Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider wasp’s (rescued) victim
August 22, 2014 9:14 am
I saw a wolf spider being attacked by a blue spider wasp today, and I managed to chase away the wasp and rescue the spider. I know some species only temporarily paralyze the victim, and I’ve seen the spider twitch, so…does he have any chance of recovering? I feel bad for intervening, especially since it’s probably too late for the spider, but the poor guy was trying very hard to get away, and I wanted to help him out.
I don’t know what kind exactly the wasp was, but it’s a Michigan variety.
Signature: Kitt

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Dear Kitt ,
We have heard of a Tarantula recovering from the sting of a wasp, but the whole purpose of the sting is to paralyze the spider so that it will provide food for the wasp larvae.  We are uncertain if it will recover.  We have illustrated your posting with an image from our archives.

Thanks for responding, and I’m glad you could answer my question. I’ll keep an eye on the spider. who knows? He might recover soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Predatory bee killer!
Location: Tucson, AZ
August 20, 2014 5:39 pm
This enormous predator buzzed down to enjoy its dinner on an elk antler in my yard – what is it?
Signature: Alicia

Giant Robber Fly eats Bee

Giant Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Dear Alicia,
This is one of the best feeding Robber Fly images we have received all summer.  This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, a genus well populated in our archives this season due to all the images we have received of Red Footed Cannibalflies.  This is a different member of the genus, and we believe it is Promachus albifacies, a species with no unique common name.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scorpion with brood consumes wolf spider
Location: Toledo District , Belize
August 17, 2014 8:32 pm
After looking at your scorpion photos, I thought you might be interested in this image.
Signature: Tanya

Scorpion with Brood devours Spider

Scorpion with Brood devours Wolf Spider

Dear Tanya,
You are our new hero.  These Food Chain images are awesome, but we have some questions.  Please tell us more about this Scorpion that appears to have been feeding indoors.  Was it living inside your home?  Also, the lighting is very different on the two images, with the redder image having more critical focus.  Why are the lighting conditions different?  We found a very similar looking Scorpion on The Flying Kiwi, but it is listed as unidentified.  Since the head of the spider has already been devoured, we didn’t think we would be able to identify your Wolf Spider, but we found an image on Scott Leslie’s site that looks very similar to the Wolf Spider in your images.  Alas, it is not identified beyond the family.  We love that you have supplied images to our site that document the maternal behavior of Scorpions.

Scorpion with Brood devours Wolf Spider

Scorpion with Brood devours Wolf Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Marbled Orb Weaver and Wasp Lunch
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
August 17, 2014 9:00 am
Caught this beautiful girl preparing lunch in a Toronto, Ontario park the other day. I’m guessing that she is an Araneus diadematus. I don’t know who lunch was.
Signature: Vanessa – Photographer and friend of all spiders

Orbweaver eats Prey

Orbweaver eats Prey

Dear Vanessa – Photographer and friend of all spiders,
This certainly is an Orbweaver, and the prey might be a Sand Wasp.  We believe you have correctly identified the scientific name of this Orbweaver, Araneus diadematus, however the common name is Cross Spider or European Orbweaver, not Marbled Orbweaver.  See BugGuide for other images of Cross Spiders.  See BugGuide for some examples of Sand Wasps.
 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp? eating ?
Location: San diego
August 17, 2014 11:06 am
Hello Bugman,
Saw what looks like to be a white and black wasp hanging around the garden today. First time I have seen a wasp like this, it is fairly large, looks like it might be eating a small frog?
Signature: curious

Bee Killer eats Honey Bee

Bee Killer eats Honey Bee

Dear curious,
This predatory Robber Fly is a Bee Killer,
Mallophora fautrix, and it appears to be eating a Honey Bee.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly eating a bee?
Location: Austin, tx
August 16, 2014 8:49 pm
Hi Bugman!
Found this dragonfly looking insect sucking down a bee in my back yard. Is it a dragonfly? It was definitely drinking the bee. Craziest thing. I have a giant oregano patch bit flower right now and the bees love it. We have a pool so sometimes see dragonflies, but this had some odd features I’d never seen on a dragonfly, like a clear abdomen and a feathery black tuft at the end of his backside. What’s that bug?
Laura
Austin, TX
Signature: Laura

Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Hi Laura,
You are mistaken in thinking that this is a Dragonfly, though like a Dragonfly, this Robber Fly is an adept predator capable of capturing large prey on the wing.  We believe we have correctly identified your Robber Fly as a member of the genus
Efferia due to its resemblance to many members in the genus, including this unidentified species that is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, there are “110 spp. in our area” and “in our area, the vast majority are restricted to sw. US, with some widely western spp. and just two widespread spp..”  We interpret that to mean that many species are very limited in their distribution.  Alas, we haven’t the necessary skills to attempt a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination