Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Similar to a Belostomatidae Abedus?
Location: Cedar Lake in Oscoda, MI
May 9, 2016 7:56 am
My friend found this in his minnow trap yesterday in Cedar Lake in Oscoda MI. I’ve been researching to learn exactly what it is but am still uncertain. At present, my best guess is a Giant Water Bug (Belostomatidae, genus Abedus) nymph. The uncertainty for me comes from the apparent lack of wings, serrated edges of the body, apparent lack of a protruding mouth and front legs which seem much more slender than other Belostomatidae and 2 claws on the front legs rather than a single point.
Do you know what tour bug is?
Signature: Scott

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear Scott,
This is an aquatic nymph, but it is not a Giant Water Bug.  Rather, it is a Dragonfly Naiad, and we believe it is a Dragonhunter Naiad,
Hagenius brevistylus.  Dragonhunter Naiads are well camouflaged among fallen leaves at the bottom of ponds and slow moving streams where they are generally found prowling for prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I have never seen one of these
Location: Virginia, USA.
April 26, 2016 7:07 am
Found near a creek in Virginia . Halifax county area. It is a couple of inches long. Has a stinger looking apparatus on its tail.
Signature: Matt

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Dear Matt,
This aquatic nymph is an immature Damselfly, commonly called a Naiad like other aquatic nymphs of flying insects.  Damselflies are classified with Dragonflies in the same insect order, Odonata.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is actually a tripart organ, the gills, used to extract oxygen from the water.

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water Bugs
Location: Michigan 49601
April 23, 2016 1:46 pm
We found this while fishing, it was below the water in a shallow Sandy area
Signature: Matthew Wooten

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Matthew,
This is a Dragonfly Naiad.  A Naiad is an aquatic nymph.

Haha, Awesome, thank you for getting back, was creeped out by the looks, it said it was supposed to be in Virginia, any idea why it’s in Michigan?

Insects just do not respect state or national borders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green pool bug or shrimp?
Location: Tampa, Florida
April 8, 2016 3:49 pm
Hello,
We came across this “thing” and what we believe to be 100s, if not 1000s, of what we assume to be it’s babies? Because it looks like them, just really smaller. Thank you for identifying this, hopefully, for us.
Signature: Nicole and Jeff

Aquatic Beetle Larva

Aquatic Beetle Larva

Dear Nicole and Jeff,
This is the larva of an Aquatic Beetle, but there is not enough detail for us to be more specific.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this big insect
Location: Oman
March 27, 2016 1:26 pm
What is this big insect
Signature: Ahmed

Giant Water Bug

Giant Water Bug

Dear Ahmed,
This is a Giant Water Bug in the family Belostomatidae.  This is an aquatic predator that can also fly.  They are reported to give a painful bite if carelessly handled or accidentally encountered in still waters.  In North America, they are called Toe-Biters and swimmers and waders should exercise caution to avoid a painful, but not dangerous bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help identify
Location: Kingsland, Tx
March 17, 2016 8:13 pm
My daughter scooped this out of our pond thinking she was rescuing a walking stick. Her sister came to get me to see it saying it had red wings under the black back covers (her words). When I got there, I took this picture and told them it was not a walking stick and before I could take another look it flew away!
Signature: Luckyclucks

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear Luckyclucks,
Though we are aware that the common name Toe-Biter can be applied to your submission, we prefer the common name Water Scorpion for this aquatic predator so as not to confuse it with the Giant Water Bug.  Either should be handled with caution as they are capable of biting and the bite is reported to be painful, but not dangerous.

Thank you! Good thing my girls are gentle with wildlife.  A good reminder to use caution with unknown wildlife.
We found a giant water bug carcass a couple of weeks ago and were so excited to have the specimen!
Love your site and refer to it often!
Warmly,
~Lindsay

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination