Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Odd beetle/roach
Location: Johnston, Iowa
July 19, 2015 8:52 pm
Hi there,
My dad and I found this bug in a window well behind our house while cleaning out a lot of leaves. The bug was pretty big- as large as any roach that I’ve ever seen in Iowa.
The window well is on the north side of the house and behind a large hosta. A couple weeks ago the downspout detached and with 5″ of rain the well flooded and water flowed into the basement through the window. So it is fairly moist down there. We also found two frogs/toads in the well.
Anyway, this bug was found on 7/19/2015 in Johnston, Iowa. Our neighborhood is relatively flat and we live within half mile to a creek that eventually feeds into the Des Moines River.
Signature: Coen Wiberg

Giant Water Scavenger Beetle

Giant Water Scavenger Beetle

Dear Coen,
What a nice discovery.  This is a Giant Water Scavenger Beetle in the genus
Hydrophilus which you can verify by comparing your image to this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they can be found in:  “stagnant/slow waters; prefer deeper water (weedy ponds, deep drainage ditches)” and “Some adults overwinter on land, under leaf litter. Others may remain under ice of ponds and stay active all winter. Lifespan may exceed one year. Adults may be found at lights in summer as they disperse.”  If there was a light in the window well, it might have attracted this Giant Water Scavenger Beetle, and if there was also water present at the time, it may have found the location to its liking.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?!
Location: Shenandoah Valley – Virginia
July 1, 2015 6:50 am
Bug found in river tank (keeping/growing fish) — no idea what it is!? Some type of stink bug maybe??
Signature: officially creeped out!

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear officially creeped out!,
There is nothing to be creeped out about.  This is the Naiad or larva of a Dragonfly.  The Naiads are aquatic, and they eventually mature and metamorphose into winged Dragonflies. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water scorpion
Location: college station TX
June 5, 2015 9:05 am
This guy was found drifting in the pool I scooped him out and put him in some freshwater and was gonna release him the next day in a proper area rather than a salt water pool. He died the next day I keep it as a specimen. I plan on keeping a toe biter until it reaches full growth.
Signature: -Tay

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear Tay,
Water Scorpions and their aquatic True Bug relatives the Toe-Biters, are amazing creatures.  As they are predators that will bite if carelessly handled, one should use caution.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site next week while we are out of the office.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this
Location: south carolina
June 4, 2015 7:10 am
I found these in my dogs water bowl. I thought they were tadpoles until I took a closer look. Any ideas?
Signature: megan

Mosquito Larvae

Mosquito Larvae

Hi Megan,
Out of curiosity, how often do you change your dog’s water?  These are Mosquito Larvae and they are generally found in stagnant water.

I normally change it daily, but last week was crazy and I missed a couple of days…never again. Thank you for letting me know what they are. They have been in a jar for 3 days (and are now disposed of).

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stick insect like thing
Location: Pond, England, Surrey ,Guildford
April 25, 2015 2:25 am
I was wondering if you could help me with a discovery that I found in my pond. I was clearing out duck weed when I found what I can only describe as a stick insect running across the water. It is about 2cm long and it has 6 legs and 2 antennae on a long thin body.
I have searched lots and lots of websites but I still cannot find out what it is.
Signature: From katie wright age 12

Water Scorpion

Water Strider or Water Scorpion???

Dear Katie,
This is a predatory, aquatic True Bug, and at first we thought it was in the family Nepidae whose members are commonly called Water Scorpions as they will deliver a painful, though not dangerous bite if they are carelessly handled.  When we reread your submission, we realized you stated it was  “running across the water.”  We apologize for the error, but since it was on top of the water, it is more likely a Water Strider in the family Gerridae.  We wish your images had greater detail.

Correction:  Water Measurer
Thanks to a comment we received, we now know that this is a Water Measurer in the family Hydrometridae and we learned on BugGuide that they are found “on emergent/floating vegetation along edges of ponds, marshes, and pools of slow-moving streams”
and that they feed upon “newly emerged, slow-moving, dying, or dead invertebrates (midges, mosquito larvae, bloodworms, ostracods, springtails, etc.)”  BioImages UK has some nice images.

Thank you sooooooo much I am really really pleased that you found out what it was. I can’t believe how good you were at identifying. If someone ever poses a question like that to me I will definately recommend you. I will ask my mum if I can make a donation

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Classification
Location: East Central Texas
April 24, 2015 11:57 pm
I need help identifying this organism. This image is under 40x magnification under a microscope. It was pulled from a pond in East Central Texas, and appeared to be sucking water through its anus as a way over breathing in the water.
Signature: Kendrick

Hatchling Dragonfly Naiad

Hatchling Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Kendrick,
This appears to be a very young, perhaps recently hatched, Dragonfly Naiad.  There are many types of flying insects like Dragonflies, Damselflies, Stoneflies and Mayflies that have aquatic nymphs that are known as Naiads.  The water action that you observed is nicely explained by Charles Hogue in his excellent book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “Human beings are latecomers in the use of jet propulsion.  by porcibly expelling water from its rectum, the dragonfly nymph can drive its body forward through the water at great speed.  This is an emergency method of locomotion that is employed principally to evade enemies.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination