Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southern House Spider
Location: Richmond, VA
February 20, 2015 12:59 am
Some time ago, I think last winter (maybe the one before), I wrote to you about a southern house spider I caught behind my couch and was going to release in the spring — you suggested I keep her, as I have tarantula experience, and I did. She’s fat and happy to this day, and she’s grown some.
This winter, I have another friend. She lives above my bed, behind an animal-skin wall hanging. I saw the web and meant to brush it away, off of my stuff (it makes all of the fur stick together and look bad), but then I saw her and realized the space was occupied. For now, and very probably permanently, she can stay, as it’s somewhere she’s safe from us accidentally hurting her, and from us being bitten on accident. I’m probably going to start feeding her periodically, so she will be more likely to stay put, instead of setting up camp somewhere less safe. I noticed her weeks ago, but I don’t see her very often. She very likely could have been living there for months. In this picture, she is out on her web “patio”, hanging out. I notice she does this at night sometimes, but usually she’s hidden all day. It’s interesting how her web is — it looks like a snowflake against the wall, and seems to exist mostly so that she can sit there with out losing footing and falling.
I’ve seen some males in my house. I think there’s a big “family” living with me.
Here’s some good pictures, if you want to put them on your website.
Best regards,
Denise Elliott

Southern House Spider

Southern House Spider

Dear Denise,
Thanks for updating us on the Southern House Spiders with which you are sharing your home .

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Subject: what is this spider?
Location: Los Angeles, California
February 12, 2015 3:20 pm
I discovered this spider on my stairs inside my house. I saved it and got it in a container and took it
outside. It jumps. The size of a finger nail.
Signature: Shannon

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Shannon,
This is some species of Jumping Spider in the genus
Phidippus, possibly Phidippus adumbratus.  Because of your kindness in rescuing this lovely Jumping Spider, we are tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

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Subject:  Male Flower Wasp
Location: Oldbury Western Australia
January 31, 2015
Meanwhile I have a couple of pics of an identified wasp for your collection, that I will attach to this mail if you are interested, as a thank you.  I see you have a pic of the female, but didn’t see one of the male.  This is a male flower wasp from the family Tiphiidae as identified by the Western Australian Museum.  I fished him out of my dog’s water bowl.
Best regards,
Jill

Male Flower Wasp

Male Flower Wasp

Dear Jill,
We have created a distinct posting for your male Flower Wasp images, and we are thrilled that you submitted them.  We do have one additional image of a male Flower Wasp in the family Tiphidae from Australia, and that individual is from Wollongong.  Because of your kindness fishing this harmless creature from your dog’s water bowl, we are tagging the posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award

Flower Wasp

Flower Wasp

Thanks for the most honourable award Daniel.  Of course I love nature, so am actually a great crusader for saving creatures of all description.  The warm happy feeling I get from saving a life, no matter how inconsequential to some people, is reward enough. : )
I was really impressed with my son the other day, who had a huntsman spider run across his chest.. this scared the crap out of him (and no doubt also the spider), but rather than bang her on the head, he found a mop and coaxed her on board and took her outside to live out her days.  I was very happy that I probably have influenced his kindness and understanding of nature. : )
I will stick to one bug at a time in submission in future as requested.
Thanks again for everything.  You have a wonderful website.
Best regards,
Jill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green moth
Location: Gilroy CA: Watsonville Road near Uvas Creek
January 17, 2015 3:11 pm
I rescued this green moth from our cat last night. I’ve never seen one like it. It was around 10 PM, high scattered clouds, and about 65° out.  My cat was chasing the green moth, which I was able to catch and release. I’ve never seen anything like it.
Signature:  Bob

Pacific Green Sphinx

Pacific Green Sphinx

Dear Bob,
This gorgeous moth is a Pacific Green Sphinx or Bear Sphinx,
 Proserpinus lucidus.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas:  “adults fly as a single brood from late January to March and nectar at flowers. Moths can be spotted much earlier (mid December) in more southerly locations (San Diego, California; Mexico) when weather conditions are right. ”   Because you were kind enough to rescue this Pacific Green Sphinx from your cat, who we imagine was a bit miffed and missing out on a thrilling toy, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Pacific Green Sphinx

Pacific Green Sphinx

Hi Daniel,
Thanks—that was quick!  I just made a $25 donation to <whatsthatbug.com> to show my appreciation.
Keep up the good work.
Sincerely,
Bob Crane

Thanks so much for your generosity Bob.

You’re sure welcome.  I saw that you have a book published with some great reviews, so I ordered 2, one for my grandkids and one for me.  Quite a price range, from about $7 to $80!
Thanks to the Internet it was pretty easy to have my moth identified.  I took entomology in college, but I can’t imagine identifying the moth like we did in the olden days, trudging to the library, looking at numerous books, taking pictures, having the film developed….
Bob

Hi again Bob,
You are correct that I did write The Curious World of Bugs, and though it was well reviewed, it did not become a best seller, hence there was but a single printing.  I guess the high price means it is becoming collectable.  Perhaps there will be a second printing if there is a demand.  Digital imaging and cellular telephones that have the capablity of taking images and distributing images on the internet has changed the face of research.

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Subject: Life span of adult fig eater beetle
December 28, 2014 11:43 am
I rescued an adult fig eater beetle last July. He has damaged wings and is unable to fly. I left him out for a couple of days so nature could take its course but on the morning the gardeners were coming I found him hanging on to a blade of grass and couldn’t let him get chopped by the mower. Since then he has lived in a terrarium with grass, leaves, dirt, sticks and is eating grapes, figs and blueberries. He has occasional visits outside, where he crawls in the grass and climbs onto sticks and tries to fly But can’t manage to do so.
I am amazed he is still alive! How long will my house guest survive?
Signature: Kate

Injured Figeater Rescued

Injured Figeater Rescued

Dear Kate,
Since you did not provide us with an image, we are illustrating your query with an image of a Figeater from our archives.  Since you have rescued this lovely Scarab from a premature death, we are tagging your letter with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Having averted the natural predators and food shortages that limit the life span of wild beetles, you have extended the life of the Figeater you rescued.  We can’t imagine it living more than a year, so we speculate that your individual will expire by summer.

Thanks so much for the award! I am honored. I am also including a photo of the actual beetle (who is generally referred to as Bugman, although I am not sure of his/her gender). He is taking one of his walks on a hibiscus.
Please once again accept my humble thanks for the award! Glad to know that others support Bug Rescue :-)
Kate

Hello again Kate,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a Figeater with damaged elytra, the hard wing covers.  We have formatted the image to illustrate the posting as the primary image and the image we found in our archives is now relegated to a secondary status.

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Subject:  Love Webspinners (the saga continues)
Location:  Henderson, Nevada
December 21, 2014
Hi Daniel,
Sorry this is so long but I have an update on my Webspinner Dynasty ;-).
I had to create a Family Tree to keep them all straight.  The tree goes as follows:
1.  Wilma 12/20/12 – the bravest and least skittish.  Wilma tunneled out from the toilet base and often stood up at the end of the tunnel looking for a male.  I still don’t know how she came to be in my bathroom to begin with, though we did discover a hole in the exterior of the house on the porch that matched the area of the toilet.
2.  Wanda 7/1/2013 – Wilma’s daughter created through asexual reproduction.  Wanda was skittish and would stay only in the grout space I called the “front yard”.
3.  Wendy 9/1/2013 – Wanda’s daughter created through asexual reproduction.  Wendy was also skittish but would peek over the grout wall of the “front yard”.
4.  Wynona 11/21/2013 – the adventurer/explorer.  Wynona was Wendy’s daughter created through asexual reproduction.  Wynona was awesome to observe.  She built and almost connected a tunnel completely around the outside of the base of the toilet.  She also started a tunnel up the front of the toilet a couple of inches.  She nearly connected the “front yard” to the other grout space area I called” the backyard”.  Wynona was all over the place.

Wynona the Webspinner

Wynona the Webspinner

5.  Wylie 3/13/2014 – I saved Wylie from a water-dish on the back porch.  He would have drowned but revived after I saved him with my finger.  I wasn’t sure if he would find Wynona but I placed him at the opening of the tunnel going up the front of the toilet and to my surprise he immediately twisted himself around to go down the tunnel.
6.  Walt – another male webspinner saved from the water-dish on the back porch.  I introduced him to Wynona’s front yard where he immediately disappeared under the linoleum.
7.  Winnie 4/4/14 – Winnie was skittish and possibly the daughter of Wylie or Walt and Wynona.
8.  Willie – another male webspinner rescued from the water-dish that disappeared under the toilet through the front yard grout area.

On 4/19/14 I had to call in a plumber to replace the wax ring on the toilet and I was worried about Winnie, Willie and any possible off-spring.  When the plumber picked up the toilet – I told him to not harm any bugs found underneath.  (I don’t know what he thought was under there but he jumped back after he pulled up the toilet – LOL!)  I did see Winnie hiding against the grout wall of the linoleum and then she went under the linoleum before I could catch her.   If bugs can be surprised she certainly seemed surprised.  A few days later, Winnie appeared.
On 7/2/14 I saw a Spider Intruder.  A couple of times over the last year and a half, different  black house spiders would find their way to the web-tunnels around the toilet.  I worried that the spiders  would eat the webspinners so I would catch them to put them outside.  The last one got away under the toilet so my husband sealed the hole on the porch and I waited for several days before seeing a webspinner alive and well.
9 & 10.  TWINS:  Wilfred & Willard – 7/21/14.  Until the twins made an appearance, I had never seen 2 webspinners at one time.  I believe the twins were Winnie and Willie’s offspring.  I was fairly sure they were males because they made appearances as immature light brown webspinners.  The females only showed themselves as black adults, no doubt looking for mates.  Also, the young webspinners could turn around in the web tunnels which is a male behavior and which females never do.

Webspinner Twins:  Wilfred and Willard

Webspinner Twins: Wilfred and Willard

11.  ACTUALLY TRIPLETS!!:  Enter Wilbert.  Another immature male webspinner.
13.  Wilda – Not sure if Wilda started out as a male and then became a female or if she was a 4th offspring of Winnie and Willie.   Wilda always stayed around the back-yard grout area.
14.  Wally – 7/12/14 rescued Wally from the water-dish and put him in the back-yard grout area where he disappeared looking for Wilda.
15.  Waldo – 7/19/14 offspring of Wally and Wilda.  Another light brown immature male.  Waldo was ready to fly on 8/15/14 so I caught him and released him outside.
16.  Wilbur – 8/13/14 offspring of Wally and Wilda.  Wilbur also stayed in the backyard grout area.  Wilbur was ready to fly by 9/16/14 so I caught him and released him on the rose bush in the front yard.
Apparently, Wilbur was the last of the dynasty.   I can’t believe how much I miss them.  I’m working on a webspinner children’s book which may help children to realize the value of a bug.  The webspinners were with me from 12/20/12 until 9/16/14 – almost 2 years!!  I’ve learned that it is possible to get attached to specific insects and that they have their own unique personalities and habits.
Thought you’d like to know ;-).  I’m attaching a few pictures (this time ;-) ):
1.  Wynona building the tunnel up the front of the toilet.
2.  The “twins in tandem” in Wynona’s web that goes around the base of the toilet.
3.  Waldo saying “goodbye” as I released him outside.
Always,
Kathi

Waldo the Webspinner

Waldo the Webspinner

Hi there Kathi,
Thanks so much for your wonderful update on your Webspinner dynasty.  Good luck with your book.  As with your previous Love Webspinners submission, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination