Currently viewing the tag: "bug of the month"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: borer ?
Location: Fredericksburg Va
July 30, 2016 7:29 pm
………….rainy times after hot dry spell
It was inside the house under a table lamp
A cloudy morning
Alive and still
One inch
Fredericksburg , Virginia
If it’s a borer of a tree of some sort…..we have MANY trees and many types>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
July 30th
If it”s a borer…it would be good to know its habitat!
Signature: susan warner

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Susan,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle,
Eburia quadrigeminata, and according to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood.”  According to MoBugs:  “Deciduous woodlands and the nearby area is their favored habitat, but they will often come to lights at night. Females deposit eggs on hardwood trees, usually in the cracks of bark. (Let me clarify here, they will only feed on dead or decaying trees, they will not harm healthy living trees…Thanks Ted for pointing out my oversight).When the larvae hatches it will eat its way into the heartwood of the tree. They feed on the wood pulp. Adults will readily come to fermented molasses bait. In large numbers these beetles could become serious pests to trees, and can cause significant damage. Because of their boring habit, and their capability of reaching the center of even the largest of trees it is not uncommon for these beetles to emerge as much as 10 to 40 years later in wood that was used to make furniture or hardwood flooring.”  We suspect this individual was probably attracted to light or had some other accidental reason for appearing in your home, but we would not rule out the possibility that it might have emerged from some finished wood product or firewood stored indoors.  Since today is the last day of July, and it is time for us to select a new Bug of the Month, we will be featuring your submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Idk what it is
Location: Womelsdorf pa
June 29, 2016 2:57 pm
This beatles looking about the size of a dime if not a bit bigger has been on our outside light for a few days.
Signature: Connie Wansley

Grapevine Beetle

Grapevine Beetle

Dear Connie,
Also known as a Spotted June Beetle, this Grapevine Beetle,
Pelidnota punctata, is closer to the size of a quarter than a dime.  They are about an inch long.  Since it is the end of the month, we need to select a Bug of the Month for July 2016, and we have decided to feature your submission.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on grape (Vitis) foliage and fruit Larvae host on dead Acer, Celtis, Juglans, Malus, Platanus, Quercus, Ulmus spp [a variety of hardwood trees]” and “Eggs are laid on stumps and rotting logs. Larvae feed on decaying roots and stumps of trees, pupate in adjacent soil. Adults emerge May-September and come to lights.”  According to the University of Wisconsin at Madison:  “Look for GBs east of the Great Plains, in woodlands, thickets, vineyards and gardens – places where rotting wood/stumps are found near grape vines. Adults eat the leaves of grape (wild and domestic) and Virginia creeper (and there’s one account of a GB browsing on spinach in a garden), and the larvae (grubs) feed on rotting wood. Most sources say that the adults do minimal damage in a well-kept vineyard and do not need ‘controlling’.  Ms. GB lays her eggs in stumps and other rotting wood, or on the ground near stumps and rotting wood, apparently favoring dead elm, oak, maple, apple, and hickory. The pale, C-shaped larvae hatch two weeks later, dig/bore in, and feed – and feed, and feed – for the rest of their first year and through their second summer. They eventually reach two inches in length and pupate underground, not surfacing until they emerge as adults the following year.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant ? Wasp?
Location: Rancho Santa Margarita ca
May 27, 2016 8:00 pm
I found this today when I was doing some planting in my backyard. I’ve never seen anything like this but we get odd creatures all the time. I’m glad I found your site so I can get help identifying some of these that I find. The white contrast with the black legs was so striking! Not knowing what it is I kept my dog, who found it, away. Should I be concerned about more showing up?
Signature: Curious critter finder

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Dear Curious critter finder,
This is both an Ant and a Wasp.  Your female, flightless Wasp in the family Mutillidae is commonly called a Velvet Ant, so she is an Ant by name and a Wasp by classification, though for even more clarification, both Wasps and Ants are classified together in the Order Hymenoptera.  Velvet Ants are not aggressive, but they are very active and purposeful, and they will defend themselves with a very painful sting should you or your dog bother one with an exposed body part.  We are going to make your sighting the Bug of the Month for June 2016.  We have had the Cow Killer, a common Velvet Ant from the eastern portion of North America featured in the past as the Bug of the Month in August 2012, but this time we want to feature the diverse Velvet Ants found in the southwest.  Many Velvet Ants sport aposomatic or warning coloration, often red or orange and black, to advertise their painful stings.  This particular individual, which may be
Dasymutilla sackeni, is well represented on BugGuide with individuals from California.

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BC Beetle
Location: BC
April 30, 2016 4:12 pm
This Beetle has been hanging around our backyard the last three days. We live in southwestern, British Columbia, Canada. Cannot find a match anywhere.
Signature: Jason Peckham

Elderberry Longhorn: Desmocerus aureipennis cribripennis

Elderberry Longhorn: Desmocerus aureipennis cribripennis

Dear Jason,
This gorgeous Longhorned Borer Beetle is a subspecies of an Elderberry Longhorn that does not have a common name,
Desmocerus aureipennis cribripennis.  A close relative in the same genus is more typically called an Elderberry Longhorn, but the same common name also applies to the entire genus.  The Elderberry Longhorns are not common and they are generally not found far from their host plant, Elderberry, according to Eric Eaton.  Because of your submission’s timely arrival at the beginning of the month, and because of your excellent image, we are designating your Elderberry Longhorn as the Bug of the Month for May 2016.  The common name Golden Winged Elder Borer is used on Encyclopedia of Life.

Daniel;
Well that just made my day!
Thank-you so much for you time to enlighten me and everyone in my Facebook and Instagram feeds who were drawing blanks.
I have four little girls and I love that exposing them to and coaching an appreciation for the diversity of life, they come running into the house yelling like someone is on fire when they find a new insect.
Thanks again,
Jason Peckham
Cheers,
Jason

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual moth
Location: Central north carolina
March 30, 2016 9:19 pm
Hi! Last night this guy flew into my house to hang around on the wall near a lamp. I hadn’t seen this kind of bug before so I isolated it under a glass before letting it back outside. It would be nice to know what species it is and if it’s the male or female of said species. I’m only guessing moth by the antennae. Here is what I’ve observed: with wings closed its about 1.5-2 inches long, 6 legs, narrow when wings are closed wings start fairly far away from the eye region, Fuzzy moth like antennae, 2 sets of wings, body is very slender, smooth, and long when wings are open. Almost like how a dragon fly is situated. Either vey dark brown or black in color all over. Wings have a same color raised textured on them. Sorry the pictures aren’t the best. And I am unsure of the wing span.
Signature: Thanks! Lauren

Spring Fishfly

Spring Fishfly

Dear Lauren,
This is a male Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, and here is what BugGuide has to say:  “Compare C. pectinicornis. Head and pronotum have dark markings on light brown background, as opposed to yellowish markings on dark brown background of C. pectinicornis. Antennae of female serrate, of male, pectinate. So, apparently, a Chauliodes with serrate antennae should be a female C. rastricornis. Note earlier flight (spring) of rastricornis in most of east. C. pectinicornis typically flies in summer.”

Male Spring Fishfly

Male Spring Fishfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  April 11, 2016
Bed Bug identification queries have increased greatly in the past five years, and though most of those have turned out to be Carpet Beetles or other Household Pests, actual Bed Bug sightings have also greatly increased, prompting us to add Bed Bugs to our Top 10 tag.

Subject: Tick?
Location: Chicago, IL USA
February 29, 2016 1:32 pm
I found this bug on my backpack today. Im not really sure what it is, but it sort of looks like a tick. I do not live in a heavily wooded area (I live in Chicago). This bug was very little and very flat. Im hoping you can tell me what it is.
Signature: Julia

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear Julia,
The bad news is that this is a blood-sucking Bed Bug and if you found it in your home, you may have more.  Look for bites that occur while sleeping.  The good news is that we are featuring your submission as the Bug of the Month for March 2016.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination