Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
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Subject: identification of 2 caterpillars.
Location: Bangalore , Karnataka, INDIA
December 12, 2014 2:11 am
Dear sir,
I like to photograph nature ,in particular flora fauna around our campus,making it useful for our Bioscience faculty to use it for teaching the students in an excited way.
While doing so i came across 2 caterpillars with strange textures:

2.Second one i will upload in my next mail.
One important thing – These pictures from India – I hope you will be able to accommodate and identify. I am mentioning this because the 2/3 sites where I tried ,INDIA is not on the list of areas to be covered.
Kindly let me know.It will excite the Boys!!
Thanking you.
Signature: Nanda Gopal

Unknown Caterpillar

Unknown Caterpillar

Hi Nanda,
We are finally getting around to posting your second caterpillar.  We were unable to identify this creature.  It appears to be covered with a substance that is unusual, like the waxy substance secreted by some Lanternflies and by the North American Butternut Wooly Worm which is a Sawfly Larva.

Unknown Caterpillar

Unknown Caterpillar

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Subject: Seed like things in drawer
Location: central MA
December 10, 2014 9:49 am
Hello,
Recently I noticed the bottom drawer of my desk was sticking and little hard black seed like things were falling out to the floor when I opened it. Today I pulled the whole drawer out and found it was loaded with these seeds in the runner area of the drawer. They are black, hard, and fairly circular. They do not look like mouse droppings to me. Any ideas?
Thanks!
Danielle
Signature: Danielle

Unknown Black Pellets

Unknown Black Pellets

Dear Danielle,
We do not believe these are mouse droppings, and interestingly, we just posted a nearly identical identification request from Connecticut
We do not believe they are either eggs or seeds.  Our best guess is Termite Pellets at this time, but the black coloration is unlike any Termite Pellets we have seen.  We will continue to research this matter and perhaps one of our readers has a better suggestion.

Unknown Black Pellets

Unknown Black Pellets

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Subject: unknown bug eggs
Location: Portland, Ct.
December 7, 2014 7:23 pm
for the past few years I have discovered piles (100+) of these tiny bead sized, black, shiny, hard shelled eggs. There only found in my basement. two piles were found in my garage. One was in a drawer of a RubberMaid rolling cart and the other large pile was on a open cabinet shelf piled high in a corner. when I touched the pile they all collapsed as if they were wet at one point. the other piles were in the cellar in a large plastic storage bin and also in my storage bag for my Christmas tree.
I took a picture with a microscope app the magnified 8xs and I will also include a few in my hand for a prospective.
Signature: Susan Popielaski

Seeds, we believe

Seeds, we believe

Dear Susan,
These look more like seeds than bug eggs to us, but we have no explanation regarding why you found them or what they might be.
  Interestingly, we just received another nearly identical identification request from Massachusetts, so we feel compelled to research this more.  Termite Pellets also come to mind, but they look different from Termite Pellets we have seen in the past.

Seeds, we believe

Seeds, we believe

Thanks for replying. We don’t have termites..we did have a ant problem that we eradicated. I’ve done research as well and found that some insects eggs are seed imposters,?
The piles are sort of glued together in a type of thin transparent sac. As soon as you touch them with slight pressure they break free and the tidy pile collapses.
Keep me posted, my FB friends are as curious as I.
Best,
Susan.

Some ants may stockpile seeds, but we believe that is a very remote possibility.

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Subject: Phasmids for ID (2 species)
Location: Patyay, Mayoyao, Ifugao Province, Philippines
December 7, 2014 10:24 pm
Greetings in peace!
During my last two travels to the remotes of Ifugao Province, north of Luzon, Philippines, I encountered these phasmid creatures which fascinates me, My recollection of past encounters were all shades of brown and gentle creatures. As to these new finds, these were of bright colored that defies the common characteristic of a camouflaged stick and seems more aggressive as it spew out some kind of a pungent odor to deter invaders unlike the tame brown.
Last October 6, 2014, I managed to capture these creatures by few frames. the red winged somehow secretes the foul smell but the greenish haven’t observe the same for I didn’t handled it closely to me. Furthermore, the red winged were considered by the local folks as pest in their ricefields as they masticate the young leaves of rice.
I hope we can ID these stick for proper recognition.
Thank you!
Signature: Kdon

Walkingstick

Walkingstick:  Orthomeria species

Dear Kdon,
The black Walkingstick with the red wings appears to be the same species of Walkingsticks we posted in 2011 when there was a major outbreak.  That species has still not been identified.  We are posting your images and we will attempt to do some research later today when we have more time.

Walkingstick

Walkingstick:  Ophicrania species

Walkingstick

Walkingstick:  Ophicrania species

Dear Daniel,
I highly appreciate your prompt response. last week, i had a ID suggestion from Project Noah
for the black and red stick :
as Genus name Orthomeria sp.. Adult female confirmed by Bruno Kneubühler. Bruno,
&
For the greenish with multi color abdomen:
Ophicrania sp. is confirmed by Bruno Kneubühler. But it might be another species than viridinervis. So, I suggest we go either with Ophicrania sp. or Ophocrania cf. viridinervis.
These were their suggestions, we might as well utilize it as starting point to pin the proper Id.
Thanks,
Kdon

Thanks for the update Kdon.  We found Orthomeria pictured on Phasmatodea.com where it states:  ” This is a totally NEW species i found 3 weeks ago in the north west of luzon and this eggs offer is the very first time ever.”  Other images can be found on Strasilky-Phasmatodea.  A member of the genus Ophicrania is pictured on Phasma Werkgroep.

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Subject: Funny looking catterpilar
Location: Randfontein South Africa
November 29, 2014 6:04 am
Hi I just found this guy under attack by a bunch of ants, saved it and placed it on a strawberry leaf to photograph. (Don’t think that is the diet of this caterpillar)
The closest pic I could find on the net is of the one eyed sphinx moth from Alaska. This however is in Randfontein South Africa. Any ideas?
Kind regards
Vic
Signature: Vic Mouton

Probably Nymphalidae Caterpillar

Moth Caterpillar

Dear Vic,
Though it has a caudal horn, we do not believe this is a Hornworm.  We believe this is a Butterfly Caterpillar, not a moth caterpillar, and we believe it is in the Brush Footed Butterfly Nymphalidae.  We have not had any luck finding any matching images online, and we have contacted butterfly caterpillar specialist Keith Wolfe to see if he can identify your caterpillar.

Probably Nymphalidae Caterpillar

Moth Caterpillar

Correction Courtesy of Keith Wolfe
Hi Daniel; I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving!  This is definitely not a nymphalid (butterfly) larva of any sort, but rather an immature moth.  Sorry to be of limited help.
Best wishes,
Keith

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Subject: Honduras- Spider
Location: El Ocote, Honduras
November 19, 2014 7:35 pm
HI, I visited the forests of Honduras and came across this beautiful spider! The body was easily the size of my palm, and its legs longer than my fingers!!! It was on a rock, that was in the middle of a creek. This was in easternHonduras, in the forests outside the small community of El Ocote.
The back part of the body had mostly black, but was fat and round. The legs were banded with black and brown stripes.
This beauty was easily larger than my hand when we took the legs into account. No web that I could see.
Sadly I asked our military escort to grab this pic and we couldn’t get much closer due to the creek and safety reasons…. when i asked him what type this was, all he said was spider in Spanish.
Signature: Curious Traveler

Unknown Spider

Long Legged Fishing Spider

Dear Curious Traveler,
Your image is too blurry for an identification.

Can you identify this Spider?
or if not,any educated guesses?
A better description is as follows:
Long thin legs with alternating black and brown bands, each leg aprox  6 inches long.
Abdomen/body aprox 4 inches long.
Fangs were aprox half an inch.
The  main body was just a  plain brown and then the back part of the body was all brown with no markings then it faded to black, no markings again.
Location: found on a rock in the middle of a creek  in the woods about 45 mins outside the village of El Ocote in eastern Honduras. NO web nearby.
Time: middle of afternoon aprox 12noon, on august 25th 2014.

We will post your blurry image and give our readership a chance at identification.

Update:  Long Legged Fishing Spider
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash who runs our sister site Insetologia out of Brazil, we believe this is a Long Legged Fishing Spider in the family Trechaleidae.  Both the shape of the spider and the behavior that is described in the submission fit for this family.

Oh wow thank you! I’m sorry I could not get a better picture but it is nice to get an idea :-)
Looking up pics online and it does look a lot like the spider. The body in the back is slightly off, but  I think that may have been it! Thank you!

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