Currently viewing the tag: "Edible Insects: Tasty Morsels"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colourful bugs from South Mexico
Location: South Mexico – jungle
September 23, 2014 5:09 am
Further to my previous email I wondered if you could identify this very colourful bug? I have tried but to no avail. Searching for Mexican insects almost always leads to sites about eating them. I imagine these are probably found in parts of the US as well but I have been unsuccessful none the less. This type of bug is completely beyond my normal range of knowledge… it kind of looks like a really fat leaf-footed/assassin hybrid!
Any ideas?
Signature: Long time avid WTB reader

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs from Mexico

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs from Mexico

Dear Long time avid WTB reader,
These colorful nymphs are immature Giant Mesquite Bugs in the genus
Thasus.  Interestingly, this is an edible species and we are surprised you didn’t find it on the edible sites you searched.  There is a North American species of Giant Mesquite Bug that is found primarily in Arizona.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southwest Florida driveway find
Location: Southwest Florida
August 26, 2014 4:54 pm
Found this on a driveway that is about 100 feet from a pond…it has a friend a little freaked out. Can you help? Saw some other post about a claw on the right side only, and I think this one fits that bill too. Appreciate an accurate assessment. Thanks!
Signature: Scott

Crayfish

Crayfish

Dear Scott,
this is a positively gorgeous image of a Crayfish.  Crayfish are called Crawdads in Louisiana where they are eaten.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: North America. Missouri
August 15, 2014 12:58 pm
What type if moth will emerge? How long will it take?
Signature: Thank you Rebecca Byrne

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars

Hi Rebecca,
If possible, please let us know which plant these Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars were feeding upon.  This is a highly variable caterpillar, and in addition to green individuals like the ones you submitted, some Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars are yellow and some Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars are black.  This is an edible species of caterpillar and it is found in all 48 continental states.  We are curious about the food plant as there is such a large variety of plants that can serve as larval foods.  Whitelined Sphinxes are especially numerous in the American southwest, and some years see tremendous explosions in the population numbers of both the larvae and the adults.  Whitelined Sphinxes are large and very pretty moths that are frequently attracted to lights.  We cropped your second image to show a fresh pupa on the right and a caterpillar nearing the moment of pupation on the left.  We expect metamorphosis will be complete within a month, though at the end of the year in colder climates, the pupa may pass the winter and emerge in the spring.

Whitelined Sphinx Pupa (right) and caterpillar nearing pupation.

Whitelined Sphinx Pupa (right) and caterpillar nearing pupation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTb
Location: North West England
May 3, 2014 3:01 pm
Hi Bugman
My husband and I are sat out in our garden at approx 10pm in Thelwall, Warrington, England, United Kingdom and have spotted this interesting looking beetle which appears to have been attracted to our outdoor lamp. Having researched beetle with long eye lashes we came across your website and found a similar looking beetle called the cedar beetle although we noticed this originates from Australia. So…WTFB?
Thanks
Sarah
Signature: S&B

Cockchafer

Cockchafer

Hi S&B,
We recall reading once that Cockchafers, like the one you photographed, were more common in England in years past than they are now.  According to UK Safari:  “Cockchafers are sometimes called ‘May Bugs’ because of the month they appear.  In Suffolk they’re also known as ‘Billy Witches’.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

January 12, 2014
While researching something totally different, we stumbled upon 7 Insects You’ll Be Eating in the Future on the Mother Nature Network.  We have had an Edible Insects tag for years, and we thought our readers might find this article interesting.  We really don’t understand why the Toe-Biter or Giant Water Bug did not make the list.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grasshopper
Location: Oaxaca, Mexico
December 2, 2013 12:25 pm
Hi!
Any information you can give me would be really appreciated and help me with my project of gathering words in the Zapotec language.
The following pictures were taken in the town of San Cristobal Amatlan, Oaxaca, Mexico on December 7, 2011. The grasshopper body measures about 1.5 centimeters, the back legs are maybe 2 (centimeters or longer). The back is brown, the ovipositor green striped with black. Legs are blue, orange, and yellow. The face and antenae are blue, eyes are brown. Very pretty!
Signature: Chivis

Grasshopper Nymph

Grasshopper Nymph

Hi Chivis,
Based on the size of this individual and its lack of wings, we believe this is a nymph.  What you are calling its striped ovipositor is actually its abdomen.  Sadly, we did not find any images in our web searching that match your individual, however we did find many photos of Chapulines, Grasshoppers that are roasted and prepared as food in Oaxaca, Mexico.  We don’t normally link to Wikipedia, but in searching for a link on Chapulines, our other numerous choices were blogs, many of which might not be reliable, so we made an exception.  We don’t believe your Grasshopper is the species that is eaten, but there may be numerous species that are eaten.  We looked through many images of living Grasshoppers from Mexico, and we cannot provide an identification for you.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Grasshopper from Oaxaca

Grasshopper from Oaxaca

What is the Zapotec word for Grasshopper?  Is there a verbal distinction between the living Grasshopper and the roasted treat?  Though we are not certain if your species is one of the Grasshoppers popularly consumed in Oaxaca, we suspect it is probably edible and we are tagging it as an Edible Insect.

Grasshopper from Oaxaca

Grasshopper from Oaxaca

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for trying! I guess I’ll have to just say “type of grasshopper”. In this particular Zapotec there are a number of words indicating the particular kind of grasshopper: xench, kik, mbeso, ngwxiix, ngwley yer, ngwley nil, yeramas, ngsok, mbertang, mberzeyy. The one I asked you about is ngwley nil. I don’t know if this particular type is edible or not. I’ll have to ask when I get a chance. Some people in the Amatlan area do eat certain grasshoppers but it isn’t common.
Thanks for setting me straight regarding the abdomen. Ha ha. Obviously, I’m not very good when it comes to insects.
Chivis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination