Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: On my tickseed plants?
Location: North pittsburgh pa
August 20, 2014 1:42 pm
I just noticed these on my tickseeds today…august 20… I love in southwestern pa. Can you please identify ?
Signature: Mike

Goldenrod Soldier Beetles Mating

Goldenrod Soldier Beetles Mating

Hi Mike,
As the common name Goldenrod Soldier Beetle implies, this species feeds on the pollen of goldenrod and other fall blossoms that produce copious amounts of pollen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Minneapolis, MN
August 9, 2014 7:25 pm
This photograph was taken 7-15-14 in Minneapolis, MN. The beetles are on a raspberry plant in our garden. (We had the rainiest June on record & July was also very rainy.) Curious to know what these are.
Signature: Jodie Walters

Mating Candystriped Leafhoppers

Mating Candystriped Leafhoppers

Dear Jodie,
Though they are colorful and quite pretty, these Candystriped Leafhoppers,
Graphocephala coccinea, are not beneficial insects in the garden.  Like Aphids, they are fluid sucking Hemipterans that might spread viral infections from plant to plant.  According to BugGuide:  “Several species [of Leafhoppers] are serious crop pests; some transmit plant pathogens (viruses, mycoplasma-like organisms, etc.)”  We are not certain if the Candystriped Leafhopper is one of the virus spreading species.  Dave’s Garden discusses the negative and neutral comments regarding the Candystriped Leafhopper.  According to the Boston Harbor Islands All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory:  “It is thought that candy-striped leafhoppers may be one of several leafhopper species that transmit the bacteria which cause Pierce’s disease between plants as they are feeding. This disease can kill grape vines and other woody plants.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big identity please
Location: Eastern US in Columbia md
August 9, 2014 11:15 am
Hello. Live in Columbia MD. Saw these two on my wood deck. When I took their picture they buzzed off. It’s summer here.
Signature: Thank you, Lisa

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Hi Lisa,
This is peak season for large Robber Flies like these mating Red Footed Cannibalflies.  This is the fifth posting today to our site of Robber Flies and the third for this particular species, the Red Footed Cannibalfly,
Promachus rufipes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug id
Location: Northern Maine
July 27, 2014 9:27 pm
Saw these getting busy on my boat trailer tire as I attempted to put air in it.
Signature: Nathan

Mating Pale Green Weevils

Mating Invasive Green Weevils

Dear Nathan,
We believe these are mating Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils,
Polydrusus sericeus, and according to BugGuide: “introduced from Europe, where it is widespread” and it feeds on “primarily Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis).”  Since you image is not in critical focus, they might also be Pale Green Weevils, Polydrusus impressifrons, and they are also an invasive, introduced species.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe, adventive in NA (introduced ca. 1913)” though this date discrepancy information is also provided:  “earliest record in our area: NY 1906.”  Finally, BugGuide offers this comparison information with the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil:  “P. impressifrons is similarly colored but has less conspicuous black lines in elytra, relatively small eyes positioned laterally and parallel to midline, least interocular distance 1.5 to 2 times width of eye, and elytral margins slightly sinuate and widest near apex (compare images of both species).”

Thanks for taking the time. Looks like the pale green after looking at some images. I guess it’s European bug time around here.

Originally we thought Pale Green Weevils, and then we thought the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils were more likely.  Thanks for the confirmation.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oil Beetles?
Location: Colorado Springs Colorado
July 25, 2014 5:52 pm
Saw these guys while walking the dog today. This was in Colorado Springs, a place I have lived for 25+ years and never seen one of these let alone two “connected” Would love a positive ID.
Signature: Howard

Mating Oil Beetles

Mating Oil Beetles

Dear Howard,
You are correct that these are mating Oil Beetles, Blister Beetles in the genus
Meloe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mating Swallowtails
Location: New Cambria, Missouri
July 25, 2014 3:45 am
I took this photo yesterday of these two different (species?) of Swallowtails mating. Is this common? Can it result in viable offspring or a hybrid butterfly?
P.S. LOVE this website. It has been very informative.
Signature: Denise

Mating Tiger Swallowtails

Mating Tiger Swallowtails

Dear Denise,
The Tiger Swallowtails in your image are actually the same species.  The dark individual in the image is the female.  Though most female Tiger Swallowtails are yellow with black stripes, a small percentage of female Tiger Swallowtails are known as dark morphs, and even though the bold tiger striping is not evident, close inspection reveals a black on black striping pattern.  There are also examples of transitional coloration that fall between the light and dark morphs, and even more unusual are hermaphroditic gyandromorphs that contain traits of both sexes and which sometimes exhibit a combination of light male attributes and dark female attributes.  One final note, even without considering black morphs, Tiger Swallowtails are a sexually dimorphic species.  Female Tiger Swallowtails have blue dusting on the hindwings while male Tiger Swallowtails lack the blue coloration.  We are highlighting your posting on our scrolling feature bar. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination