Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
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Subject: insects near Superstition Mtn. Arizona
Location: Superstition Mountain, AZ
April 13, 2015 5:02 am
I came across these insects on a hiking trail near our house April 12, 2015 , at the base of Superstition Mtn., Arizona. Lots of people hiking were wondering what they were. Their heads and mandibles remind me of an ant and they have 3 pr. of legs. All the insects were feeding on the same flower heads, which had finished flowering and were about to produce seed. I assume they were getting a high energy feed this way.
Signature: sunburntcanuck

Iron Cross Blister Beetles Mating

Iron Cross Blister Beetles Mating

Dear sunburntcanuck,
It seems we get at least one submission each spring asking for an identification of Iron Cross Blister Beetles in the genus Tegrodera.  According to BugGuide:  “
Eriastrum [woollystar] is an important food source for all adults.”

Iron Cross Blister Beetles

Iron Cross Blister Beetles

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: water striders
Location: Riverbend Park, Fairfax, Virginia
April 3, 2015 7:09 am
I found these water striders in a quiet part of a small stream going into the Potomac River in Riverbend Park, Virginia. They are clasping each other, but isn’t it a bit early for mating? If you can identify the species that would be great, too. Thank you for your wonderful site.
Signature: Seth

Water Striders

Water Striders

Hi Seth,
Thanks for sending in your wonderful image of a Water Strider, an aquatic insect that is able to disperse its weight so that it can skate across the surface of the water without breaking the tension.

Hi Daniel –
It looks like somehow you only got one of the water strider images I sent; here is the photo that may have gotten lost, showing one strider clasping another:
Regards, Seth.

Mating Water Striders

Mating Water Striders

Hi again Seth,
Thanks so much for forwarding what appears to be a mating or courtship image of a pair of Water Striders.

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Subject: Pretty, but what is it?
Location: Baguio City, Philippines
March 7, 2015 9:01 pm
Hi, bugman! :) I took a photo of this little guy late February in Baguio City, Philippines. After a while, a smaller version of the bug decided to hang out on him (her?). A reverse search of google images yielded no results, and my curiosity is killing me. An ID would be much appreciated — then I would no longer have to caption the photographs as “funky bugs!” :)
Signature: Thanks, Isa

Weevils engaged in mating activity.

Weevils engaged in mating activity.

Hi Isa,
All we can provide at this time is that these are Weevils, beetles in the family Curculionidae, and that they appear to be engaging in mating activity, including competition to see who gets the fertile female.

Mating Competition among Weevils

Mating Competition among Weevils

Thanks for the quick reply, Daniel! Much a lot! :)

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Subject: Pumpkin Beetle
Location: Thailand, Chiang Mai
March 2, 2015 8:01 pm
Hello Daniel,
thank you and you are right after searching for the name.
Here is something that might interest you:
This is an “orchid lover” … a real pest at orchid nurseries here in Thailand.
People call it “Pumpkin beetle” (Aulacophora abdominalis) but it isn’t one. Look at black legs and antennae.
And it’s neither Stethopachys formosa or Lema pectoralis, but close to them.
The bug and its larvae love orchid flowers, especially these of the Aeridinae group (Vanda, Rhynchostylis, Seidenfadenia and all of their hybrids), Dendrobium and Spathoglottis.
Regards … Ricci

Mating Leaf Beetles

Mating Leaf Beetles

Hi Ricci,
In the future, please submit new requests by using our standard submission form.  We realize it is easier for you to just attach additional images to a previous response, but it makes our postings so much easier if we are able to use the format of our submission form.  Thanks so much for sending us images of two phases of this Leaf Beetle.  We haven’t the time to research its identity this morning, but we are posting the images and we will provide additional feedback at a later time.
  We hope the eggs are not exported with the orchids because the introduction of a major orchid pest can wreak havoc on orchid nurseries around the globe as orchids are such a popular gift item.

Leaf Beetle Larva

Leaf Beetle Larva

Update:  March 4, 2015
We did locate this similar search for an identification on the Dokmai Dogma Drama In The Orchid Nursery posting.

Hi Daniel,
the orchid nurseries that export their plants use so much poison (most of it is forbidden in Europe) … no egg or Beetle will survive this.
When I asked a friend who own a nursery about this beetle, she answered:
“For bug (Pumpkin beetle) use Dicrotophos and Sticking Agent spray 5 days per time. And larva use Abamectin and Sticking Agent.”
Abamectin and Dicrotophos are highly toxic and dangerous for the environment.
Btw.:
– In Australia the black and yellow Dendrobium beetle (Stethopachys formosa) is a pest in orchid nurseries.
– Lema pectoralis has been reported from orchid nurseries in Thailand.

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Subject: What is this?
Location: NC
November 30, 2014 6:36 pm
I took this photo a few years ago and came across it again today. I can’t figure out what these bugs are. Can you help?
Signature: Mike

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Hi Mike,
We love your image of mating Red Footed Cannibalflies.

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Subject: green catipillar
Location: southern arizona
November 9, 2014 7:41 pm
do you know what kind of catapillar this is. I have alot of orange butterflies around, but this one is different. It started making a coccoon right before my eyes. It’s in a weed I was pulling out of my yard. I have some great butterfly pics. I’ve included a few.
Signature: babbs greg

Mating Gulf Fritillaries

Mating Gulf Fritillaries

Dear Babbs,
There is not enough detail for us to identify your caterpillar, but as it is spinning a cocoon, we are speculating that it is a moth.  Your mating Gulf Fritillaries image is a nice addition to our site.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination