Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Saving a Stranger
Location: Green Mountain Falls, Colorado
July 24, 2015 8:12 pm
So this bug we had saved from drowning in a lake/pond with a stick. He dried off and left after a while. Anyway once we got him on dry ground we were shocked by it. We never saw anything like it and really wanted to know what it is. If you could help us that would be amazing!!!
Signature: Lapen Family

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

Dear Lapen Family,
This is one of the Horntails or Wood Wasps in the genus
Urocerus, most probably Urocerus flavicornis, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  The larvae bore in the wood of coniferous trees.  Your rescue efforts are noteworthy and we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Alisha Bragg, Angie Norman, Ann Levitsky, Kristina Larson, Leigh Rollins, Dean McDonald, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Sue Dougherty, Piroska Farkas liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scary flying wasp ant??
Location: Arizona
July 23, 2015 10:51 pm
I woke up this morning and went downstairs to find this frightening critter crawling on the ceiling. My husband tried to kill it but lost it somewhere downstairs so we were forced to give up so we could go to work. Later that night it was captured and after much deliberation we decided to let it go outside. Did we make the right decision? What is this bug? Is it harmful or helpful?
Signature: Jenna

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Dear Jenna,
When it comes to insects, “harmful or helpful” are kind of relative terms, but we would have to say that the Black and Yellow Mud Dauber in your image is helpful.  This solitary wasp is not aggressive, and the female constructs a nest of mud and provisions it with paralyzed spiders to feed her brood.  Fans of Spiders might not like wasps that feed on spiders, but the food chain with predators and prey is necessary for the web of life on our planet.  Because of your thoughtful actions, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Kristina Larson, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Kristine Lachapelle, Tip Crawford, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp identification
Location: Vail, az
June 30, 2015 10:02 pm
Hello,
On a hot and sunny tucson summer day I found this curiosity burrowed in my grass, apparently trying to keep cool. I know it’s not a tarantula hawk from the antenna, but it was making stinging-like motion with its abdomen on the stick I used to relocate away from me and my children. Wish I had a clearer picture of the mouth, but, what say you?
Thank you for your wonderful site!
Signature: Jennifer

Scoliid Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Dear Jennifer,
Thanks for the compliment.  We believe we have correctly identified your Scoliid Wasp as Triscolia ardens based on images that are posted to BugGuide.  Alas, BugGuide does not provide any information on the species, and the genus information is also very limited on BugGuide except for “a single species in our area, 2 total”, however, the family page on BugGuide indicates common names “Flower Wasps, Mammoth Wasps, Scarab Hawks, Scarab Hunters” and provides this information:  “Larvae are parasitoids of ground-dwelling scarab grubs, esp. Phyllophaga; adults take nectar.  Life Cycle  Female digs down to the host grub, stings it, and lays an egg on the paralyzed grub.”  Perhaps your wasp is hunting for Scarab Beetle larvae in the lawn.  Scarab Hunters are not aggressive wasps, but because you were thoughtful enough to relocate it due to concerns for your children’s safety rather than to kill it, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award

Scoliid Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

 

David Bernstein, Alisha Bragg, Anna Carreon liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looks kind of like a firefly
Location: New Jersey
May 25, 2015 4:56 pm
Rescued this bug from a pool after it flew in, but I don’t think it’s a firefly. I did some googling but I haven’t found anything quite like it. Thanks for your time!
Signature: David

Longicorn

Tanbark Borer, we believe

Dear David,
This is a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, and we believe its dramatic coloration, especially the red thorax, and its spring emergence should make it relatively easy to identify.  We were wrong and for now it is running unidentified.
P.S.  We are tagging you as a Bug Humanitarian.

Update:  May 26, 2015
We used Arthur V. Evans book, Beetles of Eastern North America, where we found a similar looking Phymatodes amoenus pictured, and that led us to the related Tanbark Borer, Phymatodes testaceus, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “native to Eurasia; widely established around the world, incl. e. US and, more recently, in the Pacific Northwest” and it feeds on Oaks with the larvae boring in the wood.  According to NatureSpot:  “The adults are active nocturnally and will come to light but are rarely seen otherwise under normal circumstances.”  Seems like you were tagged with the Bug Humanitarian Award for rescuing an Invasive Exotic species, another tag on our site.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Alisha Bragg, Ann Levitsky, Sue Dougherty, Hanalie Sonneblom liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Omg
Location: Belleville , Illinois
May 20, 2015 6:14 am
I’m just curious about what this is? Should I be worried about a bite from one? I’m finding them at work thank god… Never seen them in my house.
Signature: Omg

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Omg,
This is a House Centipede, a predator that is frequently found inside the home.  We maintain that they are harmless, and though they contain venom, and though it is possible that a large specimen might be able to bite a human, especially one with thin or tender skin, we agree with the literature that they are not considered to be a dangerous species.  It is our opinion that House Centipedes are beneficial predators that will help rid the home of Cockroaches and other undesirable intruders.  As an aside, just yesterday while watching CNN we learned that the initials OMG have been used for years by the FBI to refer to Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs.

Thanks for getting back with me. I never kill them and put them outside when I find them. Glad I do.

Because of your behavior, we will tag this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Jessica Schneider, Amelia Gajary, Jacquelyn Born, Kelly Freeman, Rox San, Pat Chapman, Jean Liss, Nathan Rao, Christy Harris, Chrissy Bodin Ibclc, Sue Dougherty, Jody Comninos, Jack D McDonald, Marge Scheu Daisey, John Giangrosso, Jessica M. Schemm, Maryann Teejay, Lianne Montgomery, Samantha Margerum, Nectasource Pty Ltd. liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is my little buddy?
Location: Rock Hill NY
April 14, 2015 5:40 pm
Hello, I just discovered this website and I love it! I’m hoping you can help me figure out what my new little friend is. Yesterday my sister was complaining that a bee was stuck in her window so I went to go free it (I’m pretty sure it was actually a wasp) but I also noticed a tiny green spider in her window too, sitting right on the screen! I watched some kind of fly get caught in a small barely visible web, and little green friend casually walked over and started feeding! My sister has a lethal prejudice against anyone with too many legs so they couldn’t stay there. While my little friend fed, I removed the window screen (with them on it) and put it in my own window. Now they’re safe and enjoying the gnats that hang out around my house plants near by. It’s newly spring here after a long winter. I’ve never seen anyone like this before. I think they have transparent hair on their legs but they’re so small its difficult to see. When I shine a fla shlight there appears to be some gold along the center of the orange stripe. Eight teeny tiny black eyes. Gooey looking fangs. Walks slowly sometimes but mostly stays in one spot. All together probably the size of a dime.
I’m sorry about the image quality, all I have right now is my iphone. If they hang out for a while I’ll try to update with better pictures. Thank you so much :-)
Signature: Jocelyn

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Jocelyn,
This little beauty is a Long-Jawed Orbweaver,
Tetragnatha viridis, and we quickly identified it on BugGuide.  We were totally charmed by your email and we are awarding you the Bug Humanitarian Award for your kindness to this harmless spider.  Out of curiosity, how many legs are too many?

Jerry Pittman, Rickie Louise Hill, Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination