Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
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Subject: Looks kind of like a firefly
Location: New Jersey
May 25, 2015 4:56 pm
Rescued this bug from a pool after it flew in, but I don’t think it’s a firefly. I did some googling but I haven’t found anything quite like it. Thanks for your time!
Signature: David

Longicorn

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Dear David,
This is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and we believe its dramatic coloration, especially the red thorax, and its spring emergence should make it relatively easy to identify.  We were wrong and for now it is running unidentified.
P.S.  We are tagging you as a Bug Humanitarian.

Update:  May 26, 2015
We used Arthur V. Evans book, Beetles of Eastern North America, where we found a similar looking Phymatodes amoenus pictured, and that led us to the related Tanbark Borer, Phymatodes testaceus, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “native to Eurasia; widely established around the world, incl. e. US and, more recently, in the Pacific Northwest” and it feeds on Oaks with the larvae boring in the wood.  According to NatureSpot:  “The adults are active nocturnally and will come to light but are rarely seen otherwise under normal circumstances.”  Seems like you were tagged with the Bug Humanitarian Award for rescuing an Invasive Exotic species, another tag on our site.

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Subject: curious…
Location: north nj
May 12, 2015 9:26 pm
Can’t figure out if this is a European wasp, or a Japanese wasp. I’m in North Jersey.
Signature: adam minick

European Hornet

European Hornet

Hi Adam,
This is a European Hornet and we believe it is a queen.  According to BugGuide:  “Queens emerge from hibernation during the spring, and they search for a suitable location in which to start a new nest. They build the nest with chewed wood pulp, and a few eggs are laid in individual paper cells; these eggs develop into non-reproductive workers. When 5-10 workers have emerged, they take over the care of the nest, and the rest of queen’s life is devoted solely to egg laying. The workers capture insects, bringing them back to the nest to feed the brood. Workers need more high-energy sugary foods such as sap and nectar, and hornet larvae are able to exude a sugary liquid which the workers can feed on.  The nest reaches its peak size towards mid September. At this time the queen lays eggs that develop into males (drones) and new queens, she then dies shortly after. The new queens and males mate during a ‘nuptial flight’, after which the males die, and the newly mated queens seek out suitable places in which to hibernate; the old nest is never re-used.”

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Subject: Small beetle
Location: Aliso Viejo, California, USA
May 7, 2015 9:25 pm
This bug walked across our patio during the day, on a breezy spring day in Southern California. The bug is approximately 1/2 centimeter in length.
Signature: Lori

Thank you for your help! I believe this bug is a Mediterranean Red Bug. Is that correct?

Mediterranean Red Bug

Mediterranean Red Bug

Hi Lori,
We agree with you that this is a Mediterranean Red Bug,
Scantius aegyptius, a recently introduced Invasive Exotic species.

Thank you, Daniel!
Warmly,
Lori

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Subject: Los Angeles: black tiny fly likes water w short clear wings
Location: Los Angeles, CA
April 28, 2015 10:33 pm
Hi,
Thank you so much for all of your service throughout the years. I often make donations & spread the word!
This latest bug is stumping me: We live in east Los Angeles near Pasadena & the SGV (inland)- tonight I noticed approx 20-30 fruit-fly-esque bugs dead or dying in the bathroom sink. They seemed to be coming in through a tiny opening in the bathroom window, so my husband went to the roof to check it out. He said there are thousands on our roof!! He’s spraying now but we can’t find anything similar-looking enough online.
They seem to obviously be attracted to water but do not look like drain bugs.
PLEASE HELP!
(We’re so worried they’re termites but they don’t have long wings)
Signature: Gratefully, Meg

Argentine Ant Alate

Argentine Ant Alate

Dear Meg,
The person who can solve your infestation problem will probably win a Nobel Peace Prize as the solution will improve the quality of life for Californians, the people of Japan and the inhabitants of the Mediterranean, as those are the three places where super-colonies of Argentine Ants,
 Linepithema humile, are making millions of people’s lives miserable, especially in hot summer months when 1000s of Argentine Ants invade homes in search of food and water.  Your images are of winged reproductive queen and king Argentine Ants, known as alates, on their nuptial flight and according to BugGuide:  “Winged queens mate once with a winged male, after which they can continuously produce fertile eggs for as long as 10 years- until death. Unlike most ants, several productive queens of this species can share the same colony, with one or more leaving with some of the workers to form a new colony when it gets crowded (this is known as ‘budding’).”  Here are some good images on BugGuide for comparison.

Argentine Ant Alates

Argentine Ant Alates

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Subject: Fuzzy Fly? on Eschscholtzia in garden
Location: Pleasanton, CA
April 15, 2015 7:28 pm
I would appreciate it if you could help identify this insect. It looks like an orange, fuzzy fly, about the size of a small bumblebee. It was visiting my garden in early April, and though I have looked for it many days since, that first day was the only time I’ve seen it.
Signature: R. Battaglia

Narcissus Bulb Fly

Narcissus Bulb Fly

Dear R. Battaglia,
Your request has been sitting on our back burner since we first read it, because we recognized this fly, but we couldn’t remember its name.  Today it hit us.  This is a male Narcissus Bulb Fly,
Merodon equestris, a member of the generally considered beneficial family Syrphidae, the Flower Flies or Hover Flies.  According to BugGuide it is:  “native to Europe, adventive and now widespread in North America (wherever Narcissus are grown), Japan, and Australasia Food Larvae live in and feed upon plant bulbs.”  Your individual looks exactly like this image posted to BugGuide.

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Subject: Bug ID
Location: Oxford, Mississippi
April 16, 2015 1:25 pm
Found two of these crawling on me.
Signature: Luke

Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug

Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug

Dear Luke,
This is a Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug,
Megacopta cribraria, an invasive and recently introduced species that is spreading throughout the south.  We decided to do a bit more historical research on this species, and our first citation is from the Atlanta Journal Constitution website AJC.com which states:  “Best anyone can tell, the scourge began in Hoschton in 2009. A pest-control guy had samples from a house a-crawl with odd little bugs. They were brown and ugly and smelled bad, sort of like ladybugs dipped in something a dog would roll in.  The pest-control guy had never seen anything like them, so he slipped a few dead ones in a vial of alcohol. He gave them to an entomologist at the University of Georgia, who was equally perplexed.  He showed the mystery insects to Joe Eger, another entomologist who stopped by the UGA professor’s office to say hello. Eger is an expert on stinkbugs.  Intrigued, Eger visited the Hoschton house where the bugs turned up. He traced the hordes of unwanted visitors to a nearby tangle of kudzu. Thus did Megacopta cribaria officially debut. Since its discovery four years ago, it’s been discussed and cussed, researched and reviled. It’s the object of inquiry in laboratories from Griffin to Missoula, Mont. It’s the kudzu bug. With spring on the horizon, swarms of them ought to be out in force soon.”  The Bug of the Week site reports:  “As a foodie fond of invasive kudzu, some might herald the arrival of the bug as a blessing, but this bug has a darker side. In addition to kudzu, one of Maryland’s most important crops, soybeans, is also on the menu. Soybean growers in infested states have already reported important losses associated with kudzu bug.  This critter has sucking mouthparts that, once inserted into the leaves and stems, rob the soybean of its nutritious sap. The removal of these vital fluids can significantly reduce yields. In addition to kudzu and soybeans, wisteria, a widely planted and naturalized ornamental plant, also serves as a competent source of food.”  The North Carolina State University Residential, Structural and Community Pests site states:  “As temperatures and day length decline, kudzu bugs seek out sheltered areas where they can pass the winter, such as under bark or rocks, or in leaf litter, etc. They are most common along the edges of kudzu patches and soybean fields and in areas near residential areas, we can expect to see them invade homes simiilar to the behavior of another nuisance pest – the Asian lady beetle. The bugs will often congregate on light-colored surfaces (such as siding, fascia boards, etc.).”  The site also provides a link to a map that illustrates the expanded range of the Lablab Bug in the south.  While the Lablab Bug poses no direct dangerous threat to humans, they are an invasive species, a serious threat to the agricultural industry, and a troublesome nuisance when they invade homes.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination