Currently viewing the tag: "Edible Insects: Tasty Morsels"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Bug out of place?
Location: Charlottetown PEI Canada
January 30, 2016 8:24 pm
Have never seen a large bug like this before (saw it outside on sidewalk of my work building during the summer). I wonder if it might be far from home and wonder how it got to Charlottetown PEI.
Just curious.
Signature: Jenny K

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Dear Jenny,
This Giant Water Bug or Toe-Biter is an aquatic predatory True Bug that is able to fly from pond to pond in the event that food runs out or the pond dries out.  Giant Water Bugs are also attracted to lights leading to the common name Electric Light Bug, and that might be the reason you found it near your work.  Though they are not aggressive toward people, Giant Water Bugs are reported to deliver a painful bite if accidentally stepped on by waders and swimmers.  The Toe-Biter is one of our most frequent identification requests.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Snail
Location: REGUA (Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu) Atlantic Rainforest Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
January 17, 2016 8:36 am
During my stay as a volonteer in REGUA (Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu) Atlantic Rainforest Rio De Janeiro, Brazil Nov 12 – Dec 7 2011 I photographed this magnificent snal. I believe people who are fascinated of these kind of animals recognize it easily.
Signature: slit

Giant African Snail Invades Brazil

Giant African Snail Invades Brazil

OK Slit,
You threw us on this one.  No continent in the subject line and considering your previous six submissions, we automatically assumed you would be inquiring about a Tanzanian Snail, and we located the Giant African Land Snail on A-Z Animals where we learned:  “The giant African land snail, is the largest species of snail found on land and generally grow to around 20 cm in length. The giant African land snail is native to the forest areas of East Africa but has been introduced into Asia, the Caribbean and a number of islands in both the Pacific and the Indian oceans.”  Once we realized you encountered this Snail in Brazil, we verified the original identification on Latin American Science where the headline is:  “Giant African land snails are invading Latin America.”  On National Geographic the headline reads:  “Giant Snails, Once a Delicacy, Overrun Brazil.”  We consider this to be an Invasive Exotic species and we encourage Brazilians to eat them since National Geographic states:  “The giant African snail, originally brought to Brazil as a delicacy for gourmet restaurants, has instead become a major nuisance in the country.”

Giant African Snail Invades Brazil

Giant African Snail Invades Brazil

Cesar Crash provides a critical warning.
Sorry, I cannot comment again.
African snail is being considered vector of meningitis, it is believed that it is dangerous even to eat leaves where it crawled and it is recomended to use a plastic bag on hand to catch it.
http://portal.fiocruz.br/pt-br/content/meningite-transmitida-por-caramujos-com-avanco-de-casos-cientistas-alertam-para-prevencao
http://laboratoriocremasco.com.br/caramujo-africano-saiba-como-evitar-a-doenca-transmitida-pelo-molusco/
But, I don’t know, this one has a light shell, I think it may be a Megalobulimus.
I Hope it helps,
Cesar.

Thanks Cesar.  We will research Megalobulimus later.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: please identify
Location: Harare Zimbabwe
January 6, 2016 10:56 pm
Good morning. Hope you well. Compliments of the season. My friend found these awesome caterpillars on her workshop floor. All of the caterpillars were moved back onto the grass. Please may you help us identify them. Thank you so much.
Signature: Natasha

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Dear Natasha,
This is a Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar,
Bunaea alcinoe, one of the most impressive African Caterpillars, both because of its large size and spectacular coloration, but additionally, it is often found feeding in large numbers.  The Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar is edible.

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar South Africa
Location: Southern S.Africa west coast near Cape Town
December 13, 2015 1:36 pm
Hi…
Whilst jogging on the west coast of the southern cape in South Africa I found this giant caterpillar crawling across the road. Its colours were truly astounding to me. No idea what species – or even whether it is a moth or butterfly.
Any help would be amazing!
Giovanna
Signature: Giovanna

Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Dear Giovanna,
The dayglow red, green and blue colors on this Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar,
Nudaurelia cytherea, are quite impressive.  Though we don’t normally link to Wikipedia, that popular site states it is:  “commonly known as the … christmas caterpillar due to its festive colouration.”  Your images, including the close-up showing the prolegs, are quite beautiful and they really made our day.

Close-up of the prolegs of the Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Close-up of the prolegs of the Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Wow… That is super cool! Thank you. I sent in another submission of a more mysterious creature – what may be a larval lady bug. Also from Cape Town. I would LOVE to know what you thought of that.
Thank you so very much. This is an amazing service!!!
Giovanna Fasanelli

We forgot to mention that your Christmas Caterpillars are reported to be edible.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Winged insect in Batopilas
Location: Batopilas, Chihuahua, Mexico
July 3, 2015 5:32 pm
Recently stumbled across this hellish creature on a plaza in the village of Batopilas, which sits at a lower elevation in the Copper Canyons of Chihuahua, Mexico. The previous night brought heavy rains and the insects had been washed from their nesting points into the streets in large numbers; it gave me the sense of a spawning ritual, as nearly all were dead or dying. I have no background in entomology so I figured I’d petition you guys.–the answer could very well be overwhelmingly obvious, but thanks for taking the time to check it out.
Signature: Nico

Leafcutter Ant Alate

Leafcutter Ant Alate

Dear Nico,
Your speculation about the spawning ritual is 100% accurate.  This is an edible Leafcutter Ant in the genus
Atta, and they swarm with the summer rains.  Only the reproductive caste of Alates is winged, and a mated queen will start a new colony.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID help please
Location: Manzano Mtns, New Mexico
May 24, 2015 8:06 am
A friend sent me these pics of a caterpillar, asking for ID help and I have no idea what it is. Can you help? Thank you.
Signature: A. Wakefield

Pandora Moth Caterpillar

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Dear A. Wakefield,
We originally identified your caterpillar as a Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar,
Coloradia pandora, on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, and then found a matching image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on the leaves (“needles”) of various species of pine (Pinus). Particular host records include: Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi), lodgepole pine (P. contorta), sugar pine (P. lambertiana), pinyon pine (P. edulis), and Coulter pine (P. coulteri).   Adults do not feed.”

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

Pandora Pine Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination