Currently viewing the tag: "Edible Insects: Tasty Morsels"
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Subject: Winged insect in Batopilas
Location: Batopilas, Chihuahua, Mexico
July 3, 2015 5:32 pm
Recently stumbled across this hellish creature on a plaza in the village of Batopilas, which sits at a lower elevation in the Copper Canyons of Chihuahua, Mexico. The previous night brought heavy rains and the insects had been washed from their nesting points into the streets in large numbers; it gave me the sense of a spawning ritual, as nearly all were dead or dying. I have no background in entomology so I figured I’d petition you guys.–the answer could very well be overwhelmingly obvious, but thanks for taking the time to check it out.
Signature: Nico

Leafcutter Ant Alate

Leafcutter Ant Alate

Dear Nico,
Your speculation about the spawning ritual is 100% accurate.  This is an edible Leafcutter Ant in the genus
Atta, and they swarm with the summer rains.  Only the reproductive caste of Alates is winged, and a mated queen will start a new colony.

Jessica M. Schemm, Sue Dougherty, Antonia Tarnaroutskaya liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID help please
Location: Manzano Mtns, New Mexico
May 24, 2015 8:06 am
A friend sent me these pics of a caterpillar, asking for ID help and I have no idea what it is. Can you help? Thank you.
Signature: A. Wakefield

Pandora Moth Caterpillar

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Dear A. Wakefield,
We originally identified your caterpillar as a Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar,
Coloradia pandora, on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, and then found a matching image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on the leaves (“needles”) of various species of pine (Pinus). Particular host records include: Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi), lodgepole pine (P. contorta), sugar pine (P. lambertiana), pinyon pine (P. edulis), and Coulter pine (P. coulteri).   Adults do not feed.”

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Amy Gosch, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Sue Dougherty, Kitty Heidih, Ann Levitsky liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant African Caterpillars
Location: Ghana Africa
January 20, 2015 7:07 pm
I found these two beauties in Ghana Africa. They looked quite fascinating so I got a pic. Any idea what they are?
Signature: Don

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Dear Don,
These distinctive caterpillars are Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars,
Bunaea alcinoe, and they are more typically black in coloration.  This is an edible species.

Kathleen Travis Perin, Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Raokshna Yuko Ryuzaki, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle in Sierra Leone
Location: Sierra Leone
December 6, 2014 12:08 pm
Bugman,
I am out in Sierra Leone, living in Freetown at the moment and came across this beautiful beetle. My son Ethan would be over the moon if we can identify it.
Signature: C

Scarab Beetle

Scarab Beetle:  Pachnoda marginata

Subject: Beetle in Sierra Leone
Location: Sierra Leone
December 6, 2014 12:11 pm
I continue my insect hunt in Sierra Leone and would appreciate some help with identifying this bug

Scarab Beetle

Scarab Beetle:  Pachnoda chordata

Dear C,
Both of these are beautiful Scarab Beetles.  We believe we have identified the first as
Pachnoda marginata by matching your image to images on Shutterstock and Pinterest where it is called a Sunspot Beetle.  We also found it pictured on Bug Nation and our research shows much variation in the markings, so seeing a comparison of various subspecies on Beetlespace may prove interesting to you.  We believe your subspecies is Pachnoda marginata marginata and it is also pictured on BioLib where it is called a Sun BeetleBioLib lists the countries where this subspecies has been sighted as:  “Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone.”   We believe your second Scarab is Pachnoda chordata based on an image we located on FlickeR and then continued to research, eventually locating images on SAReptiles and BioLib where the country of origin is listed as Sierra Leone.  We also believe your subspecies is Pachnoda chordata chordata and BioLib expands the list of countries of the entire species as “Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal, Sierra Leone.”  If our research is correct, both of your beetles are in the same genus.

 

Sue Dougherty, Christy Harris, Vickie Allen Griffin, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Rachel Carpenter liked this post
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Subject: Colourful bugs from South Mexico
Location: South Mexico – jungle
September 23, 2014 5:09 am
Further to my previous email I wondered if you could identify this very colourful bug? I have tried but to no avail. Searching for Mexican insects almost always leads to sites about eating them. I imagine these are probably found in parts of the US as well but I have been unsuccessful none the less. This type of bug is completely beyond my normal range of knowledge… it kind of looks like a really fat leaf-footed/assassin hybrid!
Any ideas?
Signature: Long time avid WTB reader

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs from Mexico

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs from Mexico

Dear Long time avid WTB reader,
These colorful nymphs are immature Giant Mesquite Bugs in the genus
Thasus.  Interestingly, this is an edible species and we are surprised you didn’t find it on the edible sites you searched.  There is a North American species of Giant Mesquite Bug that is found primarily in Arizona.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southwest Florida driveway find
Location: Southwest Florida
August 26, 2014 4:54 pm
Found this on a driveway that is about 100 feet from a pond…it has a friend a little freaked out. Can you help? Saw some other post about a claw on the right side only, and I think this one fits that bill too. Appreciate an accurate assessment. Thanks!
Signature: Scott

Crayfish

Crayfish

Dear Scott,
this is a positively gorgeous image of a Crayfish.  Crayfish are called Crawdads in Louisiana where they are eaten.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination