Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Flaky spotted bug thing…
Hi,
I so enjoy your site, thanks for helping me out on this one. I tried to browse your site to figure out what this was, but wasn’t even sure what to type in the query. I apologize for it being sort of cropped off, but maybe it’s enough to give you an idea. I was out deadheading marigolds and actually saw this bug the day before. I thought it was a flaky dried piece of leaf and almost brushed it away. When I looked at it more closely, on that first day, it was actually two bugs. The one you see in this image and a smaller "baby" piggybacking it. It just looks so surreal to me and very creepy what it seems to be doing to that poor bee! Thanks…
Marisa Longmont, CO

Hi Marisa,
This is an Ambush Bug feeding on a Honey Bee. Ambush Bugs are True Bugs that, as their name implies, ambush prey. What you witnessed the day before was mating activity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hey Bugman!
Hi there … Iwas cleaning out the e-mail cache and it occurs to me that I ’m still not sure what this spider may be? I’ve also attached a “Predator and Prey ”shot from this summer that you might enjoy . Thanks for the website …great pics …great resource!
Bud Hensley
Middletown, Ohio
Sent (06/07/2007)
Great website and looking for a little help identifying this bizarre spider that has been taking its much welcomed toll on our local beetle population. Seeing that you were in Ohio recently, this might be right up your alley! Our garden is located in the southwestern part of the state in Middleto wn. Thanks, and keep up the good work!

Hi Bud,
We are very happy you decided to resend your image. Summer months are our busiest and we get upwards of 140 letters per day. Logistically, we can only answer a small fraction, and many letters go unread. This is a new species for our site, the Brown Lynx Spider, Oxyopes scalaris. Lynx Spiders are hunting spiders that do not build webs. Your image of a Preying Mantis with and overachiever complex is very funny.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tarantula Hawk vs. Tarantula
Dear What’s That Bug Folks,
First, I love your site, and recommend it to every natural history buff I encounter! I have to be careful not to spend TOO much time on here perusing all the amazing photos and the answers you provide. Second, I live in Southern California on the San Diego/Riverside County line and a few weeks ago we happened to spot our first tarantula here so I ran to get the camera. I was very excited until a very large Tarantula Hawk buzzed onto the scene. We realized that it was too late to save this spider as the wasp had already stung and paralyzed him. I got photos of the wasp as she drug the spider down one slope, across the driveway, and down another slope into a hole she had already discovered or dug. My husband reluctantly agreed to use his foot for scale in the first photo, but that was before I told him that pepsis wasp stings were reportedly very painful! Thanks for such a great bug resource,
cindy m.
San Diego CA

Hi Cindy,
As far as photographs on our site go, this series has to rank in the uppermost percentile. Thank you so much for submitting your awesome Food Chain images of a Tarantula Hawk securing a meal for her progeny.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

bald faced hornet
Hi again!
So I finally looked in the right place and found images that make me think this must have been a bald faced hornet. I’m not quite as thorough as I’d thought. Or as observant as I’d thought. Looking a little more closely, I see shamefully little resemblance between my images and the cicada killers. I’m keeping my day job! I’m the one who’d sent larger versions of these old images of the hornet and it’s prey on a window pane, by the way: I still didn’t see any reference to ones that were quite so large or that they’d catch something as big as a dragonfly, but there is mention of them catching insects to feed their larvae. Those dragonfly meals must be what makes those hornets of the Canadian Rockies grow so big. I have to say again, like everyone who’s posted on your website, I love your website! I also really appreciate your respect for life and the balance of nature. And congratulations on the successes of your students! Eventually,
Brian

Hi Brian,
Thanks for resending your images to us. Your identification of the Bald Faced Hornet seems accurate. Readers who desire more information should check out BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

WTB?
Can you help with this one? Thanks,
Frank Trimborn
Houston, TX

Hi Frank,
What a wonderful photo of an immature Milkweed Assassin Bug, Zelus longipes. The nymph will eventually grow wings. Assassin Bugs are tireless predators that can also bite painfully if mishandled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider from Korea: Golden Orb Web Spider?
Hello,
I read that you’re swamped, so I apologize for making your day harder. I took some photos of this spider in southwestern South Korea. Looking through some other posts it sort of resembles a Golden Orb Web Spider found in China, but after googling it I couldn’t find any exact matches. It measured just under two inches (including legs). Here it is eating a ladybug. Thanks for your help!
Brian
Suncheon, South Korea

Hi Brian,
This is a relative of the Golden Silk Spider, Nephila clavipes, found in the southern portions of the U.S. It is Nephila clavata, and is known as the Joro Spider due to its Japanese name, joro-gumo. According to Wikipedia: “The spider can be found throughout Japan except Hokkaid?, in Korea ,Taiwan and China . Due to the large size as well as the bright, unique colors of the species of the female Nephila , the spider is well-favored in Japan.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination