15 Pages of Caterpillars… No Luck
Hey Bugman,
I searched your 15 pages of caterpillars frontwards, backwards and sideways trying to figure out who I captured on camera a couple of years ago in Peachtree, Georgia. Maybe this is something common that’s just in a different instar than a pic you have posted?  Whatever the case, I thought you might be interested.
Jim Olsson
Cheboygan, MI

Inchworm camouflaged with bits of plants

Inchworm camouflaged with bits of plants

Hi Jim,
We actually do have several images of Inchworms, the caterpillars of the Geometrid Moths, that have camouflaged themselves with plant material.  BugGuide has specimens from the genus Synchlora that exhibit this unusual behavior.  The appearance of the plant parts on your specimen is resulting in the appearance.  Other than the choice of plant material, there is one image on BugGuide that looks very much like your caterpillar.  Inchworms are also called Spanworms.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

misumenoides formosipes?
Greetings,
First, thank you for such an awesome resource! I’ve spent many, many hours here…
It was a pure stroke of luck that I ran across this beautiful specimen… we stopped at a rest area near Tallahassee on I-10 and I decided to take a quick walk around. I thank the random palm seedlings growing in the curb for catching my attention and leading me to it. I did some research and found a similar spider, but it was grouped with several others and none of them really looked alike. Misumenoides formosipes is what BugGuide had to say, but the ‘whitebanded crab spider’ is what gets me… the little bugger is absolutely free of white colouration.
Thanks,
Jeff Wright

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Hi Jeff,
There is a great deal of individual variation with some species of spiders. We agree that this is probably Misumenoides formosipes, or at least a closely related species of Crab Spider. We did find a very close match on BugGuide.  The common names of insects are sometimes appropriate, and sometimes not. We will be posting your letter and gorgeous photo, but as we are currently migrating our site, we are not certain when the post will go live.

What is this bug?
This wasp looking thing was found stalking butterflies on the Mogollon Rim area of Northern Arizona around Payson
Thank you

Unknown Robber Fly eats Sulphur Butterfly

Unknown Robber Fly eats Sulphur Butterfly

This is some species of Robber Fly, but we have not been successful in locating a match on BugGuide.  The red wings are quite distinctive.  The prey is a Sulphur Butterfly.  We hope Eric Eaton can assist us in the identification of your Robber Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beetle?

Hey Bugman!

I live in Altamonte Springs, Florida. My four year old son and I found this bug on our balcony. I’ve never seen one like this before and I’ve lived in Florida my whole life(27 years).

Alien Invader

Alien Invader

Your beetle is actually a Broad Nosed Weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus, commonly called the Diaprepes Root Weevil. According to BugGuide: it is “Native to the Carribean but introduced into South and Central FL where it has become a serious pest especially of citrus and woody ornamentals.” BugGuide also indicates: “The California Dept. of Food & Agriculture has issued a flyer containing the following information: ‘The weevil was accidentally introduced into Florida in the 1960s and caused extensive damage. It has been intercepted in shipments of plants to California.’ Said to feed on some 270 different plants, it’s described as ‘a significant threat to both urban and agricultural trees and plants.’ If you see or catch one in California, call the California Dept of Food & Agriculture at 1-800-491-1899 ”

Our Readership is constantly inquiring about a great field guide for insect identification. Eric Eaton’s
new book, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America is now in its second printing. Look for it at your local bookstore or buy directly from Amazon.

Complete butterfly life cycle in central Missouri
I tried (and probably failed) to send pictures of the caterpillar and cocoon I had in my classroom.

The day he hatched, the cocoon turned transparent, and it hatched on September 10. We released it the next day. Attached are pictures of the caterpillar, his cocoon right after he completed it,

the cocoon just before it hatched,

a picture of him right after he hatched, still drying and next to his empty cocoon, and a final picture of him on a plant in our classroom. I unfortunately could not get a shot of his spread wings, but they were solid yellow, with a very narrow band of black at the edges. If you’d like, we took a few pictures of his face and wings with our hand-held microscope, which I can try to copy over and send if you’d like some 10x magnification views of him. Just let me know! Love your site,
Science Teacher in Missouri

Dear Science Teacher,
Your documentation of what we believe to be a Cloudless Sulphur, Phoebis sennae, are greatly appreciated. The image of the transparent chrysalis is most interesting. You can find out more about this species on BugGuide.