Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Vine munching beetle
Location: Southern Ontario, GTA
July 4, 2014 7:59 am
The vines that cover my back yard have been starting to die, I thought it was the neighbours until I went out side today.
I found over eight pairs of beetles mating and eating the vines in the same area.
It seems that while the female eats the leaf under neither the male gets on top to mait.
It has been only a few days and the beetles have decimated the one vine although this is the first time they have been visible.
The hard shell is a redish brown while the sides have slight stripping.
Thank you for the consideration
Signature: Backyard Beetle Babe

Japanese Beetles mating and eating

Japanese Beetles mating and eating

Hi Backyard Beetle Babe,
The invasive, exotic Japanese Beetles in your image are doing what they are best known for doing:  eating and mating.  Japanese Beetles have been in North America for nearly 100 years, and they are known to feed on hundreds of different cultivated and ornamental plants, hence they are well known to and loathed by most gardeners in the eastern part of North America.

Thank you so much for identifying my bug!!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ichneumon Wasp?
Location: West Milford, New Jersey
July 3, 2014 6:48 am
I have looked at lots of pictures, but I cant ID this insect. I have seen them in my garden a few times, I feel like it may be a Ichneumon Wasp, but I have been unable to match anything with the dark band/stripe down the middle of the thorax.
Signature: Geoffrey Syme

Mating Robber Flies

Mating Robber Flies

Hi Geoffrey,
These are mating Robber Flies in the family Asilidae.  We will attempt to identify the species.  Based on images posted to BugGuide, this appears to be
Asilus sericeus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly mating with dead fly?
Location: Northeast Florida
June 29, 2014 3:56 pm
I saw this fly (or these flies) today in northeast FL. I thought at first that it was a pair of mating flies and took a few photos. However, it appears that this is a live fly that had been mating with a fly that died, and it was now dragging the dead fly along with it as it walked and flew around. I’ve never seen anything like this before.
Signature: Karen in FL

Flesh Fly matings ends with death of the male!!!

Flesh Fly with dead mate

Dear Karen,
We are positively stunned by your images, which appear to have captured the mating of Flesh Flies in the family Sarcophagidae that ended with the death of one of the partners, from unknown causes.  We can assure you that Flesh Flies do not practice necrophilia, and that for some reason, the individual succumbed while in flagrante delicto, and for yet more unexplained reasons, the sexual bond was not broken after the death.  The red-tipped abdomen is a rather distinctive feature, and upon searching though images on BugGuide, we found at least three genera that have this characteristic:  
SarcophagaOxysarcodexia and Arachnidomyia.  Though they are not necrophiliacs, BugGuide does indicate that:  “Larvae: many species are necrophagous, but some feed in mammalian tissues or parasitize other arthropods (bees, cicadas, termites, grasshoppers/locusts, millipedes), earthworms, or snails(3). Adults feed on various sugar-containing materials such as nectar, sap, fruit juices and honeydew.”  Thanks for providing a very intriguing posting for our site.  Typical Flesh Fly mating should look like this.

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Hi Daniel,
I was pretty stunned too when I realized what was going on with that fly! I assumed both flies had been alive when mating began, but I couldn’t imagine what might have killed one partner while leaving the other looking perfectly fine and healthy, except for dragging the dead partner around everywhere it went.
Karen in FL

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Borer, hickory?
Location: Nashville, Tn
June 29, 2014 9:26 am
These bright yellow bugs are unlike any I have seen. They have a lot more yellow, and the pattern is different than all the other pics on your site. Can you identify this for me? They are all over a Hackberry tree. I did not see any Hackberry borers on your site. Is there such a thing?
Signature: Tanya

Six Banded Longhorn Beetles

Six Banded Longhorn Beetles

Dear Tanya,
Your images are very blurry, and though the details are absent, it is possible to make out the bold markings and bright colors on these Six Banded Longhorn Beetles,
Dryobius sexnotatus, which appear to be mating.  According to BugGuide:  “Primary host: sugar maple (Acer saccharum) (4) (larvae bore in living and dead trees); also basswood, beech, linden and rarely elm (1) Can maintain itself on other hosts for a short period, but survival seems to depend on the availability of large, very old (overmature) sugar maple trees (Perry et al. 1974).”  BugGuide also notes:  “Uncommon/rare (3)(4); widely scattered, populations are sparse (1); listed as rare and threatened on several state websites.  Dury (1902) noted that D. sexnotatus was once abundant but was even then becoming rare.  Perry et al. (1974) noted a sharp decline in the collection since 1942.”

Awesome! Thank you very much for getting back with me! Are they still rare? They were mating quite aggressively a few weeks ago .. lol.
I also inquired about a spined micrathena spider, also a blurry pic. I have attached a better one. Quite beautiful color!

To the best of our knowledge, the Six Banded Longhorn Beetle is still rare.  We did see the Micrathena image, and we did not post it because of the poor quality of the image.  The significance of the Six Banded Longhorn Beetle sighting prompted us to post despite the poor image quality.  We like to choose high quality images for posting whenever possible unless there is some other significant reason, like a great letter, that will encourage our staff to post blurrier images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Erie, PA
June 18, 2014 5:47 pm
I found this moth outside my home in Erie, PA and am not certain what kind of moth it is.
Signature: Lindsey

Promethea Moths

Promethea Moths

Dear Lindsey,
We wish we could have responded in a more timely manner, but we were out of the office for ten days and we are still trying to  catch up on all the mail that arrived in our absence.  This is a pair of Promethea Moths,
Callosamia promethea, or another member of the genus.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  The lower moth in the image is the female, and she is filled with eggs.  The male was attracted by her pheromones using his more feathered antennae to locate her.  Promethea Moths, like other Giant Silkmoths in the family Saturniidae, do not eat as adults, living only long enough to mate and reproduce. 

Gravid Female Promethea Moth

Gravid Female Promethea Moth

We suspect this gravid female Promethea Moth arrived first and the male was drawn to her.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big black beetles on Kythera (Greek Island)
Location: Kythera, Greece
June 16, 2014 2:32 am
Hi,
Saw this pair mating on the coast of the small Greek Island of Kythera. The female was 6-7cm long. Any idea what they are?
Signature: Mitch

Mating Rootborers

Mating Root Borers

Dear Mitch,
These are mating Root Borers in the subfamily Prioninae, and we believe they are most likely
Prionus besikanus based on images posted to BioLib and the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery.  Another possibility is Prionus coriarius also found on the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination