Currently viewing the tag: "Top 10"
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Subject: what is this
Location: fl
April 7, 2015 4:50 pm
I think it bit me on my butt
Signature: april

Mole Cricket Bites April in the Butt!!!

Mole Cricket Bites April on the Butt!!!

Dear April,
Mole Crickets, like the one that might have bitten you on the butt, are normally subterranean dwellers that also fly quite well.  As though that were not enough, we have received numerous reports of Mole Crickets that are able to swim.
  We have received accounts of Mole Cricket sightings from Namibia, Australia, Iraq, Spain, and Hawaii as well of most of North America. We think it is more likely that this Mole Cricket scratched your butt with its strong forelegs which have adapted to digging.

Thank you it sure is ugly

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Subject: cockroach??
Location: new orleans LA
March 15, 2015 9:53 am
saw this at the entrance to a winn dixie grocery store today, lloks like a cockroach but no antenae?.. looked on LSU ag site cant find anything… ideas?
Signature: Aaron Robinson

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Dear Aaron,
This Giant Water Bug is a Toe-Biter, an aquatic, predatory True Bug, not a Cockroach which is an opportunistic scavenger, or at least the few species of Cockroaches that infest human homes are opportunistic scavengers.  Also known as Electric Light Bugs because they are often attracted to the bright lights of sporting events, especially those located near swamps, ponds and other fresh water bodies of water, Toe-Biters earned their more colorful common name because they frequently bite the toes of waders in natural bodies of water.  Though aquatic, Toe-Biters are powerful fliers as well, enabling them to fly to a new habitat if their pond dries out.  Larger relatives are eaten in Thailand.  Toe-Biters are one of our most common identification requests.

Fantastic quick response very grateful for that… Ive been in NOLA for 10 years and I thought I have seen most everything haha… very informative I appreciate your time…. is it odd to see them away from water especially in front of a grocery store?.. one last… are they dangerous if bitten.
thanks again for your time !!
Aaron R

Allegedly painful, but not dangerous, though it seems some people are allergic to most things these days.

 

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Potato Bug

Potato Bug

Subject: Meet my newest, weirdest friend…
Location: San Diego, CA
October 13, 2014 12:22 am
Hey guys,
I’m baffled. Found this guy skittering along the sidewalk in front of a friend’s house around midnight. Looks like some kind of huge, wingless wasp/ant/kewpie doll. It’s thorax, legs & head are all “ant red”, if you will, while its abdomen is this incredible striped black & gold. Couldn’t tell if he has a stinger, but he’s pretty big (thumb-sized) and has great legs. When we locked eyes (yes, he’s big enough that I could see them clearly), I could swear we shared a moment. Hahaha!
Signature: Bella

Potato Bug

Potato Bug

Dear Bella,
This magnificent and unforgettable insect is a Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket, two common names for an unusual group of insects in the genus
Stenopelmatus.  Potato Bugs are rather iconic Southern California insects, and their large size and humanoid appearance make them one of our most frequent identification requests.  They are very common, though they are not encountered that often because, according to BugGuide:  “Most of their lives are spent underground. Damp, sandy soil is preferred.”

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Subject: freaky bug found in northern Georgia
Location: Blue Ridge Mountains, Northern Georgia
June 19, 2014 4:43 pm
I recently took a trip up to the Blue Ridge Mountains in northern Georgia and I came across this thing sitting on my porch during a thunderstorm. I’m not worried about it being dangerous or anything, but I’ve been trying to identify it ever since I saw it, and I can’t find anything on the internet about it, so I’d be very grateful if you could help me out!
Signature: -Alyson

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear Alyson,
We field so many identification requests for Dobsonflies like the one in your image, that we have it in out Top Ten tag along with Wheel Bugs, Toe-Biters, Potato Bugs and Eyed Elaters.
  We chuckled when we saw you named your file “hell bug” and though he looks quite fierce, this male Dobsonfly is perfectly harmless.  The much less impressive looking female Dobsonfly has smaller, but much more practical mandibles, and a bite, though harmless, has been reported to draw blood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found Bug
Location: Surrey, BC Canada
April 10, 2014 8:03 am
Found this bug outside @ my work in Surrey, BC Canada. Just wondering what it is.
Signature: Kelly

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Hi Kelly,
Our response to you yesterday was just a quick identification that this is a Toe-Biter, and we would like to elaborate a bit now that we have a moment.  Toe-Biters or Giant Water Bugs are also called Electric Light Bugs since they are attracted to lights.  They are aquatic predators that are capable of flying from pond to pond if the habitat dries up.  The bite is reported to be quite painful, and many a wader has encountered a Giant Water Bug with painful results, hence the common name of Toe-Biter.  Because of their large size and unusual appearance, the Toe-Biter is one of our most frequent identification requests.  As a side note, Giant Water Bugs are edible and their larger Asian cousins are considered a delicacy in Thailand.

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

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Subject: Saudi Arabian bug
Location: Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
April 6, 2014 8:33 pm
Hello Bugman!
I’m currently living in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia and am amazed at the wide variety of fauna around the compound. Recently I have seen lots of these critters crawling around on the ground at night. I’m curious as to what they are, please help!
Thanks, Lisa
Signature: Lisa

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Lisa,
This is a Mole Cricket, and we get identification requests from all over the world.  Mole Cricket identification are among our most frequent identification requests.  Mole Crickets are subterranean dwellers and many species are capable of flight.

Daniel,
Thanks so much for the swift response. I just heard that they’re edible, do you have any recipes? Only joking, it’s a fascinating time of the year here in Saudi, just last night I saw a praying mantis, very convincing stick insect, numerous locusts and grass hoppers and many species of moths. My best finds so far are a camel spider and the mole crickets, amazing!
Thanks again,
Lisa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination