Currently viewing the tag: "Edible Insects: Tasty Morsels"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

January 12, 2014
While researching something totally different, we stumbled upon 7 Insects You’ll Be Eating in the Future on the Mother Nature Network.  We have had an Edible Insects tag for years, and we thought our readers might find this article interesting.  We really don’t understand why the Toe-Biter or Giant Water Bug did not make the list.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grasshopper
Location: Oaxaca, Mexico
December 2, 2013 12:25 pm
Hi!
Any information you can give me would be really appreciated and help me with my project of gathering words in the Zapotec language.
The following pictures were taken in the town of San Cristobal Amatlan, Oaxaca, Mexico on December 7, 2011. The grasshopper body measures about 1.5 centimeters, the back legs are maybe 2 (centimeters or longer). The back is brown, the ovipositor green striped with black. Legs are blue, orange, and yellow. The face and antenae are blue, eyes are brown. Very pretty!
Signature: Chivis

Grasshopper Nymph

Grasshopper Nymph

Hi Chivis,
Based on the size of this individual and its lack of wings, we believe this is a nymph.  What you are calling its striped ovipositor is actually its abdomen.  Sadly, we did not find any images in our web searching that match your individual, however we did find many photos of Chapulines, Grasshoppers that are roasted and prepared as food in Oaxaca, Mexico.  We don’t normally link to Wikipedia, but in searching for a link on Chapulines, our other numerous choices were blogs, many of which might not be reliable, so we made an exception.  We don’t believe your Grasshopper is the species that is eaten, but there may be numerous species that are eaten.  We looked through many images of living Grasshoppers from Mexico, and we cannot provide an identification for you.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Grasshopper from Oaxaca

Grasshopper from Oaxaca

What is the Zapotec word for Grasshopper?  Is there a verbal distinction between the living Grasshopper and the roasted treat?  Though we are not certain if your species is one of the Grasshoppers popularly consumed in Oaxaca, we suspect it is probably edible and we are tagging it as an Edible Insect.

Grasshopper from Oaxaca

Grasshopper from Oaxaca

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for trying! I guess I’ll have to just say “type of grasshopper”. In this particular Zapotec there are a number of words indicating the particular kind of grasshopper: xench, kik, mbeso, ngwxiix, ngwley yer, ngwley nil, yeramas, ngsok, mbertang, mberzeyy. The one I asked you about is ngwley nil. I don’t know if this particular type is edible or not. I’ll have to ask when I get a chance. Some people in the Amatlan area do eat certain grasshoppers but it isn’t common.
Thanks for setting me straight regarding the abdomen. Ha ha. Obviously, I’m not very good when it comes to insects.
Chivis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identify this ground bug?
Location: South west of Dedza, Malawi
September 24, 2013 12:33 pm
Greetings!
The accompanying photo deserves identification.
Whilst climbing the wooded base of a ”mountain”, near Dedza, Malawi, we came across a hillside of divots, bored into the soil. We had no idea if it was man or beast creating the holes in the ground.
Further up we climbed, and soon, happened upon a family, with primitave hoe in hand, the son had been digging random holes in the hillside. One older sister proudly reached into an old bread sack and pulled out these critters for us to see.
From the image, do you have any idea what these are? It’s food for them, but eye candy for me.
Signature: John Robert Williams

Edible Crickets

Edible Crickets

Hi John,
These Orthopterans are most likely a species of Cricket.  Crickets, Grasshoppers and other Orthopterans are eaten in many parts of the world, including Mexico where they are roasted.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: vietnam square shaped orange and grey with white stripe
Location: Thanh Hoa, Vietnam
May 6, 2013 4:02 pm
I have no idea what this is. I was told to ”be careful of this bug” but my Vietnamese friends can be overly cautious. I would love to know a little about it as I have never seen anything like it.
Thanks
Signature: Kate

Lychee Stink Bug Nymph

Lychee Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Kate,
We suspected from your subject line that you were submitting a photograph of a Stink Bug or Shield Bug nymph in the family Tessaratomidae and we were correct.  In an attempt to identify your species, we did a search and the first visual match was called a Litchi Stink Bug and we found it on FlickR.  We then located an alternate spelling of the Lychee Stink Bug also on FlickR.  We found a more credible identification as
 Tessaratoma papillosa on the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department of Hong Kong website.  We also found a notice that they are roasted and eaten in Thailand in Edible Insects and Associated Food Habits in Thailand by Yupa Hanboonsong.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ”Mopane Worm” from Namibia
Location: Namibia: Damaraland: Hobatere Lodge, 80 km N of Kamanjab
March 18, 2013 4:43 pm
Here’s a photo of a ”Mopane Worm” I mentioned in a comment I just posted about a similar caterpillar from Tanzania. This is Gonimbrasia belina (Saturniidae), on Mopane, its namesake foodplant (Colophospermum mopane; Fabaceae), at the Hobatere Lodge, ca. 80 km N of Kamanjab, Damaraland, Namibia, on 26 March 2010.
Signature: Julian Donahue

The larvae are collected, dried, and highly prized as food (tried one, but too “spiky” for me to really enjoy).

Mopane Worm

Mopane Worm

Hi Julian,
Thanks so much for submitting this beautiful photograph of such a stunning caterpillar.  We see the resemblance to the Tanzanian Caterpillar we just posted.  The adult moth is pictured on the African Moths website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: pretoria, gauteng, south africa
March 5, 2013 12:09 am
Do you possibly know what this is, they are falling out of a tree in the garden, don’t know what tree it is.
Signature: Kobus

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Dear Kobus,
These are the Caterpillars of the Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth,
Bunaea alcinoe, and it is our understanding that they are edible.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination