Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug
Location: Hong Kong/China
April 13, 2013 7:32 am
We were in china last summer, and we saw this strange bug with purple wings and orange legs, it seemed to be eating a spider. It was as big as a pointer finger, and really scary.
I took the picture.
Signature: -Catie

Spider Wasp attacks Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp attacks Huntsman Spider

Dear Catie,
The predator is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae and the prey appears to be a Huntsman Spider in the family Sparassidae.  The spider is not being eaten by the wasp.  Female Spider Wasps hunt and paralyze Spiders to feed to their broods.  The paralyzed spider provides fresh, not dry meat for the developing wasp larva.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornworm being attacked by Paper Wasps
Location: Miami, FL, USA
April 4, 2013 4:04 pm
I saw a half dozen paper wasps attacking the head of a fairly large hornworm. Have you ever heard of this behavior? (I cannot imagine them carrying it off, it was 4 inches long).
Signature: Steve W.

Hornworm attacked by Paper Wasps

Hornworm attacked by Paper Wasps

Dear Steve,
This Tobacco Hornworm appears to be eating a tomato plant, and it has “oblique whitish lateral lines”, so we suspect it might be
Manduca sexta, the Carolina Sphinx.  See BugGuide for additional information.  The Paper Wasps are in the genus PolistesPaper Wasps will attack caterpillars and skin them, transporting the balled up flesh to the nest where it is fed to the developing larvae.  They do not intend to carry off this Tobacco Hornworm.  We suspect they will work as a crew and bite off sections of the Tobacco Hornworm to carry it off to the nest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cryptocheilus bicolor and …
Location: Perth, Western Australia
March 28, 2013 2:42 am
Dear Bugman
Recently captured few images and recognised the wasp from your site as Cryptocheilus bicolor (I think). Was interested to know what kind of spider it was. The picture were taken in Perth, Western Australia.

Spider Wasp battles with Wolf Spider

Spider Wasp battles with Wolf Spider

At first the wasp was the victim, and being dragged by the spider (yesterday). Wasp managed to get a sting in to ”seemingly” paralyse the spider, as it was still alive the following day (today).

Spider Wasp paralyzes Wolf Spider

Spider Wasp paralyzes Wolf Spider

The wasp has been dragging the spider around and attempted to get it to it’s nest in the roof… was a bit of a struggle and continually dropped it as it reached ceiling height, only to pick it up and drag it up the wall again! It now lies abandoned on the ground… seems to still have a little bit of life left in it! I think the wasp will be back for it… (?)
Signature: Marlise Nel

Wolf Spider Eyes

Wolf Spider Eyes

Hi Marlise,
Thank you for sending us your wonderful photos and your detailed observations of this Food Chain drama.  The Orange Spider Wasp, Cryptocheilus bicolor, feeds on both Huntsman Spiders and Wolf Spiders according to the Brisbane Insect Website.  We typically get photos of them feeding on Huntsman Spider and we believe this is the first example we have received of a Wolf Spider as the prey.  In your second photo, the face of the spider is perfectly facing the camera, so it was easy to make out the eye arrangement and match it to the eye arrangement of the Wolf Spiders.  Spider Eye Arrangements are posted to BugGuide.  One correction we would like to make on your observations is your mention of a rooftop nest.  Spider Wasps burrow underground, and this spider was intended not as food for the female wasp that hunted it, but rather for her brood.  Since it would be nearly impossible for the Spider Wasp to gain altitude from the ground while transporting such a large spider, it is common to see the wasps climb to a height and glide to the nest with the prey in tow.  Since we will be away from the office during the holiday, we are postdating your submission to go live early next week.

Spider Wasp dragging Wolf Spider up a wall

Spider Wasp dragging Wolf Spider up a wall

Dear Daniel
Delighted to hear from you!  Thank you so much for going to the trouble of replying with such detailed information.
Have since seen the videos of her dragging her prey underground :-)  Horribly cruel, yet resourceful execution…
Best
Marlise

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oxyopidae?
Location: Tambopata, Peru
March 26, 2013 3:52 am
Found on a broad leef during the night in Tambopata Nature Reserve in Peru.
Signature: salparadis

Spider eats Termite

Spider eats Termite

Dear salparadis,
We cannot say for certain that this is a Lynx Spider in the family Oxyopidae.  Our first inclination would be to say an Ant Mimic Spider, but again, we cannot be certain.  See some photos of North American Ant Mimic Spiders on BugGuide for comparison.  Tropical species can be very difficult to identify.  The prey appears to be a Termite alate.  Despite our not being able to provide you with an identification, we are posting your lovely Food Chain image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Salticidae
Location: Manglayang Mountain, West Java, Indonesia
March 22, 2013 9:30 pm
Hello again Daniel,
I wanted to ask what kind of fat salticidae this is.
This funny fellow eat a grasshopper on a banana leaf, after that she move to a higher ground making out a bed out of her web then she fell a sleep.
Signature: Mohamad Idham Iskandar

Jumping Spider eats Grasshopper

Jumping Spider eats Grasshopper

Hi Mohamad,
We are not certain if we will be able to identify this lovely Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae to the species level, but we think your photographs are amazing.  We are posting them and perhaps we will have some time in the future to research additional information.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Thanks Daniel,
I’m also still trying to browse for more info of this salticidae, but still couldn’t find any suitable lead.

Update:  May 10, 2013
Thanks to a comment that this is Hyllus giganteus, we are able to link to matching photos at Reptile Forums and this video on UIOVN.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug eats bigger spider in Sydney
Location: Sydney, Australia
March 20, 2013 2:20 am
Hi,
We were sitting in out courtyard in central Sydney this weekend when we noticed an insect trying to drag a much bigger spider into a corner to make a meal out of him. The spider wasn’t moving so we assume he was already dead. We accidentally scared the bug off trying to get some photos but he flew around for a few minutes then came back.
We would love to know what the insect is and also the spider as we are new to Australia and partly freaked and partly fascinated by all the different insects and spiders here.
Thanks,
Signature: S & J

Spider Wasp with Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp with Huntsman Spider

Dear S & J,
Just moments ago, we posted another version of this food chain drama of a female Spider Wasp,
Cryptocheilus bicolor, with her Huntsman Spider prey.  You can read more about this in our archives.  Your photos are awesome.

Spider Wasp with Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp with Huntsman Spider


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination