Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Pacific Northwest
September 26, 2016 5:24 pm
These bugs invade us every Fall through Winter inside and outside! How do we get rid of these pests?
Signature: Theresa

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Theresa,
This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, an invasive, exotic species accidentally introduced to North America from Asia that quickly spread across the country.  They are known for entering homes to hibernate.  Though we do not provide extermination advice, and while we do not endorse extermination, we have no problem with people who attempt to eliminate Invasive Exotic species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A True Bug I’ve Never Seen Before
Location: Portland, Oregon
September 20, 2016 6:18 pm
It’s been too many years since I took my college entomology class; are you able to identify unusual-looking bug? It was at rest on a hibiscus shrub and fairly relaxed about having its photo taken. The temperature was 64° and the skies partly cloudy. The location was the outskirts of Portland, Oregon.
Thanks!
Signature: David Hopkins

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph

Dear David,
This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph,
Halyomorpha halys, a non-native species that was reported in North America “First collected in 1998 in Allentown, PA, but probably arrived several years earlier” according to BugGuide.  In less than 20 years, it has spread across North America and BugGuide reports:  “Native to E. Asia, adventive elsewhere” and “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures.”  According to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture:  “Across North America, brown marmorated stink bug has been found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Quebec). It is causing severe agriculture problems in nine states and nuisance problems in 16 others.”  One of the reasons the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is considered a nuisance is that they frequently enter homes to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.  Needless to say, we have no problem tagging the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug as an Invasive Exotic species.  You can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.

Thanks for your very prompt identification! I was familiar with the adult form, but this was the first time I saw the nymph form. You probably get questions about this all the time. In just the last few years it’s become so ubiquitous, that I see it more than any other hemipteran. Last winter, many tens of them congregated at the bathroom skylight for several weeks and removing them with the vacuum cleaner resulted in a vile stench — they lived up to their name!
Thanks again, Daniel.
David

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Re: Leaf Footed Bug / Unknown??
Location: South East of England, Harwich, Essex
September 15, 2016 4:09 pm
Dear Daniel (The Bugman),
Please would you kindly consider helping me identify the bug in the photos? We have come across 4 of these bugs in less than 72 hours. The first one found on my wardrobe door – the next appeared on the bathroom net curtain. Just tonight, we found another walking across a bed and to our horror another in that same bed less than 20 minutes later. As you can imagine it’s proven to be quite alarmingly as we have never seen one or these before in our life – let alone four of these in quick succession. It’s a worry in case they are dangerous insect. I don’t know if it’s a coincidence or not, but a person in my household got bitten twice on the arm in the night a week ago and whatever it were pierced the skin to draw blood. She often gets beaten by gnats due to having a rare blood group though it never pierces the skin like it did on this occasion. I could be over-worrying here for nothing although the insect had similar resemblances to “Leaf Footed Bug” except I don’t think we get those in the UK. We also found a Black Widow Spider in our shed in recent weeks meaning anything is surely possible given this heatwave and hotter weather.
I would appreciate your assistance if your team has time. :)
Thank you so much,
Signature: Chris

Hi Daniel,
Here is an update. We just found another one since my email.
This is a crystal clear photo
Any ideas please? :/
Cheers,
Chris

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Chris,
Thanks for sending a sharper image.  This is indeed a Leaf Footed Bug, more specifically a Western Conifer Seed Bug,
Leptoglossus occidentalis, a species native to the Pacific Northwest.  Its range began expanding in the in the mid 20th Century, and now it is found across North America as evidenced by this BugGuide map.  We suspect the range expansion is related to human travel and to the fact that this species often enters homes to hibernate as the weather begins to cool.  Early in the 21st Century, Western Conifer Seed Bugs were reported in Europe and now sightings in the UK and other parts of Europe are relatively frequent.  According to BugGuide:  “recently introduced to Europe (first record: Italy 1999) and now widespread there.”  According to British Bugs:  “A very large and spectacular squashbug which has characteristic expansions on the hind tibiae and a white zigzag mark across the centre of the forewings.   Native to the USA and introduced into Europe in 1999, it has since spread rapidly and during 2008-2011 influxes of immigrants were reported from the coast of southern England, with a wide scatter of records inland.  The bug feeds on pines and is probably well-established here; nymphs have been found at several locations. It is attracted to light and may enter buildings in search of hibernation sites in the autumn.”

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for the quick response! :)
I must apologise for my delayed response thought had already replied.
Your response was very reassuring and a huge relieve!
Keep up the great work! :)
Cheers,
Chris

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant with enlarged head?
Location: Rochester, NY
August 30, 2016 10:18 am
Hi, I was studying in my dorm room in Rochester, NY when I noticed a little bug go scurrying by. At first I just thought it was ant carrying something black, but I quickly realized it was something far weirder. I was hoping you could identify it. Thanks.
Signature: Connor

Ant Mimic Jumping Spider

Ant Mimic Jumping Spider

Dear Connor,
Because we have gotten so many comments on the posting this summer, earlier in the week, we began featuring a five year old posting of an Ant Mimic Jumping Spider,
Myrmarachne formicaria, a species that was “Recently introduced from Europe” according to BugGuide where the range is listed as “Roughly Cleveland, OH to Buffalo, NY.”  BugGuide also notes:  “The first specimen records of M. formicaria from North America have all been from Ohio, USA: from Warren, Trumble County on 16 August 2001; the J.H. Barrow Field Station, Portage County on 15 September 2002; and at a residence near Peninsula, Summit County. Additional individuals have been observed by the third author in and around the J.H. Barrow Field Station and the Peninsula residence during the summers of 2003 and 2004. ”  Because of the timeliness of your submission, we have decided to make it the Bug of the Month for September 2016.  Readers who want to see a better image can use this BugGuide image for comparison.  If you have a sighting, please leave a comment with your location.  If you have your own image, you may submit it using the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.  We don’t know how this introduction will affect our native ecosystem, but it is possible that this Ant Mimic Jumping Spider may begin to displace native Jumping Spiders if it is a more efficient predator or if it preys upon our native species, and for that reason we are tagging it as an Invasive Exotic species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Bug?
Location: Hillsborough County, Florida
August 28, 2016 5:26 am
I have looked at all the black and white beetles and cannot find one that looks quite like this. It was on dog fennel in west central Florida. I would like to know what it is and if it is native. It looks like it is missing an antennae.
Thank you for this wonderful reference site.
Signature: Donna Bollenbach

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Donna,
This looks to us like a Diaprepes Root Weevil,
Diaprepes abbreviatus, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “Native to the Caribbean, adventive and established in so. US: so. & central FL (1964), so. TX (Cameron & Hidalgo Cos 2000, Corpus Christi 2005, Houston 2009; map), so. CA (2005), LA (2008); further north in greenhouses.”  BugGuide also indicates it is  “highly polyphagous; larvae feed on roots, adults on foliage of citrus trees (esp. oranges in TX) and almost 300 other plant species” and “Major pest of citrus crops: larvae often girdle the taproot, which may kill the plant and provide an avenue for Phythophora infections. A single larva can kill young hosts while several larvae can cause serious decline of older, established hosts.”

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant issue
Location: Austin tx
August 28, 2016 6:15 am
Hey ! I’ve had these ants come and go thru the summer more so during the high heat…they’re small but quite a few I can’t find where they are getting in from or what exactly it will take to get rid of them…I’ve tried spay and traps and gel they leave for a bit then come back thought you could help
Thanks
Signature: Rachel

Possibly Argentine Ant

Possibly Argentine Ant

Dear Rachel,
Your Ant looks and sounds like it might be the invasive Argentine Ant,
Linepithema humile, and even though BugGuide does not list any sightings in Texas, BugGuide does provide this range information:  “across southern United States (from North Carolina to Florida, west through the gulf states to the coast of California. The only limit to their range is freezing temperatures and lack of water.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “Will often invade homes when weather outside is too cold, too wet or too dry, so may be more obvious at some times than others.”  Our Los Angeles office has been plagued by Argentine Ants for years, and we would love to find an eco-friendly means of control, and though we do not normally provide extermination advice, all bets are off when it comes to invasive species, and the Argentine Ant is at the top of the list of scourges we would like to eliminate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination