Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
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Subject: Not a clue!
Location: Derbyshire, England
April 4, 2014 11:06 am
Hi,
Please could you help me identify this creature? I’ve been scrolling through photos for hours and had no luck. I’m afraid I’m completely ignorant with insects so I can’t even narrow my search.
I’ve found two of these in a Derbyshire bedroom at separate times over the last couple of weeks. I never seen them before, or anything similar, so I would like to know what they are if we’re sharing space.
I’m afraid I haven’t observed any useful behaviours, I just have this photo.
Thankyou for any help.
Signature: Rose

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle is Placosternus species

Hi Rose,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we have not had any luck identifying the species.  It is not listed on Mark Telfer’s Longhorn Beetles page, nor on Eakring Birds.  Did you get any new furniture in the room where you have found the beetles?  We don’t want to be alarmist, but it is possible they emerged from the wood used in a new piece of furniture.  We will continue trying to identify the species.

Hi,
There is a wooden bowl my brother bought back from Belize. Looking at it I can see three holes, two have dust around them and one looks like there is something still in it.
As it’s likely these beetles are foreign to my ecosystem, is there some precaution I should take?
Thank you so much for your speedy reply!
Rose.

Hi again Daniel,
I’ve just been in touch with my brother and he says it is a rosewood bowl bought in Placencia Belize that we think it has come from. Hope that can help with the identification?
Thanks again for all your help.
Rose

Hi Rose,
We believe you probably found the source of the introduction of these Longhorned Borers with the discovery of the wooden bowl and its holes.  Many invasive species have been introduced in this manner to various parts of the world, however, we don’t think you need to fear that this tropical species will survive in your much colder English climate.  We will see if we can find a match among species from Belize, though nearby Costa Rica shares many of the same species and there is more comprehensive data on Costa Rican species on the internet because of the ecotourism.

Additional Information and Identification courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and Rose:
It looks like a species of Placosternus (Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae: Clytini) which includes the familiar Mesquite Borer (P. difficilis) that occurs as far north as the southern USA , and south to Honduras. There are four species of Placosternus altogether, all of which can be found in Belize, look very similar and include neotropical rosewoods as larval host plants. The adult coloration suggests that they may be wasp mimics. The commonly used rosewood species in Belize is the Honduras Rosewood (Dalbergia stevensoni). FYI, this species has long been a staple in the Belizian artisanal tourist industry (full disclosure – we also bought a few beautiful rosewood bowls in Belize a few years ago), but unfortunately, a massive increase in the harvest in recent years to feed Asian demand has caused concern and the Belizian government has recently implemented a ban on the harvest and export of rosewood. I am not sure if this includes the small-scale production and sale of carved products for the tourist trade. If so, this would be a serious and unfortunate hit on an important village-based income source. Regards. Karl

Thanks for doing this research Karl.  We did notice the resemblance to the Mesquite Borer when we wrote the original identification, and we tried searching its tribe in England to see if there were any relatives.

Hi Karl and Daniel,
Thank you very much for solving the mystery! Thanks for all your time and effort.
Kindest regards,
Rose

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Subject: White bugs on heavenly bamboo
Location: Sacramento
March 25, 2014 12:14 pm
These creatures are all over my heavenly bamboo, particularly on the top third of the branches. They hang out on the underside–they appear to be hanging on by legs and a mouth, but my mom thinks they are a chrysalis. The front of them is a brown or maybe an orange/black. We picked a few off thinking they were a pest before thinking maybe they’re good bugs–what are they? It’s an unseasonably warm/dry spring in Sacramento, CA.
Signature: Danielle

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Dear Danielle,
You have an infestation of Cottony Cushion Scale, a pest species from Australia that has become established in North America where it is a significant crop pest.  According to BugGuide:  “The white fluted part of the insect is an egg sac that can contain up to 1000 eggs. The insect is hermaphroditic, producing sperm that can fertilize its own ova, but in an alternate reproductive strategy it can also make winged males that can fertilize the female part of other individuals.
When it first appeared in the w. US it was a major pest of Citrus crops. In CA, around 1889, it was an early success story for biological control by beneficial ladybird beetles (Rodolia cardinalis). (Full story) The control was so successful that in 1893 a Florida nurseryman asked for some of the beneficials to be sent to FL, to test as a control for other scale insects. The scale was included in the shipment as food for the beetles, and thus accidentally introduced to FL citrus.

Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale

Thank you so much! 1000 eggs! Really? Eeek–I’m not a “bug man”–my skin is crawling. I appreciate the info.

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Subject: Strange looking dead bug!
Location: Ireland
March 15, 2014 10:56 am
Hi there found this weird bug dead on sofa..there were 2 of them!  Founding n Ireland! Is this some sort of carpet beetle perhaps?
Signature: Ali

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Hi Ali,
This looks like a terrestrial Amphipod,
Arcitalitrus sylvaticus, commonly called a Lawn Shrimp or House Hopper.  These Australian natives have become established in southern California as well as several other parts of the world.  According to BugGuide, their range is:  “Southeastern Australia (New South Wales and Victoria), as well as nearby areas of the Pacific, but introduced into New Zealand, the British Isles, Florida and California.”  They are known to enter homes when their garden habitat is flooded due to rains.

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Subject: Beetle
Location: Lisboa
March 10, 2014 8:08 am
Hello im from Lisboa, Portugal.
I found this Bug with more and less 3 cm. I know is a beetle but i dont now what specime it is ….sorry my english
Signature: Miguel Monteiro

Red Palm Weevil

Red Palm Weevil

Dear Miguel,
This is a Red Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, and it is an introduced species in Portugal where it is threatening the palm trees.  You can read more about the threat the Red Palm Weevil poses to palms in Portugal on Acción Ambiental.

Hello
I Aprecciate your answer.
Thank you very much
Kind regards
Miguel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Southern Ohio-North America
March 6, 2014 7:20 pm
This bug was in my living room floor. It is the beginning of March and I live in a small housing complex in southern Ohio. I’m quite a clean freak and now panicked that I have bugs! Help me please :)
Signature: N/A

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear N/A,
This Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an invasive, exotic species from China that is spreading across North America.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug often enters homes to hibernate when the weather cools.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: UK Unknown Bug
Location: London
February 26, 2014 8:23 am
Hi i just killed a bug that i saw and i have never seen anything like it in the UK i asked my family n friends and they have never seen anything like it too and i can’t find anything on it on the internet. hope you can identify it please?
Signature: Craig Tanner

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Hi Craig,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug, is a North American species native to the Pacific Northwest.  As early as the 1960s, its North American range was greatly expanded, probably influenced by being able to stow away with the belongings of humans who are getting increasingly more mobile.  We learned that they were first documented in Northern Europe in the early years of the 21st millenium, and it appears that this Invasive Exotic species is now firmly established in the Old World.  British Bugs has additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination