Please help Identify
My seven year old found this in the driveway behind a car and saved it from being squashed, so he says. He is currently looking for a new home for it, but wanted to know what it was. I sifted through pictures on the internet and found nothing. Can you help, picture attached.
david for Samuel
round rock texas

Hi Samuel and David,
This is an Earth Boring Dung Beetle in the family Geotrupidae, and the genus Bolbocerosoma. BugGuide has not gotten any submissions from Texas, but they have received images from nearby louisiana and Oklahoma. Let Samuel know that we are very excited to receive a new species to our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

spider-like bug in Costa Rica
hello,
I just came back from my vacation in Costa Rica. One day we found a wierd looking insect on the shower wall. The local guide was not able to identify it. I attached the picture. The length of it was about 1", the colour is slightly darker than on the photo due to the flash effect. I would really apperciate if you identify it. Regards,
Alex

Hi Alex,
This is a Solpugid, a harmless, non-venomous relative of both spiders and scorpions. They are commonly called Sun Spiders or Wind Scorpions. In parts of the U.S., they are called Sand Puppies. Solpugids are generally found in arid climates. In the Middle East, they can grow to five inces or more in leg span, and they are called Camel Spiders. There are many false internet stories circulating about Camel Spiders in the Middle East, including debunked letters sent to our own site.

What bug is this?
Thank you in advance for taking a look at this bug. We found this bug in the base of our tree. The tree is at least 70 years old. What do you think? Thank you so very much,
Kathy Miller

Hi Kathy,
This looks to us to be a Blind Elater, Alaus myops, also called the Blind Click Beetle or Small Eyed Click Beetle. We generally get many images of the closely related Eyed Elater, Alaus oculatus, in the summer. According to BugGuide, the Blind Elater is: “Similar to the more popularly known A. oculatus, but smaller, especially, narrower, and the eyespots on the pronotum much smaller. More mottled, less glossy black. Elytra finely striated (coarse striations in oculatus). Flies earlier in year (spring) than A. myops (summer).” The larvae of the Blind Elater preys on wood boring beetle grubs in pine trees.

Hi, Daniel:
The click beetle appears to me to be the “regular” eyed-elater. They can pass the winter as adults. The specimen shown has sawdust on it which compromises its markings a bit, but in my experience the “blind elater” has very vague rings around the eyespots, whereas this one has very bold rings.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Giant Mesquite Bug in Southern Arizona
Hey Bugman!
I found these beautiful bugs at the campground of Sabino Canyon. They were the decorational highlight of a Mesquite tree. What kind of Giant Mesquite Bug might that be? Thanks for any information!
Daniel

Hi Daniel,
These really are called Giant Mesquite Bugs. The species is Thasus acutangulus. The winged specimen in the single photo is an adult, and the nymphs are the brightly colored non-winged individuals.

Hi Daniel,
The large bug Thasus is highly-thought-of in Mexico. I’ve read a good deal about how it’s used there, or at least once was. It’s called “Chamoes” as reported here [under the archaic genus-name Pachilis] and the details include both direct human consumption and as an element of egg-yolk coloration when fed to laying hens. Also mentioned is a crude protein content of 65.4% and fat content of 19.4% Of all the edible insects found in the US this is one of the most sought after — by me! If anyone would like to play the supplier role let’s talk. Thanks,
Dave
www.slshrimp.com

Identification of ?Robber Fly and Scorpion Fly
Dear Bugman,
Happened upon your site tonight and am most excited! Have bought several books and trying to identify local species in our Southern Tablelands area of NSW, Australia. Hubby and I spend a good deal of time at Bungonia State Recreation Area doing the lazy man tours of the gorgeous bush to see what interesting things we c an find…..we are never disappointed! What first started out as just native flowers and now turned into fauna and in particular, BUGS!I’ve attached two photographs taken this month and am hoping you can identify them. They’re beauties! Cheers!
Katherine & Ricky Lee

Hi Katherine and Ricky Lee,
Getting different species of insects in the same letter complicates our posting, so we are giving your Robber Fly its own posting. We can’t tell you the species, but perhaps our faithful reader Grev will write in and positively identify your specimen. The Geocities website includes some similar looking Robber Flies.

Identification of ?Robber Fly and Scorpion Fly
Dear Bugman,
Happened upon your site tonight and am most excited! Have bought several books and trying to identify local species in our Southern Tablelands area of NSW, Australia. Hubby and I spend a good deal of time at Bungonia State Recreation Area doing the lazy man tours of the gorgeous bush to see what interesting things we c an find…..we are never disappointed! What first started out as just native flowers and now turned into fauna and in particular, BUGS! I’ve attached two photographs taken this month and am hoping you can identify them. They’re beauties! Cheers!
Katherine & Ricky Lee

Hi Katherine and Ricky Lee,
What a positively gorgeous Blue Eyes Lacewing, Nymphes myrmeleonides, which we identified on the Geocities website. According to Wikidpedia, it is one of the largest Lacewings in the world. It belongs to the family Nymphidae and the order Neuroptera which contains other insects like owlflies and mantispids.

Dear Daniel,
What a beautiful photo Katherine and Ricky Lee have taken of the Blue Eyes Lacewing! Congratulations to you both. These insects are around our place a lot lately. You can recognise them before they land by their distinctive manner of flying – as though their wings are a bit disjointed. They like to sit underneath leaves and look up and out at the world. I recall that my first email to you was about the eggs of the Nymphes myrmeleonides, which you posted on the Eggs page, so perhaps Katherine and Ricky would like to do a bit of cross checking and watch out for the eggs. Regards
Grev