22 June 2009, 3:54 PM
Saturday night, 20 June, I noticed that Boris and Media Luna had laid eggs for the fifth time.  Spawing 3 grew fungus and I’m not sure if spawning 4 was fertile as that happened a day before I left town for Ohio.  The eggs that were laid Saturday night have hatched, and the timing is not so good.  I may try to remove some hatchlings and place them in the nursery tank, but I will be out of town at Amy’s wedding all day Friday, Saturday and Sunday, about the time the hatchlings will need to begin feeding.  Perhaps their egg sacs will sustain them until I return.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wasp eating large spider
Sat, Jun 20, 2009 at 5:08 PM
We found this wasp eating a large spider. Unusual find… This picture was taken near Vilcabamba, Ecuador.
Kyle
South America

Spider Wasp with prey in Ecuador

Spider Wasp with prey in Ecuador

Hi Kyle,
The wasp is some species of Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae.  We believe the spider is a Huntsman Spider.  For clarification, Spider Wasps do not eat spiders.  Female Spider Wasps sting and paralyze spiders to provide food for larval wasps.  According to BugGuide:  “Spider wasps prey on spiders. Some species sting and paralyze their prey and then transport it to a specially constructed nest before laying an egg. Other species leave the paralyzed spider in its nest and lay an egg upon it.” Adult Spider Wasps feed on nectar from flowers.

Possible fisher spider in odd location
Sat, Jun 20, 2009 at 8:16 PM
My friend sent me these pictures of a spider. We think it’s a fisher spider but we’d like confirmation since it was found in a rather atypical location — namely, on her stove in her kitchen!
She lives in southern New York state. It’s mid-June, warm, but not overly hot. There are no bodies of water really close to her home (although there’s a creek down the street).
The spider was non-agressive so she put it on a paper plate and took some photos of it. She took it in a container to work and someone identified it as “a really big spider”. Obviously, as the spider is nearly 2 1/2″ inches (legs included).
She took it to the woods near her home and released it into the wild where she got more fabulous photos of it.
Could you please confirm if it is indeed a fisher spider?
Thanks so much!
Krissy
Southern New York State

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Hi Krissy,
Your identification of a Fishing Spider, Dolomedes tenebrosus, is correct.  Fishing Spiders do not build snare webs, and they are a wandering mobile species.  Perhaps your friend’s stove was just a warm stop on the way to a new hunting ground.  We love the photo on the paper plate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strange Red & White Cricket (?)
Sun, Jun 21, 2009 at 9:07 AM
Hi –
I am visiting my mom in Rio Rico, AZ (about an hour south of Tucson, AZ) and we found these strange looking red, white and black crickets (?) on a bean plant this morning (06/21/09). I’ve never seen anything like them, especially their antennae. Towards the end of it there is a flattened almost circular area, and then the straight line antennae continues. They seem to be feeding on the beans in the plant, and there must be 30-40 on one plant.
Kristy
Rio Rico, AZ

Giant Mesquite Bug nymphs

Giant Mesquite Bug nymphs

Hi Kristy,
These are not crickets. Rather they are True Bugs, more specifically, Giant Mesquite Bugs, Thasus neocalifornicus, in the family Coreidae, the Leaf Footed Bugs. They are not feeding on beans, but rather the pods of Mesquite. These are colorful immature nymphs. Once they become winged adults, much of the bright coloration with distinctive markings is covered by the wings. You may read more about them on BugGuide.

Giant Mesquite Bug nymph

Giant Mesquite Bug nymph

Two bugs found in Alabama — Need ID
Fri, Jun 19, 2009 at 9:20 PM
I was walking around tonight in my apartment complex, and I found these two bugs. Right now, it’s technically still spring, but the weather is very warm and balmy right now. The pictures are as good as I could get it. They are very slow moving, and they didn’t seem to mind posing for the pictures. The one in front (brown) is shorter. It seemed to be about 1-1.5 inches. The other one has a slight green tint to the wings and seems to be 1.5-2 inches length in the body and another 1/2 inch or so for the wings. At first when I found them, the larger one was on top of the brown one. I didn’t disturb them or harm them in any way whatsoever. I just want to know what the little things are. I would appreciate ANY help!
Amanda
Jacksonville, AL

Cicada Metamorphosis

Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear Amanda,
You have observed a Cicada metamorphosis.  This is not two bugs, but one winged adult Cicada emerging from its shed larval skin.  We are unable to identify your exact species, but we can tell you that this is one of the Annual Cicadas that appear in a given location yearly.  It often takes three years for the nymphs to develop underground, but each year there is a new adult population.

It looks like a fighter plane
Sun, Jun 21, 2009 at 12:55 AM
this was spotted in london last night whilst filling my car with fuel. it looks like a mini stealth fighter plane with a thick scorpion like stinger on its back. it wasnt bothered by me being there and remained totally still.
very creepy, never seen anything as aggressive looking as this, it had defined camouflage patterns and a a streamlined look.
what is it, how rare is it? should i have put it in a jar and kept it?
David
London, England

Lime Hawk Moth

Lime Hawk Moth

Hi David,
This is a Lime Hawkmoth, Mimas tiliae, and according to the UKMoths Website it is:  “A reasonably common species in the southern half of Britain, it was most frequent in the London area, where there are still extensive tree-lined avenues. In recent years its distribution has spread northwards and is now regularly found well into North Yorkshire and beyond. ”  The larvae, which are known as Hornworms, feed on lime, alder, birch and elm tree leaves.  We do not believe you should have put it in a jar and kept it.  Though we are not opposed to keeping insects in jars long enough to observe them, we believe they are best when left in the wild.  We have had other members of the Sphinx or Hawk Moth family Sphingidae referred to as stealth bombers because of their appearance.