Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chalcid wasp?
Location: Peterborough ON
May 26, 2016 9:02 pm
I found these small (1mm+) wasp-like insects mating in my backyard on the weekend – May 24. It was sunny and warm: around 26C.
Signature: Rob Tonus

Mating Tiny Flies

Mating Thick-Headed Flies

Dear Rob,
Our initial impression that the faces on your mating insects looked more like Flies than Chalcid Wasps proved correct when we zoomed in on your very high resolution image, which revealed the presence of halteres which are defined on Entmologists’ Glossary as “modified wings. In the Diptera (true flies) it is the hind wings that have become halteres. …  Halteres are shaped like ‘drum sticks’ with a slender shaft connected to the thorax at one end and ending in a thicker structure at the other. Halteres are highly sophisticated balance organs and they oscillate during flight.”  So these are mating Flies.  We are going to post your submission as unidentified while we continue to research the identity of your mating pair of Flies.  We will also contact Eric Eaton to get his input.

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi:
Sure:  Thick-headed flies, family Conopidae, maybe Myopa for genus?
Eric

Ed. Note:  This image on BugGuide looks very close, but it is listed as 12mm, not 1mm.  According to BugGuide:  “Myopa species are parasitic on Honey Bees Apis mellifera, Andrena and Mustache Bees Anthophora.”

Thanks so much for the quick feedback, Daniel.  I appreciate you investigating these mystery insects for me.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moths are these?
Location: East Coulee Alberta
May 27, 2016 8:26 pm
These two were spotted east of Drumheller Alberta. Im curious what they are called.
Signature: Curious Kim

Mating Modest Sphinxes

Mating Modest Sphinxes

Dear Curious Kim,
We turned to the Sphingidae of the Americas site to verify the identity of your mating Sphinx Moths, and we have determined that they are mating Modest Sphinxes,
Pachysphinx modesta, and we are amused at their seemingly immodest behavior.  The species is also called the Poplar Sphinx, and it resembles a closely related species, Pachysphinx occidentalis, which has been “delisted” on the species from Alberta page of Sphingidae of the Americas.  Interestingly the species page on Sphingidae of the Americas still states:  “Pachysphinx occidentalis occidentalis, the Big Poplar Sphinx (Wing span: 5 1/8 – 5 7/8 inches (13 – 15 cm)), flies in riparian areas and suburbs from Alberta and North Dakota west to eastern Washington; south to Texas, Arizona, southern California, and Baja California Norte.”  We will attempt to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide a conclusive identification and perhaps indicate why the second species was “delisted.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Love – American Carrion Beetle
Location: Southwest Indiana
May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Hello! I wanted to share some photos I took last summer of a pair of American Carrion Beetles with their mites. They were collected around some cat vomit…which might have had some mouse remains in it. (oh so pleasant!) Somehow the photo was forgotten until now – probably because I had embarrassment over taking bug love photos, ha ha!
Thank you for the awesome site. It’s my go-to place when I find a new bug, and I’ve never had to ask for identification – I always find what I’m looking for! We practice organic gardening on our little homestead, and I often find new creatures – so I visit your site often!
Thanks again!
Signature: Heather

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Dear Heather,
We are so thrilled to find out that you find our site so helpful.  We are also thrilled to post your images of a pair of mating American Carrion Beetles and their Phoretic Mites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a type of fly?
Location: Lexington, MA
May 26, 2016 5:22 am
I live in Eastern Massachusetts and noticed these flying insects swarming all over our backyard. They don’t seem to bother humans but they really seem to like the grass seed on our overgrown grass. Can you please tell me what they are?
Signature: Gordon

March Flies

March Flies

Dear Gordon,
These are mating, sexually dimorphic March Flies in the family Bibionidae.  Males March Flies can be distinguished from females by their larger heads and bigger eyes.  We suspect because of your location they are most likely 
Bibio albipennis based on BugGuide information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug ID
Location: SW Washington, Pacific County
May 26, 2016 1:57 am
These bugs showed up in our area last year for the first time. It has been suggested that they are box elder bugs, but they do not look like photos of box elder bugs. Can you help ID them?
Signature: valleygirl

Mating Bordered Plant Bugs

Mating Bordered Plant Bugs

Dear valleygirl,
These are Bordered Plant Bugs in the genus
Largus, and considering your location, we are relatively confident they are Largus cinctus, a west coast species.  You may refer to BugGuide for additional images of Bordered Plant Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Box Elder Bug Love
Location: Monmouth County, NJ
May 22, 2016 8:46 pm
At first I thought these were beetles, but after a bit of google research I have come to think they are Box Elder Bugs. I found them like this on my window screen (mating?) where they stayed for 2-3 days with little movement.
I was unable to get a photo of the top side (or even see it), but I spotted another one about a week later and after viewing its top side it appeared to be a box elder bug.
Location: Monmouth County, NJ
Time: Around the last week of April
Signature: Anonymous

Mating Boxelder Bugs

Mating Boxelder Bugs

Dear Anonymous,
A ventral view is not ideal for an exact identification, but the red eyes that are clearly visible on the pair in your image and in this BugGuide image are a very strong indication that they are mating Boxelder Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination