black with checkers and has wings 1.5 inches long
July 16, 2009
Found this bug hanging around the hangar. What is it?
Sorry I don’t want a letter just curious as to the bug is. Thanks
Chesterfield Missouri

Cottonwood Borer

Cottonwood Borer

Dear Sorry,
This beautiful beetle is a Cottonwood Borer.  Most of our reports come from Oklahoma and Texas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant Orange Butterfly
July 16, 2009
I found this bug sitting on the ground at my apartment. It is about 2 or 3 inches long. The pictures I took pretty much explain everything else. Thank you!
Katie
Cary, NC

Regal Moth

Regal Moth

Hi Katie,
This is a Regal Moth or Royal Walnut Moth, not a butterfly.  The Regal Moth only lives a few days as an adult and it does not feed.  It mates and dies shortly after.

bombus ternarius
July 16, 2009
Dear Bugman,
I just started seeing these this summer in central Maine. After watching a few, it seems as they live in the ground/pine needles? Always lived in Maine and never have seen one of these.
JR
Fairfield, Maine, USA

Tricolored Bumble Bee

Tricolored Bumble Bee

Dear JR,
Your Tricolored Bumble Bee, does build a nest underground.  The fact that you have never seen them before this year may be that either you just never noticed them, or that the local population is small.  Some insects do not range far and it is possible that the species might be common a quarter mile away, but virtually nonexistent in your immediate area.  Thanks for sending your awesome photo.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black insect with red stripes
July 16, 2009
Found this bug east of flagstaff in an abandon trading post. It was moving quickly but seemed to be dragging that red striped sack.
Willis
30 miles east of flagstaff arizona

Blister Beetle:  genus Megetra

Blister Beetle: genus Megetra

Hi Willis,
This is a Blister Beetle in the genus Megetra.  You can see more images and get information on BugGuide.
We love your photo with its alarming color palette.  The Blister Beetle does have warning colors for a good reason.  It can exude a blistering agent called cantharidin.

Thursday, July 16, 2009
Last night, when we returned home from dinner, this Underwing Moth tried to fly into the livingroom.  We shushed it back outside, and this morning, it was still on the screen door.  We believe this is the Walnut Underwing, Catocala piatrix, which BugGuide identifies as the Penitent.
BugGuide identifies it as an eastern species, but also indicates a sighting from Arizona.  Charles Hogue describes it as a local species in his Insects of the Los Angeles Basin.  We generally sight one or two individuals each summer.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

Brazilian bug from semiarid region
July 16, 2009
Hi Bugman! I was found this bug in Brazil, state Pernambuco. Looks a Cerambycinae but I can not identify. Can be an unknown species?
Balazs
Brazil, state Pernambuco

Unidentified Longicorn from Brazil

Longicorn from Brazil:  Psygmatocerus wagleri

Dear Balazs,
We are a bit pressed for time this morning, and have not had any luck identifying your longicorn.  We believe it is one of the Prionids and the feathered antennae are quite distinctive.  We have seen similar antennae on an Australian Longicorn, Piesarthrius marginellus, but that is obviously a different species.  Hopefully, one of our readers will write in with a correct identification and link.

Unidentified Longicorn from Brazil

 Longicorn from Brazil:  Psygmatocerus wagleri

Update:  From Eric Eaton
Daniel:
Realized I hadn’t been to the WTB for too long.  Shame on me:-)  I’ll get to the longhorn, but meanwhile….
Eric

Update:  From Eric Eaton
Daniel:
Congratulations to Tina for coming to the same conclusion I would have for the wonderful Brazilian longhorn:  Psygmatocerus wagleri.  I hope she knew which subfamily to look under!  LOL!  Still would have exhausted my lunch hour hunting for that one when I ‘do’ know where to look!
Eric