Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big bee/wasp
Location: South central indiana
April 28, 2016 7:40 pm
We had this big bee/wasp fly into our home. It almost was if he was drunk. He would fly into a corner than crash to the ground. Then lay for a few minute. Get up and fly for ten seconds then crash.
We are in south central Indiana.
Signature: Paul

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear Paul,
This is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabo, and judging by the time of year, the circumstances under which you found her, and her behavior, we believe she is a Queen who just ended her hibernation and is about to begin a new colony.  You should release her.  You can read more about European Hornets on BugGuide.

Daniel, thanks for the answer and confirmation. About 15 minutes after I sent the email I concluded the same thing. I gave her an apple to feed off of and then released her today. She seemed much more energetic. It is amazing how much of he apple slices she ate.
Thanks for the feedback. Hopefully the nest she builds will be away from the house.
Have a good weekend.
Paul

Apple eaten by European Hornet

Apple eaten by European Hornet

Thanks for the update Paul.  We will be tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award for your kindness to the lower beasts.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Femae Carpenter Bee
Location: South Pasadena
April 19, 2016 9:25 pm
I believe this is a female carpenter bee? Photo was taken on a 90 -ish degree day, today, in mid April in LA., in a parking lot. She was very happy to stay on my hand and I had a hard time getting her to climb onto any plants. I wanted to do more than just say hi but didn’t know what else she would like. Thanks!
Signature: Janet

Female Valley Carpenter Bee

Female Valley Carpenter Bee

Hi Janet,
You are correct that this is a female Valley Carpenter Bee.  It was very kind and fearless of you to move her from the pavement to the foliage.  People like you make South Pasadena a wonderful place, and because of your kindness, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  We are your neighbor across the freeway in Mount Washington.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Caterpillar!
Location: Southeastern Arizona
April 1, 2016 10:55 am
Dear bugman,
I found a caterpillar in the pool this morning. He was still alive when I found him, so I took him in and gave him a few leaves from our backyard. We are still unsure what kind of caterpillar he is, or what he eats! Any help?
Signature: Dawn S

Possibly Underwing Caterpillar

Possibly Underwing Caterpillar

Dear Dawn,
This might be an Underwing Caterpillar in the genus Catocala which is pictured on BugGuide, but we would not rule out any of the other groups in the superfamily Noctuiodea, which includes the Owlet Moths.  We are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award, and unless the caterpillar was dropped into the pool by a passing bird, we feel confident it was feeding on some plant in your yard.  The plant upon which you photographed it looks like Mesquite, which is pictured on the National Park Service site, which leads us to believe it is a plant close to your pool.  Try offering other leaves from your yard, and if it starts eating, you can place the caterpillar on that plant.  Any additional information like size may help us to narrow down an identification.  We also wondered if this might be a Black Witch Caterpillar, and according to Texas Butterfly Ranch:  “Black Witch Moth caterpillars eat legumes, and favor acacia and mesquite. ”

Update: The caterpillar created a cocoon out of silk. A few weeks later, he hatched into a common , brown moth. (about 1 inch long.) I released him and watched him fly away.

Thanks for the Update.  That was neither a Black Witch or an Underwing Moth, but our general ID from the superfamily Noctuiodea is still most likely correct.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Phidippus audax
Location: Toronto, Ontario
March 15, 2016 4:56 pm
I saved this darling little guy the other day, just in time for Save a Spider Day on March 14th. I will keep him comfortable inside until it is warm enough to release him.
I located some flightless fruitflies for him tonight.
Salticidae are my favourite family of spiders and these little P. audax have so much personality!
Signature: Vanessa – Lover of all spiders

Bold Jumper eats Fruit Fly

Bold Jumper eats Fruit Fly

Dear Vanessa,
Your image of a Bold Jumper eating a Fruit Fly is quite gorgeous.  Though they are commonly called Fruit Flies, members of the genus Drosophila are actually classified as Vinegar Flies.  Because of your dedication to saving and feeding this Bold Jumper, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Thanks also for drawing our attention to Save a Spider Day which was profiled on the Smithsonian Magazine site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is responsible for this?
Location: Canberra, Australia
March 10, 2016 2:40 am
Dear Bugman,
This is probably an incredibly easy question as I myself have seen many of these before, but I have a conundrum. This appeared on an essential item of clothing (my husband’s undies) hung out to dry and I am loath to injure whatever creature may be in it by scraping it off. I realised that despite seeing these things a lot I have no idea what makes them, and trying to dentify things via the Internet when you don’t have the actual creature appears near impossible! Are you able to tell me what it is? Thanks very much for your time!
Best wishes,
Kathryn,
Canberra, Australia
Signature: Kathryn

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Kathryn,
This is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Preying Mantis, and we are not familiar enough with Australian species to provide you with an exact identification, however, if you see Mantids in your yard and garden, and you submit an image of one of them, we will attempt a species identification.  Here is a very similar looking Ootheca of a Garden Mantis from Oz Animals.  The Ootheca is formed of a frothy substance produced by the female to help protect the eggs inside.  When conditions are right, you can expect several hundred hatchlings to emerge.  In our opinion, you should hang your husband’s undies with the attached ootheca in a protected place in the garden, preferably on a low shrub, and let nature take its course.  As our editorial staff will be away for a few days, we have postdated your submission to go live over the weekend while we are away.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you very much! I did not expect such a quick reply and I really appreciate it! I will most certainly be doing what you say, and my husband is willing to sacrifice his undies to give the little mantids the best chance at life.
Best wishes,
Anna

Dear Kathryn,
Because of your kindness and because of the tremendous sacrifice your husband is making, we are awarding you as a couple the Bug Humanitarian tag on this posting, though you still have to wait until March 13 to see your posting live.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Wasp
Location: Central Arizona
November 14, 2015 3:38 pm
Funny story. Fount this guy in the pool, dead. Scooped him out and spread him out to dry after showing the kids. While laying him out I couldn’t get his legs right, to spread, so I kept at it until he came back to life.
Signature: Brian

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

Dear Brian,
What a wonderful Bug Humanitarian story.  This is a Tarantula Hawk, a group of Spider Wasps that prey upon Tarantulas.  Most North American species of Tarantula Hawks have reddish-orange wings.  We are pretty certain your individual is Pepsis mexicana based on images posted to BugGuide.

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination