Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Insect
Location: Lincolnshire, England
July 23, 2016 7:01 am
This landed on my arm. I have no idea what is neither do the people on Reddit. It’s roughly half an inch big, I’m in Lincolnshire, England. It’s fully intact and it has wings. Help me indenting this.
Signature: Elliot Cutts

Possibly Unknown True Bug

Olympic Bug

Dear Elliot,
We might even be more confused about this critter’s identity than you are.  At first glance, we thought perhaps we were seeing a headless mantid because of the raptorial front legs, until we realized those were the antennae and there were three complete sets of green legs.  The antennae seem to be the best clue in your image for identification purposes, and our best guess at this time is that this might be a member of the True Bug suborder Heteroptera because according to BugGuide, True Bugs can be identified by:  “Antennae, when not hidden, have 4-5 segments.”  Also, some True Bugs have modified antennae like this North American Giant Mesquite Bug.  We have not had any luck locating anything remotely similar looking on the British Bugs Heteroptera page, nor have we had any luck locating anything similar looking on UK Safari.  It is possible we missed something, but we can’t help but to wonder if perhaps this is a recently introduced species, or an exotic rogue that just happened to have found its way to your arm. We have sought some professional assistance, and perhaps our readership will write in with suggestions.

Eric Eaton identifies Olympic Bug
Hi, Daniel:
I think it *is* native.  It is the “Olympic Bug,” Heterotoma planicornis, a type of mirid plant bug.  Here’s more about it:
http://www.britishbugs.org.uk/heteroptera/Miridae/heterotoma_planicornis.html
Cool critter, thanks for sharing!
Eric

According to British Bugs:  “The broad and flattened 2nd antennal segment, dark ground colour and contrasting greenish legs make this species unmistakeable.   Abundant throughout most of Britain on various plants and trees, in particular nettles. Both adults and the reddish nymphs feed on small insects as well as plant buds and unripe fruits.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual bees in Southern California
Location: 90066
June 22, 2016 5:48 pm
I’ve been seeing these bees in my garden occasionally, and I haven’t been able to identify them. It’s about the size of a honey bee, but fuzzier and grayer. They seem to like yellow flowers best, especially cosmos. Do you know what they are? Where can I find more information about them?
PS: Great web site. This is an incredibly helpful resource.
Signature: Sunny in Mar Vista

Solitary Bee

Possibly Furry Leafcutter Bee

Dear Sunny,
According to BugGuide, there are 3500 species of Bees in North America.  We are guessing your white bee might be a Furry Leafcutter Bee,
Megachile perihirta, based on this BugGuide image, and according to BugGuide‘s data, there have been California sightings from May through October.  We will attempt to identify your second Solitary Bee, though we may just contact Eric Eaton to get his input as we anticipate difficulty securing an accurate identification if left to our own devices.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

Thanks for the information. I didn’t realize these were 2 different species.

Solitary Bee

Solitary Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this Bug
Location: California, Central Valley
May 31, 2016 2:54 pm
We continue to have these bugs pop in our house. Not sure what they are. We live in manteca California central valley.
Signature: Matt

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Matt,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  We will attempt to contact beetle expert Arthur Evans to see if he can provide a more specific identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Kind of Bug is this?
Location: Suburbs of Chicago
May 27, 2016 6:01 pm
I am a student photographer and as an assignment I am to photograph nature and then explain my pictures. I took about 100 pictures (manual and automatic, color and black and white). After looking online no one in my family can identify this bug. It seems to not be using its 5th and 6th legs and it isn’t flying, maybe a wing is broken.
Signature: Autumn

Braconid, we believe

Unknown Ichneumon

Dear Autumn,
We do not yet have a species identification, but we have determined that your parasitic Wasp must be in the superfamily Ichneumonoidea, which according to BugGuide has only two families, the Braconids and the Ichneumons.  Our money was originally on this being a female Braconid, but our browsing through both families on BugGuide did not produce species that even looks similar.  We are posting your request as Unidentified and we hope it does not remain so tagged for long.

Ichneumon, possibly

Unknown Ichneumon

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
Definitely an ichneumon, and pretty, but I have no idea which one.  Sorry!
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help!
Location: Central Texas
March 26, 2016 4:48 pm
Can you please help us identify this bug?
Signature: Abby

Possibly Scorpionfly

Possibly Scorpionfly

Dear Abby,
We believe this is a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera, but we cannot find any images of individuals with black wings and an orange body on BugGuide other than
Panorpa lugubris, which is definitely not your species.  We are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton.  If possible, can you send additional images showing the insect from a lateral view that would show details of the head and mouthparts?  Thanks.

Eric Eaton poses another possibility
Daniel:
I am thinking this is a caddisfly of some kind.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp identity
Location: Napier, New Zealand
March 26, 2016 7:31 pm
Hello ‘What’s That Bug’!
I was in Napier town centre the other day and saw this beautiful wasp on a car roof. Can you enlighten me as to what type of wasp this is please?
Many thanks,
Signature: Chris Atkinson

Parasitic Hymenopteran

Parasitic Ichneumon

Dear Chris,
This is a Parasitic Hymenopteran, and our initial guess would be that it is an Ichneumon Wasp, however we cannot find a matching image on the Land Care Research site.  Those orange antennae are quite distinctive, and we hope one of our readers will be able to assist with the identification.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for getting back to me with that! I enjoyed checking out the website too:-)
Regards,
Chris

Karl Provides the Identity:
Hi Daniel and Chris:
Your Ichneumonid wasp is probably Eutanyacra licitatoria (Ichneumonidae). The genus is represented on the Land Care Research site, along with information, but the sample image looks like a different species. In any event, it is difficult t recognize because the images are all of desiccated pinned specimens. You can also check out the Naturewatch NZ and BoldSystems sites. Regards.  Karl

Gee thanks Karl.  At first we didn’t register that the southern in Southern Alps signified the southern hemisphere rather than southern Europe, but we realized that the site is devoted to New Zealand once we researched that Otago is a southeastern region on New Zealand’s South Island.  Images of living insects are so much nicer than images of specimens.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination