some type of slender, green orthopteran?
Thu, Oct 9, 2008 at 2:49 PM
The picture says it all – found near Portland, OR, at the edge of a wetland area. It was observed on a tarweed plant, as pictured. My hand is in the background for scale.
I know a few insect Orders from a class I took in college, but that’s as clever as I get with this stuff. This is your cup of tea, not mine. Can you tell me what this pretty lil’ guy is called?
Heather Arndt Anderson
Portland, OR

Tree Cricket

Tree Cricket

Hi Heather,
This is a Tree Cricket in the genus Oecanthus.  We don’t feel confident enough to identify the species, but you may research the possibilities on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Feather Legged Fly Images ,Date ,Time ,Location
Fri, Oct 10, 2008 at 9:03 AM
Hi Bugman
I spotted this neat looking bug on a hibiscus in my backyard on July 14 ,2008 at 10:31a.m.
It was just buzzing around and landing on the leafs – not on the orange and yellow flowers. This is the first time I ever saw this kind of bug and have not seen one since. I thought it might
be a wierd species of wasp because of the abdomen. It has a really beautiful color of orange and these wierd looking combs on it’s legs.
Thank’s Once Again! & Have a Great Day!
Brent Hansen
Pinellas County ,Florida

Feather Legged Fly

Feather Legged Fly

Hi Brent,
Thanks so much for allowing us to post your image of a Feather Footed Fly, Trichopoda pennipes. The solid orange abdomen indicates that this is a male Feather Footed Fly. Feather Legged Flies are Tachinid Flies in the family Tachinidae. Here is what BugGuide has to say about this species: “Adult female lays one to several eggs on a hemipteran host. The larvae hatch from the eggs and burrow directly into the bug’s body, though only one larva will survive within each host. The larva feeds on the host internally and eventually a large cream-colored maggot exits from body of the bug (which soon dies). The maggot pupates in a dark reddish-brown puparium in the soil and emerges as an adult about two weeks later. There are up to three generations a year depending on location, and larvae may overwinter in the bodies of overwintering hosts. “We will try to assist you in the identification of other unidentified insects on your website when we have an opportunity. Right now, we are trying to subcategorize our own archives and it is quite a daunting task. Since our site migration, we are trying to learn all the nuances for posting information that are now available to us. It has taken us weeks (we haven’t much spare time) to partially subcategorize 36 pages of our 81 pages of beetle postings. We now realize the subcategorization needs to be more extensive and will need to start at the beginning again, but not until we finish the current task. After that, we plan to further subcategorize True Bugs, Butterflies, Caterpillars and Spiders. The problem is that this “busy work” interferes with our precious posting time of new submissions.

LARGE Caterpillar
Thu, Oct 9, 2008 at 9:32 AM
I found this 8 inch long black caterpillar in my pool skimmer. It is the size of a cigar, has a green face and a green antennae poking up from it’s butt. And it stinks! We live in North Jeannine,
Phoenix, Arizona

Incense Cedar Sphinx Caterpillar

Incense Cedar Sphinx Caterpillar

Hi Jeannine,
Though we question the exact size of your caterpillar, we will agree that Sphinx Moth Caterpillars can get quite large. We suspect this may be an Incense Cedar Sphinx Caterpillar, Sphinx libocedrus . Except for the color of the horn, it seems to match the dark form of
the caterpillar on Bill Oehlke’s website. We are going to copy Bill Oehlke on our reply as he is compiling comprehensive data on species distribution. We also hope he will confirm our identification.

Daniel,
Thank you for keeping me in check. I was so impressed with it’s size and smell, that I was too excited to remember to take a pic with a ruler. So you are quite right, it is “only” about 5 1/2 inches long. I’ve attached the pic I took this AM with my tape measure. And if you could copy me on Bill’s response to your e-mail, I would greatly appreciate it.
Thanks for the info!
Jeannine

Daniel,
I think it is an unusual dark Manduca rustica. I am going to send it and another similar one I received couple weeks ago, also from Arizona, to Jim Tuttle. Will let you know.
Bill Oehlke

Thanks Daniel,
Don’t know if I emailed you but Jim Tuttle has confirmed the dark larva found in swimming pool in Arizona as Manduca rustica.
Bill Oehlke

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Australian Lantern Fly
Hi Guys,
Well I told you there were lots of strange new bugs at my new place and this one sure fits the bill. It is a Fulgoridae: Amyclinae, Rentinus dilatatus
or Lantern Fly. It landed on my flyscreen door and let me get a few pictures before clicking once and zooming off into the bushes at great speed. I don’t think you have this guy, a search of the site only turned up one response to lantern fly.
aussietrev
Burnett Region, Queensland

Australian Lanternfly

Australian Lanternfly

Hi Trevor
Thanks for sending us your Australian Lanternfly. Wemay have to try that search, but we think your problem is that Lanternfly is one word. Generally, when fly is attached to another word, it is not a true fly, like Dragonfly or Butterfly, but if it is a separate word, like Crane Fly or Robber Fly, then it is a true fly. A Lanternfly is not a true fly.

Wednesday, October 8, 2008, at 02:16 PM
A praying mantis has moved in and is calling my porch home.  I met her on
the screen door in the morning.  She was a beautiful dark green and tan.
She was back on the screen door when I came home after 9pm that evening.
She was light green color this time.
Since I haven’t seen a praying mantis around here I looked her up on the web
to find out why she had taken up residence near my porch light.  Ah ha!  She
was slowly climbing the screen door to get the the moths flying around the
light.
I just saw her again this afternoon.  She’s just hanging on the porch light,
upside down, waiting…waiting.  Oh, and her color is brown now.
h

funny, her mate moved onto my porch light last night. The photo is on www.whatsthatbug.com right now. He is still here tonight, catching moths at the porch light. Wish you would send a photo.
D.

I’ll shoot her in the morning when I can see her without the porch light
blinding the shot.  But I wish I had a better camera to catch her catching
her catch.  It’s quite creepy the way she pivots her head whenever I walk
out the door.
Yes.  Great photo.  Same species.  I’ll photograph mine in the morning.
Amazing how their heads can turn 180 degrees.  It’s shape and movement
reminds me of the aliens in War of the Worlds.  Mine is a picky eater.  The
moths are actually bumping into her but she’s waiting for the juiciest one
to drop on her.

Thursday, October 9, 2008
Sorry this comes too late for the morning edition.  Also sorry for the lack
of control over the exposure.   …if I had more time…!
Notice the boring beige camouflage of our little gal.  I guess she was just
adding the appropriate color to blend with the existing brown and black.

Female California Mantis

Female California Mantis

Thanks Helene,
It appears you really do have a female. Perhaps we can set our respective guests up with a blind dinner date.

Thu, Oct 9, 2008 at 4:18 AM
Hey Bugman, I love your site. It has been a favorite since we moved into our NJ home 4 yrs ago. I know you are quite busy, but I think this is a brown long horn beetle. Could you please tell me if is, and how menacing they are to our trees & gardens. I have noticed a number of giant stag horns also lately. Thank you in advance.
Cindy Lea
Plainfield, NJ

Brown Prionid

Brown Prionid

Hi Cindy,
You are correct, but more specifically, this is a Brown Prionid, Orthosoma brunneum. According to BugGuide, it “Breeds in poles, roots(?) in contact with wet ground. ” We would presume that the species is not a problem for healthy trees, but that it may become a problem if it breeds in support poles that are in contact with the ground. We doubt it is plentiful enough to cause you any concern.