Currently viewing the tag: "Household Pests"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tell me this isn’t a beg bug
Location: philadelphia
May 20, 2015 5:00 am
Hello,
I am hoping you can help me figure out what this is. This is the third one of this bugs I have seen in my apartment, the first was on the wall by our linen closet, the second on the couch, and this was on the wall above my bed. I flushed the first and squished the second two and both had a blood like color left behind when I squished it. I live with roommates so any of us could have tracked something like this in. We also live around a few large trees so it is not uncommon for us to see various bugs/spiders. I have also checked my mattress and have not seen anything suspicious.
Signature: nervous renter

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear nervous renter,
This is a Bed Bug.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I don’t know what bug it is
Location: Florida
May 12, 2015 3:51 am
I see this bug all the time. I’ve found it in my hair, on my towel, and in my shirt. I don’t know what kind of bug it is and I’m worried.
Signature: Sure

Louse

Louse

You have Lice.

HOW DO I GET EID OF IT!!!!!!!!

There are over the counter remedies.  Check with your pharmacist.

Dustin Terrell, Tracy A Laliberté, Christy Harris, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Kathey Koziol, Claire Kooyman, Megan Rivera-Franceschi, Chris Banhidy liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thus was in my back
Location: Rhode Island
May 9, 2015 8:08 pm
Thank god my wife was bothering me. She found this in my back. What is it?
I was recently in Scottsdale AZ.
Signature: Hopefully ok,

Tick

Tick

Dear Hopefully ok,
You were bitten by a Tick.  Ticks are known vectors for several diseases that can be spread to humans.  We would suggest a visit to a physician.

Tick

Tick

A tick, eh?  It looks different than I remember.  Thank you for helping clear that up.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs in Window
Location: Southwest Virginia
April 30, 2015 1:03 pm
I have these bugs around my kitchen window mostly, but they venture out sometimes. I clean them up 3 – 4 times a day. Every time I clean them, I get between 25 and 50 on my wet paper towel. They seem to have a relatively short life span. I would like to know what they are and if there is some type of natural deterrent .
Signature: Louis Goodbrod

Varied Carpet Beetle

Varied Carpet Beetle

Dear Louis,
You are being troubled by a common household pest, the Varied Carpet Beetle,
Anthrenus verbasci .  You may have encountered the larvae of the Varied Carpet Beetle as well.  The larvae will feed on a wide variety of organic materials in the home, and adult Carpet Beetles feed on pollen.  You are finding them in your windows because they are trying to get outside.

Tynisha Koenigsaecker, Melissa Dilts, Crystal Alger, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Los Angeles: black tiny fly likes water w short clear wings
Location: Los Angeles, CA
April 28, 2015 10:33 pm
Hi,
Thank you so much for all of your service throughout the years. I often make donations & spread the word!
This latest bug is stumping me: We live in east Los Angeles near Pasadena & the SGV (inland)- tonight I noticed approx 20-30 fruit-fly-esque bugs dead or dying in the bathroom sink. They seemed to be coming in through a tiny opening in the bathroom window, so my husband went to the roof to check it out. He said there are thousands on our roof!! He’s spraying now but we can’t find anything similar-looking enough online.
They seem to obviously be attracted to water but do not look like drain bugs.
PLEASE HELP!
(We’re so worried they’re termites but they don’t have long wings)
Signature: Gratefully, Meg

Argentine Ant Alate

Argentine Ant Alate

Dear Meg,
The person who can solve your infestation problem will probably win a Nobel Peace Prize as the solution will improve the quality of life for Californians, the people of Japan and the inhabitants of the Mediterranean, as those are the three places where super-colonies of Argentine Ants,
 Linepithema humile, are making millions of people’s lives miserable, especially in hot summer months when 1000s of Argentine Ants invade homes in search of food and water.  Your images are of winged reproductive queen and king Argentine Ants, known as alates, on their nuptial flight and according to BugGuide:  “Winged queens mate once with a winged male, after which they can continuously produce fertile eggs for as long as 10 years- until death. Unlike most ants, several productive queens of this species can share the same colony, with one or more leaving with some of the workers to form a new colony when it gets crowded (this is known as ‘budding’).”  Here are some good images on BugGuide for comparison.

Argentine Ant Alates

Argentine Ant Alates

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Oxford, Mississippi
April 16, 2015 1:25 pm
Found two of these crawling on me.
Signature: Luke

Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug

Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug

Dear Luke,
This is a Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug,
Megacopta cribraria, an invasive and recently introduced species that is spreading throughout the south.  We decided to do a bit more historical research on this species, and our first citation is from the Atlanta Journal Constitution website AJC.com which states:  “Best anyone can tell, the scourge began in Hoschton in 2009. A pest-control guy had samples from a house a-crawl with odd little bugs. They were brown and ugly and smelled bad, sort of like ladybugs dipped in something a dog would roll in.  The pest-control guy had never seen anything like them, so he slipped a few dead ones in a vial of alcohol. He gave them to an entomologist at the University of Georgia, who was equally perplexed.  He showed the mystery insects to Joe Eger, another entomologist who stopped by the UGA professor’s office to say hello. Eger is an expert on stinkbugs.  Intrigued, Eger visited the Hoschton house where the bugs turned up. He traced the hordes of unwanted visitors to a nearby tangle of kudzu. Thus did Megacopta cribaria officially debut. Since its discovery four years ago, it’s been discussed and cussed, researched and reviled. It’s the object of inquiry in laboratories from Griffin to Missoula, Mont. It’s the kudzu bug. With spring on the horizon, swarms of them ought to be out in force soon.”  The Bug of the Week site reports:  “As a foodie fond of invasive kudzu, some might herald the arrival of the bug as a blessing, but this bug has a darker side. In addition to kudzu, one of Maryland’s most important crops, soybeans, is also on the menu. Soybean growers in infested states have already reported important losses associated with kudzu bug.  This critter has sucking mouthparts that, once inserted into the leaves and stems, rob the soybean of its nutritious sap. The removal of these vital fluids can significantly reduce yields. In addition to kudzu and soybeans, wisteria, a widely planted and naturalized ornamental plant, also serves as a competent source of food.”  The North Carolina State University Residential, Structural and Community Pests site states:  “As temperatures and day length decline, kudzu bugs seek out sheltered areas where they can pass the winter, such as under bark or rocks, or in leaf litter, etc. They are most common along the edges of kudzu patches and soybean fields and in areas near residential areas, we can expect to see them invade homes simiilar to the behavior of another nuisance pest – the Asian lady beetle. The bugs will often congregate on light-colored surfaces (such as siding, fascia boards, etc.).”  The site also provides a link to a map that illustrates the expanded range of the Lablab Bug in the south.  While the Lablab Bug poses no direct dangerous threat to humans, they are an invasive species, a serious threat to the agricultural industry, and a troublesome nuisance when they invade homes.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination