Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Three Lined Hover fly
Location: Karori, Wellington, NZ
August 16, 2016 8:35 pm
Just photographed this fly inside my house, and looked up on the internet to find what it was. Will go and liberate it now that I know it is a “good” insect. Thought that you might like to see the photos.
Signature: Heuchan Hobbs

Threelined Hover Fly

Threelined Hover Fly

Dear Heuchan,
Thank you ever so much for sending your excellent images of a Threelined Hover Fly,
Helophilus seelandicus, to our site, especially since you did not require an identification.  We have but a single image of a Threelined Hover Fly in our archives, and it is a ventral view, which is not ideal for identification purposes.  Your dorsal views are marvelous.  According to Landcare Research:  “Attracts attention because of its noisy flight  Important pollinator of flowers  Larvae are rat tailed maggots which live in liquid containing rotting plants or animals.”  According to iNaturalist, it “is a native hoverfly of New Zealand. The name corresponds to the three black lines behind the insect’s head.”  We are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award since you captured and released.

Threelined Hover Fly

Threelined Hover Fly

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for your reply to my email re the Threelined Hover Fly.
I give you permission to use my photos, if you wish in your “What’s that bug” archives.
I have also included two extra images taken after I liberated the fly onto some retaining wall timber. I don’t know how long the fly stayed there, it was gone about 30 minutes after liberation. Didn’t stay “on watch”, was getting cold, late afternoon time.
Thanks again for your informative email,
Regards,
Heuchan

Three-LIned Hoverfly

Three-LIned Hoverfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: One very strange bug….
Location: North of Seattle, Wa
July 30, 2016 4:10 pm
My cat was staring at this bug that got inside and first I thought it was a wasp so I picked it up and tossed it in the toilet and it started skeeting around
on the water so I took the below photos. I have no Idea what it is. Can you help?
I picked it up and put it outside
Can you help???
Signature: Don Everest

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Dear Don,
This Black and Yellow Mud Dauber,
Sceliphron caementarium, actually is a wasp, and we are curious how you “picked it up and put it outside.”  The Black and Yellow Mud Dauber is a solitary wasp, and it is not an aggressive species, however, females are able to sting.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults nectar at flowers; mud nests are built in all kinds of sheltered locations, incl. man-made structures, rock ledges, etc. Adults collect mud for nests at puddle/pool edges” and “nests are provisioned with spiders; adults common at flowers(3), especially parsnip and water parsnip, and visit hummingbird feeders.”  Because you took pity on this Black and Yellow Mud Dauber, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Fernbridge/ Loleta CA
July 12, 2016 9:41 am
I was a t a gas station and it was windy and when I got out of the car a moth was on the ground on its back. It was pretty and as I was going to pick it up, I put my finger down and it grabbed my finger. I put it on a wall but its little wing was out of wack and it couldn’t fly.
I brought it home and took pictures then put it out side in a plant pot to live.
I looked it up but couldn’t find one like it.
Signature: Darlene

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Dear Darlene,
This is a Sphinx Moth in the genus
Smerinthus and based on the Sphingidae of California, there are three species in the genus, but Smerinthus saliceti is limited to extreme Southern California.  The Sphingidae of California also states:  “Moths previously listed as S. cerisyi, west of the Continental Divide, are more likely S. ophthalmica” which implies that your species is Smerinthus ophthalmica.  Sadly, your lovely moth has no common name.  According to Sphingidae of America:  “S. ophthalmica flies across southern British Columbia and southern Alberta into southwestern Saskatchewan. In the United States it can be found in Washington, Oregon and northern and central California eastward into Idaho, western Montana, western Wyoming and northern Nevada and northern Utah.”  Unfortunately, this moth will not be able to fly in its current condition, and its dislocated wing needs to be adjusted so the underwing is oriented correctly.  We are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award because of the care you gave this injured moth.

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Thank you so much for letting me know about my moth. Unfortunately it has passed away but is still in beautiful condition. I wasn’t able to fix it’s wing until after it had died.
It is sad that it couldn’t continue on.
Thanks again for being out there to identify bugs.
Darlene

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Metallic Green Bee or Sweat Bee
Location: Toronto Canada
June 16, 2016 9:39 am
I have had a nest in my garden for about 6 years (it is a no dig zone). Thought I would share a photo with you. Great site! Have an awesome summer.
Signature: Scott Morrow

Metallic Green Sweat Bee and Nest

Metallic Green Sweat Bee and Nest

Dear Scott,
We love your image of a Metallic Sweat Bee hovering near her nest so much we are going to feature it this month.  According to BugGuide, Sweat Bees in the family Halictidae are:  “typically ground-nesters, with nests formed in clay soil, sandy banks of streams, etc. Most species are polylectic (collecting pollen from a variety of unrelated plants).”  We also want to commend you on your “no dig zone” which will protect the young that are developing in the nest.  We wish more of our readers were as sensitive to the environment as you are.

Wow…i am honoured!!
There is a ‘but’ though…I have been seeing small red and black bees landing on the nest site. To the best of my research they may be trying to attack the nest of the green bees (cleptoparasites I think they were called). I don’t like to alter how real life happens but I love my green bees…any suggestions?
Scott

Hi Scott
We are sorry to hear about your disappointment.  We are hoping you are able to provide an image of the “mall red and black bees.”  They sound like they might be members of the genus
Sphecodes, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Cleptoparasites, usually of other Halictinae.”

My apologies if it came across as being disappointed. I am very happy in fact.
I will try to get a picture but they are quite small and fast to fly away.
Thanks again.
Scott

Hi Scott,
Sometimes electronic communication leads to misunderstandings.  We interpreted your love for your green bees to mean you were disappointed that they were being Cleptoparasitized by the black and red relatives.  On a positive note, we doubt that all of the Green Sweat Bee young will be lost.  We eagerly await a potential image of the Cleptoparasite.

Update:  June 24, 2016
Hi Daniel
This is the best I managed to get. The Green Bee guard is blurred but can be seen in the centre of the photo.
Even though I love my Green Bees I will not harm or harass the red ones as this is what nature does.
Be well and have a great buggy summer.
Scott

Cleptoparasite Bee

Cleptoparasitic Cuckoo Bee

Hi Scott,
Thanks so much for the update.  We are confident that the red bee is a Sweat Bee in the genus
Sphecodes which is well represented on BugGuide, though we would not entirely rule out that it might be a Cuckoo Bee, Holcopasites calliopsidis, based on the images posted to Beautiful North American Bees.  That would take far more skill than our editorial staff possesses, though according to BugGuide it is a diminutive “5-6 mm”.  We will contact Eric Eaton to get his opinion.  While we feel for your affection for the Metallic Green Sweat Bees, we do not believe the presence of the red cleptoparasitic  Bees will decimate the population of the green bees.  Nature has a way of balancing out populations, and when food is plentiful, populations flourish.  Your “no dig zone” is diversifying in its inhabitants.  To add further information on cleptoparasitism, we turn to BugGuide where it defines:  “cleptoparasite (also kleptoparasite) noun – an organism that lives off of another by stealing its food, rather than feeding on it directly. (In some cases this may result in the death of a host, for example, if the larvae of the host are thereby denied food.”

Correction Courtesy of Eric Eaton
Daniel:
The cleptoparasite is a Nomada sp. cuckoo bee.  The host bee is Agapostemon virescens, by the way.  Never seen a turret on their nest entrance that was so tall!  Nomada is a genus in the family Apidae (formerly Anthophoridae).
Eric

Ed. Note:  When we first responded to the Cleptoparasite response, we suspected we might be dealing with a Cuckoo Bee and we prepared a response with BugGuide quotes including “Wasp-like, often red or red and black and often with yellow integumental markings” and “cleptoparasites of various bees, primarily Andrena but also Agapostemon and Eucera (Synhalonia) (these are usually larger than the Andrena cleptoparasites). (J.S. Ascher, 23.iv.2008)  males mimic the specific odors of the host females and patrol the host nest site.”  We were going to console Scott with the information that his Green Sweat Bees were most likely being scoped out by male Cuckoo Bees who had not net mated with a female, the real cleptoparasite.  Next time we will trust our first impression.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Insect
Location: Birmingham Alabama
June 7, 2016 4:35 pm
Found on a bed in Birmingham Alabama . Presuming it entered through an open window and was comfortable enough to stay.
I carefully got it to crawl into a paper towel and carried it outdoors.
Signature: David Gentry

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear David,
We love that you consider this male Dobsonfly to be beautiful.  Male Dobsonflies are harmless.  We are tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award for the kindness you showed in relocating it outdoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big spider!
Location: Southeastern Virginia
June 1, 2016 6:25 pm
Found this creature in my kitchen in southeastern Virginia in May 2016. I captured him in a cup and set him free outside, away from the house. It is quite large, What type of spider is this?
Signature: Beaker

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Beaker,
This is a harmless Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and they are sometimes called Dock Spiders.  We are guessing you have a body of water near your home.  Because of your kindness, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination