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Subject: ID. needed
Location: la California
August 11, 2015 6:14 pm
I’m not from the area that this was found so I have no idea what it is. This was found walking across a parking lot in Los Angeles California. Thanks
Signature: no tech

Mating Walkingsticks

Mating Walkingsticks

Dear no tech,
Is this a hoax?  Did you take this image while visiting Los Angeles?  You indicated you are not from the area where it was found and the WTB? form you submitted the image with contains the language:  “you swear that you either took the photo(s) yourself or have explicit permission from the photographer or copyright holder to use the image.”  The digital file you attached begins with the letters “fb” which leads us to believe they have been pilfered from FaceBook.  These are mating Walkingsticks and we believe they are Striped Walkingsticks or Muskmares in the family Pseudophasmatidae.  To the best of our knowledge, and according to BugGuide, the range of the family in North America is the Southeast, and the furthest western reports are from Texas.  With that said, we can come up with several explanations.  This might be a hoax, or it might be a mistake.  We suppose it is possible that Striped Walkingsticks may have been imported into California through individuals or through the exotic insect trade, and that they were either released or escaped.  If that is the case, and this mating pair is in the wild, Southern California may soon have another Invasive Exotic species with which to contend.  According to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”  

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: STILETTO FLY?
Location: Ouachita Mountains, Ark.
August 10, 2015 6:50 pm
Hi! Are these Stiletto Flies? Photographed on a small bridge overlooking a creek in Fannie, Arkansas. Only one photo of them mating before they left. Summer, Aug. 10th. Is this a common variety?
Signature: Bill Burton

Mating Flies

Mating Bee Flies

Dear Bill,
Though they resemble Stiletto Flies, we cannot find a matching image on BugGuide.  Among the most noticeable diagnostic features for us are the posterior edge of the eye having an unusual concave feature and the spacing between the eyes being almost equal between the male and the female.  We have requested assistance from Eric Eaton and we hope he can provide an identification soon.

Eric Eaton Identifies mating Bee Flies
Daniel:
I do recognize these as bee flies, family Bombyliidae.  I don’t recognize the genus offhand.  Herschel Raney’s “Random Acts of Nature” website might have pages devoted to bee flies of Arkansas.  I know he has lots on Arkansas *robber* flies…..
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Ed. Note:  We scanned the images on Random Natural Acts and BugGuide, but we could not conclusively identify these mating Bee Flies.  Assistance from our readership is always welcomed.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Denver Colorado
August 5, 2015 3:58 pm
Hi. My nephew sent me this picture from their backyard. Have to love summertime in the rocky mountains! No one know what this is. We hope you can help.
Thank you
Signature: Hillary Arellano

Mating Peach Tree Borers

Mating Peach Tree Borers

Hi Hillary,
Despite the lack of critical focus, the distinctive markings of these sexually dimorphic, mating Peach Tree Borers,
Synanthedon exitiosa, are quite apparent.  The darker individual in the pair with the bright orange band is the female.  Peach Tree Borers are moths in the Clearwing family Sesiidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Illinois
July 29, 2015 8:41 am
This bug literally flew onto my patio door right as I was about to let my dog out. Noticing the weird thing, i had to stop and take pictures. It looks like it almost is a conjoined twin? I have no idea what it could be, either.
Signature: Hayley P

Mating Crane Flies

Mating Crane Flies

Dear Hayley,
While this may look like conjoined twins, it is actually a pair of Crane Flies in flagrante delicto.  Mating Crane Flies are not the only insects that are able to fly while in the act, but their gangly appearance with their long legs makes them an especially memorable sighting.

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Subject: Help identify this beetle?! please
Location: Vellore, India ; Bangalore, India
July 29, 2015 6:44 am
Greetings Mr Bugman
I have come across this particular insect (which I assume is a Beetle) since my childhood . Unfortunately for me, it has been very hard to identify this bug because to my knowledge it is not known by any specific name in any of the Indian languages I speak. Add to this the fact that environment conservation and species identification takes a backseat in developing countries has made it hard for me to crosscheck with any National Database. I would like to know if this insect could be endemic to my country for I did not find any references to it any of the Google searches. Also, they mate during July – I have always found it intriguing to find a pair of them attached at their hinds ,walking busily with one walking backwards. I haven’t specifically noticed if the females and males are physiologically different. I found this site by chance and felt this would be a good place to have my curiosity quenched. I am attaching two recent photos of the insect. I must apologise as the pictures may not be of good quality. Thanks in advance.
PS: I have found this insect in South India, not the North
Signature: Varun Bharadwaj

Predatory Red Bug

Predatory Red Bug

Dear Varun,
These look like Red Bugs in the family Pyrrhocoridae, and in one of your images, it appears that one individual is eating another.  Several years ago we posted an image of a predatory Red Bug from India that was eventually identified as
Antilochus conqueberti.  Members of this family are frequently found in multigenerational aggregations like the one you have included, and close inspection of that image reveals that there are several mating pairs among the crowd.  To the best of our knowledge, this is an endemic species in India.  Here is a FlickR image for comparison, but it is identified as Antilochus cocqueberti.  The Journal of Entomology and Zoology Studies site identifies this Pyrrhocorid predator as Antilochus conqueberti.

Aggregation of Red Bugs

Aggregation of Red Bugs

Hi
First things first – thank you so much for such a prompt response and I am sorry to have sent so many requests to an already overworked staff.
Now that I have the Family and Order of the insect ( Antilochus conqueberti), I am able to get more relevant results from Google Searches . From what I have found, it appears that this insect is spread across Yunnan of China and Thailand as well. The possibility that it is “cannibalistic” is simply shocking. I have come across references to it as being a pest in Cotton Crops and with studies being conducted to identify a potent insecticide for it.
I have also heard someone mention that it is poisonous. Any way to validate that claim? Also, are they capable of  feeding on Humans?
Lastly, I have another picture of them aggregated in a mound. Would you guys be interested in it?
Varun Bharadwaj

Mating Red Bugs

Mating Red Bugs

Hi again Varun,
At this time, we cannot verify if they are poisonous, but we doubt it.  They do not suck human blood.  The previous images you sent are sufficient.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pelidnota punctata mating
Location: Minneapolis Minnesota
July 25, 2015 7:12 pm
I saw these grapevine beetles mating in Minneapolis Minnesota on July 19 2015. They were beside an urban sidewalk in a residential area not far from a lake. The pictures turned out nicely, so I thought you might like to have them.
Signature: Mary

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Hi Mary,
Technically, your images are documenting the courtship of Grapevine Beetles rather than the actual act of mating, but that is really splitting hairs with us.  It is also awesome that this courtship is taking place on a grapevine.  Your images are an excellent addition to our archives.

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination