Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Trapdoor Species I.D
Location: South Okanagan, BC, Canada
October 8, 2013 8:34 pm
I have identified this to be a male Trapdoor Spider but am interested in getting more info with regards to the particular species. This one was very aggressive and jumpy, was hard to trap and when I put a BBQ skewer stick into the jar to get some good body pics and get him moving, the spider launched itself at it, clamped on with its fangs and would not let go.
I was able to lift his entire body up to the rim of the jar, approx 12” while he hung on with his fangs. I found the spider making its way into my house at 4:30am, he attempted to run inside once I opened the door. While trying to place a jar over him, he reared and made small charging attempts at the jar with his fangs extended. I have several more pictures if you need more to properly identify this spider. Thanks!
Signature: Luiza

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Hi Luiza,
We are very late and haven’t any time to research this at this moment, but we are posting your photos and we hope to get some input from our readership today.  Your photos should be very helpful for identification purposes.

Ed. Note October 14, 2013:  This spider somewhat resembles the Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spiders in the genus Aptostichus as pictured on BugGuide.

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Cat
Location: Andover, NJ – backyard
September 24, 2013 7:33 am
I’m totally stumped by this one and hope you can help. It is a distinctive orange color with some yellow spots just above the face. The face is black/white and the tail has a point. It has some fine hairs, but is mostly hairless. It was making its way across a pavered walkway in our garden, apparently heading for the mulched area? Length, approximately one inch.
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Unknown Moth Caterpillar

Clear Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Hi Deborah,
Other than figuring that this is a Moth Caterpillar, we haven’t a clue either.  We will post your photos and we hope someone will write in with a closer identification.  We cannot even provide a family at this time.

Unknown Moth Caterpillar

Clear Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Thanks for getting back to me,  Daniel.  I’ve also sent the photos to several local naturalists and so far ,  no one can identify it.  Quite a mystery.  I will drop you a note if I learn anything.

Update:  September 25, 2013
Thanks to a comment from one of our readers, we now know that this is a Clear Owlet Moth Caterpillar, Acronicta clarescens.  There are matching photos on BugGuide.

Hi again,
Just wanted to let you know that I found a local naturalist who identified this as a Clear Dagger Moth caterpillar (Acronicta clarescens).  Mystery solved…
Debbi

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Bug!
Location: Harare, Zimbabwe
September 22, 2013 11:16 am
Hi,
We saw this bug yesterday at around 20:00, in a house yard at Harare, Zimbabwe.
The size was about 1 cm for the body and 2 cm for the tail.
What is that???
Signature: African S.

Longhorned Orthopteran

Longhorned Orthopteran

Dear African S.,
This appears to be a member of the order Orthoptera, and it is probably a Shieldbacked Katydid.  Judging by the ovipositor, it is a female.  We hope by posting your photo, one of our readers may be able to assist with a species identification.

Dear Daniel Marlos,
Thank you for your quick and interesting answer!
I’ll keep following,
Yours,
Shira

Hi Shira,
One of our readers supplied a comment suggesting this might be a Blattid with an Ootheca, which translates to a Cockroach with an Egg Capsule.

Update:  Septmeber 27, 2013
After receiving a few comments, we agree that this is a Cockroach, but we have not had any luck finding any similar looking images on the internet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs on deer netting
Location: Northeastern Massachusetts
September 18, 2013 2:04 pm
Many groups of eggs have been deposited on my deer netting this year. I’d like to know what kind of insect they are. For size reference, the netting is one-half inch per square.
I live in northeastern Massachusetts. Groups of eggs were deposited throughout this summer. The photo shows one group, but there are about a hundred groups over 30 feet of netting. The colors are various shades of beige to medium brown. Several groups have either hatched or been eaten. I have been using using deer netting for 4 years, but this is the first year for eggs.
Thanks!
Signature: Pam

Eggs on Fence

Eggs on Fence

Hi Pam,
We can’t say for certain what type of eggs these are, but our initial guess is Moth Eggs of some type.  Perhaps one of our readers will have an idea.

Possibly Moth Eggs

Possibly Moth Eggs

More information:  The deer netting with the egg clusters is in full sun.  The netting that is in partial shade has no eggs.  Thanks for your help!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: scary bug
Location: campground in San Jacinto, CA
September 16, 2013 11:17 pm
found hiding under the rain fly of our tent
Signature: your choice

Shield-Backed Katydid

Shield-Backed Katydid

The sharp, upturned curve of the ovipositor on this female Shield-Backed Katydid is quite distinctive, yet we cannot match it to any photos posted to BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Spider
Location: Perth, Western Australia
September 16, 2013 12:02 am
Hi,
I would love an ID for this spider if possible – I think it is a Lynx spider, but having looked through various guides online, I can’t see a similar looking one? I found it on my cat’s scratching post on my verandah in Perth, Western Australia. Body length approx. 8-10mm.
It has an interesting mosaic pattern on the abdomen.
He was released unharmed after the photo :)
Many thanks
Tanya
Signature: Tanya

Possibly Male Orbweaver

Possibly Male Orbweaver

Hi Tanya,
The eye pattern on this spider looks most like that of the Orbweavers in the family Araneidae (see BugGuide).  The large pedipalps indicate this is a male spider.  The body pattern also reminds us of Orbweaver Spiders, so our initial guess is that this is some male Orbweaver, but we haven’t had any luck matching it to an images online.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with an ID.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination