Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

After going to your website after my first experience with the Cicada Killer( at the time, I had no idea what it was), I thought I would share a pic with you. Thanks for having your website and solving my "mystery". Many thanks,
Mike and Kathy
Oxford Florida

Hi Mike and Kathy,
We just recently removed the Cicada Killer from our homepage since identification requests, which peaked in July, had dwindled. Looks like your robust female Cicada Killer has nabbed a Dog Day Harvestfly for her brood’s meal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Lynx Spider
I was told this is a green lynx spider, and thought you might enjoy these photos I took of one on my passion vine.

What a wonderful addition to our Food Chain pages: a Green Lynx Spider feeding on a Gulf Fritillary.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Large green caterpillar
Hi,
I just found this large catterpillar hanging from a tree and was wondering what it was. I found it hanging in what I think was a eurpean buckthorn tree in the Oak Ridge’s Morraine, Clarington, Ontario, Canada. It was at the edge of a forest with bitternut hickory trees, swamp oak, white oak, red oak, pines, maple, silver birch, butternut, hawthorn, yellow beech and a wide variety of plants. I’m curious about what it is and will turn into! It seems to be quite close to changing into a chrysalis, it was hanging upside down and not moving when I found it. It’s very inactive.
Stella

Hi Stella,
The good news is we can identify your Cecropia Moth Caterpillar. The bad news is that it will not live to adulthood. The orange, yellow and blue tubercles are typical caterpillar markings, but the white nodules with the brown spots are a sign the caterpillar has been parasitized, probably by a Brachonid Wasp. These pupa look much smaller than the Brachonid Pupa we sometimes see on Sphingidae caterpillars and Saddleback Caterpillars, so they must be a different species. We will try to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can tell us what species of Brachonid parasitizes Cecropia Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Crab Spider feasts on Pipevine Swallowtail.
Hi again bugman,
I thought I would share with you another image taken the same day as the puddling pipevine swallowtails I sent in, this one of a crab spider enjoying its pipevine swallowtail lunch. Hope you enjoy it!!! Keep up the great work
Michael

Hi Michael,
We have never seen documentation of a Crab Spider with such a huge catch. It is a wonder the spider managed to hold onto that Pipevine Swallowtail. Thanks for sending us another image from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park near Gatlinburg, Tennessee.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Whats that Bug
Hey Bugman, caught this in my kitchen feeding on a housefly. I put him in a little bugviewer and took some pics. It stabs its prey with its needle and sucks em dry. It stabs the bugs all over rolling it around while it eats. Never flew but it has wings. Doesnt make any sounds. Walks around very slowly. Int the photot he is eating a cricket. I live in Columbia Missouri.
Nouri

Hi Nouri,
This is an Assassin Bug in the genus Pselliopus. Be careful handling your pet since they can bite and the bite is painful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

slug?
My daughter found this creature crawling on a rotting stick in the woods in Southwest Missouri. We initially thought it was a caterpillar, but see that it moves like a slug or snail. It also appears to have antennae at the front like a slug, but similar protrusions all along its body. Are the white things on its back eggs, or perhaps parasites? It is approximately 3/4 inch long.

This is one of the Slug Caterpillars in the family Limacodidae. We believe it is a Spiny Oak Slug, Euclea delphinii. The “eggs” are really Brachonid Pupa, a parasite that feeds on the caterpillar’s inner tissues.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination