Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: running on a trail
Location: Santa Rosa, California
April 1, 2014 7:10 pm
Greetings,
I was running on a trail in Southern California and came across this…… bug spider guy/gal. I stopped and noticed it was actually being attacked by an army of ants. Never seeing a spider this big in California I decided to pick it up with a stick. I managed to get the ants off and relocate the creature to a safer location.
Signature: Jamie

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Hi Jamie,
This beautiful spider is a Trapdoor Spider, but we are not certain of the genus or species.  It looks very similar to this
Aptostichus stanfordianus that is pictured on BugGuide.

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Thank you! It was quite beautiful and intriguing.

WE forgot to tag your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award for rescuing this Trapdoor Spider from the Ants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large black and red butterfly
Location: Phnom Penh, Cambodia
February 28, 2014 3:53 am
Dear WhatsThatBug.com,
I have just found this butterfly in the stairwell of my apartment building in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
It couldn’t find it’s way out and me and my teacher were worried that someone else would kill it. So I got a bowl and some paper and set it free outside. It flew all around the building for a while before we lost track of it.
I have seen this butterfly a few times and I’m just interested in it. Hopefully you can give me an answer.
Thank you
:)
Signature: Chloe (age 14)

Swallowtail

Common Rose Swallowtail

Hi Chloe,
When someone sends us an email that indicates unusual kindness to an insect or other bug, we like to tag that posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award, and your identification request is one of those postings.
  According to The Flying Kiwi Cambodian bug page:  “This is a common rose, a type of swallowtail butterfly.   They earn their name from their wide distribution, all the way from Afghanistan to China, and from belonging to the genus Atrophaneura, the red-bodied swallowtails.   In this case, the red body indicates to birds and other predators that the butterfly is toxic and distasteful to eat.”  Because this species is poisonous, other species have evolved to mimic it, and the Confessions of a Lepidopterist site states:  “The red spots on these butterflies [Common Mormons] were actually made to mimic another species of butterfly alltogether. The Crimson Rose butterfly (another one of my favourites) that is poisonous and therefore unedible to birds and other predators. The Common Mormon female (carrying the eggs and thus, the lifeline of the butterfly species) has evolved to mimic the wings of Crimson Rose butterflies thus avoiding being eaten. To the trained eye, however, these two butterflies can be distinguished quite simply. The Crimson Rose, as its name suggests come from the family of red-bodied swallowtails that is to say their bodies are colored a brilliant red, advertising the poison that actualy runs in their blood.”  According to TrekNature:  “The Common Rose (Atrophaneura (Pachliopta) aristolochiae) is a swallowtail butterfly belonging to the Pachliopta subgenus, the Roses, of the genus Atrophaneura or Red-bodied Swallowtails. It is a common butterfly which is extensively distributed across South and South East Asia.”    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Sitka, Alaska
January 24, 2014 11:20 pm
What kind of spider is this? Its kind of big as the newspaper lettering is about 3/4 of an inch..so the spider must be about over an inch long… I live in Sitka Alaska and I found this spider in the house around early December of 2013. I caught it using a glass mason jar. I released it outside after I took this pic of it. Thank you.
Signature: Don’t kill any bugs please

Ground Spider

Hackelmesh WeaverSpider

We believe this is a Ground Spider in the family Corinnidae, possibly in the genus Castianeira.  You can see some similar looking spiders on BugGuide.  For your kindness to the lower beasts, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

On Fri, Jan 31, 2014 at 9:08 AM, daniel marlos wrote:
Hi Mandy,
Any thoughts on this critter?
Daniel

Hi Daniel,
That one is a female “hacklemesh weaver” in the genus Callobius, family Amaurobiidae. There are only two species recorded from Alaska: C. nomeus and C. pictus.  Of those two species, C. pictus is the one that usually has faintly banded legs like this Sitka specimen has.  Callobius aren’t your run-of-the-mill house spiders, so this one probably got in accidentally, or was carried in on firewood if the photographer uses a wood stove or fireplace. They are really gorgeous spiders in person, vibrant burgundy or wine-colored!
Mandy

Wow, thanks Mandy,
I will look for some links.
Daniel

You’re welcome. =)  Here’s also a link to the Callobius section at BugGuide: http://bugguide.net/node/view/18812/bgpage.  Not every species is represented there yet, but we have some examples of both the Alaskan species (nomeus & pictus).
Geez, I can’t believe we’re already a month into 2014! Time goes too fast. Happy Chinese New Year to you too!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southern House Spider?
Location: Richmond, VA
December 17, 2013 10:22 pm
I found this little friend behind my couch while looking for something. She appears to be a southern house spider.
What are they like — temperament, environment, bite, etc?
I have her in a jar. I might find a more semi-permanent solution for her later (a container I used to house a baby terrestrial tarantula who outgrew it). I don’t want her to go back to her home behind my couch (I found her webs as well as evidence of past feasts she made of escaped tarantula food — I think we’ve been “roomies” for some time, and I’ve found young males inside before as well) because I don’t want her to get squished or for her to end up in a situation where she might feel the need to bite — or to get eaten by my dog. However I don’t want to throw her outside because it’s very cold right now (I realize she is a native wild animal, but I don’t know what her species does to combat the cold, if anything special — I don’t want to just throw her out into the cold unprepared). I was thinking I could feed her for a few months and release her in an abandoned barn on a local plantation this spring.
Can you give me any general information on these guys, and confirm that she is what I think she is? Thanks!
Signature: Denise Elliott

Female Southern House Spider

Female Southern House Spider

Hi Denise,
We concur with your identification of this female Southern House Spider which looks exactly like this individual posted to BugGuide.  There is not much information on the Southern House Spider on the BugGuide info page, except for this comment: “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”  So, she is totally harmless, but that does discount that a large individual might bite if carelessly handled.  We will turn elsewhere to seek additional information.  According to Featured Creatures:  “Females may live up to eight years” which means you might want to entertain the idea of keeping her as a pet as long as you have tarantula rearing experience.  While Spiders.us does not have any information on the bite, there is a photo of a large female being held.  Some of the best firsthand information we found is on a BugGuide posting by Mamata Polle who writes:  “These make suprisingly good house guests if you can tolerate their highly effective, (Though not very pretty,) web making style. Females tend to stay put until either they grow out of their retreat, they are starving to death, or their web is destroyed. For the past 13 years I’ve been living with this type of spider and have never been bitten by one, they are docile and very good at snaring flies, roaches and other household invaders. Usually when I see their webs I just leave them be, but one of our cats has recently decided he likes to eat spider webs… (Weird huh,) and that is how I ended up with Kholi, (Pictured above.) She was wandering around looking to rebuild her web where it had been, (And said cat would have come back to eat it again!) so I decided to capture and provide a home for her. She produces webbing as needed and without hesitation, which is good because she won’t eat without it! Southern House Spiders totally depend on their webs to catch food; their eyesight is poor, so they seem to, “Feel” their prey when it gets stuck and squirms, then they pounce. It is VERY dificult to get them to eat from a pair of tweezers, one must be very… patient. However they will take water very easily when they’re dehydrated, even off your finger. The first time I had one do this I thought it was biting me, but it wasn’t, it was just sucking the water out of my damp hands, which didn’t hurt. One of the best ways to distiguish this species other than their general appearence is the very fine silver hair they possess, which is most visible at the joints.  BTW: They will sometimes very convincingly play dead when threatened…:P And if they don’t mate, they can live an incredibly long time. (I have been watching one adult female for three years!)  Be Well, God Bless and Thanks for Reading. :)”
Regardless if decide to keep her as a pet or to release her back into a plantation barn in the spring, because of your sensitivity regarding the welfare of this female Southern House Spider, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Large Black Torpedo-Shaped Insect
Location: Franklin County, TN
November 16, 2013 10:10 pm
Hello-
First off, I love your site! Keep up the great work!
I’m writing for two reasons:
… My wife and I have a very good relationship with the surrounding wildlife and exercise a no-kill policy 99.9% of the time (red wasps (in the house only) being the exception). …
Two, I wanted to send you a photo of a female Hercules Beetle that somehow found her way into our house. I found her on her back, with both our cats staring at her in utter confusion. They were kittens then, and the beetle must have seemed enormous to them. I feel quite honored to have seen this beetle, as I know it’s rather uncommon to encounter one. I relocated her to some moist woody ground under one of our pecan trees, but I took a handful of photos of her before I left her. I only have space to upload one of them, but I have several other good ones if you’d like them. I figured if anyone would appreciate her, it would be you!
Thanks again for your hard work, and hopefully for some help with my shiny black porch insect!
Signature: Laine

Female Hercules Beetle

Female Hercules Beetle

Hi again Laine,
Because of the care you took in relocating this female Eastern Hercules Beetle, because of your nearly no-kill policy and because of your passionate comment regarding killing Cow Killers, we are tagging this post with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Hey again-
Thanks so much! You just made my day, big time. My wife and I love your site and will be contributing more soon. No shortage of amazing six- and eight-legged creatures to photograph at our rural TN home. We’ve had two incredible run-ins with Luna Moths, thanks to the 100-year-old black walnut tree behind our house, but so far the only photos I’ve managed to get are not worthy of your site. Still, truly special to have seen such an elusive creature. One night one flew into me and literally walked up my T-shirt flapping her wings, until she got to my face and flew away. Thanks again for the honor of the Bug Humanitarian Award!
Best,
Laine.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTF
Location: Long Beach CA
November 14, 2013 5:30 pm
I was minding my own business watching TV when THIS went shooting across my living room floor. I trapped it under a glass until my husband could take it outside. It was acting fairly aggressive, standing up on its hind legs and dancing around. It had green fangs and was about three feet long (my husband says more like half an inch but it DID have green fangs and it DID have murder in its eyes). Is it a jumping spider? Is it going to kill me and my family? BTW you should know that your website is the only reason the spider isn’t dead right now. I’m still terrified of spiders but thanks to you, I try not to kill them anymore.
Signature: Moving out if I see another one of these in my house

Possibly Bold Jumper

Possibly Bold Jumper

Dear Moving …,
We would advise you not to move because you will most likely encounter spiders wherever you go.  You are correct that this is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and we believe this might be a Bold Jumper,
Phidippus audax, based on this photo posted to BugGuide.  The Bold Jumper is found in Los Angeles, and it is a highly variable spider, with many individual having bright red and white markings.  We have several images of Jumping Spiders with green fangs in our archives.  Though it is possible to get bitten by a large Jumping Spider, the bite is mild and not considered dangerous.  Because of your kindness despite your fears, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award, and we are positively thrilled to learn that our site has had a positive impact on your tolerance levels toward the lower beasts.  If it is any consolation, Jumping Spiders like this one will help to control other unwanted visitors, including flies and cockroaches.

Thank you, What’s That Bug, I’m truly honored! Still freaked out and possibly moving to Antarctica, but honored. Thanks for all you guys do, your website rocks.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination