Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pelidnota punctata mating
Location: Minneapolis Minnesota
July 25, 2015 7:12 pm
I saw these grapevine beetles mating in Minneapolis Minnesota on July 19 2015. They were beside an urban sidewalk in a residential area not far from a lake. The pictures turned out nicely, so I thought you might like to have them.
Signature: Mary

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Hi Mary,
Technically, your images are documenting the courtship of Grapevine Beetles rather than the actual act of mating, but that is really splitting hairs with us.  It is also awesome that this courtship is taking place on a grapevine.  Your images are an excellent addition to our archives.

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge crazy fly
Location: McKinney, Texas
July 23, 2015 7:50 am
I went outside and heard an amazing ruckus in the bushes and found two of these very large, hairy, long, and huge-eyed flying buggers mating with each other. They look rather fierce and I’m not sure if they are a type of dragonfly? The picture shows the front of one of them, still attached to the other. Since they are obviously busy, I didn’t want to get too close or to be too intrusive!
Signature: Lover of bugs, Michelle

Mating Robber Flies

Mating Robber Flies

Dear Michelle,
There is not enough detail in your image to be certain, but we believe your mating Robber Flies may be Red Footed Cannibalflies.

Thank you so much!  I clicked the link to your site and that is exactly what it is.
And thank you for all you do.  I just love your site!

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A Strange Sighting
Location: Philadelphia, PA U.S.A.
July 17, 2015 9:02 am
I went out to my front yard looking at my impatiens plants. On one petal, there appeared this strange insect. It definitely was suckling on the flower . It looks like it’s conjoined and has two heads connected in the middle. Here’s some pictures that I took. Are these conjoined butterflies?
Signature: Barb Ward

Mating Bee Flies

Mating Tiger Bee Flies

Dear Barb,
These are mating Tiger Bee Flies,
Xenox tigrinus, and according to BugGuide:  “Larva is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees, Xylocopa.
Adult food unknown. An adult has been observed on damp mud, lapping up fluids (pers. observation, P. Coin).  Life Cycle Female lays eggs at entrance of carpenter bee nests. Larvae waits until carpenter bee’s larvae reach the pupal stage to parasitize it.”  Other Bee Flies in the family Bombyliidae are pollinating insects, and we find it unusual that BugGuide states the “adult food unknown” but your observation indicates that these individuals might have been feeding from the flowers while procreating.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty, Lori Ledeboer, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Jessica M. Schemm liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: is tHis a moth
Location: lafayette, colorado
July 2, 2015 1:00 pm
Is this a moth? Is it native to Colorado?
Signature: cathy

Mating Western Poplar Sphinxes

Mating Western Poplar Sphinxes

Dear Cathy,
These look like mating Western Poplar Sphinxes,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, to us, and according to BugGuide, they are found in Colorado.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Riparian areas, open parklands, suburbs at low elevations; adults are nocturnal and attracted to light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found in Indiana backyard
Location: Indianapolis indiana
June 20, 2015 4:58 pm
Hi, I found this pair in my backyard today after two days of rain. I love in indianapolis Indiana and it’s around 80 degrees in summer.
Signature: Lacey

Mating Cecropia Moths

Mating Cecropia Moths

Dear Lacey,
Your image of mating Cecropia Moths is really beautiful.  The male on the left has more feathery antennae to help him find a mate, and a slimmer body because the female is filled with eggs.

That’s fantastic! Thank you. Feel free to use the picture however you like. It was a beautiful sight.

Tip Crawford, Kingson Mendoza Maqui, Linda Kirk, Moira LeBlanc, Mike Coughlin, Leslie Gist, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Amy Gosch, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Robber Fly?
Location: Watsonville, CA
June 11, 2015 2:33 am
Hey Bugman!
I have been finding large numbers of this mysterious (but beautiful) fly in my front yard… I’ve done a lot of internet research and cannot for the life of me figure it out… Is it a Robber Fly??? I have found them all of my Armenian Basket Flower and Artichoke… Please help! I need to know if it’s a pest or not.
Thanks,
Signature: Matt

Mating Artichoke Flies

Mating Artichoke Flies

Dear Matt,
These are most certainly not Robber Flies.  This is an introduced Artichoke Fly,
Terellia fuscicornis, a species of Fruit Fly.  Your images of a single individual are both females, as evidenced by the long ovipositor, and the image with the three flies include two males that are attempting to mate.  Interestingly, bugGuide only has images of female Artichoke Flies, and they do not provide a common name.  There are many nice images on the Natural History of Orange County site.  As an introduced species, they may pose a threat to cultivated artichokes, but we have also found information that they use Milk Thistle, an introduced pest weed in California, as a host so the jury is still out if they are an agricultural pest or a biological control agent.

Artichoke Fly

Female Artichoke Fly

Female Artichoke Fly

Female Artichoke Fly

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination