Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pleocoma shastensis Male
Location: Logging Road South of Deadhorse Summit 6 miles , Hwy 89 , Shasta County, California, USA
November 22, 2016 9:46 am
I headed up north to Dead Horse summit on Highway 89 in a radical wind and rain storm October 14th and 15th 2016 , Looking for Pleocoma shastensis Dyke 1933 . In the howling darkness south of Susanville on Highway 395 , 5 semi-tractor trailer rigs were blown over and the 5th one was right in front of me. The wind not only tipped the big rig over it lifted the Whole rig Over the highway fence and put it 40 feet from the road. Amazingly the driver was OK after crawling out and he had me call 911 for him. At times I would stop several times and wait for the gusts to pass , making the speed limit was not possible . I then continued way north past Susanville to 8 miles south of Dead horse summit and set out my home made black lite traps the next two nights and waited in the Pouring rain and howling winds. I was not disappointed ! The traps received a very nice series of males , every trap had 3 to 5 males in it. During the days I walked the Forrest service dirt roads in the immediate areas and located many more dead and dying , males from the flood conditions, as well as some still flying until Noon. It appears that the males will fly until out of energy once activated that DAY. They were not flying for several days at day break for 15 to 30 minutes at a time , as other Pleocoma do. This would explain why they have been Extremely hard to find ! Many males had been driven over by other trucks on the roads in the immediate area and I have a couple handfuls to glue and repair this winter.Male sizes were from 23 mm to 34 mm . 48 degrees to 65 during the day and Heavy rain with soaked Muddy Earth. Cheers ! Gene St. Denis Sierra Nevada Research
Signature: Gene St. Denis

Rain Beetle

Male Rain Beetle

Goodness Gene, what a harrowing experience you had.  Thanks for providing us with the images.

Rain Beetle

Male Rain Beetle

Rain Beetle

Male Rain Beetle

And , I Found a Prize !! A Gorgeous female Pleocoma shastensis was just emerged and had a dirt lid on her head like a trap door spider waiting in her hole ! Two males were on the ground headed her way . Many males had been driven over by other trucks on the roads in the immediate area and I have a couple handfuls to glue and repair this winter. Cheers ! Gene St. Denis Sierra Nevada Research

Mating Rain Beetles

Mating Rain Beetles

Hi again Gene,
Thanks again for providing so many excellent images of a rarely seen species, an even rarer sighting of a female Rain Beetle and the awesome image you have of the mating process.

Rarely seen female Rain Beetle

Rarely seen female Rain Beetle

Rarely seen female Rain Beetle

Rarely seen female Rain Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ocala bug
Location: Ocala Florida
November 20, 2016 6:57 pm
Never seen one anywhere but Ocala National Forest
Signature: Scotty Cooke

Mating Striped Walkingsticks

Mating Striped Walkingsticks

Dear Scotty,
Your image depicts a gorgeous pair of Southern Striped Walkingsticks,
Anisomorpha buprestoides, but their starkly contrasting black and white coloration is unusual and we did find a similarly colored pair on BugGuide.  According to the information page on BugGuide:  “Three color forms, two of them only found in limited areas:  White form, only found around Ocala National Forest;  Orange form, only found around Archbold Biological Station;  Brown form, widely distributed and commonly found throughout the entire range of the species.”  Walkingsticks in the genus Anisomorpha are frequently found mating and are sometimes called Muskmares, and they should be handled with extreme caution or even better not at all, because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this mournful sphinx? Two mating?
Location: Cape Coral Fl
November 11, 2016 8:09 pm
Hi- This was on the side of my house late afternoon near my garden, Cape Coral Florida 11/11/2016- thought it was a bat , but looks like two moths maybe mating?
Saw pic on your website- identified as Mournful Moth? Any ideas? thanks
Signature: R p

Mating Mournful Sphinxes

Mating Mournful Sphinxes

Dear R p,
You are correct that these are mating Mournful Sphinxes.

Thanks Daniel- Very Cool!!👍

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two insects
Location: Ravenel, SC
October 31, 2016 9:51 am
My husband found these guys in there work shop and was curious what they are.
Signature: Melissa

Two-Striped Walkingsticks Mating

Two-Striped Walkingsticks Mating

Dear Melissa,
These are mating Two-Striped Walkingsticks in the genus
Anisomorpha and they should be handled with caution because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”  Mating pairs are sometimes called Muskmares, though theoretically, only the female is a Muskmare.  You might enjoy this image of a herd of mating Muskmares from our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify this bug
Location: Michigan
October 17, 2016 7:50 pm
I found 2 pair of these bugs while checking my fence line. Michigan, October 16th.
Signature: Brenda Breijak

Pair of Oil Beetles

Pair of Oil Beetles

Dear Brenda,
These are Oil Beetles, Blister Beetles in the genus Meloe, and they are attempting to mate.  We have a very detailed posting on mating Oil Beetles here.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  October 13, 2016
We are also finding Painted Tiger Moths at our porch light in Mount Washington, Los Angeles, so it is fair to say they are currently flying in Southern California.

Subject: Strange creature
Location: Soquel Ca
October 11, 2016 7:07 pm
What the heck is it??? 2 heads!!!
Signature: Eve

Mating Painted Tiger Moths

Mating Painted Tiger Moths

Dear Eve,
The reason there are two heads is that one head belongs to the larger female on the right and the other to the male.  This is a mating pair of Painted Tiger Moths, a relatively common California species that is most common in winter months.

wow you are awesome to get back to me thank you! , I just figured it out!!!! how embarrassing!!!!!  as one has left and eggs are in the place, so funny I really thought it was a 2 headed thing  and not a couple!!!! jeez are they good for the garden?  Thanks again

The larva of the Painted Tiger Moth is a Woolly Bear that is a general feeder that is quite fond of weeds, so one could argue that though the adults do not eat and do not pollinate plants, the caterpillars can help keep back weeds.  The diet of the caterpillars is described on BugGuide as:  “Larvae are generalists of low herbacious plants.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination