Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 4 legged aquatic “Walking Stick”bug?
Location: Concord, MA
August 21, 2016 7:29 pm
While kayaking along the Concord River (Concord, MA) on August 21, 2016 I encountered this 4 legged insect atop a clump of decaying, floating weeds. At first the thought of a “Walking Stick” came to mind. But upon closer examination noticed the 4 legs (4 legs?). It was also about 4 inches long (body). Definitely not a Walking Stick! So what is this bug? I apologize for the picture qualities as I was moving (wind/current) and trying to capture this insect with a telephoto lens in a macro attempt.
Signature: dpsrams

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear dpsrams,
This unusual aquatic insect is a Water Scorpion in the genus
Ranatra.  Though only four of the legs are used for walking, the front pair of legs are raptorial, and they are used to capture and hold small aquatic creatures while the Water Scorpion sucks the life sustaining fluids from the body of the prey.  Water Scorpions are also capable of flying from pond to pond which comes in handy if conditions cause one pond to dry out.

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stick looking bug in a stream
Location: Bridgeport, CA
August 21, 2016 10:48 am
I found this bug crawling in the water in a stream near Bridgeport, CA.
Signature: Leonard Powell

Caseworm

Caseworm

Dear Leonard,
This is a Caddisfly Larva, commonly called a Caseworm.  Each species of Caseworm constructs a case for protection that looks distinctly different from the cases of other species of Caddisfly.  The cases may be constructed of sticks, shells, sand, or other debris.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pool bug
Location: perth, Australia (Ed. Note:  We needed clarification on the location.)
August 19, 2016 3:57 am
I found heaps of these bugs walking amongst the leaves in the bottom of my pool. They were alive and well and did not seem to be phased being in or out of the water
Signature: djr

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear djr,
This is the aquatic larval form of a Dragonfly, known as a naiad.  Is your location Perth in Australia or Canada?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug in my pond?
Location: Central Pennsylvania
August 16, 2016 6:44 am
Hello.
Recently, I found this bug swimming around in my pond. It is summer here. There are a lot of them in there and they generally stay in the water. They don’t skim on top of the water like most bugs I’ve seen in my pond so I am curious. A lot of the time my fish will chase them around and they are very fast. Faster than the fish actually. Their color looks like that of a green and black tadpole but they obviously don’t look like tadpoles. I don’t know if these bugs are dangerous to my pond or fish and I would be very greatfull if you could help me identify it.
Signature: Makayla

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Makayla,
This is the aquatic larva or naiad of a Dragonfly.  Though they normally crawl among aquatic vegetation in search of prey, and when threatened, Dragonfly naiads are able to move more quickly through the water.  According to the Dragonfly Website:  “They easily propel themselves by expelling water out of their body through the anus.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gray bug came out of water
Location: Cumberland county nj
July 11, 2016 3:47 am
My husband had his feet in the river and this grayish bug climbed onto his leg, not sure if it fell in the river and was trying to get out or if it lives in water. Can’t find this bug in any of the books I have or on the internet
Signature: Anyway

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Anyway,
This is the aquatic larva of Naiad of a Dragonfly.  Dragonfly larvae are aquatic predators and when they are nearing maturity, they climb up onto plants growing out of the water, dock pylons or other vertical surfaces protruding from the water so that they can molt and emerge as winged adults.  Your husbands leg presented the perfect surface to accomplish this metamorphosis.  Your Naiad looks like the images on TroutNut that are identified as being in the family Gomphidae.  According to BugGuide, members of the family Gomphidae are known as Clubtails. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug in Maine
Location: Minot, ME
June 4, 2016 3:18 pm
Hello!
Our five year old son was recently catching frogs in the pond at our house and was “bit” by this strange bug. We then noticed that the pond was full of them. They have six legs, are aggressive, swim, also walk on land, two pinchers on the head as well as two small pinchers on the tail.
Signature: Colbath Family

Water Tiger

Water Tiger

Dear Colbath Family,
This is a Water Tiger, a common name for the larva of the Predaceous Diving Beetles in the family Dytiscidae, and it is most likely in the genus
Dytiscus, based on this BugGuide image.

Water Tiger

Water Tiger

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination