Update Not a bee but a Hover Fly
Hello Bugman & Bug Lady!
I know you only have 30 minutes a day to spend on emails, etc, so If you read this, great! If not, it’s okay as well. Anyway, I sent an email with 2 photos. one a White -Lined Sphinx moth..and the other photo, I thought was some sort of bee..Well I discovered that it’s a Hover Fly. I Never would have thought it was a fly, but I checked all the categories I thought it would be in, and came up with nothing, so I got bored and just started looking through other areas of your site, and that’s how I happened across the Hover Fly! I added a few more photos, hope you enjoy them.
One is a worm or some such, another is a moth and the dragonfly, I think is a Widow Skimmer, which you have plenty of photos, I just thought you might like it.
These were all taken in Minnetonka Minnesota. Thanks for all your hard work,
Laura

Common Ringlet

Common Ringlet

Hi Laura,
We are happy that you identified your Hover Fly, but we must confess, that we are not sure we saw the photo. We did open one letter with a gorgeous photo of a Hover Fly, but didn’t have time to post it. Regarding this submission, it is not feasible for us to post images of different insects in the same letter. The image we are quite happy to post is of the Common Ringlet, Coenonympha tullia. The Common Ringlet is a highly variable butterfly, not a moth. You can read more about the Common Ringlet can be found on BugGuide

Thank you so much for your kind reply.   Honestly, I didn’t expect that any of the four photos would be posted, so I’m thrilled.  I really just love your site and wanted to be part of it by sending you and Lisa some pictures that I thought you would enjoy. And thank you for the information and further information regarding
the Common Ringlet.   The very next thing I’m going to do is go to the BugGuide and read all about it!
Thanks again,
Laura in Minnesota.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strange Variation of HHD
Hi. I ran across your site as my three year old and I are trying to put a name to some of the tiny creatures around our Florida home. I have seen the Hickory Horned Devil Catapillar many times but none of them look like ours. Please tell us if we have a true HHD or something else. Thanks so much. (See attached.)
Have a blessed day!
Jacilyn Wheeler

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Hi Jacilyn,
Your Hickory Horned Devil looks like a normal fifth instar caterpillar. Perhaps those you saw previously were younger caterpillars, but as you did not describe the difference, we are uncertain. At any rate, it is wonderful to have your gorgeous, yet typical, Hickory Horned Devil to add to our archives. As we are currently transitioning our site, the image will not go live until we finish the site migration.

a bee that is not a part of your online collection
A friend of mine recently sent me a picture of a bee that wasn’t familiar with. Her name is Olive and she lives on the island of Kauai. After looking at your site, I found no matches. But I think I’ve discovered that it’s a Sonoran carpenter bee ( Hymenoptera: Anthophoridae: Xylocopa sonoria )
I’ve been a fan of “What’s that Bug” for years and hope I finally have the honor of adding a new critter to your site.
Keep up the excellent work!
Bob W.
Stewartstown, PA

Sonoran Carpenter Bee

Sonoran Carpenter Bee

Hi Bob
Thanks for forwarding Olive’s image and also for providing us with a link to the Sonoran Carpenter Bee, a non-native species that has become established on the Hawaiian Islands. We located another site with information that the Sonoran Carpenter Bee is found on or in “Hawaiian Islands, Midway, Marianas Islands, China, Japan, Java, New Guinea, Philippines.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Asian longhorned beetle love
Love you site, check out the attached Anoplophora glabripennis shot.
Best,
Mike

Mating Asian Longhorns

Mating Asian Longhorns

Hi Mike,
We are thrilled to have your wonderful documentation of mating Asian Longhorn Beetles, especially since it will be cross referenced in our Bug Love section and our Invasive Exotic section of our new site, which we are currently about to migrate to, however, your photo lacks a location. Was this taken in native China? or is this an example of the species spread in North America? As this species has become established in the U.S., there is much information about the species online, including this UC Davis posting.

Worcester, Massachusetts.

Tarantula Hawk
I have a pretty good picture of a Tarantula hawk, I believe,  according to what I have read on line.  My neighbor across the street has a bush that was just loaded with them a couple of weeks ago.  They seemed to have left the area lately, (Sept 13th, 2008).  I notice most of the pictures were a little blurry etc.  I wanted to send you a better photo. See the attachment. Thanks for your column… sure helps out when one is in the dark!!  A couple of years ago I sent in a Horse Lubber Grasshopper as no picture was available at that time. Thanks again!
Ron Stein
Green Valley, AZ
(just south of Tucson)

Tarantula Hawk

Hi Ron,
Thanks so much for sending us your wonderful photo of a Tarantula Hawk.  As we are currently migrating our site, the image will not be posted live until our migration is complete in the very near future.

15 Pages of Caterpillars… No Luck
Hey Bugman,
I searched your 15 pages of caterpillars frontwards, backwards and sideways trying to figure out who I captured on camera a couple of years ago in Peachtree, Georgia. Maybe this is something common that’s just in a different instar than a pic you have posted?  Whatever the case, I thought you might be interested.
Jim Olsson
Cheboygan, MI

Inchworm camouflaged with bits of plants

Inchworm camouflaged with bits of plants

Hi Jim,
We actually do have several images of Inchworms, the caterpillars of the Geometrid Moths, that have camouflaged themselves with plant material.  BugGuide has specimens from the genus Synchlora that exhibit this unusual behavior.  The appearance of the plant parts on your specimen is resulting in the appearance.  Other than the choice of plant material, there is one image on BugGuide that looks very much like your caterpillar.  Inchworms are also called Spanworms.