Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Assassin nymph eating fly
Location: Amarillo, TX
April 24, 2016 7:05 am
Hey bugman!
I spotted a tiny assassin bug carrying a house fly around in our yard yesterday and wanted to share. Hope y’all are having a wonderful weekend!
Signature: Brittani Hinders

Assassin Bug eats Fly

Assassin Bug eats Fly

Dear Brittani,
We believe that based on this BugGuide image, your Assassin Bug nymph is
Zelus luridus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mole eating bug
Location: Massachusetts
April 18, 2016 3:02 pm
I found this dead mole on a trail and all of these unknown bugs were all over it. I would like to you what type of bugs these are.
Signature: Sarina B

Ridged Carrion Beetles and Margined Carrion Beetles eat Dead Mole

Ridged Carrion Beetles and Margined Carrion Beetles on Dead Mole

Dear Sarina,
At least two species of Carrion Beetles, the all black Ridged Carrion Beetle,
Oiceoptoma inequale, and the red and black Margined Carrion Beetle, Oiceoptoma noveboracense, are gathering around this dead mole.  Of the Ridged Carrion Beetle, BugGuide states:  “Adults consume fly larvae at carrion.”   Of the Margined Carrion Beetle, BugGuide states:  “Adults sometimes consume fly larvae (maggots) on carrion.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Robber Fly, perhaps, with Prey, maybe?
Location: Coryell County, TX
April 6, 2016 12:05 am
Hello! This insect flew out of a rose bush and landed on the fence, holding prey, maybe? I found this on Bug Guide, but don’t know if it is the same. http://bugguide.net/node/view/5188
Clear skies, 80 degrees this afternoon.
Thank you and best wishes!
Signature: Ellen

Robber Fly eats Fly

Robber Fly eats Fly

Dear Ellen,
We always look forward to your submissions.  We agree with your assessment that this is a Robber Fly in the genus Efferia.  The tuft on the tip of the abdomen indicates this is a male Robber Fly.  The prey is also a fly in the order Diptera, but we are not sure of its classification.

Robber Fly eats Fly

Robber Fly eats Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Phidippus audax
Location: Toronto, Ontario
March 15, 2016 4:56 pm
I saved this darling little guy the other day, just in time for Save a Spider Day on March 14th. I will keep him comfortable inside until it is warm enough to release him.
I located some flightless fruitflies for him tonight.
Salticidae are my favourite family of spiders and these little P. audax have so much personality!
Signature: Vanessa – Lover of all spiders

Bold Jumper eats Fruit Fly

Bold Jumper eats Fruit Fly

Dear Vanessa,
Your image of a Bold Jumper eating a Fruit Fly is quite gorgeous.  Though they are commonly called Fruit Flies, members of the genus Drosophila are actually classified as Vinegar Flies.  Because of your dedication to saving and feeding this Bold Jumper, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Thanks also for drawing our attention to Save a Spider Day which was profiled on the Smithsonian Magazine site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: advance,nc
January 11, 2016 11:12 pm
Please tell me what kind of bug this is eating this ladybug.I took this pic on my back steps.
Signature: Michelle christenberry

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Hi Michelle,
Though both insects are predators, the individual doing the eating in your image is a Florida Predatory Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cockroach killer!!!
Location: Memphis, TN, USA
November 7, 2015 3:49 pm
Hi – can anyone identify this cockroach killing spider from Memphis, TN?
We think it’s probably a wolf spider from our google search.
Signature: Josh

Wolf Spider eats Cockroach

Wolf Spider eats Cockroach

Dear Josh,
We agree that this is a Wolf Spider.  Wolf Spiders do not build a web to snare prey.  They hunt without a web and they are often nocturnal, which makes them effective in controlling Cockroach populations.  We hope your image will cause more of our readers to have a tolerance and appreciation of harmless Wolf Spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination