Currently viewing the tag: "mysteries"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is This Thing?
Location: Michigan
October 4, 2014 8:47 am
Found in Michigan, autumn weather.
Signature: JPF

Tailless Whipscorpion allegedly found in Michigan

HOAX:  Tailless Whipscorpion allegedly found in Michigan

Dear JPF,
We would like additional information.  Did you find this creature?  Was the photograph taken by you?  If the photograph was not taken by you, from where did it come?  We are inquiring because we believe this image is part of a hoax, though it is not entirely impossible that a Tailless Whipscorpion in the order Amblypygi might have been found in Michigan since global travel is now quite routine and this Tailless Whipscorpion might have stowed away in a suitcase.  According to BugGuide, Tailless Whipscorpions have only been reported from Arizona, Texas and Florida in North America, though we imagine they might also be found in other southern states.
  Tailless Whipscorpions are found throughout Central and South America and they are also found in warm, Old World countries.

It’s a hoax.  My neighbor said they found it, but I found the exact same image online associate with a “cave spider”.

Thanks for the confirmation that you have been “Hoaxed” by your neighbor.

Sabina Swift, Brian Waldrop liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: stumped…
Location: mojave desert, southern california
September 7, 2014 4:59 pm
I just bought some land in southern California about 5 miles outside of Boron. We were returning from working the land and I stopped to pee…saw this perfectly circular hole in the ground surrounded by pebbles and stuff that seemed to be cemented together. The hole itself was about an inch across and seemed to be coated with very dense web down it’s sides. The cemented pebbles and such looked like it would be hard to the touch but it was flexible. I took some pictures and though maybe whatever lived there would pop out but nothing showed. Is this an abandoned trapdoor spider lair or what? I am curious!!
Signature: John Roush

What made the hole???

What made the hole???

Hi John,
We have to use reverse elimination here, and we know it is not a Crayfish hole, and we don’t believe it to be a Trapdoor Spider hole or a Wolf Spider hole.
  WE are going to post it and classify it as an unsolved Mystery.

What's That Hole???

What’s That Hole???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: scary hybrid looking bug
Location: Western Oklahoma USA
August 18, 2014 5:57 pm
My assistant found this bug in her dog’s water dish.
Signature: Beth Tones

Grasshopper Lure???

Grasshopper Lure???

Hi Beth,
This “thing” looks Orthopteran, like a Grasshopper, however it is missing its jumping legs.  Though it is somewhat realistic, it does not look like any species of Grasshopper we are familiar with, and we are entertaining the possibility that it is a lifelike fishing lure not unlike the many examples pictured on the Realistic Fishing Lures and Fly Tying page of Graham Owen’s Gallery.

Grasshopper or Fishing Lure???

Grasshopper or Fishing Lure???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a wood wasp?
Location: North Yorkshire England
August 6, 2014 2:25 pm
Hi I was at work today putting up a fence when I felt a pain in my leg. I looked and was not sure what it was I knocked it away and in doing so unfortunately killed the insect. It had however stung me and it is incredibly painful even now 10 hours later. I am from the north east of England and have never seen such a creature please help me identify it!
Signature: James Rowe

Great Wood Wasp

Great Wood Wasp

Dear James,
This is indeed a Great Wood Wasp, and we are quite surprised to learn of your experience.  According to UK Safari:  “The female (above) has a long pointed tube at the back of her body, and this is often mistaken for a stinging organ. In fact it’s an ovipositor, which she uses to lay her eggs in the trunks of coniferous trees. Despite their appearance, these insects are quite harmless.”  Knowing that and also knowing that the female lays her eggs beneath the surface of the bark of a tree, we believe it is entirely possible that this Great Wood Wasp mistook your leg for a conifer, and tried to lay eggs.  Do you use pine scented soap?  We do not believe she was trying to sting you.  It is also possible that she used her powerful mandibles to nibble at your leg.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your speedy and informative response. This is indeed very likely as I was at the time building a fence using pine timber and it is very possible that the timber would have come into contact with my leg. There is in all 5 “sting” marks on my leg so it is possible that she has had a nibble. It is rather swollen and painful. What could this be? It does feel like a general bee/wasp sting. Could she have laid her eggs?
Many Thanks,
James Rowe

Hi again James,
This is quite perplexing and contrary to all we have read, so we are tagging this posting as a mystery.  We suppose if you were jabbed with her ovipositor accidentally, it is also possible that she deposited eggs.  Unless you have a wooden leg, you shouldn’t have much to worry about, however, as we are not medical doctors, should any irritation persist, you might want to seek medical attention.

Eric Eaton Concurs
Daniel:
I would concur with your assessment, except I doubt she would have laid eggs.  After five attempts she may have concluded “this is not a tree.”  In any event, I agree he should seek medical attention if symptoms persist or get worse.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue jumping spider??
Location: Austin, TX west hills
August 6, 2014 8:44 am
A friend, an arachnophobe no less, posted a pic of a beautiful tiny blue spider that looks like a jumping spider to me but I couldn’t find another matching it’s blueness anywhere online. Is this a really rare blue jumping spider?
Signature: LauraMaura

Blue Jumping Spider???

Blue Jumping Spider???

Dear LauraMaura,
How well do you know this friend?  Is your friend a practical joker?  Excuse us for being skeptical, but we have had submissions in the past that have tried to hoodwink us.  See here and here.  We believe this is a Cardinal Jumper,
Phidippus cardinalis, a species found in Texas, and we believe that the color has been altered in photoshop.  See BugGuide for an image of the Cardinal Jumper.  We know of no electric blue Jumping Spiders in North America.  We began our investigation by cropping much closer and then lightening and cropping a second time.  The edges around the spider do not look right.

Cropped Blue Jumping Spider:  Hoax or Not???

Cropped Blue Jumping Spider: Hoax or Not???

Blue Jumping Spider has questionable edges.

Blue Jumping Spider has questionable edges.

Then we found a similar Cardinal Jumper from our archives and we created a color altered version of the file, which we present side by side for comparison.  Click on the image to enlarge.  You judge:  Hoax or Not???

Cardinal Jumper:  Real and Enhanced color

Cardinal Jumper: Real and Enhanced color

Apparently his camera phone auto-adjusted and this is the color that the spider appeared in the photo, though the photographer says it was more black than blue in person.

Thanks for that information.  The overall color on the original is not true to nature, leaning toward cyan, which might make a black spider appear blue.  Black is a common color for a Jumping Spider.  This is definitely a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, but there is not enough detail to determine the exact species.

 

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Long blue worm
Location: Dickson, Tn (near Nashville)
July 22, 2014 4:52 pm
Found this worm hanging in an oak tree on July 20 by a silk thread. It is 5-6 inches long and iridescent in the sunlight. Can’t find any info about it, hoping you can help. Thanks.
Signature: Carole

Blue Worm:  Hoax or Real???

Blue Worm: Hoax or Real???

Dear Carole,
We have no idea what this is, but it does not look natural and it appears to have been hung by a human.

Blue worm

Blue worm

So sorry to bother you.  I came to the same conclusion you did  this afternoon as I got more curious and decided to get a step ladder out and touch it.  Turns out it is a fishing lure.  I still have no idea how it got into a tree in my back yard.  My yard is fenced with no gate and I have several dogs (they are friendly).  I hung a chandelier on the next branch over not long ago and the worm was not there then.  I live alone and do not fish.  It is now a new mystery.  Thank you so much for your time.  A friend sent me to your site…it is really interesting.  Again sorry for sending you on a wild goose chase.   Carole

Don’t worry Carole.  Your submission prompted a robust dialog in our comment section and led to some nice links of “real” blue worms in various parts of the world.

Detail of Blue Worm

Detail of Blue Worm

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination