Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scorpions in house
Location: Edenvale, South Africa
January 16, 2014 12:29 am
Hi,
I live in Edenvale South Africa and this is the 5th scorpion we found in our house. I stepped on one (I think its the same one on the photo) about two years ago and it burnt like hell but I managed to sort it out with a bit of aloe.
I found this little dude (a baby one) in my drawer this morning – would love to know more about them.
Signature: MaddyZA

Scorpion

Scorpion

Dear MaddyZA,
This is one of the most beautiful Scorpions we have ever seen.  We will attempt to identify it tomorrow.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – What’s This Egg?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
November 7, 2013 2:13 pm
Hi Daniel,
When I was out looking for Monarch Caterpillars on the Mexican Milkweed the other day, I spied these eggs on the bottom of a leaf. Can you please identify what laid them? I’m hoping something beneficial.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Moth Eggs, we believe

Moth Eggs, we believe

Hi Anna,
We just discovered this unanswered request that dates to our return after a short holiday.  The shape of the eggs and the quantity leads us to believe these are Moth Eggs.  Biophotonics has a photo of Milkweed Tiger Moth Caterpillars,
Euchaetes egle, that is attributed to Kailen Mooney of the University of California, Irvine, however, to the best of our knowledge, the Milkweed Tiger Moth is an eastern species.  See the BugGuide range map for confirmation.  We have not had any luck locating any moths that feed on Milkweed in California.

Hi Daniel,
I think these may have been Mourning Cloak eggs.  They all hatched out at once, ate their egg sacs, and left.  I thought it very strange that they would be on milkweed and  noted that these caterpillars sometimes feed on rose leaves.  There are rosebushes on either side of the milkweed plant in question, but I never spied any activity there.  I guess it will remain a mystery.
Thank you,
Anna

Eggs

Eggs

Hi again Anna,
According to Backyard Nature and BugGuide, Mourning Cloak eggs are yellow and ribbed.  We don’t think your eggs are Mourning Cloak eggs.

Hi Daniel,
I still think these are Mourning Cloak eggs, but have been known to be wrong on more than one occasion.  This picture was taken the day before they hatched and, now that I think back, they did not eat the egg sacs.  Here’s a photo of them just after hatching.
Anna

Hatchling Caterpillars

Hatchling Caterpillars

Hi Anna,
It might be very difficult to identify these Caterpillars from a photo, but they still look like hatchling Tiger Moth Caterpillars to us.  Mourning Cloak Caterpillars will stay together as they grow.  Too bad you lost track of them.  We may never know for certain.

Now I see that you are most likely correct.  I am confused, though because you say the Tiger Moth is an Eastern species.  I’ll try to do some research into this.  These caterpillars definitely did not stay together.  They disappeared, never to be seen again.
Anna

Hi again Anna,
Tiger Moths are a subfamily Arctiinae, not a single species.  See Bugguide.  There are many western species, but the Milkweed Tiger Moth (see BugGuide) is an eastern species.  We have numerous western species.  Perhaps it was a Painted Tiger Moth
The Painted Tiger Moth is a general feeder, but we don’t think it would feed on milkweed.  Female Painted Tiger Moths often lay eggs on buildings, but the caterpillars will not eat the buildings.  Upon hatching, the caterpillars soon disperse and begin feeding on a wide variety of plants in yards.
P.S.  We will be away for a week.  This entire correspondence is postdated to go live on January 20.  We will return to the office late next week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar from Peru
Location: Central Peru
January 9, 2014 6:26 pm
Dear Bugman,
today I am sending you a pic of a caterpillar from the cloudforest of Central Peru. Would you be able to identify the species? Thanks you in advance for your always great help!
Signature: Frank

What's That Caterpillar???

What’s That Caterpillar???

Hi Frank
We don’t recognize your caterpillar, but we can tell you that it will metamorphose into a moth rather than a butterfly.  We will be out of the office in mid January, and we like to postdate some submissions so that there are daily updates in our absence.  Your request will go live sometime next week.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in its identification.

Of course! I hope it is ok with you that I am sending you so many ID requests. I am well aware how popular your site is and that you cannot attend every request. But I still have a lot of unresolved (bug) issues, haha! And maybe some of my submissions will also be interesting for you.
So thank you very much, Daniel, and have a good trip, wherever you’re going!
Frank

Your photos are lovely Frank, and they are a marvelous addition to our site.  January is the slowest time of the year for us, so right now, we are not troubled by the additional time it takes us to do some of your identifications.  Summer would be a totally different situation, as we sometimes get nearly 150 identification requests in a single day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found this In my garage
Location: Connecticut
January 10, 2014 4:04 pm
After googling everything I could possibly think of to figure this out, no prevail. Hope your guys will know what it is. It would move but as soon as I got close to it it would stop.
Signature: Help me haha

Thing isn't Bug

Thing isn’t Bug

We cannot say for certain what this thing is, but we are very confident it is NOT a bug.  It looks like a seedhead or other part of a plant.  Perhaps the wind was moving it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID help needed
Location: Venus Drive , Singapore
January 11, 2014 1:16 am
Hi ! Im new to nature macro photography. I shot this tiny little furry thing which crawls. Can u help ID this ?
Thk you
Signature: Eric Lim

Possibly a Caterpillar

Possibly a Caterpillar

Dear Eric,
While your macro image is quite artful, it doesn’t really show many characteristics that would be helpful for an identification.  Do you have a more traditional angle, like a dorsal view or a lateral view of this creature?  Our best guess is that it is some type of Moth Caterpillar.

Update:  January 12, 2014
While researching a South African Caterpillar, we discovered these photos of a Lymantriinae Caterpillar from South Africa on ISpot that looks similar to this creature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Leaf Footed Bug
Location: Rietfontein, Pretoria, South Africa
January 9, 2014 12:00 am
In response to an earlier post I am sending two photos of a bug that I suspect is a Leaf Footed or True bug. It was observed in my garden during summer (November) 2013. Your identification help is highly appreciated.
Signature: Robert Erasmus

Immature True Bug

Immature True Bug

Hi Robert,
We are currently experiencing a technical situation that we don’t quite understand and that has caused us to contact our webmaster.  The comment you supplied to our old posting of Possibly Leaf Footed Bug Nymph from South Africa has appeared in our email account, but not to the posting itself, so we cannot approve the comment to the site.  We are happy you submitted your own photographs and we would like to address your questions.  It is interesting that you labeled one file as a Stink Bug and one as a True Bug.  We still believe the posting you originally commented upon is likely a Leaf Footed Bug, and we agree that your nymph appears to be a Stink Bug or Shield Bug nymph.  Nymphs can be notoriously difficult to identify as they often differ considerably from adults and it is generally the adult or imago that appears in identification guide books.  With that said, we will attempt to research your request.  In the meantime, we will go live and enlist the assistance of our readership, and we will follow our gut instincts and classify this as a Stink Bug or Shield Bug.

True Bug Nymph

True Bug Nymph

Update:
Your nymph looks similar to, but not identical to, this Stink Bug nymph from Pretoria that is posted to Project Noah.  We found a pretty good match on ISpot, but it is not identified beyond the Stink Bug family Pentatomidae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination