Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water Scorpion?
Location: Germantown, Ohio
October 19, 2016 3:49 pm
I found this dude in the creek today while fossil hunting. I picked up a piece of granite from the water and there he was. I believe he’s some some of sediment deposit feeder as I saw him eating dirt off the rock. I took a few pictures and a video and set him back in the water. Let me know what you think!
Signature: Carly W

Stonefly Naiad

Stonefly Naiad

Dear Carly,
This looks like the aquatic larva of a Stonefly, known as a naiad.  Compare your individual to this individual posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a water scorpion?
Location: St Clair, N.S.W 2759
September 19, 2016 10:28 pm
Hi, my son and I are very big on insect spotting, this one popped up on our back porch and we have never seen anything like it. I have been researching for days to try figure out what he is and water scorpion is the closest I have come but we live out in the suburbs with no lakes,rivers or ponds anywhere.
Signature: Mummy and Noah

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear Mummy and Noah,
This is indeed a Water Scorpion, and they are able to fly great distances in search of water.  According to Sportsman Creek Conservation Area:  “They can ambush fast swimming prey such as small fish catching them between their front legs and stabbing them with their pointed probiscus.  Known as Toe-biters able to inflict a nasty nip although this specimen played dead when disturbed. Water Scorpions are also capable fliers and inhabit waterholes over much of Australia.”  According to the Queensland Museum, Australian Water Scorpions are in the genus
Laccotrephes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Black Hills National Forest SD
September 15, 2016 6:30 pm
Hello, these bugs were swarming around our house, falling on the roof like rain drops from the sky. We live in the Black Hills in South Dakota. Lots of ponderosa pine trees and some spruce. We saw them in September.
Signature: Dan

Backswimmer

Backswimmer

Dear Dan,
This is a Backswimmer, an aquatic True Bug that is also capable of flying.  Are you currently experiencing a dry spell?  It is possible that a nearby pond is drying out and these Backswimmers are seeking a new aquatic environment.  You can compare your image to this BugGuide image of
Notonecta undulata.  Of the family, BugGuide notes:  “Aquatic bugs that often swim upside-down. When resting at the surface, body is typically tilted with the head downward.”  BugGuide also notes that they are also commonly called “Water Bees, Water Wasps” because they occasionally bite swimmers.

Thanks so much. That’s exactly what it is. Not knowing was driving us crazy.  Dan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water insect
Location: Salisbury, North Carolina
September 8, 2016 6:22 am
Good morning!
I found this little guy in water on my deck. It’s about 9/16 inches long and wiggles like a mosquito larvae. Any information on this would be very much appreciated.
Signature: Todd

Mosquito Larva

Mosquito Larva

Dear Todd,
This is a Mosquito Larva, commonly called a Wriggler.  It will soon pupate into a Tumbler, a very active aquatic pupa.  With the Zika scare, Southerners are being cautioned about standing water, which is a breeding ground for Mosquitoes.  Mosquito larvae and pupae both need air to survive, and they generally congregate at the surface of the water where they can breed, but any disturbance sends them wriggling and tumbling beneath the surface for several minutes.

Thanks for getting back to me so quickly.  I had no idea mosquito larva got this large.
Although I feel a little like I wasted your time, I appreciate it, just the same.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swimming bug?
Location: Tennessee
August 27, 2016 7:45 am
I live in Chattanooga TN, I noticed 4 or 5 of these in the kiddie pool in the backyard. The pool is a blow up pool, and has not been cleaned out for a very long time. I usually see these in the late morning, around 10, and they are very fast swimmers. I caught one and put it on the pavement to take a picture. It has 6 legs, and is kind of a clearish yellow. Its about 3/4 of an inch long. Any ideas what it could be? Thanks for any help:)
Signature: Holly Hickam

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Holly,
This is the larva or Naiad of a Dragonfly.  As you probably realize, standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes.  Dragonfly larvae will eat any mosquito larvae that develop in standing water, so they are a beneficial insect.  Adult Dragonflies also feed on winged adult mosquitoes.  We hope you are able to relocate the larvae in your stagnant pool into a suitable area pond.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 4 legged aquatic “Walking Stick”bug?
Location: Concord, MA
August 21, 2016 7:29 pm
While kayaking along the Concord River (Concord, MA) on August 21, 2016 I encountered this 4 legged insect atop a clump of decaying, floating weeds. At first the thought of a “Walking Stick” came to mind. But upon closer examination noticed the 4 legs (4 legs?). It was also about 4 inches long (body). Definitely not a Walking Stick! So what is this bug? I apologize for the picture qualities as I was moving (wind/current) and trying to capture this insect with a telephoto lens in a macro attempt.
Signature: dpsrams

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear dpsrams,
This unusual aquatic insect is a Water Scorpion in the genus
Ranatra.  Though only four of the legs are used for walking, the front pair of legs are raptorial, and they are used to capture and hold small aquatic creatures while the Water Scorpion sucks the life sustaining fluids from the body of the prey.  Water Scorpions are also capable of flying from pond to pond which comes in handy if conditions cause one pond to dry out.

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination