thank you
Thanks for providing such an amazing site. I am a first time viewer / contributor. Your site helped me identify this beautiful creature. It’s a Cottonwood Borer, Plectrodera scalator. I have lived in and around Memphis, Tennessee all of my life and have never seen one of these beetles. My daughters came in the house screaming for me to get my camera a few days ago. I could not believe the patience of this bug! I must have taken 50 pictures or so before we realized that it flies! Oh, I should mention that I am still filled with excitement over the shot with the wings spread just before he was airborne. How cool is that? I was actually a little bit scared while taking a couple of those shots – he’s a pretty scary when you’re about 5 inches from those mandibles. Thanks for a great site – I have added it to my favorites.
Sherry
I wasn’t sure what format you needed for the picture – I just combined all of my favorites in Elements and did a ‘save for web’ in jpg format. If you need anything additional that would work better, just let me know. Happy 4 th of July!

Hi Sherry,
Your format was perfect, though our personal aesthetic for the site is to have separate images, hence we split out our mutual favorite image for posting. Thanks for your awesome submission of a Cottonwood Borer about to take flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Large Black Spider
Hello,
I spotted this large black spider walking along a dry cornfield in southern Maryland. I think it’s a species of wolf but not sure. Can you help?
Bob Cammarata
www.cammphoto.com
A Photographic Journey of the Outdoor World

Hi Bob,
This is a male Trapdoor Spider in the genus Ummidia. When conditions are right, he wanders in search of a mate. Female Trapdoor Spiders rarely leave their burrows.

one last try (this is #4!) Large spider
Bugman,
I really think this could be a spider of interest to your viewers (and you??)… thought I’d give it one more try (4th attempt!). I’ve looked through several sites and books but haven’t been able to come up with an identity except for thinking it’s some kind of Wolf spider (but not hairy as in most of the pictures I’ve come across). These photo’s were taken late one night over a year ago where she was standing next to me while I was working on my table saw. I think she’s amazing (safe assumption it’s a she??) and I would like to know more about her. It’s not often you come across a spider of this size, especially here in Boulder, Colorado. Since I have a large male cat (he eats all the bugs / spiders he’s come across… and I have seen several black widows here as well – photo included), I needed to safely relocate her outside near our building. Thanks once again ahead of time…
Jon Ehrlich

Hi Jon,
We always feel badly when we hear that someone felt ignored and had to write back a second time, but your case is unconscionable. Please accept our apology. Your photo is lacking in detail, but we believe this may be a Tube Trapdoor Spider in the family Nemesiidae as depicted on BugGuide. Generally it is the male Trapdoor Spider that wanders in search of a mate. Since we are not certain this identification is correct, perhaps a knowledgeable reader can provide a correct identification. Please list Trapdoor Spider in the subject line.

Update: (07/05/2008) Trapdoor Spider
Hi Daniel, At this point I think you probably know more about spiders than I do, but I am wondering if this could be the Burrowing Wolf Spider, shown as a Colorado species at http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PTLK/1485f2a.html With general info at http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PTLK/1485.html It does claim that wolf spiders are the largest spiders in Colorado. And you probably have a higher resolution image than the version on WTB, so I can’t really see the face and the eyes well, but the legs in Jon’s photo sure looks like the legs in the picture of the burrowing wolf spider defending its nest which is near the bottom of the Wikipedia article at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_spider Best,
Susan H.

Ed. Note: Susan requested the full sized file so she could inspect it more closely. Here is her conclusion.
Update: (07/07/2008)
Yes, the photo is a bit blurry, but the spider does look as if it has two small eyes on top, two nice large eyes facing forward, and as if it could maybe have 4 small ones in a row underneath the two big ones. If that is so, that would make it a wolf spider. I would definitely think it is a male spider in the genus Geolycosus, a Burrowing Wolf spider. In any case it really is a great-looking spider!
Susan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

More bug love
I love your site!! I just found it and will be using it to help identify some of my insect species I find up here in southwestern Manitoba in Canada. My co-workers have been teasing me lately b/c of my photos of what they call, ‘beetle porn’. I noticed you didn’t have many for the dragonflies so I thought I would send my most lovely one to you…photo that is. And if you care to tell me the species, I would great appreciate that as well, save me from looking it up!
Sherry Lynn Punak-Murphy
Natural Resource Technician/Biologist
Manitoba

Hi Sherry-Lynn,
Your photo of mating Dragonflies. It truly is wonderful. We are not that adept at exact species identification of Dragonflies. Perhaps a reader will supply us with an answer and perhaps you will do the work on the exact identification and notify us. Please include Dragonfly ID in the subject line.

Update: (07/07/2008) Mating Dragonflies
Hi Bugman:
Re: Mating Dragonflies (07/04/2008) More bug love Really nice shot! These look like American Emeralds (Cordulia shurtleffi). I am from Manitoba as well and this species is fairly common here. There are lots of good photos online; e.g.,: http://www.pbase.com/dragonhunter/image/63103267 and http://talkaboutwildlife.ca/profile/?s=741 Regards,
Karl

Hi Karl,
Thanks for doing the work on this identification.

Bug love!!
Good Morning!
My friend, Kevin, bought a new camera and went for a nature hike (here in Kentucky) and as he knows that I like to take photos of insects and spiders he showed me the assortment that he had taken. Amongst them was this spectacular bug love photo. I explained to him about your collections and he gave me the file to send to you. I hope you enjoy it, I thought it was particularly lovely when rotated to the left (also attached). Sincerely,
Teresa
(Normally photographing the bugs of Wisconsin…)

Hi Teresa,
Kevin’s image of mating Ebony Jewelwings, Calopteryx maculata, a species of Damselfly, is pretty great. We also prefer the rotated image, not only for the more obvious heart space produced between the bodies, but because it formats so nicely to our site while maximizing the image size. The photo has excellent lighting and a perfect camera angle for showcasing these lovely insects caught in the act.

More bug love
I love your site!! I just found it and will be using it to help identify some of my insect species I find up here in southwestern Manitoba in Canada. My co-workers have been teasing me lately b/c of my photos of what they call, ‘beetle porn’. I noticed you didn’t have many for the dragonflies so I thought I would send my most lovely one to you…photo that is. And if you care to tell me the species, I would great appreciate that as well, save me from looking it up!
Sherry Lynn Punak-Murphy
Natural Resource Technician/Biologist
Manitoba

Hi Sherry-Lynn,
Your photo of mating Dragonflies. It truly is wonderful. We are not that adept at exact species identification of Dragonflies. Perhaps a reader will supply us with an answer and perhaps you will do the work on the exact identification and notify us. Please include Dragonfly ID in the subject line.