Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Indian or Hobomok skipper?
Location: Great Falls Park, Virginia
August 24, 2014 4:27 pm
Looking at various sources, I am not sure one can tell the difference, but do you have an opinion as to whether this is an Indian or Hobomok Skipper? Both look just like what I photographed as far as I can see. No other angles, unfortunately, as didn’t move until it flew off. I am also attaching a photo of what presumably is a Cicada Killer Wasp (it was after all, killing an Annual Cicada!), mainly because it has a great deal more yellow than any photo I can find – is this just natural variation? A difference between the sexes? Or is there a sub-species I haven’t seen mentioned?
Signature: Seth

European Hornet kills Cicada

European Hornet kills Cicada

Hi Seth,
We will address the Skipper question later, but most Skippers look alike to our untrained eye.  What you have mistaken for a Cicada Killer with prey is actually an invasive, exotic European Hornet, a formidable predator that can take down very large prey.
  According to BugGuide:  “Predatory on other insects, used to feed young.”  There is also this elaboration:  “The workers capture insects, bringing them back to the nest to feed the brood. Workers need more high-energy sugary foods such as sap and nectar, and hornet larvae are able to exude a sugary liquid which the workers can feed on.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Chico, CA USA
August 21, 2014 5:17 pm
I was sitting on the couch and look at my window and though to myself, “That can’t be a tick.” I’ve been wondering what it is this whole time. Please help me out, and also if it helps for some reason there’s aanother one of these things close by, but its dead and all that left of it is like its shell.
Signature: -Anthony

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Hi Anthony,
This is an invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, a nonnative species that is spreading in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider with pincers and strange legs
Location: Somerset, south-west UK, bathroom ceiling
August 18, 2014 9:36 am
Hi I found this on the ceiling of our bathroom, in UK in the summer. Strange flat legs out to the sides and what look like pincers at the front. Is it a harvestman too?! Someone suggested a kind of tick!
Thanks!
Signature: Freya Morgan

Harvestman

Harvestman

Dear Freya,
You are correct that this is a Harvestman.  More specifically, it is
Dicranopalpus ramosus, an invasive species that NatureSpot has identified as being:  “Now quite frequent in Britain” and “The species has spread across Europe from Morocco. As early as 1957, it was reported in Bournemouth in southern England, from where it spread. It reached Scotland in 2000.”  We have always been amused by the uneven legs, and the shape of this Harvestman reminds us of architectural dingbats from mid-century modern Los Angeles apartment buildings and starburst home furnishings from the same time period.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stink bud
Location: Wirtz VA.
August 16, 2014 12:29 pm
Please help me control these bugs at my sisters house in Wirtz VA. What can I do to control and get rid of them…. They came back with me to L.I. Last year and yes they really Stink!!! stillhairymary
Signature: From you daniel

Invisible Stink Bug (or Bud)

Invisible Stink Bug (or Bud)

Dear stillhairymary,
We have carefully inspected the attached image from corner to corner, scrutinizing all points in between, and try as we might, we are unable to find any Stink Bud or Stink Bug for that matter.
  We suspect you may be inquiring about the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, an invasive, introduced species that is becoming a major agricultural pest and general nuisance in much of North America.  We do not provide extermination advice.  You may find some helpful information on the Penn State Entomology site as well as numerous other resources on the internet.

Yes thank you for your answer. That looks like the bug  my sister has. Very stinky if you squish them. They will hide anywhere so they came back to Long Island last fall in my suitcase lining and clothing I had packed up the day before I left.  Love your site, made my day Saturday!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Name that caterpillar from Alaska please
Location: Eagle river Alaska
August 11, 2014 3:39 pm
What is this ? We saw it on our strawberry plants !
Signature: Melissa

Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Rusty Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Melissa,
This looks like a Tussock Moth Caterpillar in the genus
Orgyia.  We believe it is the Rusty Tussock Moth Caterpillar, Orgyia antiqua, which according to BugGuide has been sighted in Alaska.  BugGuide also notes “Caterpillars are generalist feeders on the foliage of flowering trees in the Rosaceae, Fagaceae, Ericaceae, and Salicaceae” and strawberry is in the family Rosaceae.  Finally, BugGuide indicates:  “Native to Europe but now found throughout North America, Europe, and parts of Africa and Asia” which makes it an invasive, exotic species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: They are devouring my figs!
Location: San Diego County, CA
August 5, 2014 12:15 pm
Dear Bugman
My young fig tree was going to have a big crop of figs – until these guys arrived! We live on 3 acres in northern San Diego County, CA, mild weather, etc.
I have spent HOURS looking online, but still haven’t found anything quite like them. I don’t think they are Japanese beetles, but that’s as close as I can come. I believe that they attack fruit that has had a bird peck at it, but once that happens, they are voracious.
Any help would be appreciated. Thanks for your time,
Signature: Kathy

African Painted Bugs eat Figs!!!

African Painted Bugs eat Figs!!!

Hi Kathy,
When we read your subject line and saw the title of your digital image “BIG beetles”
, we thought for certain we were going to be responding that you have Figeaters, which fly in Southern California in August.  These are not big beetles, but rather, small Stink Bugs, African Painted Bugs, Bagrada hilaris, to be more exact.  We first encounted African Painted Bugs in our own garden in 2009 on kale and collard greens, and we learned at the time that this was a new invasive, exotic species that was just discovered in Southern California.  Several months later we predicted that:  “If there are no known predators, the African Painted Bugs might become a very serious agricultural pest in California.”  Most literature we read indicated that the African Painted Bugs prefer members of the cabbage family, including the kale and collard greens in our garden, but in 2010, we received a report from Arizona that African Painted Bugs were found on figs.  In 2011, the African Painted Bugs made the Los Angeles Times.  You should be able to locate significantly more information on the AFrican Painted Bugs now than we found back in 2009, and we still maintain that this is probably the biggest threat to agriculture in Southern California in recent memory.  African Painted Bugs have also been reported on citrus on the island of Cyprus.  We rid our garden of African Painted Bug by ripping out the kale and collard greens, but sadly, that is not an option with your fig tree.  Good luck with this scourge.

Yikes!
Daniel, I fear that you are dead on in your diagnosis!  My “BIG bugs” tag referred to the size of the photo: I had significantly enlarged it.  Now that I have a name I will do more research.  Thank you soooo much!
Gratefully,
Kathy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination