Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 10-Lined Beauty
Location: West Seattle, WA
July 10, 2014 12:58 pm
Hi there,
Last night, the cat brought what I thought was a small mouse into the house. Rushing to the rescue, imagine my surprise that it was instead a very large, very beautiful insect.
I’ve lived in this neighborhood all of my life (nearly 50 years) and never seen anything like it. As I was photographing it, I was touched by how sweet-tempered it seemed. It hissed when I gently assisted it into a rescue jar and didn’t move quickly when released back out into the yard. Even when it hissed, it was cute.
What was I so lucky to have met last night?
Signature: West Seattle Nature Lover

Ten Lined June Beetle

Ten Lined June Beetle

Dear West Seattle Nature Lover,
We would have guessed that based on your subject line, you realized you had an encounter with a Ten Lined June Beetle,
Polyphylla decemlineata.  The hissing is created by a phenomenon known as stridulation, or the rubbing together of body parts, and it can be quite loud.  The Ten Lined June Beetle will stridulate when it is disturbed or handled. Because of your rescue intervention, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown moth?
Location: Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia
July 8, 2014 9:52 pm
Dear bugman,
I found this little fella almost everyday with broken wing on my floor. It’s a pitiful sight and I’m wondering if there is anything I can do for these moths besides moving them away from the floor? (My house-mates always tried to kill them if I don’t) I didn’t touch their wings though; instead I let them climb on my hands by their own before moving them away from the floor. I lived in a city, but these moths are literally everywhere. The wind is harsh too since the location is very near to the coast and because of the monsoon season and stuffs.
Signature: Concerned bug-lover

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Dear Concerned bug-lover,
Thanks for resending the image.  The first attempt resulted in a corrupted file that we were unable to open.  This is a Tropical Swallowtail Moth,
Lyssa zampa, and we first published an account of a sighting this year in April, and then in May, we made a second report from Singapore a featured posting that we just demoted to a normal posting in our archives after getting 153 Facebook “likes” on the posting.  This year appears to have been and continues to be a year of numerous sightings.  There are significant increases in the population of Tropical Swallowtail Moths every few years.  Because of your concern for the disabled moths you keep finding, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Sadly, once the wings have been mangled, either by a human with a vendetta or a hungry predator, the moths will be unable to fly.

Tropical Swallowtail Moth with broken wing

Tropical Swallowtail Moth with broken wing

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Caterpillar?
Location: Frederick, Maryland
July 8, 2014 12:02 am
Hello!
My friend and I were picking up some plants for her mother at Home Depot, and we saw this big guy hanging out on one of the plants. I bought that one only so he wouldn’t be harmed by staff or other customers but I was wondering what kind of caterpillar he was, and if he turns into a butterfly or moth.
Thank you~!
Signature: – Karlee

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Karlee,
You are our kind of Bug Humanitarian.  This is a Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar,
Hyles lineata, and it is one of the greatest ranging moth species in North America.  Whitelined Sphinxes have been reported from all 48 continental United States as well as Canada and Mexico, and they are especially common in desert areas of the Southwest.  The caterpillars are highly variable, with black and yellow varieties commonly found along with green caterpillars like the one in your image.  The adult Whitelined Sphinx is a lovely moth that is often attracted to lights.  They also fly at dawn and dusk, a time known as crepuscular, so it is possible to view them pollinating flowers while there is still some daylight available.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Las Vegas Black Hairy Spider
Location: Henderson NV, Las Vegas suburb
July 4, 2014 12:48 pm
I love your site. I looked at your spiders for a few days but although I found the trap door spider to be close, the rear body tank is not the same shape as my unknown spider. I never saw this 2-inch spider before. It was found on the wall of my garage, in June, 110 F weather day. I captured it, took the photo then released it in some rocks at a nearby park. You can zoom in my photo to see the eyes and hair. Thank you.
Signature: Boyd in Las Vegas

Female Southern House Spider

Female Southern House Spider

Dear Boyd,
Unfortunately, you cannot really make out the eye arrangement of this spider in your image.  This is a female Southern House Spider,
Kukulcania hibernalis, and according to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”

Thanks, Dan.     Now when I walk by the park, I will say hello to her.    I never feared her but just wanted to get her farther away from human danger.
Boyd

Hi again Boyd,
Because of your sensitivity toward the natural world, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Luna Moth
Location: 26 State St., Montpelier VT
June 8, 2014 5:26 am
I live in downtown Montpelier, VT. Returning from walking the dog at about 8 AM today (6/8/14), I found this guy resting on the sidewalk right in front of my door. At first I thought it was a leaf, but when I realized it was a moth I figured I had to move it before someone stepped on it (or my dog tried to eat it). After nudging it a bit, it flapped around for a few feet, but seemed to have trouble flying. It ended up in the well of tree planted in the sidewalk. I thought it might be injured. I gently nudged it a bit more, and it managed to get enough air to clumsily climb into the sky, and then it flapped off above the surrounding buildings. It was quite a sight!
Signature: Ryan Kriger

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Hi Ryan,
For your noble efforts regarding the safety of this male (feathery antennae) Luna Moth, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Since Luna Moths do not eat and only live a few days, we hope he successfully locates a mate so he can help perpetuate the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp or Hornet and nest???
Location: western Pennsylvania
May 28, 2014 9:31 am
My son and I watched a wasp or hornet create its intricate nest but are not sure which insect it is, so am seeking your wonderful help as I did so a few years ago with another insect. Thank you for any help you can give us.
Signature: Marge

Queen Bald Faced Hornet begins nest.

Queen Bald Faced Hornet begins nest.

Dear Marge,
My that queen BaldFaced Hornet is building that nest fast.  She will soon have a first generation of sterile female workers who begin hunting for food and enlarging the nest, freeing her to just lay eggs.  Are you able to avoid this part of the house until the first frost?  If not, you should consider more drastic measures and evict her so she finds a more secluded location for her nest because, according to the Penn State University Entomology website:  “In Pennsylvania, a large colony will have upwards of 300 individuals.”  BaldFaced Hornets are capable of stinging repeatedly and they will defend the nest.
  We will be flying into Pittsburgh in the middle of June.

Beginnings of a Bald Faced Hornet Nest

Beginnings of a Bald Faced Hornet Nest

Thank you Daniel,
You are right, she did build it fast.  I took photos and we watched almost every other hour.  (Few photos attached.)
We “evicted” her–sort of hated to do it, but that spot is on our back “stoop” and between my son cutting our grass and me working on 4 different gardens (I plant for birds, butterflies, etc.) we felt she needed to build her large but intricate nest/home somewhere else and wanted to evict her before she laid many or any eggs and started the process.  I don’t like to kill anything including bugs and their homes, so felt it better to encourage her to build elsewhere before she had a real home/palace : )
Thanks for your help, I did see that my oldest son had a fairly large nest in his backyard last year but it was not near where they were active themselves and we think it was “done” (at the beginning of fall).
Have a safe and joyful flight.
Marge from westernPA

Beginnings of a BaldFaced Hornet Nest

Beginnings of a BaldFaced Hornet Nest

Hi Marge,
We believe the eviction was a smart move due to the heavy foot traffic at the site.  Because of your thoughtfulness, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Bald Faced Hornet builds Nest

Bald Faced Hornet builds Nest

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination