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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Katydid Question
Location: Tortola, British Virgin Islands
March 2, 2014 6:23 pm
Hey,
Just have a few bug questions. Wondering what these are, theres a katydid, a spider and a pile of these cool red beetles. Common name and genuis-species would be nice too if possible. Thanks!
Signature: Charlie

St. Andrew's Cotton Stainers

St. Andrew’s Cotton Stainers

Dear Charlie,
We were surprised that we received two identification requests from the British Virgin Islands on the same day, and we can’t help but to wonder if there was some local publicity that led you to our site.  For the purposes of organizing our archives, we like for each posting to contain a single species, or if there are multiple species, for them to be classified similarly.  For that reason we are only posting your “cool red beetles” which are actually St. Andrew’s Cotton Stainers,
Dysdercus andreae, a species of Red Bug in the family Pyrrhocoridae and classified as True Bugs and not Beetles.  There are several mating pairs evident in your photo.  See BugGuide for verification of our identification.  Please resend your other identification requests individually using our standard submission form by clicking the Ask What’s That Bug? link and please provide any important background information on the sightings.

St. Andrew's Cotton Stainers

St. Andrew’s Cotton Stainers

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Florida insect
Location: Orlando, FL
February 20, 2014 11:07 am
Hi, bugman. I’ve noticed these critters around my house in Orlando for a while now. I hate to kill anything unless I have to, so I left them alone. This morning, though, I noticed that there were dozens of them, and that they were hanging around the birdhouse the previous tenant had left (I’ve lived here about a year). The birdhouse is on a pole attached to the deck and is not in use right now, which I’m grateful for, since I have a cat. There’s an old nest in the birdhouse, and I think the bugs were living in it. I’m planning to take the birdhouse apart and remove the next soon, then put the birdhouse somewhere cats can’t get it. Anyway, there were so many bugs that I was horrified and sprayed them all with bug spray. I took this photo a week or so ago. Obviously, the bugs are mating. So what are they, and what do they do?
Signature: Karen in Orlando

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Dear Karen,
These mating Red-Shouldered Bugs are actually quite benign, however they may become a nuisance if they are plentiful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Madagascar weevils
Location: Madagascar
December 20, 2013 8:51 am
Hi Daniel.
I thought you might enjoy this selection of weevils from Madagascar.
Signature: David

Mating Weevils

Mating Weevils

Hi David,
Thanks for sending in this medley of Weevils from Madagascar, including a mating pair.  We are not going to attempt species identifications at this time.

Weevil

Weevil

Weevil

Weevil

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Black Beetle – South Africa
Location: 30k west of Bela-Bela, Limpopo, South Africa
December 17, 2013 4:32 am
I would be very grateful if you could identify these beetles. I have not found any other images online which look like this. All the images were taken in November 2013. The third image is the bush the beetles were on. There were about 8 of them and they appeared to be mating.
Signature: David Smith

Mating Scarabs

Mating Fruit Chafers

Dear David,
We tried several times to identify your mating Scarab Beetles in the family Scarabaeidae, but our attempts were not successful.  Based on the positioning of the legs during mating, which resembles the position of Japanese Beetles mating, we suspect they might be in the same subfamily, which is Rutelinae, the Shining Leaf Chafers.  Knowing the plant they were feeding upon might help.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with an identification.

Mating Scarabs

Mating Fruit Chafers

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for the quick reply.
I think you are correct in saying it is Rutelinae, the Shining Leaf Chafers. When I googled that I found these images from Brazil which is obviously the South American version.
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/17020905
All the best,
Dave

Karl provides an identification
Hi Daniel and David:
I believe these are Fruit Chafers (Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) in the genus Anisorrhina. I found two potential candidates, A. sternalis and A. algoensis, and I suspect there may be more. Regards. Karl

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crab Spider with Flesh Fly in Cyprus
Location: Nicosia (Lefkosia), Cyprus
December 6, 2013 2:49 pm
Seems the site submissions might have slowed down a bit so thought I would send you a two-part submission of the same beautiful yellow lady spider on different days back last February (though mistakingly the pictures are titled with 0212 it was 0213).
The first day she had captured what I believe is a flesh fly (which I know because of this site).
What I find amazing is she’s not holding on with her legs.
So, the question is, is there a name for this crab spider?
Part two coming in a moment.
Signature: Curious Girl

Crab Spider Eats Fly

Crab Spider Eats Fly

Subject: Crab Spider with Mate in Cyprus
Location: Nicosia (Lefkoşa), Cyprus
December 6, 2013 2:56 pm
Hi Again Daniel!
This is the second part showing the Beautiful Yellow Crab Spider on her flower in the first picture. But when I looked closely at her I realized she had additional legs encircling her. That’s when I realized she was being courted and I took a lot of pictures (so I have more if you want them). The little guy was all over her, as can be seen in the second picture.
Really amazing the size difference. On the flower next to her too was at least one other gentleman I guess hoping for a chance but not willing to get on the flower yet. I have some pics of him too.
Signature: Curious Girl

Crab Spiders Mating

Crab Spiders Mating

Dear Curious Girl,
Thanks for waiting until our number of submissions declined.  North American winter is our slowest time of the year for identification requests, but that is also the time the Australian, South African and other southern hemisphere submissions peak, but there are not nearly as many as we get during the summer.  Most of our northern hemisphere submissions at this time are for carpet beetles and other household intruders.  Your photos are awesome.  We cannot confirm that the prey is a Flesh Fly, and though your photos say it all, we would love to be able to provide you with a species name for this lovely Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae.  The knobs on the abdomen are quite distinctive, and if this species is like others in the family, color is not an accurate identifying feature as many Crab Spiders are colored so they blend in with their surroundings, which your photos graphically illustrate.  We found a similar looking individual posted to PBase and again her on PBase, but alas, there is no species ID.  There is another unidentified image on TrekNature.  We wonder if this might be the Goldenrod Crab Spider ,
Misumena vatia, which according to Animal Diversity Web, is found in Europe as well as North America.

Crab Spiders Mating

Crab Spiders Mating

Correction Update:  December 8, 2013 7:44 am
I saw the pictures of the yellow Thomisidae spider of which you say it might be Misumena vatia. Of course I am no specialist at all, only generally interested in insects and spiders, but I have seen several Misumena vatia females here in Europe (Germany and other countries) and not one had these two tubercles (if this is the right word). I understand that such tubercles occur in genus Thomisus, and I found a picture of a spider that is similar to those posted by “Curious Girl”, identified as T. onustus:
http://www.treknature.com/gallery/photo155051.htm
Kind regards, Erwin
Signature: Erwin Beyer

Thanks so much for the correction Erwin.  It is greatly appreciated.  Nick’s Spiders of Britain and Europe has some wonderful photos showing various color variations on Thomisus onustus, including a yellow form, and they all have the bumps on the abdomen.  Encyclopedia of Life also pictures a yellow individual that closely resembles the spider photographed by Curious Girl.

Curious Girl Writes Back
Ah well, you snooze you lose :~)
I was going to reply to tell you that I had found the spider name. Of course I needed to be reminded, or prompted by you but, I’ve found if I look up insects of Greece that many of those found on Cyprus will be revealed as they share a similar zoology (?). So, I had found Thomisus onustus as the genus name but the common English name is Heather Spider. Not all that different from Goldenrod.
Ironically, just before I left on my big travel adventure I randomly found a Goldenrod Crab Spider in my bed. An odd place for her I thought. I had seen pictures of them and found them fascinating so hoped to find one someday but really was not expecting one where I found her. That one was white with the pretty pink bands.
Seems the Heather Spider can be yellow (as we see) white, pink, and even partly green.
I wonder though if you noticed that not only does she happened to have what appears to be pollen on her pedipalps but also that her silk seems very yellow as well. She’s also missing a front leg on her right side.
Seems the little ones will eat pollen and nectar if they can’t capture prey. Might help them with their color change miracles.
Good job to Erwin on identifying the spider, and maybe he can find an identification for the wasps from Germany I sent in last year. :~)
Oh, and thank you for the compliments on my pics. When I get the others ready I’ll send a few more to you (if you’d like).

Oh, and the Encyclopedia of Life link has the common Portuguese name for the spider which is “Aranha-florícola-de-tubérculos” which makes me happy because Portugal is my favorite place in the world. This leads to a great picture of a spider guarding her egg-sac.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/luisgaifem/5989104744/

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Nuptial Flight of Termites
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
November 30, 2013 1:25 pm
Few insects justify the term fluttering when it comes to flight styles, but Western Subterranean Termite Alates do the adjective justice.  More to come. …

Termite Alate

Western Subterranean Termite Alate

Julian Donahue Confirms
With a black head, rather the reddish head on winged forms of the Western Drywood Termite, I agree with your identification. The first fall rains always bring them out, and they came out of the ground in our yard this year right on schedule.
Happy holidays,
Julian

Termite Alates in a Spider Web

Termite Alates in a Spider Web

We know the insectivores had a field day today with all the swarming Termite Alates today.  Several Termites fell victim to the spider that built a web stretched between the rose cane horns of our scarecrow.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination