Tan grasshopper/locust with 2-tones eyes, and a fishlike face.
Sat, Dec 13, 2008 at 6:54 PM
I discovered this grasshopper-like insect clinging to one of the leaves of a potted snake plant next to my front door yesterday afternoon. It moved lithargicly and only after it got annoyed with me taking it’s photograph. I’ve never seen a grasshopper with this fish-like face and white and green eyes. Can you help me identify what this is?
Ray Smith
Jacksonville, FL USA

Broad-Tipped Conehead

Broad-Tipped Conehead

Hi Ray,
This isn’t a grasshopper. It is a Katydid in the group known as Coneheads. We believe it is a Broad-Tipped Conehead, Neoconocephalus triops. You can compare images and get additional information on BugGuide. We will contact a specialist, Piotr Naskrecki, to substantiate or refute our identification.

Broad-Tipped Conehead

Broad-Tipped Conehead

Hi Daniel,
Yes, this indeed looks like a male Neoconocephalus triops.
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

black and yellow wings
Sat, Dec 13, 2008 at 6:43 PM
black and yellow wings, six legs, reddish head. found several recently in our house, they have wings but does not fly very well. we think they are coming from some unburnt wood in our fireplace. starting noticing them mid december in the houston texas area.
natalie
houston texas

Red Headed Ash Borer

Red Headed Ash Borer

Hi Natalie,
Your suspicions about the unburnt wood are probably correct. Your photos are quite blurry, but we are relatively certain that this is a Red Headed Ash Borer, Neoclytus acuminatus. The larvae feed on the sapwood of ash and other hardwoods and were probably in the wood when it was brought into the house.

flying bug
Fri, Dec 12, 2008 at 11:19 PM
About a month ago, we saw this flying around the flowers pictured, near a river and the gardens of Osaka Castle, Japan. Sorry I couldn’t get a better picture (despite having a DSLR) – it wouldn’t stay still long enough. Pretty big really… with the body perhaps 3 or 3.5 cms long. Image has been sharpened to bring out details better. Don’t bust a gut on my behalf – just curious :-). Regards, Tony
Tony, Japan
Osaka, Japan

Hummingbird Moth from Japan

Hummingbird Moth from Japan

answering own question
Fri, Dec 12, 2008 at 11:34 PM
Sorry – my friend found the answer to my query of 10 minutes ago: seems the bug is a Pellucid or Hummingbird Hawk Moth, for which a much better picture exists at http://www.flickr.com/photos/jshillaw/515960768/
Hope I haven’t taken your time… Regards, Tony
Tony, Japan
Osaka, Japan

Hi Tony,
The Flickr page you sent us to indicates:  “It’s Japanese name is  オオスカシバ (Oosukashiba ” but we wanted to try to find out the Linnean binomial name.  We googled Oosukashiba and found a site that listed Pellucid hawk moth = oosukashiba = Cephonodes hylas.  The Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic was our final destination.  There you may find fabulous life cycle photos as well as maps and information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Orange/Black Beetle/Hornet ? NSW
Sat, Dec 13, 2008 at 3:57 PM
My husband found this bug under his sleeve driving it’s spike into his arm yesterday. It got 4 stings in before it wore a size 9 dunlop volley.
Apparently it packed quite a punch, his arm still red/swollen/itchy 24hrs later. Just curious what bug this is? Doesn’t appear to have wings! Looks like a cross between a hornet & a beetle type bug.
Newcastle NSW Australia
Shell
Newcastle NSW Australia

Ground Assassin Bug

Ground Assassin Bug

Hi Shell,
A little bit of research revealed that this is a female Ground Assassin Bug, Ectomocoris decoratus, which we located on the Geocities Website of Brisbane Insects.  Males of the species are winged and fly while the females are winged.  Interestingly, we found some of the same photos and illustrations on a Brisbane Insects website with a different URL, but the species was listed as Ectomocoris patricius.  We also found a PDF online that states:  “Several other assassin bugs bite people in Queensland. … Ectomocoris decoratus, a fast-moving species with winged males and wingless females, is strikingly coloured in blue-black and orange.  It occurs under loose bark and may be encountered when gardening or clearing vegetation.  Because of its colour and speed, victims of this assassin bug often believe they were stung by a wasp.”  We are not exactly sure what a size 9 dunlop volley is, but it sound like it contributed to the squashing evident in your photos.  Assassin Bugs, except for a few blood sucking species, are thought of as beneficial predators, so we feel compelled to also tag your posting under Unnecessary Carnage.

Ground Assassin Bug

Ground Assassin Bug

Black and Yellow Bug
Fri, Dec 12, 2008 at 1:43 PM
These beetles or bugs were found on two different acacia species about 25km east of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. I have been unable to find any pictures on the web which remotely resemble them.
Dr David Hewitt
25 km east of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Unknown Immature Stink Bugs

possibly Immature Parent Bugs

Dear Dr Hewitt,
We believe these are immature Stink Bugs, but we are having trouble identifying the species. Many times, immature Stink Bugs or nymphs look radically different from the adults. Hopefully one of our faithful Australian readers will be able to identify the exact species.

Unknown Stink Bug Nymphs

Stink Bug Nymphs:  Commius elegans

These bugs have similar markings to Cantao parentum nymphs, although the colour (yellow) is different from the orange of the Cantao parentum.
Grev

Thanks Grev,
If you are correct, and we believe you may be correct, then these immature Parent Bugs are actually Shield Bugs in the family Scutelliridae and not Stink Bugs in the family Pentatomidae. They are called Parent Bugs because unlike most insects, the female guards the young nymphs for several weeks. The original letter indicates they were found on Acacia, and a website we linked to indicates: “its food plant, Mallotus claoxyloides (Smell of the Bush) .” This general color pattern is one that is common on several species of Stink Bugs in North America.  Another Australian Insect Website lists these food plants:  “Found on the Red Kamala (Mallotus philippensis) and other such species from the family (M. claoxyloides, M. discolor) and also Araucaria cunninghammii ” but does not mention Acacia.  This may still be an unidentified Stink Bug nymph.

Floridian Black Caterpillar.
Fri, Dec 12, 2008 at 2:41 PM
Hello Mr.Bugman, let me start by saying how very much I appreciate your work. I have a very limited knowledge of bugs, but this site has taught me much. I used to have a serious, very serious phobia of all bugs. But you have taught me to turn my fear into curiosity, and for that, I thank you.
I found this little guy out side my house, on the porch. We live in Northern Florida, in Milton, USA. This picture was taken in December, and the weather was about 20 degrees, and it had just rained. I was worried about this caterpillar, but because I feared I might harm him, I did not touch him. I checked and did not see this type of caterpillar on your site, so I do not know what species he is. Thank you for your time, it is very appreciated!
Much Love, Nick from Florida.
Nick L.
Milton, Florida, USA

Woolly Bear

Woolly Bear

Hi Nick,
Your caterpillar is a Woolly Bear, the caterpillar of a Tiger Moth.  We can’t be more specific than the subfamily Arctiidae.