Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
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Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Northern Maine
July 15, 2016 2:45 pm
We have many of these small green bugs around our house and we are wondering what they are?
Signature: Elizabeth Collins

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus formosus, a species introduced from Europe.  According to BugGuide, it feeds on “primarily Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown beetle
Location: Pierrefonds, Quebec, Canada
July 22, 2016 2:15 pm
This beetle (and many others like it) have shown up in my uncle’s pool in Pierrefonds, Quebec, Canada. Any help identifying it would be appreciated. :)
Signature: Jeff Robinson

Japanese Beetle

Japanese Beetle

Dear Jeff,
This is an invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle and we have already made a posting this year commemorating the 100 Year Anniversary of its accidental introduction. Most home gardeners in eastern North American are very familiar with Japanese Beetles, dreading their yearly appearance when they feed upon the leaves and blossoms of roses, fruit trees and many other cultivated trees, shrubs and flowers. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A strange visitor
Location: Alicante, Spain
July 16, 2016 5:55 pm
Dear Bugman, I was wondering if you could help me to identify a bug I came across. I came across it in southern Spain in the summertime. It is quite a fascinating looking creature, pale white dots with almost neon blue body. I assume it’s some breed of mosquito but I’d love to know more.
Thank you for your help!
Signature: Daniel Owen

Male Asian Tiger Mosquito

Male Asian Tiger Mosquito

Dear Daniel,
The bad news is that this is an introduced Asian Tiger Mosquito,
Aedes albopictus, and according to Spanish News Today:  “The mosquito can carry more than 20 exotic diseases, including West Nile fever, dengue fever, yellow fever, chikungunya virus and two types of encephalitis and is strikingly distinct from other mosquitos due to its distinctive black and white striped markings.”  The Asian Tiger Mosquito has also been introduced to North America, and according to BugGuide:  “The ATM differs from most other mosquitoes in that it’s diurnal (active during the day).”  The good news is that the feathery antennae indicate your individual is a male and male Mosquitoes do not feed on human blood, but there are more than likely a few females in the vicinity that may try to bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Central WI
July 12, 2016 2:02 pm
What is this bug? We are camping and it is on what we think might be an Ash tree but not sure! Thank you!
Signature: Sue

Japanese Beetles

Japanese Beetles

Dear Sue,
These invasive, exotic Japanese Beetles are turning those leaves into what mom calls “lace doilies.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen this before
Location: Lancaster County
July 11, 2016 8:17 am
Found this on my flag this morning. Have never seen this before? Please enlighten.
Signature: James DeBord

Wood Leopard Moth

Wood Leopard Moth

Dear James,
Where is Lancaster County?  If you are in UK, this is a native species.  If you are in Pennsylvania or North Carolina, this is an introduced species.  It is a Wood Leopard Moth,
Zeuzera pyrina, and according to BugGuide:  “Supposedly introduced (from its native Europe?) in mid-1800s; first reported in North America at Hoboken, New Jersey in 1882.  It is considered a pest of some fruit trees.” 

Yes sorry, I didn’t specify. Pennsylvania. Thanks for the info. I have never seen one before in all my years in PA.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bee looking bug?
Location: New York, 10960
July 8, 2016 10:07 am
I know there are carpenter bees eating away at my deck. But the other day I saw this guy just lurking around. It doesn’t look like the others. The thorax is much longer than the C-bees. And the black circle, by where the wings attach to the body, surrounded by the gold fuzz is much much larger.
Image 1 is the bug in question
Image 2 is the carpenter bee
Thank you!
Signature: Deena

Sculptured Resin Bee

Sculptured Resin Bee

Dear Deena,
The Bee in question is an introduced Sculptured Resin Bee,
Megachile sculpturalis, and according to BugGuide:  “They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. Effectively pollinate kudzu, another invasive species.”  Thanks for including the image of the Eastern Carpenter Bee for comparison.

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Eastern Carpenter Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination