Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

WTB?
Can you help with this one? Thanks,
Frank Trimborn
Houston, TX

Hi Frank,
What a wonderful photo of an immature Milkweed Assassin Bug, Zelus longipes. The nymph will eventually grow wings. Assassin Bugs are tireless predators that can also bite painfully if mishandled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider from Korea: Golden Orb Web Spider?
Hello,
I read that you’re swamped, so I apologize for making your day harder. I took some photos of this spider in southwestern South Korea. Looking through some other posts it sort of resembles a Golden Orb Web Spider found in China, but after googling it I couldn’t find any exact matches. It measured just under two inches (including legs). Here it is eating a ladybug. Thanks for your help!
Brian
Suncheon, South Korea

Hi Brian,
This is a relative of the Golden Silk Spider, Nephila clavipes, found in the southern portions of the U.S. It is Nephila clavata, and is known as the Joro Spider due to its Japanese name, joro-gumo. According to Wikipedia: “The spider can be found throughout Japan except Hokkaid?, in Korea ,Taiwan and China . Due to the large size as well as the bright, unique colors of the species of the female Nephila , the spider is well-favored in Japan.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

WTB??
My daughter nearly stepped on these while walking her dog through a recently mowed field. I have scrolled through your bug links until I am dizzy and cross-eyed. Can you tell me what they are? They seemed to be feeding on a small dead rodent, possibly killed during the mowing. (Notice the hitch-hiker flies.) Thanks.
Vicki
South-central Missouri

Hi Vicki,
These are Sexton Beetles or Burying Beetles. They will bury the mouse and lay eggs on it. It just seems odd that there are so many at work as they generally work as a couple. We believe these are Tomentose Burying Beetles, Nicrophorus tomentosus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wheel Bug eating a wasp.
I got some good photos today of a wheel bug enjoying its wasp lunch. Here are the two best ones. I hope you enjoy them.
Mike D.

Hi Mike,
All Assassin Bugs are effective hunters, and Wheel Bugs, probably the largest North American Assassins, can take significantly larger prey. This Polistes Paper Wasp is a good example.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

ambush bug with flesh fly
Hello,
I’ve spent quite a bit of time on your site in recent months, trying to identify arthropods of all kinds. One I’ve found especially fascinating is the ambush bug–what a formidable hunter!! Several days ago, I was astonished to find one with a Silver-spotted Skipper, quite a large catch for such a small bug. Today, spotted one with a flesh fly. My goal was a good photo of the ambush bug, not the flesh fly; unfortunately, the near constant breezes of the last week are not conducive to ultra-sharp pictures. I almost deleted the picture, but then something caught my attention. The fly, in her death throes, had given birth. Just yesterday, in thumbing through my new Kaufman’s “Field Guide to Insects of N.A., read that some flies, including flesh flies, are viviparous. If you like, you may post the attached picture. Thanks for all you do. Between your site, BugGuide & my new Kaufman’s, I’m happily IDing most of my arthropod photographs. Sincerely,
Linda

Hi Linda,
Your photograph is quite wonderful, even though your primary objective is not as visible as you might hope. Try to remember that the excellent camouflage of the Ambush Bug is key to its success as a predator. We will be archiving your image on numerous pages, including flies, maggots, true bugs and food chain.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cicada and Unknown
I saw a cidada (I think) fall out of a tree in my backyard (St. Louis, MO, USA) and down came an iteresting insect that grabbed the cidcada and started climbing up the tree. Thought I would share.
Kyle Marsden

Hi Kyle,
This is a female Cicada Killer wasp. She will climb the tree and glide to her burrow with the stung and paralyzed Cicada. She will lay an egg and bury the Cicada which will remail alive and be a food source for the hatchling larval wasp. Our Cicada Killer reports are occurring much later in the season this year than usually.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination