Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify Grasshoppers
Location: Costa Rica cloud forest
February 2, 2016 9:32 am
Can you identify the mating grasshoppers please? I have asked several ‘experts’ in Costa Rica where I took the photo without success.
Taken at 4500 feet in cloud forest at the Bosque de Paz private reserve, 1 1/2 hours drive from San Jose. It lies between the National Parks of Juan Castro Blanco and Volcan Poas.
Thanks
Signature: Moira

Mating Grasshoppers

Mating Grasshoppers

Dear Moira,
We have not had any luck identifying what species you have documented.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Damselfly
Location: Mexico
January 11, 2016 3:08 pm
Damselflies mating on a man-made pond at the Botanical Gardens in Puerto Valalrta, Mexico. Blue in colour…so I’m guessing a Enallagma sp??
Signature: Graeme Davis

Mating Damselflies

Mating Damselflies

Hi Graeme,
We agree that these are most likely Bluets in the genus
Enallagma, a genus well documented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wingless moth..?
Location: Massachusetts
November 27, 2015 7:13 am
I found these 2 moths seemingly mating on top of my shoe last night !! I always call these “winter moths” since they come out in December but I would like more information on maybe why this ones wings are gone? Is one sex flightless? Or did something happen to it? – sorry about the photo quality, my camera would not focus on them.
Signature: Ali

Mating Fall Cankerworm Moths

Mating Fall Cankerworm Moths

Dear Ali,
It is unfortunate that the point of focus is your shoelace, and not the moths, but we believe these are mating Winter Moths,
Operophtera brumata, an introduced species with wingless females and winged males, and the males resemble the individual in your image based on this BugGuide image.  The general appearance of the moths, the time of the sighting and your location are all consistent with what we know about Winter Moths.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to Europe, introduced to Northeast and Pacific Northwest, pest species in areas such as Boston. Established in the NW since the 1970s” and “adult males seen October to February and often attracted to lights”  We should point out that other species in the family Geometridae also have flightless female moths, including the Fall Cankerworm Moth, Alsophila pometaria.  According to BugGuide:  “The females are wingless and stout-bodied, with the body banded dark and pale gray.”  We are amused that your name for these moths is the approved common name. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this bug a “kissing bug”
Location: Albuquerque, NM
November 26, 2015 10:24 am
My daughter was playing with this bug, and I think may have a bite from it. I saw there is a CDC warning about kissing bugs, and wasnt sure if this was a kissing bug or not?
Signature: Lynn Foreman

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Dear Lynn,
Though your image pictures them in an amorous position, these are mating Small Milkweed Bugs, not Kissing Bugs.  The images of the dead insect are also of a Small Milkweed Bug.

Thank you so much, that’s a big relief to me! Thank you for what you do!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery moths?
Location: Bathurst, NSW
November 21, 2015 9:45 pm
Hi there,
Any help identifying these? Found today in Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia .
Many thanks
Signature: Mark

Mating Wood Moths

Mating Wood Moths

Dear Mark,
We believe these are mating Wood Moths in the family Cossidae, which are pictured on Butterfly House, and we also believe that they might be
Endoxyla mackeri, which is also pictured on Butterfly House and is listed as occurring in New South Wales.  According to the Australian Museum site:  “The larvae of some species of wood moths are better known as witchetty grubs and bore into smooth-barked eucalypt trees. As they grow, the tunnels left behind in the bark increase in width. They may spend up to one year within the tree before emerging as moths. The newly emerged, small caterpillars lower themselves to the ground on silky threads where they are thought to feed on plant roots. As adults they are unable to feed and only live for a few days. The heavy females lay about 20,000 tiny eggs before dying.”  We sometimes have trouble distinguishing Wood Moths from Ghost Moths in the family Hepialidae, and we would not rule out that possibility, and that family is also represented on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Halloween Oil Beetle Orgy
Location: New Haven, CT
November 17, 2015 7:54 pm
This group of oil beetles was having a party in one corner of a lawn in a residential New Haven, Connecticut neighborhood on the morning of October 31. They were all within a one-foot square and there were none anywhere else around.
Thanks to all the hours I’ve spent on your site, I knew exactly what they were! I had never seen any in person before.
The cell phone photos came out pretty well so I thought I’d contribute them for your archives.
Signature: Tom

Mating Oil Beetles

Mating Oil Beetles

Dear Tom,
You images of mating Oil Beetles from the genus
Meloe are a wonderful addition to our archives. It would be curious to know what about the small area where you found them caused the Oil Beetles to congregate so amorously.  According to BugGuide:  “In males of some species mid-antennal segments are modified, and the c-shaped ‘kinks’ involving antennomeres V–VII are used to grasp female antennae during pre-mating displays.”  The individual featured alone in your one image has these modified antennae, hence is a male.

Male Oil Beetle

Male Oil Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination