Giant Water Bug
Mon, Oct 27, 2008 at 12:34 AM
Hi, love this site. I have one here I found in a small local pond, among other water insects. It appears to be a giant water bug. I have looked throughout the site and seen several varieties. It still has no wings, and surfaces to attach a bubble to its sternum before diving back down to the bottom of the aquarium. I am feeding it moths and flies, observed it and other beetles feeding on floating bee remains. Will it eventually crawl out and scare the fiber out of my girlfriend?
thank you
Lanz
Soledad, CA

immature Giant Water Bug

immature Giant Water Bug

Hi Lanz,
There are three genera of Giant Water Bugs and all three grow wings as adults and can fly.  When it matures, your specimen may decide your aquarium doesn’t suit its needs and it may try to fly away.  Your specimen is either Abedus or Belostoma.  We will try to get some assistance on which genus your specimen belongs to.

immature Giant Water Bug

immature Giant Water Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Whip Spider
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 9:39 PM
My friends came over for breakfast the other day and while I was talking I noticed a little spider hanging off the side of a plant pot. I told my friends but as soon as they turned around the spider coiled up its legs and looked exactly like a small stick. They thought I was mad! But eventually they saw it move and became very interested in the little fellow.
It’s about 2 to 3 cm long and I think it looks a little bit like a miniature face-hugger form the film Alien!
Today I searched online and discovered that it is a whip spider. I know that the pictures I took of it aren’t too amazing, but it was so difficult to get a picture of it with its legs spread out that I thought images of them un-camouflaged would be quite rare.
Bonnie
Melbourne, Australia

Whip Spider

Whip Spider

Hi Bonnie,
Thanks for contributing photos of the fascinating Whip Spider, Argyrodes colubrinus, to our website archives.  We are linking to the Australian Museum Online website that states:  “Whip Spiders get their name from their elongate, worm-like body shape – up to about 20 mm long but only about 1 mm wide. They are common in forest habitats and can readily be seen in gardens on summer nights, suspended on delicate silk lines in spaces among shrubbery.
They specialise in feeding on wandering spiders, usually juveniles. The Whip Spider sits at the top of a few long silk threads that run downs below it among foliage. When a wandering spider walks up one of these handy silk `bridges’ it gets a nasty surprise. The waiting Whip Spider uses toothed bristles on the end segment of the last leg to comb out swathes of entangling sticky silk from its spinnerets. These rapidly entangle the struggling victim so that it cannot escape. “

Whip Spider

Whip Spider

Butterfly ID?
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 4:03 PM
I photographed this butterfly sunning on the deck by the pool in early Sept. At first it looks quite plain, but some of the detail is stunning! I guess I am going to have to invest in some good insect id books to go with my new camera!
Sara Edwards
NW Tennessee

Common Buckeye

Common Buckeye

Hi Sara,
This beautiful butterfly is known as the Common Buckeye.  We hope its human namesakes, all those Ohio voters in the Buckeye Swing State, get out to vote.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mating Large Tolype
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 4:18 AM
Thought you would like a picture of two Tolype mating. These were on the side of a large flower pot. I took this picture on 9/22/08. I live in Geetingsville, Indiana, located in central Indiana. I do not know what that is on the pot to the left of the Tolype. About a week later it was gone. Thanks, Diane Little
Diane
Geetingsville, IN. Central Indiana

Large Tolype Moths Mating

Large Tolype Moths Mating

Hi Diane,
WE agree that this pair is more likely the Large Tolype, Tolype velleda, than the Small Tolype, Tolype notialis, based on the comments on BugGuide. The species is also called the Velleda Lappet Moth.

Orb weaver nookie
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 10:57 AM
Just wanted to share a picture of the two Orb weavers we shared our patio with this summer. We live in Charleston, SC. We named them Lilith and Frasier. Unfortunately, Lilith disappeared about a week after this photo was taken.
Amy
Charleston, SC

Golden Silk Spider Courtship

Golden Silk Spider Courtship

Hi Amy,
What an amazing photo of a pair of Golden Silk Spiders, Nephila clavipes.  We are not sure who was named Lilith, but the larger of the pair is the female.  We would think that it would have been the smaller male that vanished.

What is this blue and black butterfly?
Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 12:23 PM
I live in Central FL (Orlando area) and saw a black and blue butterfly on one of my sunflowers. It had orange and white spots under his wings. I have looked on a TON of butterfly sites and cannot figure out what kind of butterfly it is. I’d love to know!
Kate
Orlando, FL

Pipevine Swallowtail

Pipevine Swallowtail

Hi Kate,
Your butterfly is a Pipevine Swallowtail, Battus philenor.  Peter Glassberg, in his book Butterflies through Binoculars The West, writes:  “As butterfly gardeners plant more pipevines, the range of this species will probably  expand.”

Swallowtail

Swallowtail