Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Southwesr kansas.
May 18, 2016 4:51 pm
Found about 6 or 7 of these on my sweatshirt when was cutting branches off tree. Not sure what they are.
Signature: Chaz

Giant Willow Aphid

Giant Willow Aphid

Dear Chaz,
Were you by chance pruning a willow or a cottonwood tree?  This is a Giant Willow Aphid,
Tuberolachnus salignus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “Non native, introduced from Europe around 1872. Considered a minor pest.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help identify
Location: Feilding New Zealand
May 15, 2016 9:58 pm
I found quite a few of these crawling around on my outdoor table and occasionally on me. Just want to know what they are and if they are a known pest or harmless.
Signature: Narelle

Giant Willow Aphid

Giant Willow Aphid

Dear Narelle,
We believe we have correctly identified this Aphid as a Giant Willow Aphid,
Tuberolachnus salignus, a species that according to Farm Forestry New Zealand:  ” was first found in New Zealand on 23 Dec 2013 at Western Springs Park, Auckland by entomologist Stephen Thorpe. Surprisingly, subsequent surveys have revealed that it is already well established throughout much of New Zealand.”  The site also states:  “Large dense colonies of the giant willow aphid form over summer. Reproduction occurs asexually with no males having ever been found, thus the aphids in these colonies are typically clones. The aphids are noted to be long lived, with winged individuals in particular displaying lengthy maternal care of their offspring. In Great Britain colonies are apparent from mid-summer into late winter, after which the aphids curiously disappear in spring. We may expect to see a similar trend in New Zealand with T. salignus present between December and July.”  More information on the Giant Willow Aphid can be found on the Study of Northern Virginia Ecology site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: North America, New York, Waterford.
May 7, 2016 6:06 pm
North America, New York, Waterford.
Thinking some variety of longhorn beetle?
Signature: Trevor Grimm

Tanbark Borer

Tanbark Borer

Dear Trevor,
This is certainly a Longicorn Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we believe it is the Eurasian Tanbark Borer,
Phymatodes testaceus, a species that has become established in North America.  See images on BugGuide for verification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red headed beetle in SE PA?
Location: Southeastern PA
May 1, 2016 7:04 pm
Hi, we found this bug in our house in southeastern PA. After a web search, the closest I can ID is the blister beetle, but the head does not seem to be an exact match. Found today, mid-Spring. Grateful for any help identifying this bug!
Signature: -InsectIlliterate

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Dear InsecIlliterate,
We believe we have correctly identified your Longhorned Borer Beetle from the family Cerambycidae as the Tanbark Borer,
Phymatodes testaceus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to Eurasia; widely established around the world, incl. e. US and, more recently, in the Pacific Northwest.”  According to iNaturalist:  “Larvae develop in and under the bark of various deciduous tree species, causing damage. Larvae pupate in the spring. The beetle’s life cycle lasts one year in central and southern parts, and two years in northern climes.”  It is described on Nature Spot as being:  “Length 8 to 13mm. Very variable in colour from golden brown, through reddish to a deep blue-black. A common form has the thorax reddish and the elytra deep blue.”

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Tanbark Borer, we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found in my Daughter’s Room
Location: New York (Long Island)
April 11, 2016 6:49 am
My daughter (4 years old) has always been both fascinated and scared of bugs, so finding the attached bug in her room at bedtime was an adventure.
We captured the bug carefully, and while I was taking it outside, realized that we had never seen this sort of bug before. So we carefully put it on the ground and put a plastic cup over it. My daughter ran and grabbed her magnifying glass immediately and started to examine it. With the cup between her and it, she felt brave enough to look at it and ask questions, like “what does it eat?” and “how did it get inside?” Once she was done, we took it outside and put it in the flower bed.
It was found on Long Island (New York) in April, just relaxing on a wall in my daughter’s room. I think the picture is pretty good, and you can zoom in for more.
I’d love to talk to her again about what sort of bug it is, and provide more info; she’s naturally very curious and the more she learns the more she wants to know!
Signature: –David

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear David,
We applaud you trying to educate your daughter regarding insects, but we wish you had encountered a better species for this lesson.  This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug,
Halyomorpha halys, and while it is not dangerous to humans, this is an invasive species accidentally introduced to North America from Asia.  Because the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is able to feed on such a wide variety of plants, it has quickly spread across the entire continent of North America, and it is expected to become a significant agricultural pest.  Additionally, it is a species that seeks shelter indoors when weather begins to cool, making itself known in the spring when it tries to find egress.  It is the bane of thousands of homemakers who find they are sharing their warm homes with countless Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs.  Again, they pose no direct threat to people or homes, but they are a nuisance.

Thank you very much for the very prompt reply!
I guess we’ll just replace one lesson with another.  From friendly and useful insects to the invasion of areas by non-indigenous species and the impact it can have.
Seeing as I found one already – should I expect to find me?  And what’s the best course of action when they are found?

Finding one means you will more than likely find more.  Though we typically encourage tolerance of the lower beasts, we don’t have much tolerance when it comes to invasive species, like the Argentine Ants.  We do not have any reservations to manually squashing Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs when we find them in our home office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Boxelder Relative?
Location: Snohomish, WA
March 30, 2016 4:18 pm
We have numerous of these on our south facing exterior walls. The closest images I have found that look like these are the Boxelder, although ours do not have the reddish-orange coloring. I always attempt to let nature police itself the best I can. (Paper wasps in outdoor light fixture annually, which my wife hates.) We have many jumping spiders that patrol the same south facing walls, but I haven’t seen any of these little beetles fall prey to them yet. Hopefully, these are not an infestation that needs to be addressed. Thank you for your time!
Signature: CEROE

Mediterranean Seed Bug

Mediterranean Seed Bug

Dear CEROE,
We believe this is a Mediterranean Seed Bug,
Xanthochilus saturnius, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to Europe and the Mediterranean, adventive in NA (WA-CA) and now locally abundant.”  According to the Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook:  ” There is very little known about these bugs, possibly because they are not major economic pests. They do cause anxiety among homeowners, and costly eradication expenses.”  The PNIM Handbook also states:  “Even though they do no damage to house, humans, or pets, these seed bugs become a huge annoyance and costly to exterminate when they migrate into households.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination