Currently viewing the tag: "Milkweed Meadow"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fat orange juvenile(?) insect.
Location: Walnut Creek CA open space near pond.
February 29, 2016 7:06 pm
I found the group of orange insects with black spots near water last August, in the Walnut Creek Open Space, California. Later I found an earlier picture of a what must be a close relative of this bug in my files. I don’t know where I found it. That one does not have the spots.
I hope you can tell me what these critters are.
Signature: Dirk Muehlner

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Dear Dirk,
We wish you had not cropped your image.  These sure look like Large Milkweed Bug nymphs,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, based on this BugGuide image, and they do appear to be feeding on milkweed pods, but we would love to see more of the plant to try to identify the species of milkweed.  The image you captured earlier is also a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but from there the taxonomies diverge.  The Large Milkweed Bugs are Seed Bugs in the family Lygaeidae and the other is a solitary Western Boxelder Bug nymph, Boisea rubrolineata, in the Scentless Plant Bug family Rhopalidae which you can verify on BugGuide

Western Boxelder Bug Nymph

Western Boxelder Bug Nymph

Update:  March 7, 2016
Hi Daniel
Thank you for identifying these Large Milkweed Bug larvae!  You regretted that my image was cropped and I found a less cropped version, for what it’s worth.

Large Milkweed Bugs (juvenile)

Large Milkweed Bugs (juvenile)

Thanks again.   I really appreciate your response to my query.
Dirk

Wow Dirk,
We are so excited to get an image that includes the narrow leaf milkweed seed pods and the leaf is also visible.  Las Pilitas Nursery has more wonderful information on the California Narrow Leaf Milkweed, a critical plant in a vibrant ecosystem that we profile in Milkweed Meadow.

Narrow Leaf Milkweed with Large Milkweed Bug nymphs

Narrow Leaf Milkweed with Large Milkweed Bug nymphs

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tussock moth?
Location: Hancock County, Ohio
November 13, 2015 1:58 pm
Is this a photo of some sort of tussock moth caterpillar? I came across it in Findlay, Ohio this summer. The closest thing I have found that looks like it are the tussock moth caterpillars, but I have not found one even closely resembling this. It was about 1.5 to 2 inches long.
Signature: Ivan

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ivan,
Like the Monarch Butterfly, your Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar,
Euchaetias egle, is a species that is always found in association with milkweed.

Many thanks!.  I’m finding out that milkweed is very important to the insect world!

That is why many years ago we created a tag to recognize the complex ecosystem of the Milkweed Meadow.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow mites? Bugs? What are they?
Location: Northern IL – October
October 18, 2015 7:03 pm
Greetings!
While doing some fall cleanup today, I came across these interesting critters. We have a swamp milkweed plant in the yard (which has done a fine job attracting the butterflies – many monarchs this summer – yay!). I was cutting back the stalks of the milkweed and at the base of one of those stalks, I found this interesting collection of… something. At first I thought it was a fungus or mold, but then realized they had legs and were moving! They are a beautiful color – just wondering what they are? We are in northern Illinois.
Thanks for any help you can provide!
Signature: JP

Milkweed Aphids

Milkweed Aphids

Dear JP,
You have Milkweed Aphids,
Aphis nerii, and according to BugGuide it is:  “native to the Mediterranean, now cosmopolitan. Introduced along with its host plant, oleander. It has spread beyond the geographic distribution of this plant to the entire US and Canada.”  Aphids are not considered beneficial insects as they suck the juices from plants while feeding.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar
Location: southwestern Ontario, Canada
August 15, 2015 6:09 pm
I was very excited to see that the milkweed I planted in my mother’s garden was well-munched, but somewhat surprised to discover who was munching it! Not monarchs, as I hoped for, but a milkweed tussock moth caterpillar. There were four or five of these little guys. When disturbed, they curl up into a ball and drop to the ground. I haven’t seen them in this area before and so this spotting was particularly interesting to me. I know you have lots of tussock moth caterpillar photos already, but thought I would send this along in case you found it useful.
Thanks for such a great site and all your hard work!
Signature: Alison

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Alison,
Your Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar image is of very high quality and a wonderful addition to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: yellow worm/ larvae/ milkweed plants
Location: traprockridge Plainville CT
August 7, 2014 12:54 am
Here is an aadditional photo to add to my original question of what are the yellow larvae worm ? things eating the milkweed pods. You can also see the red beetle to the left.
Signature: hopefish

Aphid Infestation and Lady Beetle on Milkweed

Aphid Infestation and Lady Beetle on Milkweed

Dear hopefish,
We did not see any additional submission from you.  You have a major infestation of Milkweed Aphids or Oleander Aphids, Aphis nerii, and since Aphids release honeydew, it also appears you are getting a black buildup on the plant.  None of this is healthy since Aphids suck juices from plants.  The beetle is a predatory Lady Beetle, but that single Lady Beetle will not put a dent in this Aphid infestation.  We would recommend attempting to control the Aphid population, but without pesticides as those will have an injurious effect on other creatures that feed on milkweed, including Monarch butterfly caterpillars.  See BugGuide for additional information on the Oleander Aphid.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug identity
Location: Eastern Nebraska
June 10, 2014 1:33 pm
I found these beetles all over my flower garden. In all my years of gardening I have never seen them.
I live in Eastern Nebraska in a suburb next to many farms. Every year I see a new bug I’ve never seen before. He was especially interested in my milkweed which is just beginning to grow.
Signature: Gramma Sally

Milkweed Longhorn

Milkweed Longhorn

Dear Gramma Sally,
If milkweed is new in your garden, that would explain why this Milkweed Longhorn or Red Milkweed Beetle in the genus
Tetraopes is a new bug for you.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on leaves of milkweed (Asclepias); larvae feed externally on roots of host (root feeding is unique among Lamiinae). Each species (or subspecies) is associated with one or a few species of Asclepias (an example of coevolution) (Farrell & Mitter 1998).”

Thank you for your information. I have had the milkweed for several years and have never encountered this bug. I found info on it and it indicated they were present in the eastern part of the US.
They obviously have moved a bit west!!! Sally

According to BugGuide Data, members of the genus are found from coast to coast.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination