Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identify this worm
Location: Kozhikode, Kerala, India
November 17, 2015 3:48 am
Sir,
I found this in my well water.. Plz identify this worm
Signature: megha

Fly Larvae

Fly Larvae

Dear Megha,
The best information we can provide is that these are the larvae of a member of the order Diptera which contains the Flies, Gnats and Mosquitoes.  They look like the larval form of some type of Fly.  One of you images also contains what appears to be an aquatic True Bug like a Water Boatman.

Fly Larva and Aquatic True Bug

Fly Larva and Aquatic True Bug

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swimming pool bug
Location: Canberra Australia
October 22, 2015 9:58 pm
Hi Bugman.
I left my above ground swimming pool uncovered for approx. 6 months over winter. I didnt clean it nor did I add any chlorine. Now that its getting warmer I thought time to clean it out and start getting it healthy again. When doing so I caught 11 of these swimming bugs and I just needed to know more.
They swim to the water surface and sit there facing downwards (with the backsides toward the top).
When I stir the water they dive to the bottom (approx. 600mm) where I can’t see due to the leaves and other garbage – then do not come up for at least 5 minutes.
They appear to have 6 legs, two tails (split) and two clippers or claws on their face. They are very good at staying absolutely still, but when they swim they have a fish like turning movement. It should be noted that when I pulled them out of the water, they had no troubles walking around, moving almost like a scorpion.
I have attached a video and some pics.
This is in Canberra, Australia. Currently October (middle of spring) and heading towards summer.
Appreciate if you had any ideas on what these are?
Signature: thank you

Water Tigers

Water Tigers

These are Water Tigers, the aquatic larvae of Predaceous Diving Beetles in the family Dytiscidae.  There is a nice simple explanation of the life cycle of the Predaceous Diving Beetles on the Australian Museum website where it states:  “Larvae have a siphon (like a snorkel) coming out the end of their body. They stick this siphon out of the water to get oxygen to breathe.”  According to the Missouri Department of Conservation site:  “Larvae, called ‘water tigers,’ are elongated, flattened and can be 2 inches long. They commonly come to the surface to draw air into spiracles (like snorkels) located at the hind end of the body. There are 3 pairs of legs, and the jaws are strong pincers that are used to grasp prey.”  The Natural History of Orange County, California site has some nice images of Water Tigers.  As you can tell by our links, Predaceous Diving Beetles are found in many places on the globe.

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Subject: 6 legs no antennae
Location: Verde Valley Arizona
September 13, 2015 6:42 pm
I have spent a fair amount of time searching the web for some idea of what the bug might be. I am including 2 photos of different bugs of the same species. They are found at Dead Horse Ranch State Park, near Cottonwood, AZ. Photos are from Sept. 12 and 13, between 8 and 11 AM. Insects found within 7-8 feet of the local pond and a couple of these critters were found at the waters edge in tall grass. Your assistance is greatly appreciated.
Signature: Don

Toad Bug

Toad Bug

Dear Don,
These aquatic Toad Bug nymphs in the family Gelastocoridae are masters of camouflage.  According to BugGuide they are:  “Generally oval, flattened, cryptic, with bulging eyes and antennae hidden under the head.”

Toad Bug

Toad Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug found near Boston, MA
Location: Boston, MA
September 6, 2015 7:10 am
Hello,
We found this bug yesterday at a pond near boston. Haven’t seen anything like it around here before. About an inch in length. Dark brown in color. Head like a preying mantis, some spikes on its back.
Have done some web searches, but can’t find it.
Thank you!
Signature: Matt

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Matt,
This is a Dragonfly naiad.  The larvae of Dragonflies are aquatic, and naiad is a collective term for the larva of winged insects that pass their larval stages aquatically.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hola from Buenos Aires!
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
August 22, 2015 2:30 am
My son sent me this picture of a beetle he found on his way home from work lat night. He lives in Olivos, which is a suburb of Buenos Aires, Argentina. He couldn’t identify it, but we offered a guess that it was some type of cicada. Do you guys agree with our assessment?
Thanks!
Signature: Rich Williams

Giant Water Bug

Giant Water Bug

Dear Rich,
This is NOT a beetle or a Cicada.  It is a Giant Water Bug, an aquatic True Bug that is also capable of flying.  They are frequently attracted to lights and in North America they are sometimes called Electric Light Bugs, but more commonly they are called Toe-Biters because waders are sometimes surprised by a painful bite if they step on them in shallow water.  Giant Water Bugs are aquatic predators with mouths designed to pierce the prey and suck the fluids from the body.  Though painful to humans, the bite is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it
Location: San Isabel national forest, Colorado
August 18, 2015 4:13 pm
I found this critter in a unnamed lake at about 12,000 ft. There was only this creature, leaches and small invertabreas that looked like minnows. Under closer inspection they were not minnows but a small swimming animal using cilia to move. I have found pictures close to this mystery animal but nothing exact. Also, was wondering if there may be a guess at what the smaller swimming creatures were too, (sorry blurry pic).
Signature: Adam

Predaceous Diving Beetle Larva

Predaceous Diving Beetle Larva

Dear Adam,
This magnificent aquatic predator is a Water Tiger, a Predaceous Diving Beetle larva, probably in the genus
Dystycus based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, they can be identified by the following features:  “Larvae with prominent cerci and dense lateral fringes of hair on the last 2 abdominal segments and cerci. The anterior portion of the head is rounded.”  We cannot make out anything in your blurry image, but we suspect the “small swimming animal using cilia to move” is a Fairy Shrimp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination