Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White and black insect in MN
Location: SE Minnesota
October 24, 2014 8:43 am
This insect was seen on October 22, 2014, in southeast Minnesota (Minneapolis). It was about 5/8 to 3/4 of an inch in length. It was on an aluminum storm door’s frame (the green background), at about 5:30 p.m. (less than an hour before sunset). It stayed in the same place (did not climb the door frame, etc.) at least through the time we went in at sunset to fix supper. It was no longer there the next morning (no surprise). Temperatures were probably in upper 50s Fahrenheit. The porch is raised about four feet above ground level. There is a dogwood tree next to it, with branches touching the porch roof and supports. The ground below the dogwood is occupied by hostas. The body texture appeared a bit like moth wings, i.e., as though there were small scales, but in the photo the body looks smoother. The body is more flat than round, in case the photo does not show that sufficiently.
Signature: Curious in MN

Someone else has told me the insect is probably a wingless female linden looper moth, Erannis tiliaria.  Photos of the wingless female linden looper elsewhere (e.g., at the end of the page at http://www.wci.colostate.edu/shtml/LindenLooper.shtml and at http://www.invasive.org/browse/TaxThumb.cfm?fam=210&genus=Erannis) appear to be the same general size, color, and pattern, and there are indeed linden trees in the boulevard strip about thirty feet from the porch, up and down the street. Not that I’ve seen info yet to say that the linden looper feeds on or uses for egg-laying only linden or basswood trees, despite the “tiliaria” name; it might be tolerant of other species, too, even dogwoods.  Also, the mating season is said to be in the fall, and I probably should not have omitted from my original post that the porch is roofed, with a low-wattage light that attracts moths, including presumably any male Erannis tiliaria in the vicinity.  So you can probably mark this one as closed.

Female LInden Looper Moth

Female LInden Looper Moth

Dear Curious in MN,
While this file is closed for you and may not require any additional information on our part, we are still thrilled that you followed up with the identification of the wingless, female Linden Looper Moth and that you provided so many helpful links so that we can prepare a posting for our readership.  The introduction of invasive, exotic species continues to be a significant threat to agriculture and native species diversity.
  We did locate a related species in our archives, a female Mottled Umber Moth, Erannis defoliaria, which is in the same genus and which is native to Europe.  It is possible that that particular posting from our archives is of the Linden Looper Moth as well.  In doing our research, we discovered your image already posted to BugGuide.

Oops.  I may have jumped too early to a conclusion.  A search for Erannis on your site found a page for a tentative identification of a wingless female of a mottled umber moth on November 29, 2009 in California, that looks very similar, too.  And from the photos of Erannis defoliaria and Erannis tiliaria found elsewhere, I’m not sure I could tell them apart just from a photo of the back. Perhaps you will be sensitive to details in the photographs that might distinguish the two.

We don’t think that we are able to distinguish between the two species, but at least we can be certain that we are dealing with a member of the genus Erannis and that it is an invasive species in North America.  Since you have nearby Linden trees, we would favor your original identification of a Linden Looper Moth.

You’re right, I did ask two places, at your wonderful site and at BugGuide.  I hope that’s not a problem.  If you’re preparing a post, you might be amused to add a link to a picture of E. defoliaria from a British guide (John Curtis’s British Entomology Volume 6, says the Wikipedia attribution of the image) over a hundred years ago: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/19/Britishentomologyvolume6Plate703.jpg, that includes the wingless female, but not at sufficient detail in the image (I can’t speak to the print original) to be able to say what details are distinguishing for the female E. defoliaria and E. tilaria.  Thank you for operating a wonderfully useful site.

