Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: advance,nc
January 11, 2016 11:12 pm
Please tell me what kind of bug this is eating this ladybug.I took this pic on my back steps.
Signature: Michelle christenberry

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Hi Michelle,
Though both insects are predators, the individual doing the eating in your image is a Florida Predatory Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cockroach killer!!!
Location: Memphis, TN, USA
November 7, 2015 3:49 pm
Hi – can anyone identify this cockroach killing spider from Memphis, TN?
We think it’s probably a wolf spider from our google search.
Signature: Josh

Wolf Spider eats Cockroach

Wolf Spider eats Cockroach

Dear Josh,
We agree that this is a Wolf Spider.  Wolf Spiders do not build a web to snare prey.  They hunt without a web and they are often nocturnal, which makes them effective in controlling Cockroach populations.  We hope your image will cause more of our readers to have a tolerance and appreciation of harmless Wolf Spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Grey Forest, Texas
November 8, 2015 11:28 am
We live near San Antonio, Texas and have seen this fellow a couple of times. He behaves somewhat like a robber fly, but I could not find a robber fly that looks like him. He is very hairy and quite large, as you can see in comparison to the red wasp. Red wasps are about an inch and a half long. He is quite noisy and slow in flight.
Signature: Dylan Tobe

Belzebul Bee-Eater eats Red Wasp

Belzebul Bee-Eater eats Red Wasp

Dear Dylan,
This impressive Robber Fly is a Belzebul Bee-Eater,
Mallophora leschenaulti, a magnificent predator that is capable of catching on wing and eating large stinging insects.  We are very proud of some images in our archives of the courtship activity of Belzebul Bee Eaters.  We are also noting that your images indicate they were taken in August, and not in November.

Dear Daniel:  Thank you for responding so quickly.  Yes, correct, we took the picture this summer, but just found your site today.  Dylan

Now that you found us, you should visit more often.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantis vs Caterpillar?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 13, 2015 7:37 am
Hello again, hope you are both well!
This smallish mantis (another male Carolina mantis, perhaps?) was hanging upside down from an Autumn Sage bush (Salvia greggii). At first I thought it was holding a flower, then realized it was eating prey. He made short work of it, too, with many quick, small bites.
I think it is a pink bird-dropping caterpillar, quite small, but had a lot of trouble getting a good photo due to the wind, dim lighting, an uncooperative flash, and my own lack of finesse. Please tell me that this wasn’t a Giant Swallowtail caterpillar. I can’t find any references to any butterflies using Autumn Sage as a host plant, although many pollinators and hummingbirds love the flowers.
Very warm, upper 90’s, around 5 PM, shaded corner of the garden.
Thank you so much and best wishes!
Signature: Ellen

Male California Mantis eating what might be a Tobacco Budworm

Male Carolina Mantis eating what might be a Tobacco Budworm

Dear Ellen,
We agree that this is most likely a male Carolina Mantis, and upon searching our own archives for a pink caterpillar on sage, we located this posting of what might be a Tobacco Budworm eating Russian sage.  There is a BugGuide posting that indicates the caterpillars have been found on sage and BugGuide also notes:  “Caterpillars vary greatly in color. They seem to take on the color of the flower they are eating – green, pink red or maroon forms are described. Consistent features include small dotlike black ‘microspines’ giving the body a rough texture. Later instars typically have a brown head capsule and stripes along the body including a broad pale subspiracular stripe.”  Our original posting especially resembles your caterpillar.

Male Carolina Mantis eats Caterpillar

Male Carolina Mantis eats Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Assassin bug preying on fly?
Location: Kingston, Ontario
September 16, 2015 3:17 pm
Hey there Daniel!
I spent the evening in a mesh tent observing all sorts of bugs – some I’ll be sending for IDs if you feel like it! A robberfly, a dragonfly, many ants, a horsefly, some sort of wasp-mimic, I think. And then, these two.
I think it’s a sort of assassin bug munching on a house fly. He has red eyes and a sort of yellow-borded red saddles on his back/abdomen.
Thanks for your time! I’m currently browsing through the posts so far – I’m on page 205 atm.
Signature: Dannie

Assassin Bug nymph eats Fly

Assassin Bug nymph eats Fly

Dear Dannie,
By comparing your image to Assassin Bug nymphs on BugGuide, we believe we have correctly identified your individual as
Zelus luridus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bold Jumping Spider
Location: Apulia Station, NY
September 7, 2015 9:46 pm
Thank you for the great site! While I can’t make a donation…yet, I thought I would pass along a photo or two I took of a Bold Jumping Spider dining on a moth in our grape arbor. Your site is now my go-to site for ID of bugs and such. Great work and witty prose!
If one looks carefully one can see the fangs imbedded in the moth. Yuck and cool all at the same time.
Signature: Dave Lenweaver

Bold Jumper Eats Moth

Bold Jumper Eats Moth

Dear Dave,
Thanks for sending in your excellent images of a Bold Jumper eating a moth.

Bold Jumper eats Moth

Bold Jumper eats Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination