Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Busy milkweeds
Location: Columbus, Ohio
July 12, 2016 1:04 pm
So the milkweeds seem to be the water cooler of the insect world. We have monarchs, Japanese beetles, tons of bees (honey and bumbles), and these red mating things! Their flowers are a pretty color and they really have a pleasant and strong scent. I’m rather surprised that these weren’t grown on purpose before the whole monarch decline. Any way, were enjoying the show and hope to get a caterpillar or two.
Signature: Amber

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear Amber,
There is indeed quite a robust ecosystem surrounding milkweed, which is one of the reasons we created a Milkweed Meadow tag on our site recently.  Monarch Butterflies need milkweed as it is the only food consumed by the Monarch Caterpillars.  Milkweed Borers and Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars are other visitors you might expect in the future.  Your mating Large Milkweed Bugs are another species that depends upon milkweed.  Many pollinators like your Bumble Bees, numerous species of butterflies and many wasps including Tarantula Hawks (mostly in western states), while not dependent upon milkweed as a sole food, are attracted to the fragrant blooms that are laden with nectar.  We will attempt to identify your Bumble Bee species.  

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of beetle is this?
Location: Vancouver wa
July 11, 2016 7:42 am
Hello, I was wondering if you could help me with the identification of this beetle….. my wife, son and I where in a walk the other day in a field at the Vancouver wa. Wild life refuge. I was looking at a cluster of flowers (image 1) when I seen a couple of little black bugs crawling threw it. I flipped it over and found two little orangish beetles that where mating (image 2-3) I’ve never seen these little guys before and can not seem to find them on Google or any of the other sites I use for identification.
Signature: Thank you for your time, James Roberson

Mating Hogweed Bonking Beetles

Mating Hogweed Bonking Beetles

Dear James,
These mating Soldier Beetles are living up to their name Hogweed Bonking Beetles.  They are an introduced species from Eurasia and they are predators.  The dark tips of the wings are an identifying feature.

Lol, yeah I’d defiantly say that they are… Thank you for your help and quick response. I have found your site very useful many times and this is another good example.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Male and Female Fish Fly?
Location: Troy, VA
June 30, 2016 2:25 pm
I believe these are male and female fish flies. The female was very active while the male just sat there. I don’t think she ever closed her wings. I will draw no conclusions from this.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Male Fishfly (Pectinate Antennae)

Male Fishfly (Pectinate Antennae)

Dear Grace,
We really love your newest images.  Perhaps you captured these Fishflies post-coital and he has completed his mission and now can contribute to the food chain, while she must have the energy to lay eggs in a nearby aquatic environment.  It is late in the season for Spring Fishflies, according to BugGuide, but your female appears to have serrate or saw-like antennae, a characteristic of the female Spring Fishfly as opposed to the female Summer Fishfly, though this is the season for the Summer Fishfly according to BugGuide, as both female and male Summer Fishflies have pectinate or comb-like antennae, along with only the male Spring Fishfly.  Read more about the Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, on BugGuide and also read more about the Summer Fishfly, Chauliodes pectinicornis, on BugGuide.  It took us years finally to get images of mating, related Dobsonflies. We prefer your image of the male Fishfly on the white background as it better sets off his antennae.

Female Fishfly (Filiform Antennae)

Female Fishfly (Serrate Antennae)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Orange bugs that seem to attach together at back end
Location: Henderson, NV
June 15, 2016 8:53 am
Hi! I’m a new homeowner and found these bugs recently. They are normally single, but they will occasionally come together at their backside and even move in unison when I approach them. Do you know what I’m dealing with here? Thanks!
Signature: New Homeowner

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Dear New Homeowner,
These are mating Small Milkweed Bugs, and they pose no threat to your new home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pls identify
Location: Southern Ontario, Frankford
June 6, 2016 5:14 pm
We have recently planted 32 various tree and shrubs on our property including maples spruce pines dogwood aspen etc and now have them ALL covered with these beetles. Can you pls idenitfy and advise on how to get rid of them.
Thank you
Signature: D DRAKE

Mating Rose Chafers

Mating Rose Chafers

Dear D DRAKE,
These are mating Rose Chafers,
Macrodactylus subspinosus, and you may verify our identification on BugGuide which states:  “Adults emerge in early summer and feed on flowers, some leaves. They live for up to 6 weeks. Mating occurs on food sources. Eggs are laid deep (13-15 cm!) in soil and hatch in one to three weeks. Larvae feed on roots and overwinter deep in soil. Pupation in early spring in the soil, just under the surface.  Adults contain cantharadin, can poison chickens, other birds.”  We do not provide extermination advice, but now that you know what you are dealing with, you can do additional research.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chalcid wasp?
Location: Peterborough ON
May 26, 2016 9:02 pm
I found these small (1mm+) wasp-like insects mating in my backyard on the weekend – May 24. It was sunny and warm: around 26C.
Signature: Rob Tonus

Mating Tiny Flies

Mating Thick-Headed Flies

Dear Rob,
Our initial impression that the faces on your mating insects looked more like Flies than Chalcid Wasps proved correct when we zoomed in on your very high resolution image, which revealed the presence of halteres which are defined on Entmologists’ Glossary as “modified wings. In the Diptera (true flies) it is the hind wings that have become halteres. …  Halteres are shaped like ‘drum sticks’ with a slender shaft connected to the thorax at one end and ending in a thicker structure at the other. Halteres are highly sophisticated balance organs and they oscillate during flight.”  So these are mating Flies.  We are going to post your submission as unidentified while we continue to research the identity of your mating pair of Flies.  We will also contact Eric Eaton to get his input.

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi:
Sure:  Thick-headed flies, family Conopidae, maybe Myopa for genus?
Eric

Ed. Note:  This image on BugGuide looks very close, but it is listed as 12mm, not 1mm.  According to BugGuide:  “Myopa species are parasitic on Honey Bees Apis mellifera, Andrena and Mustache Bees Anthophora.”

Thanks so much for the quick feedback, Daniel.  I appreciate you investigating these mystery insects for me.

Thanks again for this additional information.
The flies were larger than 1 mm, but much smaller than 12 mm – perhaps 5 or 6 mm at most . . . that’s only an estimate, though, since I saw them mating, and they could have had their abdomens twisted, which made them look shorter.
Are these presumptions on genus the closest we’ll get to identifying them?  Is it difficult to determine species without having them in hand?

Perhaps a Dipterist may be able to do a conclusive species ID, but alas, we have not the necessary skills.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination