Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug id
Location: Northern Maine
July 27, 2014 9:27 pm
Saw these getting busy on my boat trailer tire as I attempted to put air in it.
Signature: Nathan

Mating Pale Green Weevils

Mating Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils

Dear Nathan,
We believe these are mating Green Immigrant Leaf Weevils,
Polydrusus sericeus, and according to BugGuide: “introduced from Europe, where it is widespread” and it feeds on “primarily Yellow Birch (Betula alleghaniensis).”  Since you image is not in critical focus, they might also be Pale Green Weevils, Polydrusus impressifrons, and they are also an invasive, introduced species.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe, adventive in NA (introduced ca. 1913)” though this date discrepancy information is also provided:  “earliest record in our area: NY 1906.”  Finally, BugGuide offers this comparison information with the Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil:  “P. impressifrons is similarly colored but has less conspicuous black lines in elytra, relatively small eyes positioned laterally and parallel to midline, least interocular distance 1.5 to 2 times width of eye, and elytral margins slightly sinuate and widest near apex (compare images of both species).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oil Beetles?
Location: Colorado Springs Colorado
July 25, 2014 5:52 pm
Saw these guys while walking the dog today. This was in Colorado Springs, a place I have lived for 25+ years and never seen one of these let alone two “connected” Would love a positive ID.
Signature: Howard

Mating Oil Beetles

Mating Oil Beetles

Dear Howard,
You are correct that these are mating Oil Beetles, Blister Beetles in the genus
Meloe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mating Swallowtails
Location: New Cambria, Missouri
July 25, 2014 3:45 am
I took this photo yesterday of these two different (species?) of Swallowtails mating. Is this common? Can it result in viable offspring or a hybrid butterfly?
P.S. LOVE this website. It has been very informative.
Signature: Denise

Mating Tiger Swallowtails

Mating Tiger Swallowtails

Dear Denise,
The Tiger Swallowtails in your image are actually the same species.  The dark individual in the image is the female.  Though most female Tiger Swallowtails are yellow with black stripes, a small percentage of female Tiger Swallowtails are known as dark morphs, and even though the bold tiger striping is not evident, close inspection reveals a black on black striping pattern.  There are also examples of transitional coloration that fall between the light and dark morphs, and even more unusual are hermaphroditic gyandromorphs that contain traits of both sexes and which sometimes exhibit a combination of light male attributes and dark female attributes.  One final note, even without considering black morphs, Tiger Swallowtails are a sexually dimorphic species.  Female Tiger Swallowtails have blue dusting on the hindwings while male Tiger Swallowtails lack the blue coloration.  We are highlighting your posting on our scrolling feature bar. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Vine munching beetle
Location: Southern Ontario, GTA
July 4, 2014 7:59 am
The vines that cover my back yard have been starting to die, I thought it was the neighbours until I went out side today.
I found over eight pairs of beetles mating and eating the vines in the same area.
It seems that while the female eats the leaf under neither the male gets on top to mait.
It has been only a few days and the beetles have decimated the one vine although this is the first time they have been visible.
The hard shell is a redish brown while the sides have slight stripping.
Thank you for the consideration
Signature: Backyard Beetle Babe

Japanese Beetles mating and eating

Japanese Beetles mating and eating

Hi Backyard Beetle Babe,
The invasive, exotic Japanese Beetles in your image are doing what they are best known for doing:  eating and mating.  Japanese Beetles have been in North America for nearly 100 years, and they are known to feed on hundreds of different cultivated and ornamental plants, hence they are well known to and loathed by most gardeners in the eastern part of North America.

Thank you so much for identifying my bug!!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ichneumon Wasp?
Location: West Milford, New Jersey
July 3, 2014 6:48 am
I have looked at lots of pictures, but I cant ID this insect. I have seen them in my garden a few times, I feel like it may be a Ichneumon Wasp, but I have been unable to match anything with the dark band/stripe down the middle of the thorax.
Signature: Geoffrey Syme

Mating Robber Flies

Mating Robber Flies

Hi Geoffrey,
These are mating Robber Flies in the family Asilidae.  We will attempt to identify the species.  Based on images posted to BugGuide, this appears to be
Asilus sericeus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly mating with dead fly?
Location: Northeast Florida
June 29, 2014 3:56 pm
I saw this fly (or these flies) today in northeast FL. I thought at first that it was a pair of mating flies and took a few photos. However, it appears that this is a live fly that had been mating with a fly that died, and it was now dragging the dead fly along with it as it walked and flew around. I’ve never seen anything like this before.
Signature: Karen in FL

Flesh Fly matings ends with death of the male!!!

Flesh Fly with dead mate

Dear Karen,
We are positively stunned by your images, which appear to have captured the mating of Flesh Flies in the family Sarcophagidae that ended with the death of one of the partners, from unknown causes.  We can assure you that Flesh Flies do not practice necrophilia, and that for some reason, the individual succumbed while in flagrante delicto, and for yet more unexplained reasons, the sexual bond was not broken after the death.  The red-tipped abdomen is a rather distinctive feature, and upon searching though images on BugGuide, we found at least three genera that have this characteristic:  
SarcophagaOxysarcodexia and Arachnidomyia.  Though they are not necrophiliacs, BugGuide does indicate that:  “Larvae: many species are necrophagous, but some feed in mammalian tissues or parasitize other arthropods (bees, cicadas, termites, grasshoppers/locusts, millipedes), earthworms, or snails(3). Adults feed on various sugar-containing materials such as nectar, sap, fruit juices and honeydew.”  Thanks for providing a very intriguing posting for our site.  Typical Flesh Fly mating should look like this.

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Hi Daniel,
I was pretty stunned too when I realized what was going on with that fly! I assumed both flies had been alive when mating began, but I couldn’t imagine what might have killed one partner while leaving the other looking perfectly fine and healthy, except for dragging the dead partner around everywhere it went.
Karen in FL

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination