Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
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Subject: SE Oregon in March
Location: Near Malheur Basin in Burns, OR
March 27, 2015 10:10 am
Found this crawling across a parking lot in Burns, OR. Looks almost cockroach-like, but doesn’t have antennae.
Signature: Visiting in Burns

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Dear Visiting in Burns,
This is a Giant Water Bug or Toe-Biter, an aquatic predator that can also fly from pond to pond in search of prey.
  The Giant Water Bug was our featured Bug of the Month in June 2008.

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Subject: Bug from natural pool near Chiang Mai, Thailand
Location: Near Chiang Mai, Thailand
March 7, 2015 10:14 pm
G’day Bugman,
My wife and I were enjoying our honeymoon throughout SE Asia, and in one spot near Chiang Mai I came across an insect the likes I have never encountered before
Signature: John

Water Strider

Water Strider

Dear John,
This is a Water Strider in the family Gerridae, a group of insects that are also known as “Pond Skaters, Jesus Bugs, Water Skippers” according to BugGuide, a North American insect website.  Water Striders skim across ponds and other bodies of water on long legs that distribute the insect’s weight so as not to break the tension of the surface of the water.
  Water Striders prey on insects that fall into the water.  Here is an image from the Insects of Thailand site.  We suspect your individual is immature as it does not have fully developed wings, but we cannot say for certain as we believe some species of Water Striders are wingless. 

Water Strider

Water Strider

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Subject: Molting aquatic life form
Location: Lucas County, Ohio
March 6, 2015 12:37 pm
One of my volunteers found this insect (I think), molting in her collecting tub of vernal pool water in mid-July in NW Ohio. The pool is isolated, nowhere near a creek, pond, or lake. The attached pictures are 20x if I remember correctly (other option is 40x) and were taken in the field. We watched it struggle free of the larval skin under the microscope. The skin shape reminds me of a damselfly nymph. Could this possibly be the pupal form? I’ve tried to count legs of both larvae and the skin, magnify head shape etc, but I am still stumped.
Signature: Eileen

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

Dear Eileen,
We cannot say for certain what creature this is, but we have some thoughts.  If the tub collected rain water, any insects present would need to have either developed from an egg laid by a flying insect or been transported from another water source on the bodies of a bird or other creature that visited the pool.  This creature reminds us somewhat of an aerial view of a mosquito tumbler, the pupal form.  Most images online are side views, but BugGuide does contain an aerial view that looks similar.  We hope someone more skilled at aquatic identifications can provide some input.

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the reply. This was found in a collecting bucket, about a
quart of water taken from a huge vernal pool that has a wild egg bank
in the bottom of the pool when it is dry. I agree, it does resemble a
top view of a mosquito tumbler. It was definitely squirming out of the
nearby exoskeleton though, and the legs on that shell have spurs on
them – not found on mosquito larvae. It’s always possible that larvae
can get caught up in other exoskeletons as they’re wriggling about,
but in the one picture there are definite legs on the new critter.
Thanks very much for trying. I use this as an example for my
volunteers – there is always something new to be found in a vernal
pool and it can’t always be identified!
Eileen

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

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Subject: Trying to identify bug in pool
Location: Martinique
November 22, 2014 10:00 am
Can you help identify what this is please ?
I found it swimming in our pool after a few days of heavy rains.
Signature: Matthew

Backswimmers

Backswimmers

Dear Matthew,
These aquatic true bugs are Backswimmers in the family Notonectidae.  According to BugGuide they are:  “Aquatic bugs that often swim upside-down. When resting at the surface, body is typically tilted with the head downward”
and they “Prey on other aquatic insects and sometimes on small vertebrates.”  Backswimmers can fly, which enables them to seek a new home if their pond dries out.  We don’t know what would have caused them to relocate to your pool after the rains.

Daniel,
Thank you very much for your reply.
Fantastic info. My son has taken matters into his own hands and relocated them to another improvised pool. They’re doing well.
Can they fly far ? Perhaps the winds carried them a little further than normal.
Also, my pool is a salt based pool rather than chlorine, would that allow them to survive better than in the latter ?

Dear Matthew,
Since Backswimmers are predators, they will not remain in a body of water that does not provide a food supply.  Insects will not live in a chlorinated pool, but many insects will fall into the water.  Backswimmers are air breathers, and if the chlorine is not strong, we imagine they can survive in a chlorinated pool.  We also believe there are some species that can inhabit brackish water, which is a blend of fresh and salt water.  They can fly considerable distances.

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Subject: Bug in Dam
Location: Taggerty, North East Victoria, Australia
November 18, 2014 2:26 am
Hi there,
I was taking photos of dragonfly over my parents dam when I noticed this guy staring at me.
This photo was taken in Taggerty, (north east) Victoria, Australia. We’re at the end of spring but it’s been quite a hot spring. Never seen anything like it before and it was about an one maybe one and a half inches long.
Thanks for your time
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Subject: Bug In Dam Update
Location: Taggery, Victoria, Australia
November 19, 2014 2:03 am
I sent a ID request yesterday about a bug i saw laying on a lillypad that i’d never seen before. Well today i went back to take a look and i think it’s shed it’s skin?? Thought it might help to ID it if you get the time.
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Dragonfly Exuvia

Dragonfly Exuvia

After having had a look on line i think this might actually be a dragonfly nymph! i did notice what i think is a red dragonfly, yesterday i only noticed one red one and today there was definitely two bright red ones.

Dear Cait,
You are correct that is a Dragonfly Naiad, and your second image is of the exuvia or cast off exoskeleton.  Dragonfly Naiads are aquatic predator, and when the time for metamorphosis nears, the naiad leaves the water and climbs a vertical surface, like the grasses depicted in your second image, and there it molts for a final time, flying off as an adult Dragonfly.

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Subject: Large bug in pond seems to be eating frog spawn
Location: Aisen, Patagonia, Chile
October 26, 2014 11:31 am
A few years ago we made a pond in our garden in Patagonia, Chile. A few weeks ago a frog laid some spawn and three weeks later we wondered what had happened to the developing tadpoles, then looked closely and spotted several long insects slightly below the water, congregated around the spawn, which now contained only one of the tiny tadpoles. The insects seem to be sprouting wings. Are they a type of dragonfly?
Signature: Paul Coleman

Naiad:  Possibly Dragonfly nymph with frog eggs

Naiad: Possibly Dragonfly nymph with frog eggs

Dear Paul,
The insect in your image is an aquatic nymph of a flying insect, known as a Naiad.  It is very likely that the naiad will develop into a Dragonfly.

Dragonfly Naiad, we believe

Dragonfly Naiad, we believe

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