appears that may be a female of the same species owing to the shorter antennae.  We don’t know what species this is, so we are going to contact Doug Yanega at UC Riverside for his opinion.

Male Longhorned Borer Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Could you please help me put a name to this mantis?
Location: Costa Rica, Heredia Province mountains
July 31, 2012 9:13 am
Hi.
Found this beautiful mantis with moss camouflage in the north part of the Costa Rican Central Valley (mountains).
Could you please provide me with a scientific name?
Thanks
Signature: Oscar Blanco

Moss Mimic Mantis

Hi Oscar,
Your photos are stunning and we imagine a Mantis expert should have no problem with a species identity thanks to your specific location information.  The best we could come up with in a short time is this similar looking Moss Mimic Mantis from Costa Rica on the Minibeast Wildlife Rainforest Encounters website (with a comment that identifies the genus as
Pseudoacanthops) and image on a French Website Elevage de Mantes Exotiques et Francaisesthat looks like a perfect match to your mantis.  Alas, we do not speak French, though Costa Rica is mentioned several times in the comments as is the genus name Pseudoacanthops.  Perhaps one of our readers will supply some useful information.  If you ever learn the answer, please let us know.

Moss Mimic Mantis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown wasp or ichneumon
Location: Island Park, Idaho
July 27, 2012 3:26 pm
Could you identify this flying bug for me. It was shot in Island Park, Idaho in July 2012.
Signature: Brent

Unknown Ichneumon

Hi Brent,
We agree that this is some species of Ichneumon, but after browsing through the BugGuide possibilities twice with no luck at a species or genus identity, we are unable to provide you with that information.  We are posting it as an unidentified Ichenumon and perhaps we will be able to determine the species in the future.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination