Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Makers Mark Beetle?
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
September 13, 2014 6:41 am
Hello!
I noticed this fella (or lady) pulling a moth up the wall of our front porch. At first glance I thought it might actually be a spider, but on closer inspection, it’s obviously some type of weevil or beetle. Up close, it genuinely appears to have been dipped in hot red wax, like the top of a well known bourbon whiskey. It’s obviously a hunter, given the activity in the photos. I would say this fella is approx 10-13mm long. Just curious, and thanks so much for this amazing site!
Signature: M Coughlin

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Moth

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Moth

Dear M Coughlin,
Your Maker’s Mark bourbon analogy is amusing and quite timely considering the link we located.  This is actually an immature Florida Predatory Stink Bug and they are very effective predators.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: UNUSUAL CRAB SPIDER
Location: Fannie, Arkansas
September 10, 2014 2:43 pm
I know this is a crab spider but the coloration and design are new to me. The spider is white, pink and green with a pink combed effect on the sides, pink area on the abdomen and green on the thorax top. Do you know which crab spider it is?
Signature: Bill Burton

Crab Spider catches Fly

Crab Spider catches Fly

Dear Bill,
What wonderful Food Chain images you have submitted.  We believe that based on this image from BugGuide, your individual is a Whitebanded Crab Spider,
Misumenoides formosipes, which is a highly variable species.  Browsing through the images on BugGuide, you can see just how variable the colors and markings are on the Whitebanded Crab Spider.  We have run out of time this morning, and we can’t identify the fly at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide a comment.

Crab Spider eats Fly

Crab Spider eats Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mud Dauber with Araneus – Square Peg in a Round Hole!
Location: Thousand Hills State Park – Kirksville, MO
September 4, 2014 1:10 pm
Hi, Bugman!
I saw this rather interesting sight at work today. Apparently we have a Black and Yellow Mud Dauber nesting inside the hollows of our steel office door, and she has been getting in through a tiny gap above the door handle. I had seen a mud dauber hanging around the area, but didn’t realize there was one nesting there until I saw her on top of the door lever. At first I thought that she might be injured, but on closer inspection, she was trying to squeeze through the gap with a particularly rotund spider she had caught! I managed to snap some photos of the mud dauber doing some very amusing gymnastics, struggling to get the spider through the gap, before she left. Sadly, when she did give up and fly away, she did not drop the spider, which would have been helpful for identification! The most I can narrow down the spider is to the genus Araneus – which I realize, given the huge number of species under that umbrella, is like seeing an A-10 Warthog and identifying i t as ‘an aircraft of some kind.’ I was hoping you might have more luck in finding out what kind of spider our mud dauber had flown in, but, if not, then I simply hope you get a chuckle out of the photos.
Thanks!
Signature: EB

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber preys on Orbweaver

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber preys on Orbweaver

Mud Dauber tried to stuff Orbweaver in hole.

Mud Dauber tried to stuff Orbweaver in hole.

Mud Dauber kicks it with Orbweaver

Mud Dauber kicks it with Orbweaver

Dear EB,
We absolutely love your images of a Black and Yellow Mud Dauber attempting to return to its nest with this substantial Orbweaver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider wasp’s (rescued) victim
August 22, 2014 9:14 am
I saw a wolf spider being attacked by a blue spider wasp today, and I managed to chase away the wasp and rescue the spider. I know some species only temporarily paralyze the victim, and I’ve seen the spider twitch, so…does he have any chance of recovering? I feel bad for intervening, especially since it’s probably too late for the spider, but the poor guy was trying very hard to get away, and I wanted to help him out.
I don’t know what kind exactly the wasp was, but it’s a Michigan variety.
Signature: Kitt

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Dear Kitt ,
We have heard of a Tarantula recovering from the sting of a wasp, but the whole purpose of the sting is to paralyze the spider so that it will provide food for the wasp larvae.  We are uncertain if it will recover.  We have illustrated your posting with an image from our archives.

Thanks for responding, and I’m glad you could answer my question. I’ll keep an eye on the spider. who knows? He might recover soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Predatory bee killer!
Location: Tucson, AZ
August 20, 2014 5:39 pm
This enormous predator buzzed down to enjoy its dinner on an elk antler in my yard – what is it?
Signature: Alicia

Giant Robber Fly eats Bee

Giant Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Dear Alicia,
This is one of the best feeding Robber Fly images we have received all summer.  This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, a genus well populated in our archives this season due to all the images we have received of Red Footed Cannibalflies.  This is a different member of the genus, and we believe it is Promachus albifacies, a species with no unique common name.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scorpion with brood consumes wolf spider
Location: Toledo District , Belize
August 17, 2014 8:32 pm
After looking at your scorpion photos, I thought you might be interested in this image.
Signature: Tanya

Scorpion with Brood devours Spider

Scorpion with Brood devours Wolf Spider

Dear Tanya,
You are our new hero.  These Food Chain images are awesome, but we have some questions.  Please tell us more about this Scorpion that appears to have been feeding indoors.  Was it living inside your home?  Also, the lighting is very different on the two images, with the redder image having more critical focus.  Why are the lighting conditions different?  We found a very similar looking Scorpion on The Flying Kiwi, but it is listed as unidentified.  Since the head of the spider has already been devoured, we didn’t think we would be able to identify your Wolf Spider, but we found an image on Scott Leslie’s site that looks very similar to the Wolf Spider in your images.  Alas, it is not identified beyond the family.  We love that you have supplied images to our site that document the maternal behavior of Scorpions.

Scorpion with Brood devours Wolf Spider

Scorpion with Brood devours Wolf Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination