Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle orgy on goldenrod!
Location: Schenectady, NY
August 27, 2016 11:46 am
Hello WhatsThatBug,
I thought you’d enjoy this shot of no less than four pairs of mating beetles on the same goldenrod plant! There were actually at least two other pairs that I didn’t get in the shot, so clearly this plant is the place for looooove. I think they are Goldenrod Soldier Beetles.
I spotted them at a local park that has a perfect pond for dragonflies. This stand of goldenrod grows alongside a tiny stream that runs through the grass in an open area, and as you can imagine it is a very popular spot for all kinds of insects, including a huge variety of bees and wasps. I’ll need to go back with extra batteries in my camera to see what else I can photograph!
Signature: Susan B.

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Dear Susan,
Your lurid images of mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles,
Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, are a wonderful addition to our Bug Love tag.  Many years ago we created a Milkweed Meadow tag because there is such a diverse group of insects, including the Monarch Butterfly, that depend upon milkweed for survival, and there are many other insects that are attracted to the nectar rich blossoms.  At that time, we had planned a companion plant community tag called the Goldenrod Meadow because similar to milkweed, goldenrod is also associated with a very diverse insect community.  We are taking the opportunity to launch our Goldenrod Meadow tag with your wonderful submission, and now we will have to go back through our archives to tag appropriate postings from the past.  When you return to the goldenrod patch with extra batteries, please send us any images that you feel will be of interest to our readership. 

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  For Bug Love
Location:  sorry… Magdalen Hill
August 18, 2016
For Bug Love
http://butterfly-conservation.org/2401-1937/magdalen-hill-down-hampshire.html
Clare

Mating Soldier Beetles

Mating Soldier Beetles

Dear Clare,
These are mating Soldier Beetles, and there is not a high enough resolution in your image to be certain of the species.  We located several similar looking species on Nature Spot, and regarding the species
Cantharis cryptica, Nature Spot indicates:  “7 to 8.5 mm. An orange/brown beetle with black rings above the ‘knees’ and all-yellow palps. There are several similar species and precise identification may need detailed examination.”  Another possible species is Cantharis rufa, and Nature Spot indicates:  “Length 9 – 11 mm. This soldier beetle is largely all orange but sometimes there is a black mark on the pronotum which is quite square looking and doesn’t reach to the front border (extending just over half way). The legs may be be pale or dark but with contrasting ‘knees’ in both cases.  Similar Species:  This species is larger than the similar Cantharis cryptica and C. pallida – both of which are 7-8mm in length. Rhagonycha translucida lacks the blacks knees and has a pronotum that narrows towards the head.”  Of the similar looking Cantharis pallida, Nature Spot indicates:  “They are frequent visitors to thistles and umbelliferous flowers, where they probably prey on other flower-feeding insects.”  That is a thistle in your image.  Finally, we could not rule out the larger Common Red Soldier Beetle, Rhagonycha fulva, and Nature Spot states:  “A very common beetle throughout most of Britain.”  After all that, we hope a family identification will suffice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug ID request
Location: coopersburg, Pa
August 18, 2016 3:19 pm
Saw these two bugs on my back deck in Coopersburg, Pa. They are about 1 1?2 inches long. Would love to know what they are.
Thank You,
Dan
Signature: banjodan

Mating Giant Robber Flies

Mating Giant Robber Flies

Dear banjodan,
These are mating Giant Robber Flies or Bee Killers in the genus
Promachus, a group that includes the Red Footed Cannibalfly.  We turned to BugGuide to see if we could find a species match for you, and we were surprised to find your image which was submitted to them last week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ?
Location: Atlantic county NJ
August 12, 2016 1:42 pm
Hello, I love in southern new Jersey by the shore. I keep finding more and more of these bugs on my raspberry bushes. I can’t seem to find them online and I don’t know if they’re beneficial or otherwise. Can you help?
Thanks!
Signature: Sunny

Mating Banded Net-Winged Beetles

Mating Banded Net-Winged Beetles

Dear Sunny,
You do not need to fret about the health of your raspberry bushes because of these Banded Net-Winged Beetles,
Calopteron reticulatum, because according to the genus page on BugGuide:  “adults take nectar; larvae prey on small arthropods under bark.”  According to Featured Creatures, the Banded Net-Winged Beetle is:  “commonly found resting on vegetation in moist woods throughout much of the eastern United States.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need ID: Bugs seen mating in Mumbai, India
Location: Mumbai, Maharashtra – India
August 9, 2016 12:45 am
Spotted these bugs in the moist deciduous forest in the monsoon season here in Mumbai.
Signature: Rizwan Mithawala

Unknown Mating Weevils

Unknown Mating Weevils

Dear Rizwan,
Your image of mating Weevils is quite stunning.  It depicts both the mating behavior and the damage the beetles make to the leaves while feeding.  Many Weevils are generalist feeders, meaning they do not limit their diet to a single plant, or even a single genus or family.  We are not sure of the species, and since Weevils are members of the largest family of animals on planet earth, and since India does not have the best online archive for insect identification, we are not even going to attempt a species identification, but we would challenge our readership to give it a try.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your help!
Could it be this one?
Asiatic oak weevil
Cyrtepistomus castaneus
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cyrtepistomus_castaneus_Kaldari.jpg
http://www.invasive.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=2136
http://bugguide.net/node/view/52987
Rizwan Mithawala
Photographer & Correspondent
The Times of India, Mumbai

Perhaps.  Was it feeding on Oak or Chestnut?

Sorry, I don’t know. Can you guess looking at the leaves?

sorry, we are What’s That Bug? not What’s That Leaf?

Hahaha…thanks for your help!

Unknown Mating Weevils

Unknown Mating Weevils

Our pleasure Rizwan.  Seriously, we really have no scientific credentials and this site began as a lark many years ago as part of an art project/writing collaboration.  Since knowing the plant upon which a particular insect is feeding is often a great assistance in the identification process, we are going back to your original uncropped image and posting it as well.  Weevils are such an enormous family, and though it does contain many colorful and distinctive species, most are rather drab and ordinary, and look alike to our relatively untrained eyes.  Proper identification of insects often includes careful examination of the actual specimen, counting things like antennae segments, or wing veins, or even the examination of genitalia, and all of that is well beyond our capabilities.  Additionally, many folks just want to know what something is in a general sense, and not a specific one.  We are pretty good at general.  Specific often eludes us.  We never really know what the purpose of an identification request is when we receive it.  Is it feeding on a treasured plant in the garden?  Was it seen on vacation?  Will it bite and kill me?  Is this an exotic introduction that will decimate the crops in its newly expanded range?  These are just some of the myriad possibilities that go unstated when a brief request is made.  Perhaps someday a real expert will see your image on our site and write in and comment with a proper identification.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much; really appreciate your interest and efforts. These pictures are shot for a newspaper story about how life flourishes in the monsoon (in the forest). It’s a photo-feature about the season of abundance, feeding and mating. Hence, I needed to identify the beetles and know their role in the forest ecosystem. Any additional information you can share will be of great help for me. Thanks!
Regards,
Rizwan

Hi again Rizwan,
We suspect general weevil information will suffice for your readership, and exact species information might not be necessary.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: plant-like creature
Location: Swarthmore, PA
August 5, 2016 4:51 am
This, which I took at first to be a plant, was clinging to a lamp post this morning. What is it please?
Signature: talluncle31

Mating Luna Moths

Mating Luna Moths

Dear talluncle31,
Though we have already received several images of Luna Moths this year, we are especially thrilled to post and feature your mating pair of Luna Moths, arguably the most distinctive looking North American moth species.  The male in the pair has the more feathery antennae, which he uses to sense the pheromones of the female, who is full of eggs and has the fatter abdomen.  Luna Moths do not eat as adults, and they live only long enough to mate and procreate.

Mating Luna Moths

Mating Luna Moths

Thank you very much for the identification of the Luna Moths. They were still there as it got dark last evening, but no longer in contact. This morning they were gone.
Talluncle31

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination