Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: assassin bug eating japanese beetle
Location: Hermann, Missouri
July 19, 2014 4:09 pm
stopped to close a gate and saw this. took about 30 pics in order to get one that was decent. sending in high rez. makes me really really happy that there are natural predators to the dang japanese beetles. not nearly enough of them, but still….
Signature: c. millard

Wheel Bug eats Japanese Beetle

Wheel Bug eats Japanese Beetle

Dear c. millard,
Thank you so much for sending in your excellent image of a Wheel Bug feeding on a Japanese Beetle, and we are certain it will warm the collective hearts of gardeners in the eastern portions of North America where the invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle feeds on hundreds of different ornamental garden plants and food crops.  According to our sources, Japanese Beetles were not a big problem in Ohio in 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: everywhere
Location: Lewiston Idaho hot dry low elevation pacific northwest
July 8, 2014 6:37 pm
These little tiny beetle shaped insects fly all over they just came out of every crevasse of the house they are dark brown and there are tons they are like termites in basically but I’m not sure I don’t think it is a type of termite please help
Signature: they’re everywhere

Elm Seed Bug

Elm Seed Bug

Dear t.e.,
Last year we posted a letter, also from Idaho, regarding an infestation of Elm Seed Bugs,
Arocatus melanocephalus, and since that time, we have received many comments.  ABC News reported on this dilemma a year earlier in July 2012.  Boise local KTVB News also reported on this infestation last July.  This is an invasive species introduced from Europe, and until a natural predator is discovered, we suspect they will continue to spread in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Vine munching beetle
Location: Southern Ontario, GTA
July 4, 2014 7:59 am
The vines that cover my back yard have been starting to die, I thought it was the neighbours until I went out side today.
I found over eight pairs of beetles mating and eating the vines in the same area.
It seems that while the female eats the leaf under neither the male gets on top to mait.
It has been only a few days and the beetles have decimated the one vine although this is the first time they have been visible.
The hard shell is a redish brown while the sides have slight stripping.
Thank you for the consideration
Signature: Backyard Beetle Babe

Japanese Beetles mating and eating

Japanese Beetles mating and eating

Hi Backyard Beetle Babe,
The invasive, exotic Japanese Beetles in your image are doing what they are best known for doing:  eating and mating.  Japanese Beetles have been in North America for nearly 100 years, and they are known to feed on hundreds of different cultivated and ornamental plants, hence they are well known to and loathed by most gardeners in the eastern part of North America.

Thank you so much for identifying my bug!!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please Identify (Hawaii)
Location: Waialua, Hawaii
June 23, 2014 1:26 pm
Aloha BugMan,
Recently while we were helping clear a trail in Hawaii on the North Shore on the island of Oahu we came across this bug – as none of us have seen it before we were wondering if you could help identify it? It appears to us as if it were a hybrid of a cockroach + ant + caterpillar visually.
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: Tiffany K.

Kiawa Roundheaded Borers

Kiawa Roundheaded Borers

Dear Tiffany,
Several years ago we did all the research on this Longicorn which we identified as an invasive Kiawe Roundheaded Borer,
Placosternus crinicornis.  More information is available on the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health website.

Kiawe Round Headed Borers Mating

Kiawe Round Headed Borers Mating

Kiawe Roundheaded Borers Mating close-up

Kiawe Roundheaded Borers Mating close-up

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual Bug
Location: Rochester, NY
June 19, 2014 11:38 am
I saw this yesterday at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, NY.
By looking online I can see that it is very similar to a Giant leopard moth, but with some significant differences.
The one I saw has black spots instead of black circles, and notice how the body protrudes behind the wings.
It is also less than 2″ long.
Any ideas?
Signature: Thanks, Doug

Leopard Moth

Leopard Moth

Dear Doug,
Though the Giant Leopard Moth, which is one of the Tiger Moths, and your Leopard Moth,
Zeuzera pyrina, look similar, they are not even closely related.  Your Leopard Moth is in the Carpenter Moth family Cossidae, and according to BugGuide:  “Unlike the Giant Leopard Moth, this one is not native to the US. Supposedly introduced (from its native Europe?) in mid-1800s; first reported in North America at Hoboken, New Jersey in 1882.  It is considered a pest of some fruit trees.”  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  June 25, 2014
This request arrived during our absence from the office, hence the delay in our response.  We are still feebly trying to catch up on our unanswered mail.

Subject: Hawk(moth)
Location: calonge,Girona,Spain
June 18, 2014 6:35 am
16-06-2014 I found this moth flying at daytime in our garden.It looks like a kind of hawk-moth,but I´ve never seen this species before.The wings are a bit worn off,but the hindwings are still very eyecatching with the bright orange color and black/white markings.Location:Calonge,Girona,Spain.
I hope somebody knows the scientific name.
Thanks!
Signature: Cheers,insectlover123

Butterfly Moth

Butterfly Moth

Subject: Moth
Location: calonge,girona,spain
June 22, 2014 2:04 am
A few days ago I´ve already sent two pictures of this moth.
I´m very curious what species it is.
Location: Calonge,Girona,Spain.In our garden
Date:16 june 2014 daytime
A few days later on 20 june 2014 I´ve found the same specimen in our kitchen against the window-pane.It was not very active and clearly dying.Indeed after an half an hour it died and I put in a box.
On the picture is the prepared species.
Hope you can help!
Signature: insectlover123

Butterfly Moth

Butterfly Moth

Dear insectlover123,
This stunning moth is a Butterfly Moth,
Paysandisia archon, and according to Karl who researched this for us several years ago:  “The species is Paysandisia archon and according to Wikipedia:  ‘It is native to Uruguay and central Argentina and has been accidentally introduced to Europe, where it is spreading rapidly. It is considered the only member of the genus Paysandisia.’  The larvae are palm borers and are considered a serious pest. The spread of this species is being closely tracked in France and several other Mediterranean countries and it is likely that someone may be interested in this sighting. “  According to Palms Journal:  ” [it] has been discovered recently on the French Riviera as a new pest and appears to be very noxious to palms. It is native to Argentina and Uruguay and was probably introduced into France through the importation of mature plants of Trithrinax campestris.”  You might want to consider reporting this to your local agricultural authorities.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for your message and information.
I´m very happy that I know which species it is now:)
Much appreciated!
I´ll consider to report this to my local agricultural authorities.
Kind regards,
Jimmy Hoffman

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination