Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Warrior
Location: Texas
August 21, 2014 12:58 pm
this is just a pic i took that i thought i would share the story behind it is my mom poured soapy water to get rid of some ants outside near our melons in the process this big spider got washed out i picked it up with a stick to get it out and brushed the suds off with a leaf i left it for 20 minutes alone under a pot plant hoping it would be okay. but it wasn’t moving and its legs started to curl. i saw my nephews toys and thought well its dead i could take a nice pic, 10 minutes after the pic it jumped to life and scurried away i was shocked but happy it did not die
Signature: Coyote

Wolf Spider saved from Drowning

Wolf Spider saved from Drowning

Dear Coyote,
We love your story and accompanying image of this Wolf Spider rescued from drowning.  We have heard other accounts of drowned Wolf Spiders rescued from swimming pools that also revived and survived.  We are also tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fisher spider??
Location: New jersey
August 18, 2014 11:54 pm
I found this spider in my fireplace about 3 inches from my face while fixing the fireplace in August, northern New Jersey. I released it shortly after this photo session.
Signature: Tom

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Tom,
You have correctly identified a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, but we are uncertain of the species, though if you are located far from water, this is most likely
Dolomedes tenebrosus.  This is a female and she is carrying an egg sac.  Female Fishing Spiders carry an egg sac around until they find a suitable location to spin a nursery web in which to deposit the egg sac.  The female continues to guard the egg sac in the nursery web until she dies or until the egg sac hatches and the spiderlings disperse.  Because of your kindness to this expectant mother Fishing Spider, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow moth
Location: SE Pennsylvania
August 6, 2014 6:02 am
My dog was “playing” with this moth this morning, so I moved it off the ground to where she couldn’t reach it. We’re in south east Pennsylvania, and its wingspan is roughly 4 inches. It has a “hairy” yellow head, and has a short, stout body about the circumference of one’s thumb. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Ron B.

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Hi Ron B.,
This is a female Imperial Moth.  Females have more yellow while male Imperial Moths have more darker markings.  The sexual dimorphism is obvious when one is lucky enough to observe a mating pair of Imperial Moths.  Like other members of the Giant Silkmoth Family Saturniidae, Imperial Moths do not feed as adults as they do not have functional mouthparts.  They live long enough to mate and lay eggs.  Hopefully rescuing this gal from your dog will allow her to procreate.  For your kindness to one of the lower beasts, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Thank you, Daniel, for taking the time to help me know what kind of moth my dog found. She is doing fine resting high up on a fence post, waiting for the sun to go down. Thanks again…
Ron

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 10-Lined Beauty
Location: West Seattle, WA
July 10, 2014 12:58 pm
Hi there,
Last night, the cat brought what I thought was a small mouse into the house. Rushing to the rescue, imagine my surprise that it was instead a very large, very beautiful insect.
I’ve lived in this neighborhood all of my life (nearly 50 years) and never seen anything like it. As I was photographing it, I was touched by how sweet-tempered it seemed. It hissed when I gently assisted it into a rescue jar and didn’t move quickly when released back out into the yard. Even when it hissed, it was cute.
What was I so lucky to have met last night?
Signature: West Seattle Nature Lover

Ten Lined June Beetle

Ten Lined June Beetle

Dear West Seattle Nature Lover,
We would have guessed that based on your subject line, you realized you had an encounter with a Ten Lined June Beetle,
Polyphylla decemlineata.  The hissing is created by a phenomenon known as stridulation, or the rubbing together of body parts, and it can be quite loud.  The Ten Lined June Beetle will stridulate when it is disturbed or handled. Because of your rescue intervention, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown moth?
Location: Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia
July 8, 2014 9:52 pm
Dear bugman,
I found this little fella almost everyday with broken wing on my floor. It’s a pitiful sight and I’m wondering if there is anything I can do for these moths besides moving them away from the floor? (My house-mates always tried to kill them if I don’t) I didn’t touch their wings though; instead I let them climb on my hands by their own before moving them away from the floor. I lived in a city, but these moths are literally everywhere. The wind is harsh too since the location is very near to the coast and because of the monsoon season and stuffs.
Signature: Concerned bug-lover

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Dear Concerned bug-lover,
Thanks for resending the image.  The first attempt resulted in a corrupted file that we were unable to open.  This is a Tropical Swallowtail Moth,
Lyssa zampa, and we first published an account of a sighting this year in April, and then in May, we made a second report from Singapore a featured posting that we just demoted to a normal posting in our archives after getting 153 Facebook “likes” on the posting.  This year appears to have been and continues to be a year of numerous sightings.  There are significant increases in the population of Tropical Swallowtail Moths every few years.  Because of your concern for the disabled moths you keep finding, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Sadly, once the wings have been mangled, either by a human with a vendetta or a hungry predator, the moths will be unable to fly.

Tropical Swallowtail Moth with broken wing

Tropical Swallowtail Moth with broken wing

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Caterpillar?
Location: Frederick, Maryland
July 8, 2014 12:02 am
Hello!
My friend and I were picking up some plants for her mother at Home Depot, and we saw this big guy hanging out on one of the plants. I bought that one only so he wouldn’t be harmed by staff or other customers but I was wondering what kind of caterpillar he was, and if he turns into a butterfly or moth.
Thank you~!
Signature: – Karlee

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Karlee,
You are our kind of Bug Humanitarian.  This is a Whitelined Sphinx Caterpillar,
Hyles lineata, and it is one of the greatest ranging moth species in North America.  Whitelined Sphinxes have been reported from all 48 continental United States as well as Canada and Mexico, and they are especially common in desert areas of the Southwest.  The caterpillars are highly variable, with black and yellow varieties commonly found along with green caterpillars like the one in your image.  The adult Whitelined Sphinx is a lovely moth that is often attracted to lights.  They also fly at dawn and dusk, a time known as crepuscular, so it is possible to view them pollinating flowers while there is still some daylight available.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination