Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown beetle
Location: Warsash, England
August 24, 2016 11:15 am
Found this beauty in our back garden today, in Warsash on the south coast of England. It was very hot here today and he appeared to be resting in the shade. Can’t find him in our Beetle books!
Many thanks
Signature: Tracy Dukes

Sun Beetle:  Pachnoda marginata

Sun Beetle: Pachnoda marginata

Dear Tracy,
Our first impression proved correct:  This is not a native species in England.  We believe we have correctly identified your Scarab Beetle as a Sun Beetle,
Pachnoda marginata, a species that according to Shutterstock is:  “a beetle from the subfamily Cetoniinae (Scarabaeidae) that lives in west and central Africa. They are used as food for terrarium animals.”  Perhaps this individual escaped from someone who is raising them in captivity.  According to BioLib, it is a Congo Chafer.  According to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility:  “Pachnoda marginata is a beetle from the subfamily Cetoniinae with a large number of subspecies that lives in west and central Africa.  They are sometimes used as food for terrarium animals.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: San Fernando Valley, CA
August 19, 2016 9:23 am
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I found a lot of this bugs in on the wall coming up from the ground in my backyard. I normally do not see them. What is it?
Signature: Ken

Mediterranean Red Bug

Mediterranean Red Bug

Dear Ken,
The Mediterranean Red Bug,
Scantius aegyptius, is an invasive species that was accidentally introduced into Southern California recently.  We first found an individual in our Mount Washington, Los Angeles office grounds two years ago, but luckily we have not found another.  According to BugGuide:  “native to the Mediterranean, adventive in NA (first found 2009); established in so. CA.”  According to the Center for Invasive Species Research:  “Recently, another brightly colored, mostly seed feeding bug belonging to the family Pyrrhocoridae or ‘Red Bugs’ has become established in southern California and is drawing attention due to large aggregations of the bright red and black nymphs and adults feeding on annual broadleaf weeds in open space areas.  Scantius aegyptius, an old world pyrrhocorid bug, native to the eastern Mediterranean region, was documented for the first time in North America in Orange County during June of 2009.  Reports of this insect from other southern California locations (i.e., Riverside County) suggest that this insect has been established for a year or more prior to these Orange County collections.”  The site also states:  “Damage: The literature contains very little information regarding the biology of S. aegyptius and Scantius species in general are not considered to be economically important species.  In California, Scantius has been observed feeding on the developing seeds and stems of Knotweed (Polygonum spp.) and Malva (Malva parviflora).  It is likely that S. aegyptius will feed on the seeds of several species of annual herbaceous plants.  The most noticeable impact of S. aegyptius in California will likely be the presence of large numbers of nymphs and adults migrating from drying annual weeds into adjacent developed areas.  These migrations consisting of thousands of individuals can be very conspicuous and lead to large aggregations on small patches of host plants causing concern to local residents who notice these obvious aggregations.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Southern California
August 9, 2016 2:41 pm
Found this bug on me while laying in bed. What is it?
Signature: Mathew

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Dear Mathew,
The Glassy Winged Sharpshooter is a recently introduced insect to Southern California.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Moth-Like Bug
Location: Metro Vancouver, BC, Canada
August 6, 2016 5:37 pm
My name is Jason, and I discovered this Moth-Like bug in July in the Metro Vancouver area in British Columbia, Canada. It was completely fur-less, with the wings being scale-less and almost plasticy. the rear of the abdomen ends in a sort of spike that was longish and seemed kind of flexible.
I estimated the body to be about two inches long.
I had ended up finding it because my cat was trying to eat it,and i thought it was really cool looking so I took pictures she stopped him from actually taking a nibble. just in case it was poisonous. the bright pink colour made me wary.
Signature: Jason

Large Elephant Hawkmoth

Large Elephant Hawkmoth

Dear Jason,
We were very surprised to get your submission of a Large Elephant Hawkmoth,
Deilephila elpenor, from Vancouver because this is a European species, and then we were even more surprised when we learned on the Sphingidae of the Americas site that it  “has recently established populations in southern British Columbia, Canada.”  According to BugGuide:  “Reportedly introduced to British Columbia ca. 1995.”  According to Pacific Northwest Moths:  ” It is unclear how the species was introduced or if it has started to spread to other areas.  It has been suggested that this moth was released deliberately by an amateur entomologist, but this has not been substantiated.”  According to the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic:  “This species has also recently been recorded from southern British Columbia, Canada, as an introduction.”  Hawkmoths are very strong fliers that are often found far out to sea, and we were secretly hoping that the Vancouver population was a result of a fertile female flying from Siberia.  To the best of our knowledge, the species is not poisonous.

Large Elephant Hawkmoth

Large Elephant Hawkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very large slug or snail?
Location: Toronto, canada
August 4, 2016 4:09 pm
can you please identify what this is….
Signature: Michelle

Leopard Slug

Leopard Slug

Dear Michelle,
We are pretty confident this is a Leopard Slug,
Limax maximus, and according to the article “Giant slugs slither into Saint John” on CBC News:  “Donald McAlpine, research curator of zoology at the New Brunswick Museum in Saint John, said the giant slugs are commonly known as the giant spotted leopard slug because of their markings.  ‘These are by far the largest slug in this region, probably one of the largest, if not the largest slug in Canada,’ McAlpine said.  McAlpine said the slugs thrive in damp, dark places.”  According to the Fairfax County Public Schools site:  “Leopard Slugs were introduced to America, but are now common. They grow to four inches. They are usually grayish yellow with black spots or bands. Often they are wrinkled.”  According to The Living World of Molluscs:  “The leopard slug is a commensal species, which, apart from its habitats in forests, often may be found in cellars and in cultivated areas. While its original home was in Southern and Western Europe, today it not only occurs over nearly all of Europe, but also has been introduced Overseas with food transports.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lawn Shrimp
Location: Castle Hayne, NC
August 3, 2016 7:01 am
I found these little creatures in our pet’s water bowl yesterday and googled what they might be, your site gave me the answer and now I’m letting you know they are also just outside of Wilmington, NC!
Signature: Becky H.

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Dear Becky,
Thanks so much for reporting this North Carolina sighting.  Lawn Shrimp are an introduced species from Australia that are well established in California, and BugGuide indicates they are also found in Florida, though the data on the site indicates Georgia reports.  This North Carolina sighting cannot be considered a normal range expansion as this is an introduced species, but there is no telling how far North they will be able to survive in North America.  We have already reported Lawn Shrimp in South Carolina.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination