Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
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Subject: Wasp ID and damage?
Location: North East NJ
September 4, 2016 9:49 pm
Hi Bugman, love the site, always informative and always entertaining. I cam across this wasp today. At first I thought perhaps it was a sand wasp and the protrusion on its face would help it dig, but the more I did research, the more I think it was some type of damage it received, (Not from me!)
Any idea of ID and if this was inflicted damage or a weird clypeus perhaps?
Signature: Thank you!!

Unknown Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Weevil Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Do you have any other images of this individual?  Perhaps a shot of the entire insect and a dorsal view?

Hi and thanks for the response!  I have two other shots, all from the side. I could not get a front shot due to the leaf and I did not want to disturb the wasp. Not knowing what type it was, I didn’t know it’s aggressiveness or habits. I will say the wasp was alive and did move slightly but not much at all for as close as I was. Perhaps dying? I could not find any other damage, or distinguishing features. I hope I attached the photos correctly. Thank you again!

Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Weevil Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Thanks for sending additional images.  We wanted to get an idea of the entire body structure of this unusual Hymenopteran.  Though we have searched for some time, including using the word “cowcatcher” to describe what appears to be an unusually structured clypeus, which we needed to look up on BugGuide, we have not had any luck locating anything similar looking.  We do not believe any damage or injury is evident.  The symmetry is too perfect.  We have written to Eric Eaton for assistance.  We are posting your submission and tagging it as unidentified and we hope to get back to you soon with an identification.

Wasp with unusual Clypeus

Weevil Wasp with unusual Clypeus

You rock! And I didn’t get intellectual enough to try ”Cowcatcher”. I did however try bee horn or wasp snout.  😊 Thank you for all your help. I love a mystery and your help is very appreciated. I also wondered if there was some kind of parasite that crawled out of there.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
It is a species of Cerceris.  The females hunt weevils or jewel beetles as food for their larval offspring.
Eric

Ed Note:  Though Eric Eaton has provided us with the genus name Cerceris for the Weevil Wasps, we have not been able to verify a species identity based on the images posted to BugGuide which notes:  “The faces of females are modified with unusual projections on the clypeus and clypeal margin.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “Most Cerceris species prey on adult beetles, but some also prey on bees and wasps. At least one species, C. halone, preys exclusively on acorn weevils (Curculio nasicus).”  According to InsectIdentification.org:  “”Members of the genus Cerceris are hunters and gatherers of weevils and other beetles.  Females dig nests in the ground along roads or in areas with loose sand or soil like basevall fields, parks and beaches.  They compact the material and create cells where they lay a fertilized egg.  They fly off, in search of future food for their larvae.  Female Weevil Wasps bite their prey and paralyze them.  The weevil or beetle is then brought back to the nest and stuffed inside a cell where they will remain paralyzed.  A hatching wasp larva will immediately begin feeding on the living, paralyzed weevil or beetle.  Once the wasp has grown, it will pupate into its adult form and leave the nest.  This BugGuide image looks close, but it is not identified to the species level.  After finding this BugGuide image, we are going to speculate this is Cerceris clypeata.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Costa Rican Spider
Location: Costa Rica, Limon
September 1, 2016 6:57 am
Hi. I found this spider on a tree in the Limon province of Costa Rica. Very close to the Panama border. Do you know what it is?
Thanks!
Signature: Calvin

Unidentified Spider

Unidentified Spider

We are not certain of the identity, or even the family classification of your spider, but we can tell you that the enlarged pedipalps indicates it is a male Spider.  Perhaps one of our readers will want to take on the challenge of this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: parasitoid wasp
Location: Cochise County, AZ
August 1, 2016 10:15 am
Hello! The bug in the picture seems like a parasitoid wasp and I wonder what kind it is and what it is doing on the cadaver of a rat. It looks like it’s stinging the rat but it shouldn’t be laying eggs on it, right? Maybe feeding on small flies on it? The photo was taken March 8th, 2015. Thank you for your help!
Signature: Kana

Parasitoid Wasp on Rat Carcass

Parasitoid Wasp on Rat Carcass

Dear Kana,
We are currently going back through requests sent in the past few weeks that we did not yet open, and we are awestruck at this image.  We agree it is a Parasitoid Wasp and that the host is likely the immature stage of a fly or beetle that is attracted to carrion.  We have not begun the research on this yet, but we did send your image to Eric Eaton to get his input as well.  We are posting it as unidentified and are going to immediately begin to do some research.  This is a very exciting posting for us and we hope to be able to identify the genus or species for you.  This is the kind of posting that validates our practice of going back a few weeks out of guilt to look at all the requests we have left unanswered.

Parasitoid Wasp on Rat Carcass

Parasitoid Wasp on Rat Carcass

Upon doing a web search for “Braconid on Carrion” we found a Google Books online pdf from The Entomologist’s Monthly Magazine, Volume 43 that states:  “Few Hymenoptera are found in carrion; the commonest is a Braconid, Alysia manducator, which is parasitic upon both the Dipterous and Coleopterous larvae (cf. Marshall, Bracon, d’Europ., ii.377); I first took it on a foal at Brockenhurst in May and subsequently on a rabbit in June, also on a horse’s shin bone and a cow’s head in the same month.  An Ichneumonid, Atractodes bicolor, which may be hyperparasitic on the last species (cf. Morley, Ichn. Brit., i, 291 et ii) was taken in a rabbit in September, 1895, in a cow’s head at Lyndhurst in August and in a mole in June; its cousin, A. gilvipes, was once found in a rabbit early in June, 1903.  A second kind of Braconid (? Rhogas sp.) was taken in the same kind of animal at the end of September, 1899; and a third, Meteorus filator, in a rabbit in November. ”  All that is from an old English publication, but it does validate that there are Parasitoid Wasps that will search for hosts on carrion.  We searched BugGuide for the genus Atractodes, and worked backwards to the subfamily Cryptinae, and BugGuide states:  “Mostly external parasites of pupae and cocoons; a few attack wood-boring beetle larvae, others attack larvae of Diptera, a few are hyperparasites of braconids and other ichneumons.”  We similarly searched Alysia on BugGuide and back to the Tribe Alysiini on BugGuide where it states:  “Often in moist habitats and decaying substrates, where host larvae are likely to be found” and “Larvae are parasitoids that feed on larvae of cyclorrhaphous Diptera (advanced flies with short antennae).”  We followed other links and did not find anything that looks like your Parasitoid Wasp, but we know we are on the right track.

Eric Eaton responds
Daniel:
Interesting.  Definitely one of the colorful Braconidae, and she is certainly ovipositing on *something.*
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your reply!  I’m so excited to hear from you.  Your second email is very informative and answers my question why the wasp was on the carrion.  This is the first time I posted my photo on any public website and I’m glad I did.  Hope to hear from you with the species name and I really appreciate your time and effort.
Kana

Update from Kana:  August 23, 2016
Dear Daniel,
BugGuide had a photo of wasp very similar to mine and it was taken in my area:  http://bugguide.net/node/view/464251
They filed it under subfamily Agathidinae.  The only thing is that they say it hosts Lepidoptera larvae and it doesn’t explain why mine was on rat.  But thank you for your help!
Kana

Hi again Kana,
The BugGuide information “hosts: Lepidoptera larvae” is so general it might not apply to all members of the subfamily.  Some parasitic Hymenopterans are not well studied and many have mysterious life cycles.  The BugGuide information might also be wrong.  Thanks for the update.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Insect?
Location: Lima, Perú
August 10, 2016 1:10 pm
Hi I’m Luis Calle from Perú. I just came to Lima and before entering to my house I saw this little insect. I don’t know if it flies. Should I catch it? I have never seen this one before. I think it has 6 legs and 2 of them are in the front. It’s 2cm long , maybe 3cm. I forgot to mention that it has a sting like a scorpion, pointing to its body. Contact me if is needed.
Signature: Luis C.

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Dear Luis,
First we need to state that identifying insects from countries that do not have extensive web databases of creatures can be very difficult, and Peru is one such country.  Our first thought upon viewing the dorsal view you provided was that this might be a Fly in the order Diptera (only two wings visible in the image), possibly a Stilt Legged Fly in the family Neriidae, but once we opened the lateral view (thanks so much for including these two valuable views) we realized we were looking at a moth in the order Lepidoptera.  Our search for similar looking moths led us to BugGuide where we found the Eggplant Leafroller Moth, and though BugGuide indicates its range is “southern United States (Florida to California), south to Chile; …” we are quite confident your images represent a different species, but there is enough visual similarity for us to surmise they may be in the same family, the Crambid Snout Moth family Crambidae.  We tried briefly searching that possibility to no avail, including scanning Insetologia from nearby Brazil.  This Jade Scorpion Moth from Peru on Learn About Butterflies has a similar posture, but it is obviously a different species, and it is identified as being in the family Pyralidae, which is taxonomically included with the family Crambidae in the superfamily Pyraloidea.  Our time right now is running short, so we are posting your images and tagging it as unidentified, but classifying it as a Snout Moth, and perhaps one of our readers will write in with some suggestions.

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Hi Daniel,
I have posted the moth i found on 4chan. It has some images that may help you.
Link: http://boards.4chan.org/an/thread/2187282/new-insect

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tortoise Beetle in Artwork
Location: Guyana
August 5, 2016 2:51 pm
Hi! I’m a nature illustrator and have created a sculpture of a Tortoise beetle, but I cannot find the scientific name of the beetle. I hope that you can help me find it so that I can accurately label the artwork! I have attached an image of the sculpture.
Thank you so much for your help!!
Zebith
Reference photo from the web:
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/artour_a/5286734532/
Signature: Zebith Thalden of Intersectus Design

Illustration of a Tortoise Beetle from Guyana

Illustration of a Tortoise Beetle from Guyana

Dear Zebith,
Thanks for working with us to create this posting.  We hope you understand why we cannot post images downloaded from the internet when there is no permission from the photographer.  This Dobsonfly posting addresses the complicated issues of Copyright Infringement and also illustrates the problems we encounter when there is no permission to use images.  This Eucharitid Wasp image is another example of plagiarism we have encountered on our site.
We began our search using the common name Tortoise Beetle coupled with first Guyana, and then neighboring countries like Suriname, Brazil and Venezuela, but all produced no matching images.  We then turned to the scientific name for the Subfamily Cassidinae that includes Tortoise Beetles, and we struck gold with this pdf on BioLib entitled Tortoise beetles of the French Guyana – a faunistic review (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae) by LECH BOROWIEC1 and GÉRARD MORAGUES, but alas, there are no illustrations, though there are numerous scientific names of the species found in French Guyana.  Searching for images for each of those names might take weeks, and though we do not have the time, you may.  We then tried to search the subfamily name coupled with other nearby countries, and when we found this unidentified Tortoise Beetle from Peru in our own archives that we suspect might be in the genus
Eugenysa, we decided to search that name as well, but again to no avail.  Though we drew a big blank, we are going to put out a request to our readership, including Cesar Crash of Insetologia from Brazil and to Karl who loves a challenge, to assist us in this ID.  You might also try to contact LECH BOROWIEC1 and GÉRARD MORAGUES to see if they can assist you.  If you do eventually score a species, or at least a genus ID, please let us know.

Thank you so much for all of your work! I will continue the search and hope that the tendrils that we both are putting out there will bring back an answer. Fingers crossed!
As far as the copyright, I appreciate your policy. As an artist, I deeply appreciate when people make sure others only post images that they have direct permission to use. Thank you for upholding these respectful (and legal) standards!
Zebith

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Insect
Location: Lincolnshire, England
July 23, 2016 7:01 am
This landed on my arm. I have no idea what is neither do the people on Reddit. It’s roughly half an inch big, I’m in Lincolnshire, England. It’s fully intact and it has wings. Help me indenting this.
Signature: Elliot Cutts

Possibly Unknown True Bug

Olympic Bug

Dear Elliot,
We might even be more confused about this critter’s identity than you are.  At first glance, we thought perhaps we were seeing a headless mantid because of the raptorial front legs, until we realized those were the antennae and there were three complete sets of green legs.  The antennae seem to be the best clue in your image for identification purposes, and our best guess at this time is that this might be a member of the True Bug suborder Heteroptera because according to BugGuide, True Bugs can be identified by:  “Antennae, when not hidden, have 4-5 segments.”  Also, some True Bugs have modified antennae like this North American Giant Mesquite Bug.  We have not had any luck locating anything remotely similar looking on the British Bugs Heteroptera page, nor have we had any luck locating anything similar looking on UK Safari.  It is possible we missed something, but we can’t help but to wonder if perhaps this is a recently introduced species, or an exotic rogue that just happened to have found its way to your arm. We have sought some professional assistance, and perhaps our readership will write in with suggestions.

Eric Eaton identifies Olympic Bug
Hi, Daniel:
I think it *is* native.  It is the “Olympic Bug,” Heterotoma planicornis, a type of mirid plant bug.  Here’s more about it:
http://www.britishbugs.org.uk/heteroptera/Miridae/heterotoma_planicornis.html
Cool critter, thanks for sharing!
Eric

According to British Bugs:  “The broad and flattened 2nd antennal segment, dark ground colour and contrasting greenish legs make this species unmistakeable.   Abundant throughout most of Britain on various plants and trees, in particular nettles. Both adults and the reddish nymphs feed on small insects as well as plant buds and unripe fruits.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination