Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
False Bombardier Beetle

False Bombardier Beetle

Subject: Red and black beetle?
Location: Kentucky
October 20, 2014 8:24 pm
I found this darling after work the other day. Eveningtime, autumn weather, in the parking lot. It was about 2 inches long, see photo of it in a plastic cup. Long legged, with covered wings like a beetle, but kind of soft to the touch, not crunchy like a typical beetle shell. It was trapped in a puddle, so I dried it off and made sure it was ok before I let it go into the weeds. :)
Signature: Casey

Hi Casey,
You rescued a False Bombardier Beetle in the genus
Galerita, and you can read more about this predatory Ground Beetle on BugGuide.  We are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

MaryBeth Kelly, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Beetle(?) with transparent wings
Location: Southeast Michigan
September 12, 2014 8:28 pm
Can you help ID this strange bug I found today, Sept. 12, on my back porch? I found it on its’ back, somewhat tangled in a bit of spider web, and I thought it might be dead. When I picked it up,
however, it moved.
I carefully removed the web, and it began flapping its’ wings but seemed happy to crawl around my
hand. In the 2nd photo you can see exposed what appears to be a proboscis of some kind. Quite an interesting little critter! Thank you!
Signature: Kathy

Cicada

Cicada

Dear Kathy,
This is an Annual Cicada in the genus
Tibicen, not a beetle, and you are probably quite familiar with the din caused by Cicadas that emanates from the tops of trees in mid to late summer.  These Annual Cicadas are also known as Dog Day Harvestflies.  For your kindness to this Cicada, we are honoring you with the Bug Humanitarian Award, and we are also tagging this posting as a Buggy Accessory as that Cicada looks quite fetching on your hand.

Dog Day Harvestfly

Dog Day Harvestfly

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your prompt reply and for the lovely honor!  You made my day!
Go bugs!
Respectfully,
Kathy Genaw

You are welcome Kathy.  We should also warn you that we have received one report of a bite from a Cicada.  Many years ago, Vince who works at a Nature Center sent in an extensive comment beginning with:  “A few years ago, while working in a state park nature center in Indiana, a young (6 years old) entomologist brought his latest aquisition, a cicada, to show me. I picked it up and let it crawl on my thumb. When I was ready to give it back, the thing wouldn’t let go, and decided to press that sucking mouth part into my thumb. It was pretty painful. They can DEFINATELY bite (or perhaps STAB is a more appropriate term).”

Daniel,
You have gone above and beyond with your thoughtful warning!  Thank you!
I must share with you that, once you had identified by bug, I was compelled to follow up
with a bit more research.  I was particularly interested in that mouth part to which you referred.
As you can see in one of my photos, the cicada had just begun to insert its’ proboscis into my
flesh…it was at that point that I set it down on the ground!  From what I have read, this behavior
was not adversarial or defensive but rather a food absorbing action.  I did feel a bit of a sting,
but I have no hard feelings nor any skin effect!  All in all, my cicada experience was very
interesting, and your input much appreciated!
Have a great day…
Kathy Genaw

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hundreds of American Carrion Beetles freed!
Location: Beaver Bay, MN
September 6, 2014 7:40 pm
Hi, guys! I know it’s been years since I’ve submitted anything but I’ve never forgotten you. I now live in Minnesota and yesterday got to visit Beaver Bay, way north of Duluth. I came across a geodetic marker that was open, and the pipe was full of American Carrion Beetles that had fallen in and got stuck. I put a stick in there and it did not take long for them to find their way out. They all stopped for a quick romantic moment…really, they were. It sure looked like it anyway. Within I’d say, 15 minutes, they had all flown away and all that was left were a few ground beetles.
I’m sending an image of them on the stick, and will also send one of them in the pipe as there is I think, a rare Burying Beetle in there, too.
Much love!
Signature: Joanne, now living in Minnesota (previously Darien and Romeoville, Illinois)

American Carrion Beetles and a Burying Beetle in Geocache

American Carrion Beetles and a Burying Beetle in Geodetic Marker

Subject: A possible American Burrying Beetle
Location: Beaver Bay, MN
September 6, 2014 7:55 pm
As far as I can tell, what I’ve found online shows this beetle to be rare up here. It is lacking the distinctive orange or red dot on the pronotum so it might just be a regular burying beetle.
It is in an open geodetic marker with a billion carrion beetles. I helped them all get out. Will send a note to your comments section and tell you the story.
Signature: Joanne, now living in Minnesota (previously Darien and Romeoville, Illinois)

Carrion Beetles freed from Geodetic Marker

Carrion Beetles freed from Geodetic Marker

Subject: Intersting Carrion Beetle story
September 6, 2014 8:15 pm
Hi Dan and Lisa!  I hope you guys are doing well!  It’s been a few years since I’ve posted here, I know, but I’ve never forgotten about you and still check in on occasion.
Here’s my story of the great American Carrion Beetle Rescue.
Yesterday I was in Beaver Bay, MN (north of Duluth) and in my wanderings I found this geodetic marker that was open. As I peered into it my first thought was “Oh, S***, bees.  I’m gonna die now.”  I slowly backed away and went and got a friend to show her cuz I figured if I’m gonna die she’s going with.  She looked in there and said “No! It’s beetles!”  And so they were.  Hundreds of beetles stuck in this hole in the ground.  They were all crawling on each other.  It was just this constant boiling movement of these poor things.  So I went and found a stick and put it in there.  It took maybe 10 seconds before they started climbing out and maybe 15 seconds before the newly freed beetles started to have what looked like celebratory sex.  They one by one, they flew away.  Within about 15 minutes they were gone, save for a few ground beetles.  It was a truly amazing sight.  I couldn’t get back to close the lid once everyone was free, but the stick is stuck in there pretty good so if any future wandering  bugs should fall in they can still get out.
I also saw a ton of grasshoppers but thankfully I have no chiggers.  Or ticks.  Gah.  Ticks.
Take care and thanks for providing this awesome service for all these years!
Joanne Pleskovich
Anoka, MN
Signature: Joanne Pleskovich

American Burying Beetle (from our archives)

American Burying Beetle (from our archives)

Dear Joanne,
How nice to hear from you after all these years.  The Burying Beetle found amongst all the American Carrion Beetles is NOT an American Burying Beetle, but it is another Burying Beetle or Sexton Beetle in the genus
Nicrophorus.  To the best of our knowledge, the American Burying Beetle is the only rare and endangered species in the genus.  The American Burying Beetle can be distinguished from other members of the genus, according to BugGuide, because the “orange/red pronotal disc is distinctive.”  We only have a single image of an American Burying Beetle in our archives, and we located that image to add to this posting.  Your story is fascinating, and because of your kindness toward all those trapped American Carrion Beetles and the single Burying Beetle, we are awarding you the Bug Humanitarian Award and featuring this posting.  Additionally, we have combined your three submissions into a single posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Warrior
Location: Texas
August 21, 2014 12:58 pm
this is just a pic i took that i thought i would share the story behind it is my mom poured soapy water to get rid of some ants outside near our melons in the process this big spider got washed out i picked it up with a stick to get it out and brushed the suds off with a leaf i left it for 20 minutes alone under a pot plant hoping it would be okay. but it wasn’t moving and its legs started to curl. i saw my nephews toys and thought well its dead i could take a nice pic, 10 minutes after the pic it jumped to life and scurried away i was shocked but happy it did not die
Signature: Coyote

Wolf Spider saved from Drowning

Wolf Spider saved from Drowning

Dear Coyote,
We love your story and accompanying image of this Wolf Spider rescued from drowning.  We have heard other accounts of drowned Wolf Spiders rescued from swimming pools that also revived and survived.  We are also tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fisher spider??
Location: New jersey
August 18, 2014 11:54 pm
I found this spider in my fireplace about 3 inches from my face while fixing the fireplace in August, northern New Jersey. I released it shortly after this photo session.
Signature: Tom

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Tom,
You have correctly identified a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, but we are uncertain of the species, though if you are located far from water, this is most likely
Dolomedes tenebrosus.  This is a female and she is carrying an egg sac.  Female Fishing Spiders carry an egg sac around until they find a suitable location to spin a nursery web in which to deposit the egg sac.  The female continues to guard the egg sac in the nursery web until she dies or until the egg sac hatches and the spiderlings disperse.  Because of your kindness to this expectant mother Fishing Spider, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow moth
Location: SE Pennsylvania
August 6, 2014 6:02 am
My dog was “playing” with this moth this morning, so I moved it off the ground to where she couldn’t reach it. We’re in south east Pennsylvania, and its wingspan is roughly 4 inches. It has a “hairy” yellow head, and has a short, stout body about the circumference of one’s thumb. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Ron B.

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Hi Ron B.,
This is a female Imperial Moth.  Females have more yellow while male Imperial Moths have more darker markings.  The sexual dimorphism is obvious when one is lucky enough to observe a mating pair of Imperial Moths.  Like other members of the Giant Silkmoth Family Saturniidae, Imperial Moths do not feed as adults as they do not have functional mouthparts.  They live long enough to mate and lay eggs.  Hopefully rescuing this gal from your dog will allow her to procreate.  For your kindness to one of the lower beasts, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Thank you, Daniel, for taking the time to help me know what kind of moth my dog found. She is doing fine resting high up on a fence post, waiting for the sun to go down. Thanks again…
Ron

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination