Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this thing?
Location: Durham, North Carolina
September 16, 2014 7:09 pm
Dear Bugman,
I came out of the store this afternoon and noticed these 2 creatures perched on my car. At first they were lined up, but then one turned around so their tails were touching. I’ve never seen anything quite like them! They appear to be a cross between a bee and a dragonfly? I’m quite curious to find out!
Signature: Thank You, Sarah Miles

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Dear Sarah,
We are amused that you encountered a mating pair of Red Footed Cannibalflies, yet you composed your images to show only half of the pair.

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle on a bamboo plant
Location: Singapore
September 1, 2014 6:23 am
I’ve been visited by these beetles around August. Three years ago, I snapped a photo of them mating. Just the other day, I took a picture of one laying eggs.
Could you tell me more about them?
Signature: Lee Yew Moon

Mating Leaf Footed Bugs

Mating Leaf Footed Bugs

Dear Lee Yew Moon,
These are not beetles.  These look like Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae to us, but we cannot provide a species name for you.  We did find a very similar looking Leaf Footed Bug from Singapore on AllExperts.

Leaf Footed Bug laying Eggs

Leaf Footed Bug laying Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly Bug Love <3
Location: Clifton, Va
August 31, 2014 7:01 am
Found this amorous pair in Hemlock Park- Clifton, Va
Signature: Katie from Manassas

Mating Dragonflies

Mating Dragonflies

Hi Katie,
We believe your mating Dragonflies are Tiger Spiketails,
Cordulegaster erronea, based on this image from BugGuide and the distribution range.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Acrobatic slug coitus
Location: Tigard, OR
August 28, 2014 11:00 pm
A friend of mine sent these photos to me asking for my explanation of what the heck was going on here. Pasted below is my reply. Just thought you’d enjoy the pictures, post as you like, no credits necessary. I live in the Portland, OR metro area, and these pictures were taken 8/28/2014, in case you wanted to know.
“Yes indeed, this is slug sex. Perhaps the air was just right, or you happened to be playing some Rick James just a little too loud. It looks just barely post-coital, so perhaps this scene is more accurately referred to as “slug afterglow”. Either way, those white misshapen things are the slugs genitals. Slugs have both a penis and a vagina (lucky bastards), and it looks as if the one in the foreground is hastily retracting its junk. Perhaps in order to avoid the traditional slug version of pillow talk, which involves the chewing off and consuming of each others’ penises. They grow back, but still, kinda intimate for a one-night stand, don’t you think?”
Signature: Jason

Mating Slugs

Mating Slugs

Hi Jason,
We are always amazed at images of mating Slugs, and one 2006 posting of Mating Slugs resulted in quite a bit of controversy.

Thanks for that link, I really needed a good laugh. You folks are awesome, thanks for the great work!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: On my tickseed plants?
Location: North pittsburgh pa
August 20, 2014 1:42 pm
I just noticed these on my tickseeds today…august 20… I love in southwestern pa. Can you please identify ?
Signature: Mike

Goldenrod Soldier Beetles Mating

Goldenrod Soldier Beetles Mating

Hi Mike,
As the common name Goldenrod Soldier Beetle implies, this species feeds on the pollen of goldenrod and other fall blossoms that produce copious amounts of pollen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Minneapolis, MN
August 9, 2014 7:25 pm
This photograph was taken 7-15-14 in Minneapolis, MN. The beetles are on a raspberry plant in our garden. (We had the rainiest June on record & July was also very rainy.) Curious to know what these are.
Signature: Jodie Walters

Mating Candystriped Leafhoppers

Mating Candystriped Leafhoppers

Dear Jodie,
Though they are colorful and quite pretty, these Candystriped Leafhoppers,
Graphocephala coccinea, are not beneficial insects in the garden.  Like Aphids, they are fluid sucking Hemipterans that might spread viral infections from plant to plant.  According to BugGuide:  “Several species [of Leafhoppers] are serious crop pests; some transmit plant pathogens (viruses, mycoplasma-like organisms, etc.)”  We are not certain if the Candystriped Leafhopper is one of the virus spreading species.  Dave’s Garden discusses the negative and neutral comments regarding the Candystriped Leafhopper.  According to the Boston Harbor Islands All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory:  “It is thought that candy-striped leafhoppers may be one of several leafhopper species that transmit the bacteria which cause Pierce’s disease between plants as they are feeding. This disease can kill grape vines and other woody plants.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination