Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Euglandina rosea attacks Achatina fulica
Thu, Sep 11, 2008 at 8:09 AM
Good Morning. Hope the subject line got your attention!
Quick one: While in Guam some time ago, I did a photo/research project on the Giant African Snail and its predator. MANY 35mm Ektachromes now converted to medium-format digital….showing adults of both, and the actual attack. Winnowed them down to 4 of the most significant.
Want ’em? File sizes run under 400kb….but I can easily and quickly optimize to any filesize.
Freely offered….gratis….use them as you wish.
Fred Davis

Snail Attack

Snail Attack

Hi Fred,
Sorry it has taken us so long to get back to you, but your letter arrived during the time our website was transitioning, and things got a bit rocky. We just finished posting a letter with an image of mating Spotted Leopard Slugs, and that jogged our memory regarding your several week old letter. We thought your photos and letter would make an interesting companion piece the the aforementioned letter as it is another example of questionable behavior among molluscs.

Snail Attack

Snail Attack

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

SPIDER
WHAT TYPE OF SPIDER AND BUTTERFLY?
CARY HARPLEY
FLORIDA PAN HANDLE

Crab Spider eats Gulf Fritillary

Crab Spider eats Gulf Fritillary

Hi Cary,
Your spider is a Crab Spider, Misumena vatia, also called a Flower Spider or a Goldenrod Spider. The prey is a Gulf Fritillary. To a certain extent, these Crab Spiders are able to change coloration to match their surroundings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dragonfly Nymph?
I was out on the back porch with my kids when I saw a wasp land on the screen, a minute later I looked up and saw another bug fly up and land on the wasp. I had my camera taking pictures of the kids so I walked outside and snapped a few of the bug with the wasp.. just a moment later it flew off with the wasp. I have no idea exactly what kind of bug this is, as it’s the first time I’ve ever seen it around here. Someone said it might be a dragonfly nymph but the google image search I had didn’t look like it. Any idea what it is?
Nick Young
Charleston, SC

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Wasp

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Wasp

Hi Nick,
Our favorite aspect of posting your letter and wonderful photo is that we learned the common name of this Robber Fly.  It is a Red Footed Cannibalfly, Promachus rufipes.  The unusual composition of the name brings something interesting to question.  Generally, when “fly” is tacked onto a word like butterfly or dragonfly, the insect is not a true fly.  Crane Fly and Robber Fly would be true flies.  This naming is something of an anomaly since the Red Footed Cannibalfly is a Robber Fly, hence a true fly.  Your photo is a lovely addition to our Food Chain section.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Is this related to a Squash Bug?
I’ve seen this bug in large numbers around my vegetable garden near Dallas Texas. They often congregate in the sunflowers and are proficient fliers. They look similar to and I thought related to a squash bug. Thinking that I figured they were harmful to my veggies, so I would mash one whenever I got the chance. Until I saw this one. Seems to be quite helpful as he’s eating one of the worms on this ear of corn. But what is it?
Near Dallas, TX
Jerry D. Coombs, Wylie, TX

Wheel Bug eats Caterpillar

Wheel Bug eats Caterpillar

Hi Jerry,
Your predator is a Wheel Bug, and its resemblance to a Squash Bug is because the two are in the same insect order, but they are not closely related as they are in different families.  The Wheel Bug is in the Assassin Bug family.  We are pleased to add you photo to our food page section.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this bug?
This wasp looking thing was found stalking butterflies on the Mogollon Rim area of Northern Arizona around Payson
Thank you

Unknown Robber Fly eats Sulphur Butterfly

Unknown Robber Fly eats Sulphur Butterfly

This is some species of Robber Fly, but we have not been successful in locating a match on BugGuide.  The red wings are quite distinctive.  The prey is a Sulphur Butterfly.  We hope Eric Eaton can assist us in the identification of your Robber Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

(08/29/2008) Golden-Silk Spider Eating Large Dragonfly – Palm Beach County – Florida
Hello Purveyors of Bug Identifications,
First – thanks for providing such an educational website. I use it quite a bit while working for the Palm Beach County Department of Environmental Resources Management. We oversee the protection of thousands of acres of wildlands and one of my numerous jobs is to create trail guides/publications for these properties. This means I need to know what sorts of creatures roam the woodlands – and since I work in the warm, wet climate of South Florida, that means lots of bugs! I am sending you a picture of a female golden-silk spider enjoying a light repast of dragonfly. This photos was taken at the Delray Oaks Natural Area in Delray Beach, Florida. Note, I believe the small spider in the upper right corner is a male. He seems to be waiting his turn at the dinner table – probably smart considering the huge size discrepancy between the two. If he is not careful, he may be dessert! Keep up the great work!
Ann Mathews
Senior Environmental Analyst
Palm Beach County

Hi Ann,
Your letter came at the perfect time to be selected as the Bug of the Month for September as well as being cross referenced in the Food Chain and Bug Love. Golden Silk Spiders, Nephila clavipes, have pronounced sexual dimorphism, with the female sometime being 100 times the mass of the diminutive male. Golden Silk Spiders have extremely strong silk, and attempts have been made to use it for fabric, but this is far too expensive to be practical. Golden Silk Spiders are also called Banana Spiders and can be found in the southeastern US and south all the way to Argentina.

Anxious Comment
OK, this is just sad
I’m anxiously awaiting the September Bug of the Month…does that mean I’m addicted?
Misty Doy

Hi Misty,
We usually post the new Bug of the Month on the last day of the month even if we have selected it a few days earlier. It will be live shortly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination