Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
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Subject: Swallowtail?
Location: Milpa Alta, Mexico
August 28, 2015 1:26 pm
About 4 inches long
Picture taken Aug 14, 2015
Signature: Leo Perez

Hornworm from Mexico

Hornworm from Mexico

Hi Leo,
This is not a Swallowtail caterpillar.  It is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, but we have still not been able to identify it to the species level.

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Subject: Dragonflies are awesome!
Location: Back Bay National Park, Virginia Beach
August 14, 2015 3:21 am
Hi Daniel!
I absolutely love your site, by the way.
Anyways, my dad and I took a trip to Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, at Virginia beach, at the end of July. My dad and I both love birdwatching, so we go there with binoculars and a camera, in my case. To my delight, the place was filled with many different species of dragonflies!!! Needless to say, I didn’t get much birdwatching done. 😛
I’m attaching three photos and (I think) I’ve identified the first two, but I have no idea what the third might be. Any thoughts?
1- Four spotted pennant
2- Widow skimmer (female)
3- ???
Thank you for all the work you do!
Signature: Al

Four Spotted Pennant

Four Spotted Pennant

Dear Al,
Thanks for the compliment.  We agree with your identification of the Four Spotted Skimmer based on images posted to BugGuide, but we are not certain that the second individual is a female Widow Skimmer.  Often female Dragonflies have less obvious coloration and markings and they can be more difficult to identify.  We are posting your images and perhaps one of our readers will weigh in on an identification while we continue to research the matter.

Unidentified Dragonfly

Unidentified Dragonfly

Unidentified Dragonfly

Unidentified Dragonfly

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Subject: Moth ?
Location: On a vanilla plant
August 4, 2015 12:25 pm
Found an interesting looking Catapillar on my patio- my enclosed patio – during recent heavy downpours in Central Florida – Zone 9B
He may have come in accidentally on some other plant I was moving around I am very familiar with butterfly caterpillars and some swings moth caterpillar’s but I can’t put my finger on what this is there are no Morance I touched him he’s very smooth didn’t exhibit any need anything as far as touching him
Signature: From Jenny

P.S.  Not swings Sphinx
And he was very smooth

Probably Hornless Hornworm

Unknown Caterpillar

Dear Jenny,
We believe, but we are not certain, that this is a hornless Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae.  Are you certain this is a vanilla orchid?  It looks to us like a
Hoya, a plant with milky sap, related to milkweed in the family Apocynaceae.  We tried to identify your caterpillar on the Sphingidae Larvae of Miami-Dade County, Florida site, but with no luck.  It is possible this is a tropical introduction that has not yet been reported in Florida, and it is also possible that this is an unusual color form of a more common species.  Several hornless caterpillars in the genus Erinnyis are listed as feeding on plants from the aforementioned family.  Caterpillars in the genus Eumorpha are also hornless.  We are contacting Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide any information on this critter’s identity. 

Probably Hornless Hornworm

Unknown Caterpillar

Bill Oehlke Responds
I do not recognize it as a Sphingidae species.
I think it belongs to another family

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Subject: Identification Needed!
Location: Hetauda, Central Region, Nepal
July 30, 2015 5:58 pm
Hello Bugman,
I have this little creature that looks amazing, i have always found it living and feeding on Bitter Melon or Bitter Gourd leaves.
Now please give me name. Thank you very much.
Signature: Suman Acharya

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Suman,
Our initial web search did not produce any matching images while searching with the key word Nepal, but we believe, based on the similarity in appearance to other species from other locales that we have identified, that this is the larva of a Tortoise Beetle in the tribe Cassidini.  Here is an image of a North American individual from BugGuide.  The larvae of Tortoise Beetles are often quite spiny, they feed on leaves and they are often very host specific.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide some more specific information.

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

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Subject: Brazil Wasp Moth (Dinia?)
Location: Fenix, Parana State, Brazil
July 29, 2015 4:10 am
I found a moth similar to the one in my picture, though clearly a different species, here:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2013/04/07/wasp-moth-from-brazil/
The photo I am submitting was taken on the 1st August 2008 in Parana State near the town of Fenix, close to the Ivai river. This one has a slimmer body and a yellow bar across the thorax, but is superficially otherwise similar.
Signature: Patrick

Wasp Mimic Moth

Wasp Mimic Moth

Dear Patrick,
We agree that your moth looks very similar to the
Dinea species you found in our archives, and we also found a similar looking Ctechunid on Project Noah, but it is only identified to the subtribe Ctenuchina.  Perhaps Cesar Crash who runs a sister site in Brazil, Insetologia, will recognize this lovely Wasp Mimic.

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Subject: Milkweed bug?
Location: New South Wales, Australia
July 21, 2015 1:19 pm
Hello! Came across this bug last week while in New South Wales, Australia, but am unable to find its species online. All I’m certain about is that it’s in the true bug (Hemiptera) category, and highly likely from the family Lygaeidae. (Photo has been scaled down for upload purposes)
Any help will be appreciated.
Thanks and regards
Signature: Abigail

Unknown Seed Bug

Unknown Seed Bug

Dear Abigail,
Our “go to” site for Australian identifications, the Brisbane Insect Site, has wonderful images of this species, but they are only identified to the family level and they are being unofficially called the 4 Coloured Bug.  They were feeding on a milk vine plant in the genus
Marsdenia.  An image on FlickR is also listed as unknown and identified to the family level.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide additional information.

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