We love BugGuide and we have no problem sharing your image.  Thanks for the compliment and additional link.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch, Kristi E. Lambert liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Biking Bug
Location: Tallahassee, FL
October 20, 2014 1:12 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found this bug sitting on my bike, right beside the back wheel. I had turned the bike over a few times to secure the chain on the wheel, without seeing this little guy fall off. I even tried to slightly move him over with a leaf, but this guy would NOT budge!
I continued to ride, downhill, and uphill until I reached my destination. When I locked up the bike, he (or she) had moved, but was still attached to my bicycle.
This bug had black and yellow patterns. It looks like a beetle, but I’m not entirely sure. It has a “bigger” antenna, as well as legs and feet that tend to stick and hold on to wherever they are.
Signature: Biking with a Bug

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Biking with a Bug,
This looks like a Diaprepes Root Weevil, and according to Featured Creatures: “It was first reported in Florida in 1964 from a nursery near Apopka. It was presumably introduced in an ornamental plant shipment from Puerto Rico. Since 1964, Diaprepes abbreviatus has spread over a large area of central and southern Florida where it is damaging to citrus, ornamental plants, and some other crops.”

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Subject: what’s that bug
Location: Stockton CA
October 10, 2014 11:05 am
I live in Stockton CA, about 35 miles south of Sacramento. These bugs just started appearing in my home about a week ago. They vary in size, this one about the size ofa quarter. They can fly a bit. Saw another one about 2 inches, didn’t look quite the same but I think it was.
Thanks for any help you can give.
Signature: Lisa

Hi Lisa,
Accidentally introduced into North America from China in the last years of the twentieth century, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is now well established in much of North America, having made an appearance in California just recently.  According to BugGuide, Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs are “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to the fruiting structures.”
  Though it poses a significant agricultural threat, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug seems to draw the most attention from its habit of entering homes to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.

MaryBeth Kelly liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Halyomorpha halys in Oregon
Location: Mulino, Oregon
October 5, 2014 9:40 am
Hi – this bug is a nightmare unfolding. It goes by the common names of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, BMSB, or Asian Stink Bug; it’s Latin name is Halyomorpha halys.
In the last three or four days, I’ve vacuumed hundreds off the outside of house and garage, windows – they’re everywhere – horrid lingering bug stink – aptly named – and they ruin an incredibly diverse variety of plants, fruits, nuts – and joy! Oregon weather allows TWO breeding cycles a year – these little beasts cannot be allowed to ruin everything !
Here is a link to an invaluable report that I hope the Oregon State University extension folks won’t mind my sharing with you, as word of this disaster needs to spread, and spread fast so everyone can do what they can to eliminate as many of these bugs as possible, by any means at their disposal.
http://oregonstate.edu/dept/hermiston/sites/default/files/7_nwiman.pdf
Signature: Cheryl Anne, The Hamlet Nursery, or maybe not…

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Sheryl Anne,
Thanks for all the information and the link on the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug infestation in the Pacific Northwest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flying bug id
Location: eugene, oregon.
October 4, 2014 2:33 pm
These things are everywhere here in Eugene Oregon. I thought it was a stink bug but they look bigger. I would like to know the name of the bug it is commonly known as.
Signature: jordan mccray

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Jordan,
The reason this insect looks like a Stink Bug to you is that it is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, however it is not a native species.  This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug,
Halyomorpha halys, a species from Asia first reported in Pennsylvania in 1998.  According to BugGuide:  “Severe Agricultural and Nuisance Problems: PA-VA (Leskey-USDA 2011)  Native to E. Asia, adventive in N. Amer., detected in 38 states (2) and spreading…” and “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range (3);   feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to the fruiting structures.”  Though we do not endorse extermination, we haven’t much tolerance for invasive species and we have no problem crushing invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs that find their way into our garden and office.  In our opinion, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug and the African Painted Bug, another Stink Bug, are two of the greatest threats to the agriculture industry that have been recently introduced to North America.  

Jennifer Smith, Tara Howard liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Found scuttling across the back patio.
September 20, 2014

We identified this Red Bug on BugGuide as Scantius aegyptius.  We will attempt to capture an image tomorrow.

Red Bug

Red Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination