Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Wasp
Location: Central Arizona
November 14, 2015 3:38 pm
Funny story. Fount this guy in the pool, dead. Scooped him out and spread him out to dry after showing the kids. While laying him out I couldn’t get his legs right, to spread, so I kept at it until he came back to life.
Signature: Brian

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

Dear Brian,
What a wonderful Bug Humanitarian story.  This is a Tarantula Hawk, a group of Spider Wasps that prey upon Tarantulas.  Most North American species of Tarantula Hawks have reddish-orange wings.  We are pretty certain your individual is Pepsis mexicana based on images posted to BugGuide.

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large green caterpillar
Location: Mexico City, Mexico
October 20, 2015 10:18 pm
Hello. For about a week I was keeping track of the ravenous diet of a relatively large caterpillar on one of the neighborhood’s trees. Over a month ago it cocooned (Sept 10) and I was keeping track of that too when I saw someone trimming the tree. Luckily the cacoon seemed undamaged, but it is now in my home and I’d like a ballpark figure of what it could be, or more specifically, how long it will remain in the cacoon (seems from the type of cacoon it will become some kind of moth). Any information will be greatly appreciated!
Signature: Adriana

Rothschildia species Caterpillar

Rothschildia species Caterpillar

Dear Adriana,
Just last week, we posted another example of a caterpillar in the genus
Rothschildia, and Bill Oehlke tentatively identified it as Rothschilida orizaba orizaba or Rothschildia peggyae.  We suspect, since you do not have a harsh winter, that the emergence should take four to six weeks, so you might be expecting an adult moth in the very near future.  The image you submitted that is a close-up of the prolegs of the caterpillar is especially interesting.  Because you rescued the cocoon after the tree trimming, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Prolegs of a Rothschildia caterpillar

Prolegs of a Rothschildia caterpillar

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for the response.  It seems like Alfredo and I had extremely similar experiences.  I looked at hundreds of caterpillars and none had that particular division between the bottom and top body, I too was looking at the prolegs and none were quite right.  It is definitely a Rothschildia.  Beautiful.  Can’t wait for its emergence!  Thank you!
Adriana Urbina

Hi Adriana,
Please send us an image or two (dorsal and ventral view perhaps) when it emerges.

Cocoon of a Rothschildia caterpillar

Cocoon of a Rothschildia caterpillar

Update:  November 2, 2015
We are 3 days away from week 8.  Is this normal or could there be something wrong?

Rothschildia Cocoon

Rothschildia Cocoon

Dear Adriana,
Since you do not have a freezing climate, we suspect emergences of Giant Silkmoths in your area are more connected to humidity than temperature.  Be patient.  The cocoon looks fine.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Luna Moth
Location: Indianapolis
October 10, 2015 6:50 pm
We have had such an amazing journey with the Luna Moth this summer … starting with the large green caterpillar stowing away in a bag in early June, later to be found as a cocoon inside the bag, which when placed on our screened in porch … emerged as the beautiful moth several weeks later. Upon attempting to set it free (by opening the screened door at night in hopes that it would fly out during the night), she instead attracted her mate to the porch, and 250 eggs later … we soon found ourselves providing walnut leaves for a large sum of caterpillars for about 40 days. They all cocooned and we were banking on them overwintering in their cocoons, when to our surprise … two have emerged … and they have already attracted a mate (from beyond the screened porch) who found the screened in porch last night. I fear that we will start the cycle again, and there won’t be enough leaves still on the trees (Indiana) to keep them fed until they pupate. Plus, its getting cold outside. Should I bring them inside, or let nature take its course?
Signature: Ellen in Indiana

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Luna Moth Caterpillar

Dear Ellen,
We are speechless about your submission, but at least we have the wherewithal to title it the “Story of the Year for 2015” and to post your three gorgeous images, which we took the liberty of cropping and formatting for web.

Mating Luna Moths

Mating Luna Moths

Good Morning Ellen,
We believe you should try to raise some of the caterpillars in captivity and release the others into the wild.  According the BugGuide, the caterpillars will feed upon the leaves of:  “The caterpillars eat a variety of trees including white birch (Betula papyrifera), persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua), hickories (Carya), walnuts (Juglans), pecans, and sumacs (Rhus).”  Thankfully you have choices other than walnut for feeding the caterpillars.  You can also turn to Bill Oehlke’s magnificent site on Silkmoths for instructions on raising Luna Moth Caterpillars, though it sounds like you don’t have much need for that information.  Not all adults emerge at the same time and having generations of moths mature at different times is undoubtedly a benefit to the species.  Thanks again for your thrilling account of raising Luna Moths.

The Next Generation: Hatchling Luna Moth Caterpillars

The Next Generation: Hatchling Luna Moth Caterpillars

Update:  October 12, 2015
Thank you so much for your reply and advice. I had another female emerge today and have attached a short video. This is before her wings dried and expanded. The male who showed up on Sat., I think must have been close to his last days. There has been no pairing activity and pretty sure that he will expire soon. Planning to leave the porch door open tonight to let the females fly off if they wish, or attract another male to the porch if there are any in the vicinity. Really hoping that the remainder of the pupae remain cocooned for the winter! Again, thank you for the reply. I have had fun sharing the link to the Story of the Year!!
Ellen

You can try refrigerating the remaining cocoons to prevent them from hatching until spring.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery beetle or queen of the ants?
Location: Connecticut
September 26, 2015 4:32 pm
This bug was found crawling on the ground in our backyard in Connecticut. The front half looks very ant like but the abdomen was huge in proportion. It had little pronto wings but looked like it could not fly. We left it in a protected place to continue its journey after taking its photo.
Signature: Bug lover

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Dear Bug lover,
This is an Oil Beetle in the genus
Meloe, one of the Blister Beetles.  Blister Beetles can secrete a compound known as cantharidin that can cause blistering in human skin, so Blister Beetles should be handled with caution, or not at all.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Centipede brushing his hair
Location: South Carolina
September 25, 2015 7:18 pm
My wife was getting ready to go to bed. After changing clothes she reached for the hair brush. When she felt something tickle her hand, she looked down and screamed. She threw the brush and this not so small centipede against the mirror. When I came to see what was wrong, I found him hiding behind my can of shaving cream. Can you tell me what type he is? Also just so you know, I work on the catch and release program. Especially for the little critters that help me keep the other creepy crawlers out.
Signature: Ron

Bark Centipede

Bark Centipede

Dear Ron,
This is a Bark Centipede in the order Scolopendromorpha, and because of the fat terminal legs, we believe it is either in the family Scolopendridae or Plutoniumidae, based on images posted to BugGuide.  We do not feel confident with any more specific identification, however, due to your “catch and release program” we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wheel bug, shortly before relocation
Location: Dayton, OH
August 25, 2015 8:11 pm
I moved this guy to an area not frequented by kids, right after a short “look but don’t touch” speech. :) We seem to see a lot of these in late August, usually after a storm.
Signature: Amorette

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Dear Amorette,
The presence of significant numbers of Wheel Bugs in your area is indicative of a plentiful food supply.  Wheel Bugs are stealth hunters that move slowly along plants searching for prey, and because of their hunting style, they tend to encounter foliage and blossom eating insects, including the invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle. Because of your thoughtfulness in relocating this magnificent predator, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Thank you so much!   I think that it’s better for everyone involved that I relocated it :)   I’ve heard horrifying things about the bites of wheel/assassin bugs.
Amorette

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination