Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird flying insect in southern Maryland
Location: Waldorf, MD
July 22, 2016 10:35 am
I’ve never seen this insect/bug before, just curious as to what it is.
Signature: Matt

Mating Imperial Moths

Mating Imperial Moths

Dear Matt,
These are mating Imperial Moths, and the darker member of the pair, the male, is on the bottom.  We have numerous images in our archives of mating Imperial Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this creature?
Location: Huntsville Alabama, outskirts of city
July 24, 2016 5:46 pm
Hi
I live in Huntsville Alabama and saw these insects on the railing of my deck. Never seen this creature before. Any id assistance would be appreciated! It’s been close to 100 degrees here, has now cooled off for the evening to about 80-85.
Signature: Carolyn Sanders

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Dear Carolyn,
We have a few images in our archive of mating Red Footed Cannibalflies,
Promachus rufipes, a large impressive species of predatory Robber Flies, but nothing comes close to your amazing images.  It looks like you were several inches away.  Though they are not aggressive toward humans, Red Footed Cannibalflies look quite frightening, so we applaud your courage in securing these awesome images.  We are also quite impressed the amorous pair did not fly away when you got close.  Though not aggressive toward humans, Red Footed Cannibalflies are able to take down very large prey, including stinging wasps and bees, on the wing, and we have read on Hilton Pond Center that a large Robber Fly can even prey upon a hummingbird.  We would also caution against trying to handle a living Red Footed Cannibalfly with bare hands as that would most likely result in a painful bite.

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Busy milkweeds
Location: Columbus, Ohio
July 12, 2016 1:04 pm
So the milkweeds seem to be the water cooler of the insect world. We have monarchs, Japanese beetles, tons of bees (honey and bumbles), and these red mating things! Their flowers are a pretty color and they really have a pleasant and strong scent. I’m rather surprised that these weren’t grown on purpose before the whole monarch decline. Any way, were enjoying the show and hope to get a caterpillar or two.
Signature: Amber

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear Amber,
There is indeed quite a robust ecosystem surrounding milkweed, which is one of the reasons we created a Milkweed Meadow tag on our site recently.  Monarch Butterflies need milkweed as it is the only food consumed by the Monarch Caterpillars.  Milkweed Borers and Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars are other visitors you might expect in the future.  Your mating Large Milkweed Bugs are another species that depends upon milkweed.  Many pollinators like your Bumble Bees, numerous species of butterflies and many wasps including Tarantula Hawks (mostly in western states), while not dependent upon milkweed as a sole food, are attracted to the fragrant blooms that are laden with nectar.  We will attempt to identify your Bumble Bee species.  

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of beetle is this?
Location: Vancouver wa
July 11, 2016 7:42 am
Hello, I was wondering if you could help me with the identification of this beetle….. my wife, son and I where in a walk the other day in a field at the Vancouver wa. Wild life refuge. I was looking at a cluster of flowers (image 1) when I seen a couple of little black bugs crawling threw it. I flipped it over and found two little orangish beetles that where mating (image 2-3) I’ve never seen these little guys before and can not seem to find them on Google or any of the other sites I use for identification.
Signature: Thank you for your time, James Roberson

Mating Hogweed Bonking Beetles

Mating Hogweed Bonking Beetles

Dear James,
These mating Soldier Beetles are living up to their name Hogweed Bonking Beetles.  They are an introduced species from Eurasia and they are predators.  The dark tips of the wings are an identifying feature.

Lol, yeah I’d defiantly say that they are… Thank you for your help and quick response. I have found your site very useful many times and this is another good example.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Male and Female Fish Fly?
Location: Troy, VA
June 30, 2016 2:25 pm
I believe these are male and female fish flies. The female was very active while the male just sat there. I don’t think she ever closed her wings. I will draw no conclusions from this.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Male Fishfly (Pectinate Antennae)

Male Fishfly (Pectinate Antennae)

Dear Grace,
We really love your newest images.  Perhaps you captured these Fishflies post-coital and he has completed his mission and now can contribute to the food chain, while she must have the energy to lay eggs in a nearby aquatic environment.  It is late in the season for Spring Fishflies, according to BugGuide, but your female appears to have serrate or saw-like antennae, a characteristic of the female Spring Fishfly as opposed to the female Summer Fishfly, though this is the season for the Summer Fishfly according to BugGuide, as both female and male Summer Fishflies have pectinate or comb-like antennae, along with only the male Spring Fishfly.  Read more about the Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, on BugGuide and also read more about the Summer Fishfly, Chauliodes pectinicornis, on BugGuide.  It took us years finally to get images of mating, related Dobsonflies. We prefer your image of the male Fishfly on the white background as it better sets off his antennae.

Female Fishfly (Filiform Antennae)

Female Fishfly (Serrate Antennae)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Orange bugs that seem to attach together at back end
Location: Henderson, NV
June 15, 2016 8:53 am
Hi! I’m a new homeowner and found these bugs recently. They are normally single, but they will occasionally come together at their backside and even move in unison when I approach them. Do you know what I’m dealing with here? Thanks!
Signature: New Homeowner

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Dear New Homeowner,
These are mating Small Milkweed Bugs, and they pose no threat to your new home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination