Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found Bug
Location: Surrey, BC Canada
April 10, 2014 8:03 am
Found this bug outside @ my work in Surrey, BC Canada. Just wondering what it is.
Signature: Kelly

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Hi Kelly,
Our response to you yesterday was just a quick identification that this is a Toe-Biter, and we would like to elaborate a bit now that we have a moment.  Toe-Biters or Giant Water Bugs are also called Electric Light Bugs since they are attracted to lights.  They are aquatic predators that are capable of flying from pond to pond if the habitat dries up.  The bite is reported to be quite painful, and many a wader has encountered a Giant Water Bug with painful results, hence the common name of Toe-Biter.  Because of their large size and unusual appearance, the Toe-Biter is one of our most frequent identification requests.  As a side note, Giant Water Bugs are edible and their larger Asian cousins are considered a delicacy in Thailand.

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is it
Location: western wa state
March 25, 2014 11:07 am
Found in western wa state
Signature: sonny

Possibly Water Nymph?

Possibly Water Nymph?

Dear sonny,
Are you able to provide any additional details?  Was the sighting near water?  This is obviously a nymph, and the front half of its body looks aquatic, while the rear end looks arboreal.  We will attempt to discover this immature insect’s identity.  It is going to have really big eyes.

Immediate Update:  Small Western Green Drake
Hi again sonny.  We quickly identified this Small Green Drake,
Drunella coloradensis, on the Troutnut website.  Here is a photo from BugGuide, which reports sightings in the Pacific Northwest, including Washington.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found odd bug in youth
Location: Shallow water in a lake
March 17, 2014 8:44 am
When I was younger I found an odd aquatic insect when I went to a local camp. I caught it and put it into a bucket of sand and water. Later It was preserved as part of an insect collection I used for 4-H under the most-likely false name “Water Cockroach”. I recently discovered my old insect collection when moving and noticed the insect once more. I tried looking it up based on what little I could describe it by. It appears to be a nymph, but of what I’m completely uncertain. It would be great if I could learn what it was if only to rectify it’s label after all these years.
Additional description of the insect portrays the insect to be roughly the size of a quarter, brad and flat, about as thick as one. Mud colored, most likely for camouflage. Adept at burrowing under the mud/sand as it attempted to do so when confined in the bucket (though it was a 5 gallon bucket).
I do so apologize for the terrible resolution of the pictures but I did not have a proper image capturing device at the time and was forced to use my webcam.
Signature: Spars with Mantids

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear Spars with Mantids,
The larval nymphs of many flying insects live in water, and they are collectively known as Naiads.  These include Mayflies, Stoneflies, Damselflies and Dragonflies.  This is a Dragonfly Naiad, more specifically, the Naiad of a Dragonhunter,
Hagenius brevistylus.  Dragonhunter Naiads are very well camouflaged among fallen leaves at the bottom of ponds.

Thank you ever so much for you kind help. I’m glad to finally be able to put a name to this odd little guy after all these years.
Sincerely,
Spars with Mantids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified larva in pond
Location: NNorthern Central Valley California.
March 14, 2014 10:09 am
I started a new frog pond and began seeing Mosquito larva. At first I hunted them down individually with a turkey baster and got rid of them until I suddenly had hundreds! I purchased a biological remedy safe for other wildlife and all the mosquito larva disappeared overnight thankfully. BUT there are some other larva that were unaffected. The behavior is similar to a mosquito larva as they wiggle underwater when I shine a flashlight on them but they are oval shaped when viewed from above as they keep their tailed curled underneath them. they have two tiny nubs of an antenna as well. I caught one and observed it (Too small for a picture really although I will make the attempt). But they resemble a small grammarian and most definitely have metallic green coloring as well as black. I put it right back into the pond thinking perhaps it may be a larva of something beneficial??? I absolutely love your site and use it often! Thanks!
I have already submitted this once but after poking around on the net I found a much better picture posted by someone from Colorado. I used a bacterial larvacide to get rid of the hundreds of mosquito larva in my newish pond yet these were unaffected. Behaviorally they act very much like mosquito larva but look very different. I have captured two and I am keeping them to see what develops. The other person who posted this image was unsuccessful after posting his picture on ten sites. I will not simply eradicate any animal no matter how small unless it is harmful. West Nile is active in my area so mosquitos are sentenced to death immediately but I want to give these little buggers a chance.
Signature: All life (unless it sucks blood) lover

Mosquito Pupa

Mosquito Pupa

Dear All life (unless it sucks your blood) lover,
Your remedy might have gotten rid of the Mosquito Larvae, but it did not eliminate the next stage in the metamorphosis process, the Mosquito Pupae.  This is a Mosquito Pupa, sometimes called a Tumbler, while the larvae are called Wrigglers.

Solved my own riddle!  They are Mosquito pupae and I imagine because they do not eat at this stage they are immune to the bacterial larvacide.  Luckily there are only a few that reached this stage and I am hunting them down with my trusty Turkey baster!  Love your site!  Thank you so much for the reply, I poked around on the internet and found an answer.  I am hunting these things down individually with a turkey baster and putting them into a jar with bleach.  Thank you so much for the reply.  I and my children use your site constantly.  Thank you again!

We fully understand your war on bloodsuckers.  Here at the offices of WTB?, we catch Mosquito Larvae and Pupae and feed them to our Angelfish.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small beetle needs identifying
Location: Midlands, UK
March 13, 2014 5:24 am
Hi,
I founf several of these small beetles in a wheat field in the UK. They have light bodies, ridged/bumpy elytra and a dark head. I can’t seem to identify it though. Do you know what species it is?
Signature: H Watkins

Unknown Beetles

Possibly Water Scavenger Beetles

Dear H Watkins,
We don’t recognize your beetles, which means we must research.  Preparing questions and images for posting takes time, and our time this morning is running short, so we are posting your images and we hope to attempt an identification as well this morning, but we may not be able to provide you with a response immediately.

Unknown Beetles

Unknown Beetles

Eric Eaton provides a very interesting identification:  Water Scavenger Beetles
Daniel:
Two of us are thinking the beetles might be water scavenger beetles (family Hydrophilidae).  Not all of them are strictly aquatic as adults, and as Doug Yanega said:  Haven’t they had a lot of rain in the UK this year?  So, if the wheat fields were flooded, or even just “soggy,” it is a fair bet to say that is what the beetles are.
Eric

Another Update from Eric Eaton:  March 17, 2014
Ok, got a more specific reply from Michael Geiser:  “Yup, I would suspect Helophorus nubilus, a species with costate elytra, well-known from wheat fields in England (even reported as a “pest species”). But I’ll wait for Robert’s reply, as he’s the expert…”
So, yes, a water scavenger beetle!
Eric

Another Update from Eric Eaton:  March 22, 2014
Daniel:
Please meet Clive Turner, a coleopterist interested in the beetles, which turn out to be a different species (not Helophorus nubilus, but a different one).  I will let Clive fill you in…..
He is interested in obtaining the specimens if the person who wrote to WTB still has them.  Thanks!
Sincerely,
Eric

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: never seen it before..
Location: Bad Dürkheim, Rhineland Palatinate, Germany
March 9, 2014 3:40 pm
hey bugman!
I am from Germany, exactly from Rhineland Palatinate.
So I opend the trunk of my car yesterday and a huge bug just lay there.. It tried to cover up, I guess.
It was already dead when I found it.
I have never seen something like this! Really big and colour was golden and green, it also got huge eyes.
It would be awesome if you know what kind of bug it is!
thank you!
Sarah
Signature: Sarah

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Hi Sarah,
This is an aquatic beetle, most likely a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the family Dytiscidae.  Like many aquatic insects, Predaceous Diving Beetles are capable of flying from one body of water to another.  Your individual bears a resemblance to
Cybister laterimarginalis, a European species that is pictured on the Polish website Iconographia Coleopterorum Poloniae and on Wikimedia Commons

Predaceous Diving Beetle

Predaceous Diving Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination