Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: The Gambia

Location: Sami Pachonki, The Gambia, Africa
September 22, 2014 3:12 am
Found this sort of hemipteran looking bug in my garden one evening. He must be covered in some kind of fungus, but i’ve no idea what it is!
Signature: Dee

Unknown Immature True Bug

Unknown Immature True Bug

Dear Dee,
We agree that this looks like a Hemipteran, but we can be even more specific in our guess.  This appears to be a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, and it appears to be an immature individual.  Though it appears to be infested with fungus, we would also like to propose another possibility.  There is at least one species of Heteropteran that has a nymph that has a sticky exoskeleton that attracts lint and debris, effectively camouflaging the insect.  That species is the Masked Hunter, a species of Assassin Bug.  We hope we are able to provide you with a more concise identification that is not based on pure speculation.

Unknown Immature True Bug

Unknown Immature True Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Madagascan cricket
Location: Ifaty, Madagascar
September 20, 2014 2:07 am
Are you able to id this Madagascan cricket? Seen on a night visit to a small nature reserve at Ifaty on the coast of south west Madagascar.
Signature: Niall Corbet

Unknown Ensiferan

Unknown Ensiferan

Hi again Niall,
We are contacting Piotr Naskrecki about this Ensiferan as well.

Thanks Daniel, I look forward to his thoughts.
Cheers, Niall

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cricket, Madagascar
Location: Ifaty, Madagascar
September 20, 2014 2:53 am
Another cricket from Ifaty in south west Madagascar – any ideas for id?
Signature: Niall Corbet

Ensiferan

Ensiferan

Hi Niall,
We believe this Ensiferan or Longhorned Orthopteran is a type of Katydid.  We are contacting Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki regarding both of your submissions.  The red eyes and blue legs are quite distinctive.

Katydid possibly

Katydid possibly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID please
Location: near water fall
September 16, 2014 6:58 pm
Please ID this bug. First it looks moth to me. But i am confused.
Signature: hello

Katydid

Katydid

UHHH, and where was this water fall?????

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bewildering Fungus eater
Location: Singapore
September 9, 2014 6:39 am
Hi Daniel
Hope you’re well.
Was wondering if you could help me narrow down an ID for the attached insect. It was on a dead log together with a lot of fungus weevils and fungus beetles so I suspected it liked the fungus too. I’ve never seen anything like it before. As usual when I see something bewildering I think of you :-)
Thanks,
Signature: David

What's That Beetle???

What’s That Beetle???

Dear David,
Your images are spectacular, and this is truly an odd looking beetle, and we haven’t even a guess at its identity at the time of posting.  Alas, we cannot research this at this time because we must rush off to work.  Perhaps one of our readers has a clue or the time to investigate.  It does appear to be carrying some Mites on the elytra.  The placement of the eyes is quite unusual, almost like those of a frog that lies submerged with only its eyes visible above water.

Beetle from Singapore

Bark-Gnawing Beetle from Singapore

Hi Daniel and David:
My first impression was that it looked like an odd Jewel Beetle (Buprestidae) but I could find nothing similar online. I believe this is actually a Bark-gnawing Beetle (Trogossitidae), a relatively small and obscure family of beetles. The dorsal markings resemble some Leperina (=Lepidopteryx) species, but I think there are too many dissimilarities for that to be the correct genus. I believe it is probably a species of Xenoglena, for which the lack of elytral scales and dorsally placed eyes are diagnostic. Information is generally lacking for Asian Trogossitidae, but Kolibáč (2009) provided a very complete (and technical) description of the family. Google Books provides access to this document – see page 46 for discussion and page 37 for representative pictures of Xenoglena sp.  I have a feeling it could be X. deyrollei, but I have found no image for that species so I really can’t be certain.  If you have difficulty accessing that site the same information for Xenoglena sp. is also provided atspecies-id.net.  Despite the common name for the family, these beetles are actually predatory. According to Kolibáč (2009) “Adults dwell on fallen trees and dry branches, hunting for xylophagous insects. They fly and run at great speed and appear very like some jewel beetles in body shape.”  Regards. Karl

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink Eggs?
Location: Northeast Florida, riverside
August 6, 2014 11:03 am
Hello there,
My kids and I were examining a bald cypress at a local park last week, checking out the neat cones and leaves, when we noticed many of these pink pods randomly distributed all over the leaves. I’ve searched far and wide, but haven’t figured out what they are. Are they even bug eggs? I only figured they were because no readings on cypress trees mention any growths like these, and they were so randomly placed.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Alana

Probably Galls on Cypress

Probably Galls on Cypress

Dear Alana,
Your request has been on our back burner for a few days while we have attempted an identification.  Though these are not theoretically insect eggs, we do believe they are Galls.  Galls are growths on plants that are often caused by insects (mainly Gall Wasps and certain types of Flies and Moths) or Mites, but sometimes they are caused by viruses or other means.  Galls can form on any part of the plant, but are most common on leaves and twigs, but roots, stems and other parts of plants are not exempt.  See Texas A&M AgriLIFE Extension for some general information on Galls.  Your Galls look nothing like the Cypress Twig Gall Midge pictured on Featured Creatures, but there are probably thousands of different types of Galls that are found on oak trees.
  Your Galls are also different from the Cypress Gall Midges pictured on BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck identifying the Galls you found on the cypress in your park.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination