Beetle found in bathroom
Sat, Oct 25, 2008 at 8:35 AM
We keep finding these beetles in the bathroom, and rarely in the kitchen (adjoining walls).
I think they are between 1/8 and 1/4 inch long.
They are black, and havea hard shell
Can you tell us what they are?
No house plants, no window in the bathroom.
We do have trees and plants outside, and have been bringing in dirt and manure to improve the yard.
thank you
Joe and Kathy
Oregon – near Portland

Strawberry Root Weevil

Strawberry Root Weevil

Hi Joe and Kathy,
While there are some Weevils that infest stored grain products, this is not one of them.  We did some searching on Bugguide, and believe your Weevil is in the genus Otiorhynchus.  Two species possibilities are Otiorhynchus sulcatus, Black Vine Weevil, which “may seek out hibernation sites in homes” or Otiorhynchus ovatus , the Strawberry Root Weevil , which feeds on “strawberries, other herbaceous plants, and tree seedlings in nurseries; larvae live in the soil, and feed continuously on the roots of seedlings; adults feed at night on the leaves, stem, and berries.”  If that dirt and manure you are adding to your yard is being used to fertilize strawberries, we would vote for the Strawberry Root Weevil.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Camouflaged Grasshopper
Sat, Oct 25, 2008 at 12:14 AM
Hi, I was perusing granitic formations around Knob Lick, Missouri when I espied movement. Upon closer inspection I realized I was looking at a highly camouflaged grasshopper.
There are many ‘hoppers in our general area, but I’ve never seen one quite like this. He’s approximately 2″ long. Can you tell me more about him?
Also, the second pic is of the more commonly seen ‘hoppers.
Thanks for your help! I love the site!
Misty, the HiTechRedneck
Knob Lick, MO

Pine Tree Spur-Throat Grasshopper

Pine Tree Spur-Throat Grasshopper

Hi Misty,
We spent a bit of time scanning through images on BugGuide, and we believe this is a Pine Tree Spur-Throat Grasshopper, Melanoplus punctulatus. BugGuide indicates: “Forests and oak savannah; may be nocturnal–comes to lights. Often seen perched on trunks of trees, where well-camouflaged.” Anyone who uses the verb espied is our kind of reader.

Correction:  October 27, 2008
Hi, Daniel:
Just went over to visit WTB and did find one minor error.  The image labeled “Pine tree spur-throated grasshopper” is actually a band-winged grasshopper, probably in the genus Trimerotropis, though it is hard to be conclusive.
Eric

Moth found in San Francisco, CA late Sept
Sat, Oct 25, 2008 at 8:47 AM
Our Neighbor found this moth in San Francisco in late Sept and brought it to my 9 yr old daughter for identification. She and I have been trying to match it up with moths from various sites and books but have been unsuccessful. Can you tell us what this is?
Sierra needs to know
San Francisco, CA

Black Witch

Black Witch

Hi Sierra,
This beauty is a Black Witch, a Central American Noctuid Moth that migrates north each year.  This migration, which could take specimens as far north as Canada, is unexplainable as the Black Witch does not breed except possibly in the extreme southern U.S.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Red and black large group of beetles?
Fri, Oct 24, 2008 at 9:30 PM
Hello,
As the weather has gotten colder over the past few weeks I started to notice two or three of these guys warming themselves in the sun on my front door. As time went on, more and more showed up, and now as many as 15 or 20 will show up on the front of my house.
A few days ago I was raking leaves in my backyard and came upon this rock with a huge group of them huddled together. Further investigation found other groups of them on other nearby rocks, trees, and piles of dead leaves. What are they?
I live in northern KY, just south of Cincinnati Ohio. They didn’t seem to appear (I didn’t notice them anyway) until the first part of September this year.
Gratefully
KY, USA

Democrat Bug Aggregation

Democrat Bug Aggregation

Hi Kentucky,
These are not beetles. Beetles go through complete metamorphosis so the larvae look nothing like the adult. These are Eastern Boxelder Bugs, Boisea trivittata, and since they have incomplete metamorphosis, the nymphs resemble the adults, but without the wings. Boxelder Bugs sometimes form large aggregations, and they are often noticed in the fall as cold weather starts to set in because they are known to seek shelter indoors. They will also emerge on warm sunny days in areas with southern exposures. Though they are associated with boxelder and maple trees, they really don’t do any harm to the trees since the nymphs feed on the juices of the seeds. According to BugGuide, they are also called: “Democrat Bug, Populist Bug, Politician Bug. Apparently these political terms are primarily used in the Central Plains states as I’ve seen references to such from KAN, NEB, & IOWA. (MQ) .” Though your photo does not show quite as many individuals as those gathering at a Barack Obama rally, they are nonetheless quite numerous. Your photo is a wonderful example of the great new feature on our website since our recent site migration. By clicking on the small image, you will see a much larger version open in a new window.

Jumping Bug
Tue, Oct 21, 2008 at 8:35 PM
Hi,
These tiny insects, no longer than an 1/8 inch, appear on my drawing desk while I work. They seem most prevalent in the summertime, hopping from out of nowhere onto my white paper at a rate of at least 1 per hour. They’re not particularly bothersome, but they jump faster than the eye can see… and I figure they’ve got to be coming from somewhere. Sorry for the bad pics, but I was lucky just to photograph it. Thanks!
Paolo
Brooklyn, NY

Springtail

Springtail

Hi Paolo,
This is a Springtail.  It looks to be an Elongate Bodied Springtail in the Suborder Arthropleona – Elongate-bodied Springtails, Family Entomobryidae, Genus Entomobrya, and possibly Species Entomobrya griseoolivata  as evidenced by an image on BugGuide. If Springtails get numerous, they can be an annoyance, but they are basically quite benign.

Mating blister beetles
Fri, Oct 24, 2008 at 10:31 AM
Hey fellows, love the new website design! Here are the mating blister beetles from Shilo, Manitoba, Canada
Sherry
Shilo, Manitoba, Canada

Mating Blister Beetles

Mating Blister Beetles

Hi Sherry,
WE have received images of these Blister Beetles from Canada in the past, and we have not had any success with identifying the species. We have matched the images to the genus Lytta on BugGuide, though the indication is that the species might be Lytta nutalli or Lytta cyanipennis.

Mating Blister Beetles

Mating Blister Beetles