Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
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Subject: What is this?
Location: Illinois
July 29, 2015 8:41 am
This bug literally flew onto my patio door right as I was about to let my dog out. Noticing the weird thing, i had to stop and take pictures. It looks like it almost is a conjoined twin? I have no idea what it could be, either.
Signature: Hayley P

Mating Crane Flies

Mating Crane Flies

Dear Hayley,
While this may look like conjoined twins, it is actually a pair of Crane Flies in flagrante delicto.  Mating Crane Flies are not the only insects that are able to fly while in the act, but their gangly appearance with their long legs makes them an especially memorable sighting.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help identify this beetle?! please
Location: Vellore, India ; Bangalore, India
July 29, 2015 6:44 am
Greetings Mr Bugman
I have come across this particular insect (which I assume is a Beetle) since my childhood . Unfortunately for me, it has been very hard to identify this bug because to my knowledge it is not known by any specific name in any of the Indian languages I speak. Add to this the fact that environment conservation and species identification takes a backseat in developing countries has made it hard for me to crosscheck with any National Database. I would like to know if this insect could be endemic to my country for I did not find any references to it any of the Google searches. Also, they mate during July – I have always found it intriguing to find a pair of them attached at their hinds ,walking busily with one walking backwards. I haven’t specifically noticed if the females and males are physiologically different. I found this site by chance and felt this would be a good place to have my curiosity quenched. I am attaching two recent photos of the insect. I must apologise as the pictures may not be of good quality. Thanks in advance.
PS: I have found this insect in South India, not the North
Signature: Varun Bharadwaj

Predatory Red Bug

Predatory Red Bug

Dear Varun,
These look like Red Bugs in the family Pyrrhocoridae, and in one of your images, it appears that one individual is eating another.  Several years ago we posted an image of a predatory Red Bug from India that was eventually identified as
Antilochus conqueberti.  Members of this family are frequently found in multigenerational aggregations like the one you have included, and close inspection of that image reveals that there are several mating pairs among the crowd.  To the best of our knowledge, this is an endemic species in India.  Here is a FlickR image for comparison, but it is identified as Antilochus cocqueberti.  The Journal of Entomology and Zoology Studies site identifies this Pyrrhocorid predator as Antilochus conqueberti.

Aggregation of Red Bugs

Aggregation of Red Bugs

Hi
First things first – thank you so much for such a prompt response and I am sorry to have sent so many requests to an already overworked staff.
Now that I have the Family and Order of the insect ( Antilochus conqueberti), I am able to get more relevant results from Google Searches . From what I have found, it appears that this insect is spread across Yunnan of China and Thailand as well. The possibility that it is “cannibalistic” is simply shocking. I have come across references to it as being a pest in Cotton Crops and with studies being conducted to identify a potent insecticide for it.
I have also heard someone mention that it is poisonous. Any way to validate that claim? Also, are they capable of  feeding on Humans?
Lastly, I have another picture of them aggregated in a mound. Would you guys be interested in it?
Varun Bharadwaj

Mating Red Bugs

Mating Red Bugs

Hi again Varun,
At this time, we cannot verify if they are poisonous, but we doubt it.  They do not suck human blood.  The previous images you sent are sufficient.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pelidnota punctata mating
Location: Minneapolis Minnesota
July 25, 2015 7:12 pm
I saw these grapevine beetles mating in Minneapolis Minnesota on July 19 2015. They were beside an urban sidewalk in a residential area not far from a lake. The pictures turned out nicely, so I thought you might like to have them.
Signature: Mary

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Hi Mary,
Technically, your images are documenting the courtship of Grapevine Beetles rather than the actual act of mating, but that is really splitting hairs with us.  It is also awesome that this courtship is taking place on a grapevine.  Your images are an excellent addition to our archives.

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge crazy fly
Location: McKinney, Texas
July 23, 2015 7:50 am
I went outside and heard an amazing ruckus in the bushes and found two of these very large, hairy, long, and huge-eyed flying buggers mating with each other. They look rather fierce and I’m not sure if they are a type of dragonfly? The picture shows the front of one of them, still attached to the other. Since they are obviously busy, I didn’t want to get too close or to be too intrusive!
Signature: Lover of bugs, Michelle

Mating Robber Flies

Mating Robber Flies

Dear Michelle,
There is not enough detail in your image to be certain, but we believe your mating Robber Flies may be Red Footed Cannibalflies.

Thank you so much!  I clicked the link to your site and that is exactly what it is.
And thank you for all you do.  I just love your site!

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A Strange Sighting
Location: Philadelphia, PA U.S.A.
July 17, 2015 9:02 am
I went out to my front yard looking at my impatiens plants. On one petal, there appeared this strange insect. It definitely was suckling on the flower . It looks like it’s conjoined and has two heads connected in the middle. Here’s some pictures that I took. Are these conjoined butterflies?
Signature: Barb Ward

Mating Bee Flies

Mating Tiger Bee Flies

Dear Barb,
These are mating Tiger Bee Flies,
Xenox tigrinus, and according to BugGuide:  “Larva is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees, Xylocopa.
Adult food unknown. An adult has been observed on damp mud, lapping up fluids (pers. observation, P. Coin).  Life Cycle Female lays eggs at entrance of carpenter bee nests. Larvae waits until carpenter bee’s larvae reach the pupal stage to parasitize it.”  Other Bee Flies in the family Bombyliidae are pollinating insects, and we find it unusual that BugGuide states the “adult food unknown” but your observation indicates that these individuals might have been feeding from the flowers while procreating.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: is tHis a moth
Location: lafayette, colorado
July 2, 2015 1:00 pm
Is this a moth? Is it native to Colorado?
Signature: cathy

Mating Western Poplar Sphinxes

Mating Western Poplar Sphinxes

Dear Cathy,
These look like mating Western Poplar Sphinxes,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, to us, and according to BugGuide, they are found in Colorado.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Riparian areas, open parklands, suburbs at low elevations; adults are nocturnal and attracted to light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination