Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hola from Buenos Aires!
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
August 22, 2015 2:30 am
My son sent me this picture of a beetle he found on his way home from work lat night. He lives in Olivos, which is a suburb of Buenos Aires, Argentina. He couldn’t identify it, but we offered a guess that it was some type of cicada. Do you guys agree with our assessment?
Thanks!
Signature: Rich Williams

Giant Water Bug

Giant Water Bug

Dear Rich,
This is NOT a beetle or a Cicada.  It is a Giant Water Bug, an aquatic True Bug that is also capable of flying.  They are frequently attracted to lights and in North America they are sometimes called Electric Light Bugs, but more commonly they are called Toe-Biters because waders are sometimes surprised by a painful bite if they step on them in shallow water.  Giant Water Bugs are aquatic predators with mouths designed to pierce the prey and suck the fluids from the body.  Though painful to humans, the bite is not considered dangerous.

Norman Gems, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger, Jessica Lucas, Jennifer Edelman, Aundrea Murillo-Faynik liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it
Location: San Isabel national forest, Colorado
August 18, 2015 4:13 pm
I found this critter in a unnamed lake at about 12,000 ft. There was only this creature, leaches and small invertabreas that looked like minnows. Under closer inspection they were not minnows but a small swimming animal using cilia to move. I have found pictures close to this mystery animal but nothing exact. Also, was wondering if there may be a guess at what the smaller swimming creatures were too, (sorry blurry pic).
Signature: Adam

Predaceous Diving Beetle Larva

Predaceous Diving Beetle Larva

Dear Adam,
This magnificent aquatic predator is a Water Tiger, a Predaceous Diving Beetle larva, probably in the genus
Dystycus based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, they can be identified by the following features:  “Larvae with prominent cerci and dense lateral fringes of hair on the last 2 abdominal segments and cerci. The anterior portion of the head is rounded.”  We cannot make out anything in your blurry image, but we suspect the “small swimming animal using cilia to move” is a Fairy Shrimp.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Ann Levitsky, Lake Eleni liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in our pond
Location: Central Texas
August 15, 2015 1:26 pm
Ok I have no idea what this bug is but it freaks me out. I’ve looked on all these different websites trying to identify it but have never been able to. It has 6 legs and like a stinger looking thing on its butt.
Signature: Hannah

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Hannah,
You have Dragonfly Naiads, the aquatic nymphs that will eventually metamorphose into the familiar winged adult Dragonflies.  Dragonflies are predators their entire lives.  Adult Dragonflies prey upon flying insects including mosquitoes, and the naiads help to control populations of wrigglers and tumblers, the aquatic larvae and pupae of Mosquitoes.

Dragonfly Naiads

Dragonfly Naiads

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Odd beetle/roach
Location: Johnston, Iowa
July 19, 2015 8:52 pm
Hi there,
My dad and I found this bug in a window well behind our house while cleaning out a lot of leaves. The bug was pretty big- as large as any roach that I’ve ever seen in Iowa.
The window well is on the north side of the house and behind a large hosta. A couple weeks ago the downspout detached and with 5″ of rain the well flooded and water flowed into the basement through the window. So it is fairly moist down there. We also found two frogs/toads in the well.
Anyway, this bug was found on 7/19/2015 in Johnston, Iowa. Our neighborhood is relatively flat and we live within half mile to a creek that eventually feeds into the Des Moines River.
Signature: Coen Wiberg

Giant Water Scavenger Beetle

Giant Water Scavenger Beetle

Dear Coen,
What a nice discovery.  This is a Giant Water Scavenger Beetle in the genus
Hydrophilus which you can verify by comparing your image to this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they can be found in:  “stagnant/slow waters; prefer deeper water (weedy ponds, deep drainage ditches)” and “Some adults overwinter on land, under leaf litter. Others may remain under ice of ponds and stay active all winter. Lifespan may exceed one year. Adults may be found at lights in summer as they disperse.”  If there was a light in the window well, it might have attracted this Giant Water Scavenger Beetle, and if there was also water present at the time, it may have found the location to its liking.

Sue Dougherty, Claire Kooyman, Jessica M. Schemm, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?!
Location: Shenandoah Valley – Virginia
July 1, 2015 6:50 am
Bug found in river tank (keeping/growing fish) — no idea what it is!? Some type of stink bug maybe??
Signature: officially creeped out!

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear officially creeped out!,
There is nothing to be creeped out about.  This is the Naiad or larva of a Dragonfly.  The Naiads are aquatic, and they eventually mature and metamorphose into winged Dragonflies. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water scorpion
Location: college station TX
June 5, 2015 9:05 am
This guy was found drifting in the pool I scooped him out and put him in some freshwater and was gonna release him the next day in a proper area rather than a salt water pool. He died the next day I keep it as a specimen. I plan on keeping a toe biter until it reaches full growth.
Signature: -Tay

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear Tay,
Water Scorpions and their aquatic True Bug relatives the Toe-Biters, are amazing creatures.  As they are predators that will bite if carelessly handled, one should use caution.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site next week while we are out of the office.

Compost Teana's Organic Landscapes, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination