Currently viewing the tag: "bug of the month"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large moth
Location: southern nevada
March 31, 2014 7:07 am
the last few months these big moths have been everywhere and my little brother is dying to know what they are. i’d say it’s bigger than a quarter at least
Signature: curious

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear curious,
We have been getting in increasing number of requests to identify Whitelined Sphinxes, the moth species in your image, and we have decided to make your submission the Bug of the Month for April 2014.  We suspect there might be a significant annual Whitelined Sphinx population this spring, and we also got a Wanted Poster from University of Entomology PhD candidate Cristina Francois to report significant sightings of masses of Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillars.  During favorable years, the Caterpillars, which can be eaten, are found in great numbers.  We are currently observing Whitelined Sphinx Moths very regularly as they are attracted to the porch light.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weta bug?? In the Pilbara
Location: Tom Price
February 1, 2014 6:57 am
Hi. I work in Tom Price in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. I have seen this (what looks to be a female juvenile) weta walking around at night. But from all my research they are from New Zealand. .. can you tell me if they have been seen here before. None of the locals knew what it was…
Signature: Peta Louise

King Cricket

King Cricket

Dear Peta Louise,
Wetas and King Crickets belong to the family Anontostomatidae, and according to records posted to the Atlas of Living Australia, there are sightings from Pilbara.  While the Weta species found in New Zealand may be endemic and not found in Australia, there are representatives of the family in Australia where the common name King Cricket is used.  You can view some images of both female and male King Crickets,
Australostoma australasia,  on Aussie Pythons & Snakes.  You are correct that this is a female, but not necessarily a juvenile.  We also located a matching photo on FlickR.  Because they are large and formidable looking, King Crickets are often victims of Unnecessary Carnage.  We are tagging your submission as the Bug of the Month for February 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Happy New Year
What’s That Bug? has been appearing as an online column since 1998 (originally on the now defunct American Homebody website) and then as a unique website since 2002.  If we consider the development of the website to be our true date of birth, we are beginning our thirteenth year online.  Our first Bug of the Month was the Dobsonfly in June 2006, and each month since then, we featured some bug that is representative of the season or relevant for some other reason.  Since the beginning of the new year is always a kind of rebirth, we thought you might enjoy this positively gorgeous set of images of the Metamorphosis of the Ladybird Beetle that were shot on Barbados.

Ladybird Beetle Eggs

Ladybird Beetle Eggs

Subject: different stages in a ladybird’s development
Location: Barbados
December 30, 2013 8:39 pm
Hi Daniel,
That is good to know. i will send in some pics occasionally but for now i think this set will make a great addition to your site. It is a set of the different stages in a ladybird’s development. eggs > larvae > pupa > adult and one of an adult with a buffet of aphids.
Regards,
Signature: Niaz

Ladybird Larva

Ladybird Larva

Dear Niaz,
Thank you so much for sending us your beautiful images documenting the metamorphosis of a Lady Beetle on Barbados.  We haven’t had much luck determining the species, however we are thrilled to find it is not the invasive, exotic Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle, a species that has gotten a strong hold in North America, and which we fear might be resulting in a drop in the populations of native Lady Beetle species because of the fierce competition as well as aggressive predation.

Lady Beetle Pupa

Lady Beetle Pupa

It is the time of the month for us to select a Bug of the Month for January 2014, and we have selected your submission to run on our scrolling banner for the next month.  We thought metamorphosis would be a lovely subtext for the beginning of the new year.  So Happy New Year to all of our faithful readers as well as to our new visitors.

Lady Beetle from Barbados

Lady Beetle from Barbados

As an aside, the photo of the Lady Beetle feeding on the Aphids allows us to tag this as a Food Chain posting.

Lady Beetle feeds on Aphids

Lady Beetle feeds on Aphids

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this??
Location: Gainesville, Georgia North
November 27, 2013 9:48 am
We live in North Georgia and I found this in our yard, completely terrifying.
What is this?
Signature: Emily

Pumpkin Spider is Harmless to Humans, but not to flying insects.

Pumpkin Spider is Harmless to Humans, but not to flying insects.

Dear Emily,
Don’t be terrified.  The Pumpkin Spider,
Araneus marmoreus, is not dangerous to humans, though we cannot guarantee the risk of not getting a bite at 0%.  We imagine that, if provoked, a large female Pumpkin Spider might bite, and though she does have venom, that venom is not considered harmful to humans, but it might result in localized swelling and tenderness.  Because of its timely submission, and because of the quality of your photograph, we are tagging your Pumpkin Spider as the Bug of the Month for December 2013.
We are curious exactly what being from Georgia North means.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: October bug
Location: Pasadena Maryland
October 29, 2013 9:02 pm
Hello,
Every October we get a bunch of the bugs in the files below. They live only in one bush in our yard and lay eggs in the light strands I use for halloween. Would you be able to help me identify them?
Thanks!!
Signature: Carrie

Euonymus Leaf Notcher

Euonymus Leaf Notcher

Hi Carrie,
This moth is appropriately colored for Halloween.  We quickly identified it on BugGuide as a Euonymus Leaf Notcher Moth,
Pryeria sinica, and we learned that it is an invasive species.  Since Euonymus is a common shrub used in landscaping, we expect that this species may begin to spread to other states, though right now it is only reported from Maryland and Virginia.  According to BugGuide:  “Introduced from Asia; first found in MD and VA in 2001; it is spreading.”  Maryland Department of Agriculture lists it as an Invasive Species of Concern in Maryland.  There is an October 2004 update which states:  “Pryeria moths are expected to emerge in November. MDA is attempting to delimit the populations of this emerging pest. Marylanders are asked to contact Dick Bean at MDA (410) 841-2743 if you see pupae now, or moths in late October/November.”  That number might still be valid and we would suggest that you contact the MDA.  Control is probably most effective with the larvae.  Since its emergence is timely and since it is a species of concern, we are featuring your submissions as our Bug of the Month for November 2013.  Thank you for allowing us to provide a valuable public service announcement to notify people of this invasive species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: SW Utah Bug
Location: Southwestern Utah
September 29, 2013 8:10 pm
I ran across two bugs today while hiking in Southwestern Utah. One light blue one and one green one. I have never seen these before and would like to know what they are.
Signature: Linda H.

Desert Ironclad Beetle

Desert Ironclad Beetle

Hi Linda,
Your blue beetle is a Desert Ironclad Beetle,
Asbolus verrucosus, and since it is the end of the month and time for us to feature a new Bug of the Month for October, we have selected your submission.  The color of the beetle is nicely contrasted by the red color of the rocks and substrate depicted in your photograph.  There is a comment posted to BugGuide from a person who has raised Desert Ironclad Beetles in captivity and claims to have several individuals that lived more than ten years.  The BirdAndHike Wildlife Around Las Vegas website states:  “Desert Ironclad Beetles (Asbolus verrucosus) are medium-sized, fast moving beetles of the desert. These beetles eat plant debris on the desert floor, and apparently make good pets that live more than 10 years.”  Another common name is Blue Death Feigning Beetle, and  according to Bugs in Cyberspace, that name refers to:  “their tendency to play dead when bothered, combined with a powder blue colored coating they excrete on themselves to protect them from the sun.”  Your green insect is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination