Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you help me identify this bug?
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
June 22, 2016 5:36 am
I find so many of these around and in my house during the summer months. They’re maybe an inch and half long and dark brown with many legs. They have to antennae sticking out from the front (at least that’s what I think they are). I don’t know how they keep getting in or what I can do to keep them out.
Signature: Sam

Greenhouse Millipede

Greenhouse Millipede

Dear Sam,
Your image is not of the highest quality, but this appears to be a Greenhouse Millipede,
Oxidus gracilis, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to Asia, introduced to North America and found throughout the lower 48 states and southern Canada.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Flying Insect
Location: Reseda, Ca
June 19, 2016 8:52 pm
Hi, there are flying beetle like bugs that are eating a tree in our backyard. My dad started to notice them this year and doesn’t remember seeing then before. Please help!
Signature: Won Cho

Glassy Winged Sharpshooters

Glassy Winged Sharpshooters

Dear Won Cho,
You have two different insects here, in different orders.  Two of them are Glassy Winged Sharpshooters that feed by sucking fluids from plants, and they do the most damage to new shoots.  According to BugGuide:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, southeastern US. This species was accidentally introduced into so. California in the early 1990s, probably with ornamental or agricultural stock. There, it has become a serious threat to viticulture.  The biggest problem is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.”  According to the University of California Integrated Pest Management System site:  “The real problem associated with glassy-winged sharpshooter, however, is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa from one plant to another. This bacterium is the causal agent of devastating plant diseases such as Pierce’s disease of grape, oleander leaf scorch, almond leaf scorch and mulberry leaf scorch. Other diseases to landscape plants in California include sweet gum dieback and cherry plum leaf scorch. Outside of California, other strains of X. fastidiosa cause phony peach disease, plum leaf scald, leaf scorches in sycamore, elm, maple, and oak,and variegated citrus chlorosis, but these diseases have not been detected in California. It should be noted that the strain of X. fastidiosa that causes oleander leaf scorch will not cause Pierce’s disease in grapes and the strain of X. fastidiosa that causes mulberry leaf scorch does not cause disease in oleanders or grapes. At this time there is no cure for any of these diseases.”  The other insect we can only identify to the family.  It is a Metallic Borer Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and the larvae bore in the wood.  They are generally very host specific.  Telling us what tree is affected may help in further identifications.

Borer Beetle

Borer Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown insect
Location: Bay Area, California
June 14, 2016 2:45 pm
Hello,
Love this site and use it often! I got this photo from a co-worker and couldn’t identify it with my books or your posts. It was found on a backpack in early June. Is it some kind of horntail larvae?
I think you are out in the field, I look forward to your answer when you return. Thanks for your time!
Signature: Jess
Resource Analyst  | Stewardship
East Bay Regional Park District
Oakland, CA

Unknown Larva

Probably Longtailed Sawfly Larva

Dear Jess,
Thanks for your patience, though we received so much mail while we were away that we will never be able to respond to everything.  This looks nothing like the drawing of a Horntail larva pictured on Bug Eric.  It appears to have an ovipositor, and we are not aware of any larvae that possess an ovipositor.  Like you, we are stumped.  We will write to Eric Eaton to see if he can provide an identification.  For now, we will classify it as a Beetle Grub, but we are not convinced that this the appropriate classification.

Eric Eaton responds
Reminds me of a rat-tailed maggot, except those don’t have legs, which this one clearly does, plus a head capsule….I’m stumped, too.
Eric

Update:  As we await additional information from Jess, we are featuring this posting and requesting assistance from our readership.
Dear Jess, please provide us with any additional information, like size.  Also, was this discovery made on a backpack in the field, or was it shortly after an excursion?

Hello Daniel,
Thanks so much for your time on this! My co-worker is off at a conference, and didn’t provide a size. However, using his photograph of the backpack(see the blurry strap?);  it looks to be about 2.5-3 stitches long. I measured the reinforced stitches on my backpack and got approx. 8-10mm. When I first saw it and said it looked like a cricket larva, he said it was “a small cricket-size”. After review of cricket larva (no ovipositor) and rat-tailed maggots, I emailed. Maybe a female after a molt? But no wings….
He was out in the field, likely a grassland in one of our parks: Alameda or Contra Costa Counties of the East Bay.
Thanks to Eric for his time too.
I hope this helps,
Jess

Thanks for the information Jess,
Now that this request is back in our consciousness, we had a thought.  It reminds us of a Sawfly Larva, especially some Australian Sawflies, and sure enough, we found a Longtailed Sawfly in our archives that looks nearly exactly like your image.  Here is another image from the Australian Museum.  Now our mission is to see if any North American Sawflies have the long tail or if this might perhaps be an Australian introduction, a direction in which we are leaning as there are so many eucalyptus trees and other Australian fauna already naturalized in Southern California.  Now, going back to your original request, you suggested a Horntail Larva, and interestingly, Horntails and Sawflies are classified together as Symphyta which you may verify on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What IS this?
Location: Upstate New York
June 4, 2016 6:14 pm
Hello!
I live in Upstate New York (the Hudson River Valley, to be more precise), and this spring, I started noticing these strange bugs in my yard. I’ve never seen them before this year, but I’m finding them ALL OVER THE PLACE. They are super strange, and I’m hoping you can help me out!
Thanks!
Signature: Sara

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larva

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Sara,
This is the larva of a Lady Beetle, and both larvae and adults feed on other insects.  They are generally considered to be beneficial as they eat enormous quantities of Aphids.  Your larva appears to be that of the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle
Harmonia axyridis, an introduced and invasive species, based on this BugGuide image.  Though they help control insect populations, they are crowding out native species of Lady Beetles, reducing their populations.  Adult Multicolored Asian Lady Beetles often enter homes in great numbers to hibernate, creating quite a nuisance for homemakers.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site next week while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Update:  June 17, 2016
We’re Back.

Subject:  We’re posting this image of a dead Ten Lined June Beetle being devoured by Argentine Ants and leaving town
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California

June 8, 2016 1:08 AM
Upon leaving the house this afternoon, we moved the garbage to the curb and discovered this dead Ten Lined June Beetle under the recycle bin.  We placed it on the fence so we could take an image upon returning.  Since it was dark, we needed to use the flash.  The beetle is being devoured by invasive Argentine Ants.  This is only the second Ten Lined June Beetle we have found in Mount Washington, and it is just shy of a year ago that we had the first Ten Lined June Beetle visit our office.  This is most likely our last posting prior to taking a week long holiday, during which time we will not be answering any identification requests.  We have postdated numerous submissions to go live during our absence.  We will return in mid-June, so kindly hold your requests until after June 17.

Ten Lined June Beetle devoured by Argentine Ants

Ten Lined June Beetle devoured by Argentine Ants

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Madison, Wisconsin area
June 6, 2016 6:56 pm
Hello! I’m from the Madison, Wisconsin area, and I found this moth (butterfly??) while I was gardening. He has 3 legs and cant walk or fly. What kind of moth/butterfly is he?
Signature: Hannah

Large Yellow Underwing

Large Yellow Underwing

Dear Hannah,
Though it is a very pretty moth, the Large Yellow Underwing, , is an Invasive Exotic species that according to BugGuide, was:  “Introduced from Europe to Nova Scotia in 1979, this species has since spread north to the Arctic Ocean, west to the Pacific, and south to the Gulf of Mexico.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination