Unknown micro-mantis
Hello Bugman!
I just wanted to ask for help with this tiny tiny critter. My friend found this inside of a cicada husk while collecting them for me in south central Pennsylvania. It was surrounded by some sort of webbing (or the husk was anyway), so at first we thought it was some sort of spider, but it only has six legs. It holds its two front limbs like a mantis, so I assume this is predatory. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks!
PS- I figured out my last mystery insect, it was a lesser ichneumon.
Blanton A.
Pennsylvania (Lancaster)

Thread-Legged Bug

Thread-Legged Bug

Hi Blanton,
We are happy you figured out your last mystery insect as we don’t have time to answer all inquiries. October 2 was a slow letter day, probably because many people were watching the debate. This is a predatory Thread-Legged Bug, most likely Stenolemus lanipes which can be found on BugGuide which indicates that it “Preys on spiders, or perhaps scavenges prey caught in webs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Flower Fly?
I found this fly on a cassia in my yard this evening. The closest thing I found in the archives was a flower fly.
Thanks again Tad Swackhammer
Cutler Bay, FL

Syrphid Fly

Syrphid Fly

Hi Tad,
Your are correct.  This is a Syrphid Fly or Flower Fly.  The species is Palpada vinetorum and is is well represented on BugGuide.  Since our new site migration, we have been spending our free time trying to organize our archives a bit.  We started with beetles, the biggest chunk of posts, and we are trying to sub-categorize.  At some point, we will get to the flies as well.

Good looking Orthoperan
Dear bugman, last year I sent in an unidentified Katydid from texas.
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2007/05/29/truncated-true-katydid-not-unknown- shieldback-katydid/
You did so much legwork tracking down people to get me that information that I figured I should return the favor with this shot of another Orthopteran. I’ve taken an entomology course since then and I am fairly sure he’s a Lubber grasshopper (Family Romaleidae). He was enjoying some Mayan ruins near Merida, Mexico.
He was about three inches long, and a slow mover.
Best, Dave
Mayan Ruins outside Yaxunah, Mexico

Lubber Grasshopper from Mexico

Lubber Grasshopper from Mexico

Hi Dave,
We agree that this looks like a Lubber Grasshopper, but we don’t recognize the species. Perhaps one of our readers will provide a comment with the correct identification.  It really is a comely specimen.

Update:  August 5, 2012
In trying to clean up some old unidentified postings, we now believe this is one of the Dragon Lubber Grasshoppers in the genus
Dracotettix, based on photos posted to BugGuide.

Update:  December 18, 2012
We just received a comment indicating a belief that this Grasshopper is a different species of Lubber: 
Taeniopoda reticulata.  We looked at the links provided in the comment and we concur, and we also located this Encyclopedia of Life image to support the correction. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Need ID on this caterpillar
Found this caterpillar on my sages and coyote mints eats leafs and builds nest at base of plants. About 1/2″ long. Located in Southern California
Second picture is another caterpillar I found in my backyard
Dennis
Brea California

Inchworm

Inchworm

Hi Dennis,
One of the caterpillars is and Inchworm or Spanworm in the family Geometridae.  We are not sure of the exact species as there are numerous similar looking caterpillars posted to BugGuide.  We have a similar looking caterpillar that defoliates the new growth on our Matilija Poppy each spring.

Grammodes ocellata
Hi Guys,
Just did a search on your site but didn’t come up with any result for Grammodes ocellata so thought I would send through this pic. Looks a very cat like false face I feel. Taken today on my property, hope you like it.
aussietrev
Northern Burnett region, Queensland Australia.

Australian Owlet Moth

Australian Owlet Moth

Hi Trev,
Were it not for your numerous contributions, our Australian selections would be considerably less. Thanks for adding Grammodes ocellata, one of your lovely Owlet Moths, to our archives.

Secretive nocturnal spider from Vancouver island
Hello, I’ve been waiting for your site to be back up to ask you what this spider is. I love spiders and researching them and am slightly embarrassed I have no idea what this is. I found him running full tilt across a sidewalk from a hedge towards a main road about 2 am in the morning in Victoria, vancouver island BC. He froze and posed for a picture (a couple since I couldn’t fix the macro on my camera) I’d say that he was about the size of a quarter around, he was easy to spot in the dark because he was so big, like bulky. I went through every spider picture on your site, is it a trapdoor spider? I realize I should have got a better picture of the eye arrangement.
Holly
Victoria, British Columbia

Folding Door Spider

Folding Door Spider

Hi Holly,
We believe we have matched your spider to a Folding Door Spider in the genus Antrodiaetus that is posted on BugGuide.