Currently viewing the tag: "Household Pests"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Carpet Moth/Beetle
Location: United Kingdom
April 14, 2014 2:16 am
Good Morning, Please see photos of bugs collected from carpet with rice like cocoons?? Can you identify what the bug is and what the rice bits are. There are areas of carpet which have clearly been eaten and we need to identify the problem.
Many thanks
Signature: Ashley Clarke

Case Bearing Clothes Moths and Woodlice

Casemaking Clothes Moths and Woodlice

Hi Ashley,
The “bugs” are Woodlice or Pillbugs, and though they might be a nuisance indoors, they are not eating your carpet.  They are attracted to damp conditions.  The rice like cocoons appear to be the cases of Casemaking Clothes Moths,
Tinea pellionella, a species that will eat wool rugs and clothes and we believe that is the source of the damage.  According to BugGuide, the larvae feed on:  “Feed on wool, feathers, fur, hair, upholstered furniture, leather, fish meals, milk powders, lint, dust or paper.”  The larvae, not the adult moths, are responsible for the damage.  It appears that one of the cases in the center of your “collection” is a different species in the same family, a Household Casebearer Moth case, Phereoeca uterella, which according to BugGuide:  “feed on old spider webs; may also eat woolen goods of all kinds if the opportunity arises.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Larval cases can be found on wool rugs and wool carpets, hanging on curtains, or under buildings, hanging from subflooring, joists, sills and foundations; also found on exterior of buildings in shaded places, under farm sheds, under lawn furniture, on stored farm machinery, and on tree trunks.”

Many thanks really helpful
Regards,
Ashley

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small beetle, windowsill & baseboards
Location: Vancouver Island, BC – southern tip.
April 13, 2014 11:12 am
Hi,
I have been finding these little beetles on my windowsill in my atrium (18′ ceilings) and along the baseboards in that atrium. There is no carpet – it’ s laminate flooring. The house is only 7 years old. The atrium is our ‘dining room’ which is only used for dinner in the evenings and kept clean.
Can you please advise what the bug is – I’m assuming it’s some sort of beetle.
Signature: Thanks, Tammy

Varied Carpet Beetles

Varied Carpet Beetles

Hi Tammy,
You have Varied Carpet Beetles,
Anthrenus verbasci , currently our most common identification request with an average of five requests arriving daily.  Varied Carpet Beetles are members of the family Dermestidae, a group that contains many members that are cosmopolitan and that infest homes.  The adults, which you are finding, feed on pollen, and they are likely congregating on the window sills in an attempt to gain access to the outdoors.  The larvae are the pests that infest homes.  According to BugGuide, they are “primarily a household pest on plant (dried fruits/nuts) and animal materials; regularly encountered in dried-milk factories, occasionally in flour mills and warehouses” and they eat a “wide variety of materials of animal origin (wool, fur, skins…)(1); stored food materials and products (biscuits, cakes, seeds, wheat, maize, oats, rice, cayenne pepper, cacao, and dried cheese)”.  They are reviled in museums and BugGuide also notes they are: “arguably, world’s most important pest of insect collections.”  The best way to eliminate them from the home, in fact the only way to eliminate them from the home, is to identify the source of the infestation, the place where the larvae are feeding, and discard any food or other item that might be feeding the larvae. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Kind Of Bug Is This
Location: United States, NJ
April 12, 2014 7:27 pm
hello..this kind of bug ended up in my house two different times..im wondering what it is..if you could help that would be great
Signature: not sure

Oriental Cockroach

Oriental Cockroach

Though it is commonly called a Water Bug, this is an Oriental Cockroach, Blatta orientalis, and it is one of the species of pestiferous Cockroaches that is closely associated with human habitation.  They can become especially numerous in cool, damp places including basements and sewers.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “Omnivorous but prefers starchy or sugary foods. Often associated with garbage or decaying organic matter, indoors or out. Can survive one month without food as long as water is available, or two weeks with neither food nor water.”  Flushing it down the toilet, which is what it appears might happen immediately after this image was taken, will likely introduce it to more of its kin. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found a bunch of these guys under my sink
Location: San Ramon, CA
April 11, 2014 11:55 am
I live east of Berkeley California and have been finding these winged bugs around my hallroom bathroom. Are they flying termites?
Thanks for any help you can provide!
Signature: Andy

Termite Alate

Termite Alate

Dear Andy,
You have an image of a winged Termite Alate as well as Termite Damage.  You should get some professional assistance.  A leaky pipe may have played a part in your infestation.

Termite Damage

Termite Damage

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Varied Carpet Beetle?
Location: Eugene, Oregon
April 10, 2014 1:15 am
I thought because I’ve found five or so on the bed it was bed bugs, but the pattern and the fact that they have wings hidden (like a lady bugs) indicates its not. I’ve have some possible “bites” on my stomach (which is covered when I sleep) and no where else. Went from panic to relieved, and hope this is the right reaction to have. They can eat my clothes, I don’t care as much if its if its not me…
Thanks!
Signature: V

Varied Carpet Beetle

Varied Carpet Beetle

Dear V,
You are correct that this is a Varied Carpet Beetle, and this year we have been receiving considerably more identification requests for them and in any other year, that we can remember.  It seems there are about five reemails per day with images of Varied Carpet Beetles.  Adult beetles feed on pollen, and the larva do the damage in the home.  The larvae will eat organic items, and we don’t believe your clothes will be significantly damaged unless you favor furs and clothes with feathers.  Your food items in the pantry are at a much greater risk of being eaten than your clothing is.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Bedroom floor under the bed
March 27, 2014 11:50 am
Sorry I used wrong form. I found this bug in my bedroom. I have a live one in a box. He is about 1/4 inch long with little hairs on his back. 3 legs each side, to the front of his body. very dark and pale cream stripes. Lots of dicarded shell casings but he does not look like a bedbug. his body is quite rounded. Moves quite slowly in a concertina like movement.
I am being bitten and was looking for bedbugs. I have cleaned and smoked the room. Would be gratefull for your advise as I cannot find this little darling anywhere on the internet.
I should mention that we have just replaced our roof andall the stuff out of the loft came downstairs and we have been overseas in the last 6 months
Signature: Ann

Carpet Beetle Larva Sketch

Carpet Beetle Larva Sketch

Dear Ann,
Your sketch of this Carpet Beetle Larva is much better than your photograph.  Carpet Beetles are common household pests, but we do not believe it is responsible for the bites you are getting.

Carpet Beetle Larva

Carpet Beetle Larva

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for your help. Have fumed and cleaned the room and will keep a vigilant watch for more offspring. Seen the doc and he says they are definately bites. I think they are scabies but he is not convinced as they are not between my fingers and are generally in groups of three. No other family member is affected. They are quite nasty and it has taken antibiotics in addition to lyclear cream to calm them down. Still the mystery remains. I will try to make a donation to your organisation via paypal  Many Thanks Ann

Thank you for your generosity.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination