Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Orange bugs that seem to attach together at back end
Location: Henderson, NV
June 15, 2016 8:53 am
Hi! I’m a new homeowner and found these bugs recently. They are normally single, but they will occasionally come together at their backside and even move in unison when I approach them. Do you know what I’m dealing with here? Thanks!
Signature: New Homeowner

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Dear New Homeowner,
These are mating Small Milkweed Bugs, and they pose no threat to your new home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pls identify
Location: Southern Ontario, Frankford
June 6, 2016 5:14 pm
We have recently planted 32 various tree and shrubs on our property including maples spruce pines dogwood aspen etc and now have them ALL covered with these beetles. Can you pls idenitfy and advise on how to get rid of them.
Thank you
Signature: D DRAKE

Mating Rose Chafers

Mating Rose Chafers

Dear D DRAKE,
These are mating Rose Chafers,
Macrodactylus subspinosus, and you may verify our identification on BugGuide which states:  “Adults emerge in early summer and feed on flowers, some leaves. They live for up to 6 weeks. Mating occurs on food sources. Eggs are laid deep (13-15 cm!) in soil and hatch in one to three weeks. Larvae feed on roots and overwinter deep in soil. Pupation in early spring in the soil, just under the surface.  Adults contain cantharadin, can poison chickens, other birds.”  We do not provide extermination advice, but now that you know what you are dealing with, you can do additional research.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chalcid wasp?
Location: Peterborough ON
May 26, 2016 9:02 pm
I found these small (1mm+) wasp-like insects mating in my backyard on the weekend – May 24. It was sunny and warm: around 26C.
Signature: Rob Tonus

Mating Tiny Flies

Mating Thick-Headed Flies

Dear Rob,
Our initial impression that the faces on your mating insects looked more like Flies than Chalcid Wasps proved correct when we zoomed in on your very high resolution image, which revealed the presence of halteres which are defined on Entmologists’ Glossary as “modified wings. In the Diptera (true flies) it is the hind wings that have become halteres. …  Halteres are shaped like ‘drum sticks’ with a slender shaft connected to the thorax at one end and ending in a thicker structure at the other. Halteres are highly sophisticated balance organs and they oscillate during flight.”  So these are mating Flies.  We are going to post your submission as unidentified while we continue to research the identity of your mating pair of Flies.  We will also contact Eric Eaton to get his input.

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi:
Sure:  Thick-headed flies, family Conopidae, maybe Myopa for genus?
Eric

Ed. Note:  This image on BugGuide looks very close, but it is listed as 12mm, not 1mm.  According to BugGuide:  “Myopa species are parasitic on Honey Bees Apis mellifera, Andrena and Mustache Bees Anthophora.”

Thanks so much for the quick feedback, Daniel.  I appreciate you investigating these mystery insects for me.

Thanks again for this additional information.
The flies were larger than 1 mm, but much smaller than 12 mm – perhaps 5 or 6 mm at most . . . that’s only an estimate, though, since I saw them mating, and they could have had their abdomens twisted, which made them look shorter.
Are these presumptions on genus the closest we’ll get to identifying them?  Is it difficult to determine species without having them in hand?

Perhaps a Dipterist may be able to do a conclusive species ID, but alas, we have not the necessary skills.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moths are these?
Location: East Coulee Alberta
May 27, 2016 8:26 pm
These two were spotted east of Drumheller Alberta. Im curious what they are called.
Signature: Curious Kim

Mating Modest Sphinxes

Mating Modest Sphinxes

Dear Curious Kim,
We turned to the Sphingidae of the Americas site to verify the identity of your mating Sphinx Moths, and we have determined that they are mating Modest Sphinxes,
Pachysphinx modesta, and we are amused at their seemingly immodest behavior.  The species is also called the Poplar Sphinx, and it resembles a closely related species, Pachysphinx occidentalis, which has been “delisted” on the species from Alberta page of Sphingidae of the Americas.  Interestingly the species page on Sphingidae of the Americas still states:  “Pachysphinx occidentalis occidentalis, the Big Poplar Sphinx (Wing span: 5 1/8 – 5 7/8 inches (13 – 15 cm)), flies in riparian areas and suburbs from Alberta and North Dakota west to eastern Washington; south to Texas, Arizona, southern California, and Baja California Norte.”  We will attempt to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide a conclusive identification and perhaps indicate why the second species was “delisted.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Love – American Carrion Beetle
Location: Southwest Indiana
May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Hello! I wanted to share some photos I took last summer of a pair of American Carrion Beetles with their mites. They were collected around some cat vomit…which might have had some mouse remains in it. (oh so pleasant!) Somehow the photo was forgotten until now – probably because I had embarrassment over taking bug love photos, ha ha!
Thank you for the awesome site. It’s my go-to place when I find a new bug, and I’ve never had to ask for identification – I always find what I’m looking for! We practice organic gardening on our little homestead, and I often find new creatures – so I visit your site often!
Thanks again!
Signature: Heather

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Mating Carrion Beetles and Phoretic Mites

Dear Heather,
We are so thrilled to find out that you find our site so helpful.  We are also thrilled to post your images of a pair of mating American Carrion Beetles and their Phoretic Mites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a type of fly?
Location: Lexington, MA
May 26, 2016 5:22 am
I live in Eastern Massachusetts and noticed these flying insects swarming all over our backyard. They don’t seem to bother humans but they really seem to like the grass seed on our overgrown grass. Can you please tell me what they are?
Signature: Gordon

March Flies

March Flies

Dear Gordon,
These are mating, sexually dimorphic March Flies in the family Bibionidae.  Males March Flies can be distinguished from females by their larger heads and bigger eyes.  We suspect because of your location they are most likely 
Bibio albipennis based on BugGuide information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination