Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Los Angeles, CA
August 22, 2015 11:56 am
Hi, this litle guy was crawling across my bed around 11am August 22 in Los Angeles, CA. Could you help me identify it? Thanks!
Signature: Jeffrey

African Painted Bug

African Painted Bug

Dear Jeffrey,
We just finished a new posting of the African Painted Bug, an Invasive Exotic species, and you can read more information on that posting with the provided link.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Jamul, CA
August 22, 2015 1:04 pm
I am located in Jamul, Ca just about 40 minutes east of San Diego. I was watering some plants and these bugs came out of the ground and are now all over the fence and this plant which is similar to tumbleweed bit produces yellow flowers in the rainy season. Was wondering what it is?
Signature: Teri

African Painted Bugs

African Painted Bugs

Dear Teri,
You have an infestation of recently introduced, Invasive Exotic African Painted Bugs,
Bagrada hilaris, a species we first noticed in our own garden in 2009, a year after they were first reported in California.  It sounds like they are feeding on mustard, a common plant in the cabbage family that has naturalized in Southern California.  Our original prediction is that they will become a significant pest to the agriculture industry as they reproduce so rapidly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tube Nesting Wasp?
Location: Western North Carolina
August 19, 2015 9:37 am
These rather large (1 inch plus) wasps (?) are busily nesting in the larger of my Mason and Leafcutter Bee nesting tubes, and they seal the end of the tube with a mud plug.
Signature: Alan

Giant Resin Bee

Sculptured Resin Bee

Dear Alan,
This is an introduced Giant Resin Bee or Sculptured Resin Bee,
Megachile sculpturalis, and it belongs to the same family as your native Mason and Leafcutter Bees.  According to BugGuide:  “They are opportunistic and nest in existing wooden cavities, rather than excavating their own. Effectively pollinate kudzu, another invasive species.”

Giant Resin Bees

Giant Resin Bees

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ginormous Yellow Jacket/Wasp/Spawn of Satan
Location: Suburbs of Cleveland, OH; near the Cuyahoga Valley National Park
August 12, 2015 5:46 am
Dear Bugman,
I hope this message finds you well. Every Spring, I find a few of these monstrosities in my house, and they kinda creep me out. This year, as usual, they were buzzing around my windows, trying to escape into the outside world, where they can then eat children and small pets, but I’ve also found them outside my house this Summer. Recently, I found two engaged in a duel to the death on my driveway, then, last night, I heard what I thought was a helicopter landing in my front yard, but it turned out to be another one of these big sumbitches buzzing around my porch light. Finally, this morning, I saw what I assumed was a hummingbird, but it was actually another one of these big jerks, which landed briefly on my driveway, picked something up, then scurried off to a nearby oak tree. Any chance you can please tell me what they are, and whether or not I should just burn my house down to get rid of them? Alive, they are about 2″ long, but shrink to about an inch after an entire can of wasp/hornet spray has been deployed against them. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Kenneth F Mucha II

European Hornets:  Battling Queens

European Hornets: Battling Queens

Dear Kenneth,
These are European Hornets,
Vespa crabro, an Invasive Exotic species that according to BugGuide was introduced to eastern North America in the nineteenth century.  These are top of the food chain insect predators that are able to dispatch much larger native predators including Dragonflies.  According to BugGuide:  “Paper nest is built in hollow trees, or in human structures such as attics. Adults come to lights.”  We cannot recall any reports of people being stung by European Hornets, but we imagine they will defend the nest and we also imagine the sting could be quite painful.  We believe your images document battling Queen European Hornets, perhaps fighting over prime real estate for nest construction.

Chris Mccleary, Liza Dennison, Marieke Bruss, Ann Levitsky, Christy Harris, Kathey Koziol, Megan Rivera-Franceschi, Sue Dougherty, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Christine Johnson Kramer, Holly Smith Henry, Sylvia Kartika liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID. needed
Location: la California
August 11, 2015 6:14 pm
I’m not from the area that this was found so I have no idea what it is. This was found walking across a parking lot in Los Angeles California. Thanks
Signature: no tech

Mating Walkingsticks

Mating Walkingsticks

Dear no tech,
Is this a hoax?  Did you take this image while visiting Los Angeles?  You indicated you are not from the area where it was found and the WTB? form you submitted the image with contains the language:  “you swear that you either took the photo(s) yourself or have explicit permission from the photographer or copyright holder to use the image.”  The digital file you attached begins with the letters “fb” which leads us to believe they have been pilfered from FaceBook.  These are mating Walkingsticks and we believe they are Striped Walkingsticks or Muskmares in the family Pseudophasmatidae.  To the best of our knowledge, and according to BugGuide, the range of the family in North America is the Southeast, and the furthest western reports are from Texas.  With that said, we can come up with several explanations.  This might be a hoax, or it might be a mistake.  We suppose it is possible that Striped Walkingsticks may have been imported into California through individuals or through the exotic insect trade, and that they were either released or escaped.  If that is the case, and this mating pair is in the wild, Southern California may soon have another Invasive Exotic species with which to contend.  According to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”  

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Subject: Swamp Darner attacked by hornet
Location: Rochester, NY
August 10, 2015 1:51 pm
Hi!
While trying to identify the dragonfly in my picture I came across this post of yours:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2009/09/03/european-hornet-eats-dragonfly-unknown-darner/
and the comments led me to correctly identify the dragonfly as a Swamp Darner, as it is identical to the photos and descriptions on BugGuide, here: http://www.bugguide.net/node/view/2584 The dragonfly pictured was easily 4-5 inches in length.
I believe the attacker may be a European Hornet, as it look very similar to the insect in the original post?
I took this photo August 8th in Rochester, NY. I noticed a loud buzzing and the sound of the dragonfly hitting the glass door several times as he valiantly attempted to keep flying and fend off his attacker. The efforts became more feeble and the hornet appeared to be crawling around going straight for the underside of the thorax. The dragonfly kept curling his abdomen, but after several minutes he seemed pretty much gone, and I could have sworn I heard crunching- the hornet eating his prize.
It was a pretty incredible sight; the kids I was babysitting had very different reactions. The 9 year old, “it’s probably laying eggs in the dragonfly,” and walked away unconcerned. The 2 year old kept trying to go touch it and seemed very concerned for the dragonfly’s well-being.
I thought you might appreciate the picture. Sorry it’s captioned; it’s the only one I had time to get while keeping a 2 year old away from touching!
Signature: Jamie

Swamp Darner attacked bt European Hornet

Swamp Darner attacked bt European Hornet

Hi Jamie,
Your image is an excellent documentation of this Food Chain scenario, but your written account of the observation is especially interesting.  We agree the predator is a European Hornet, and the long term effect that these top of the Food Chain introduced Invasive Exotic predators is having on the native insect population like this Swamp Darner may or may not be significant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination