Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gray bug came out of water
Location: Cumberland county nj
July 11, 2016 3:47 am
My husband had his feet in the river and this grayish bug climbed onto his leg, not sure if it fell in the river and was trying to get out or if it lives in water. Can’t find this bug in any of the books I have or on the internet
Signature: Anyway

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Anyway,
This is the aquatic larva of Naiad of a Dragonfly.  Dragonfly larvae are aquatic predators and when they are nearing maturity, they climb up onto plants growing out of the water, dock pylons or other vertical surfaces protruding from the water so that they can molt and emerge as winged adults.  Your husbands leg presented the perfect surface to accomplish this metamorphosis.  Your Naiad looks like the images on TroutNut that are identified as being in the family Gomphidae.  According to BugGuide, members of the family Gomphidae are known as Clubtails. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug in Maine
Location: Minot, ME
June 4, 2016 3:18 pm
Hello!
Our five year old son was recently catching frogs in the pond at our house and was “bit” by this strange bug. We then noticed that the pond was full of them. They have six legs, are aggressive, swim, also walk on land, two pinchers on the head as well as two small pinchers on the tail.
Signature: Colbath Family

Water Tiger

Water Tiger

Dear Colbath Family,
This is a Water Tiger, a common name for the larva of the Predaceous Diving Beetles in the family Dytiscidae, and it is most likely in the genus
Dytiscus, based on this BugGuide image.

Water Tiger

Water Tiger

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID in MA after swimming
Location: MA
May 28, 2016 2:13 pm
Could you help us identify this bug.
It was on swimming suit after being in an MA lake
Thanks
Signature: Steve

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear Steve,
This is a Naiad, the aquatic nymph of a flying insect, more specifically, it is a Dragonfly known as the Dragon Hunter,
Hagenius brevistylus.

Many Thanks Daniel
That’s fantastic. I had no idea the dragonflies came from nymphs like this
Much appreciated
Steve

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug
Location: Maine USA
May 28, 2016 7:00 am
My friend took pictures of these bugs and we cannot figure out what they are.
Signature: Emil Falkenberry

Stonefly Exuvia

Stonefly Exuvia

Dear Emil,
These are the Exuviae or cast off exoskeletons of aquatic nymphs of Stoneflies, known as a naiads, so we are guessing these images were taken close to a stream or river.  Of the Stonefly family, BugGuide notes:  ”
nymphs occur primarily under stones in cool unpolluted streams; some species occur along rocky shores of cold lakes, in cracks of submerged logs, and debris that accumulates around stones, branches, and water diversion grills.  spring and summer adults may be found resting on stones and logs in the water, or on leaves and trunks of trees and shrubs near water; winter stoneflies are often attracted to concrete bridges over streams, and some species are commonly found on snow or resting on fence posts during the warmer days of late winter.”  Though we cannot be certain of the species, your images resemble the Exuviae of the Beautiful Stone, 
Paragnetina immarginata, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Since one of your images appears to be up-side-down, we are guessing they may have been taken on a bridge overhang.

Stonefly Exuviae

Stonefly Exuviae

Thank you so much and yes they were under a bridge by water.  :)  Have a great weekend.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Similar to a Belostomatidae Abedus?
Location: Cedar Lake in Oscoda, MI
May 9, 2016 7:56 am
My friend found this in his minnow trap yesterday in Cedar Lake in Oscoda MI. I’ve been researching to learn exactly what it is but am still uncertain. At present, my best guess is a Giant Water Bug (Belostomatidae, genus Abedus) nymph. The uncertainty for me comes from the apparent lack of wings, serrated edges of the body, apparent lack of a protruding mouth and front legs which seem much more slender than other Belostomatidae and 2 claws on the front legs rather than a single point.
Do you know what tour bug is?
Signature: Scott

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear Scott,
This is an aquatic nymph, but it is not a Giant Water Bug.  Rather, it is a Dragonfly Naiad, and we believe it is a Dragonhunter Naiad,
Hagenius brevistylus.  Dragonhunter Naiads are well camouflaged among fallen leaves at the bottom of ponds and slow moving streams where they are generally found prowling for prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I have never seen one of these
Location: Virginia, USA.
April 26, 2016 7:07 am
Found near a creek in Virginia . Halifax county area. It is a couple of inches long. Has a stinger looking apparatus on its tail.
Signature: Matt

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Dear Matt,
This aquatic nymph is an immature Damselfly, commonly called a Naiad like other aquatic nymphs of flying insects.  Damselflies are classified with Dragonflies in the same insect order, Odonata.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is actually a tripart organ, the gills, used to extract oxygen from the water.

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination