Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
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Subject: mystery pink and white bug
Location: North Shore of Maui, Hawaii
February 28, 2015 11:38 pm
Aloha, I found this little guy on some herb/greens cuttings from the garden. I’m not sure of the exact species he was on… either parsley, kale, or young leaf lettuce. He was in the bottom of my tray when I removed the greens. I took this photo with a 200x usb microscope, but I can’t swear to the magnification as it was kind of cheap. Temps have been in the mid 70’s and on the humid side (70-80%) if that helps.
Signature: Aloha, Greg Hansen

Immature Torpedo Bug

Immature Torpedo Bug

Dear Greg,
This looks like an immature Torpedo Bug,
Siphanta acuta, one of the Flatid Leafhoppers.  You can read more about it on BugGuide where it states:  “native to Australia, adventive elsewhere (New Zealand, Hawaii, S. Africa); established in CA.”

Wow!  That was so fast!  Thank you so much for your help!  I love your website!
Greg Hansen

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: can you identyfy this large beetle
Location: hythe, kent
February 28, 2015 2:08 pm
Dear all
We found this bug in our bathroom , running down the door.
Can you help with his identity
Thanks Grant
Signature: G West

Australian Cockroach

Australian Cockroach

Dear Grant,
At first we were going to send a brief response that this is a Cockroach, but we decided the thoracic markings are so striking that we would attempt to identify the species of Cockroach you encountered.  After finding several similar looking images that only identified it as a Cockroach, we found the Suffolk Pest Control Company that identified it as an Australian Cockroach,
Periplaneta australasia., and that provided this information:  “Inspite of their exotic origins Australian cockroaches are making a home for themselves in the UK, where they can found in most major cities.”  Not confident that the Australian Cockroach is actually native to Australia, we found this information on BugGuide:  “Adult has thorax outlined in yellow with black/brown center marking somewhat like a sideways number eight. Differentiating Australian cockroaches from other species of Periplaneta requires identification of the narrow yellow mark along front outside edge of wings”, but nothing was written about the country of origin.  The garden is calling us from additional research at this time.

Hi Daniel
Thanks for your help. Am guessing we need to contact some form of pest control company as they seem quite dangerous.
Because we d found one , I suppose there are more so will get onto it straight away.
Thanks again
Grant

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Subject: Bug eating my lemon tree leaves.
Location: South Florida
February 12, 2015 1:13 pm
I have this bug/beetle eating my little outdoor lemon tree leaves around the edges and is there a treatment for them?
I hope you can help.
Signature: Joe cocchario

Sri Lanka Weevil

Sri Lanka Weevil

Dear Joe,
This is a Sri Lanka Weevil,
Myllocerus undecimpustulatus.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Sri Lanka, adventive and established in so. FL.”  BugGuide also notes:  “in FL, recorded from 55 host plant spp., from palms to roadside weeds, including citrus.”  According to Featured Creatures:  “Leaf-feeding adults damage the foliage of ornamental plants, fruit trees, and vegetables, whereas the larvae injure root systems. Due to its feeding habits, the Sri Lankan weevil could negatively affect subtropical and tropical fruit, ornamental, and vegetable industries here in Florida. The possible impact to the horticulture industry in nurseries, landscape services, and horticultural retailers could reach billions of dollars based on the value they generate in Florida (Kachatryan and Hodges 2012). Extension agents and Master Gardener volunteers around the state have received requests from homeowners for information on the control of this weevil. Botanical gardens and plant nurseries have reported damage due to chewing injury and require effective control measures.”

Leaf Damage due to Weevils

Leaf Damage due to Weevils

Update:  It seems Joe submitted a photo previously posted to our site, so now we cannot be certain that the insect eating his lemon tree leaves is actually a Sri Lanka Weevil.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Keep getting these in the house
Location: Ma
January 25, 2015 6:29 am
I live in MA and they have been coming since we moved in in June.
Signature: Lisa

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Lisa,
This is an invasive, exotic species, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, and it was accidentally introduced to North America from China.  It has since spread across the continent and it is a nuisance to residents when it enters homes to hibernate.  It is also a significant agricultural pest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: South Carolina
January 4, 2015 8:49 pm
I have found three of these in my house. What are they? They move slowly.
Signature: Hates bugs

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Hates bugs,
This is an invasive exotic species, a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.  It was recently introduced to North America and spread rapidly across the continent.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID Bug. please?
Location: Ventura County, CA
December 28, 2014 11:14 am
Hello. Happy New Year.
Can you ID this bug for us. They seem to be increasingly multiplying on our property in the
north end of the Santa Monica Mountains of Southern California. We grow some organic
fruits and want to make sure they are not a plant eating insect, or what we would have to do
in an organic way to handle them.
Thank you.
Clay
Signature: email

Mediterranean Red Bug

Mediterranean Red Bug

Dear Clay,
Though it is lacking an recognized common name on BugGuide, we have been calling the invasive exotic species
 Scantius aegyptius by the descriptive name Mediterranean Red Bug based on its site or origin and its common family name.  According to the Center for Invasive Species Research at UC Riverside:  “Recently, another brightly colored, mostly seed feeding bug belonging to the family Pyrrhocoridae or “Red Bugs” has become established in southern California and is drawing attention due to large aggregations of the bright red and black nymphs and adults feeding on annual broadleaf weeds in open space areas.  Scantius aegyptius, an old world pyrrhocorid bug, native to the eastern Mediterranean region, was documented for the first time in North America in Orange County during June of 2009.  Reports of this insect from other southern California locations (i.e., Riverside County) suggest that this insect has been established for a year or more prior to these Orange County collections.”  We suspect sightings of this Mediterranean Red Bug will be increasing in Southern California this winter, which makes your submission a very appropriate Bug of the Month for January 2015.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination