Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

ambush bug with flesh fly
Hello,
I’ve spent quite a bit of time on your site in recent months, trying to identify arthropods of all kinds. One I’ve found especially fascinating is the ambush bug–what a formidable hunter!! Several days ago, I was astonished to find one with a Silver-spotted Skipper, quite a large catch for such a small bug. Today, spotted one with a flesh fly. My goal was a good photo of the ambush bug, not the flesh fly; unfortunately, the near constant breezes of the last week are not conducive to ultra-sharp pictures. I almost deleted the picture, but then something caught my attention. The fly, in her death throes, had given birth. Just yesterday, in thumbing through my new Kaufman’s “Field Guide to Insects of N.A., read that some flies, including flesh flies, are viviparous. If you like, you may post the attached picture. Thanks for all you do. Between your site, BugGuide & my new Kaufman’s, I’m happily IDing most of my arthropod photographs. Sincerely,
Linda

Hi Linda,
Your photograph is quite wonderful, even though your primary objective is not as visible as you might hope. Try to remember that the excellent camouflage of the Ambush Bug is key to its success as a predator. We will be archiving your image on numerous pages, including flies, maggots, true bugs and food chain.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cicada and Unknown
I saw a cidada (I think) fall out of a tree in my backyard (St. Louis, MO, USA) and down came an iteresting insect that grabbed the cidcada and started climbing up the tree. Thought I would share.
Kyle Marsden

Hi Kyle,
This is a female Cicada Killer wasp. She will climb the tree and glide to her burrow with the stung and paralyzed Cicada. She will lay an egg and bury the Cicada which will remail alive and be a food source for the hatchling larval wasp. Our Cicada Killer reports are occurring much later in the season this year than usually.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s eating the cricket?
This was taken earlier this evening with the night photography feature on my camera. What is this? Thanks. Love your web site.
Cathey

Hi Cathey,
There are several very similar looking Assassin Bugs in the genus Rasahus that are collectively known as the Orange Spotted Assassin Bugs. One species, Rasahus thoracicus, is also known as a Western Corsair. Sadly you did not provide us with a location which might have helped with the exact species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

PRAYING or PREYING MANTIS IN OUR CONNECTICUT GARDEN (9-5-07)
Hello Daniel,
I hope this email reaches you. My first attempt failed, according to message received from my carrier, "due to an unexpected disconnection from service. Yes, I know you have praying mantis pictures posted on your site but perhaps these will be of use to you as well. On September 1st I commented, to my husband, that I’d yet to find a praying mantis to "shoot" for my photo collection of insects. On September 2nd, we were host to a tremendous monarch butterfly convention. Perhaps we are on a flyway here in Connecticut? They were swarming about our Joe Pie weed and having a great time. I suddenly noticed that one of the revelers was, apparently, "stuck" in the flowers. It was behaving as if engaged in a battle. Upon closer examination, I discovered the truth. A battle to the death. Just look at the "arms" of the praying mantis . . . "all the better to hug you with, my dear. I’m wondering; can you tell if our ravenous praying mantis is a female or male? The creature is still here, well-disguised as a Joe Pie weed branch, waiting for another victim, but our monarchs seem to be gone. From Connecticut, would they travel to Mexico, California or Florida to spend the winter? Thanks for providing such a marvelous site for those of us fascinated by the insects found in our gardens. One does not have to travel far, as I have found, for great adventure!
Susan B. Naumann

Hi Susan,
What a marvelous Food Chain documentation. Your Chinese Mantis might be a male, but we cannot be certain. Your Monarchs would not winter in California but the Oyamel Fir forests of Mexico’s Transverse Volcanic Belt.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

After going to your website after my first experience with the Cicada Killer( at the time, I had no idea what it was), I thought I would share a pic with you. Thanks for having your website and solving my "mystery". Many thanks,
Mike and Kathy
Oxford Florida

Hi Mike and Kathy,
We just recently removed the Cicada Killer from our homepage since identification requests, which peaked in July, had dwindled. Looks like your robust female Cicada Killer has nabbed a Dog Day Harvestfly for her brood’s meal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Lynx Spider
I was told this is a green lynx spider, and thought you might enjoy these photos I took of one on my passion vine.

What a wonderful addition to our Food Chain pages: a Green Lynx Spider feeding on a Gulf Fritillary.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination