Unknown Bug – New Zealand
Fri, Nov 14, 2008 at 2:17 AM
Caught this bug inside today. Never seen one before and want to know what it is.
I haven’t measured it, but I would guess about 20mm long.
The photos aren’t the best (especially #3), but hopefully good enough.
Jon
Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

Unknown Longicorn

Longicorn: Xuthodes punctipennis

Hi Jon,
The best we can do at the moment is to provide the family name, Cerambycidae, for your unknown orange Longicorn Beetle. Perhaps we will have better luck in a future identify search, or perhaps a reader will provide us with a more exact identification.

Update: Wed, Nov 19, 2008 at 5:52 PM
Hi Daniel,
I have had a reply from NZ Ministry of Agriculture Biosecurity people…..
see below:
The beetle is a native longhorn, Xuthodes punctipennis (Coleoptera:
Cerambycidae). The larvae feed in dead wood of native trees and has
recently been found breeding in Eucalyptus & Acacia. The adults are
attracted to light and found on flowers in the evening.
Cheers
Jon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Orange and black bugs
Fri, Nov 14, 2008 at 6:33 PM
Hi, I live in Western Australia, and recently moved house, finding these bugs in the backyard right after moving in.. What are they? and are they useful or harmful? (There’s a ton of them in the lawn…)
DN
Perth, Western Australia

Gutta Bug

Gutta Bug

Hi DN,
You have photos of a winged adult and immature nymph of the Gutta Bug, Physopelta gutta.  We located images on the Geocities Australian Insects page. The Gutta Bug is a Seed Bug in the family Largidae.

Gutta Bug Nymph

Gutta Bug Nymph

this red and olden dragonfly like insect i am in capable of i dentifying my self please help.
Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 4:52 PM
i found this bug on my Jamaican dogwood in south florida and i cant seem to find out what its is. i wasn’t sure if it was a dragon fly do to its small size it was about 1 inch long maybe a little longer but very small it had only 2 wings at least that i could see the head and thorax where golden yellow and looked fuzzy to me the the abdomen was almost florescent red and looked like if you where to poor a glass and cranberry juice and look through it but brighter when it fly it hovered then moved and hovered more however it was moving to fast and i was only able to see it when hovering.
the ruler
south florida

Salpingogaster nepenthe

Salpingogaster nepenthe

Dear The Ruler,
This is a species of Syrphid Fly, Salpingogaster nepenthe, which we quickly identified on BugGuide. Syprhid Flies belong to the family Syrphidae, and certain groups have common names like Flower Flies or Hover Flies, but this lovely specimen does not have a common name.  You can impress your neighbors by referring to it by the scientific tongue twister Salpingogaster nepenthe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Western Conifer Seed Bug
Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 10:03 AM
The last week of October, I was outside and heard a loud, heavy buzzing by my ear. It was one of these guys flying by my head to land on the pine tree out back. I didn’t know what they were, but noticed that they seemed to be enjoying walking around on the sappy, green pine cones. Even though I am in Worthington, Ohio (just north of Columbus), I believe that they are Western Conifer Seed Bugs. Of course, I only figured that out after looking at this site!
Just thought that I’d share.
Love the site, keep up the great work!
Ed Huston
Worthington, Ohio

Western Conifer Seed Bugs

Western Conifer Seed Bugs

Hi Ed,
Over the years, we have received countless images of Western Conifer Seed Bugs, but to the best of our knowledge, your image is the first one that shows the Western Conifer Seed Bugs feeding on the seed cones of a conifer.  Thanks for your wonderful addition to our archive.  The Western Conifer Seed Bug has piercing/sucking mouth parts and they are most likely responsible for the oozing sap on the cone.

colourful bug in india
hi bug man,
told you i had more, mostly cos i don’t know the first thing about identifying bugs.
anyway in found this little guy in india in my room in Trivandrum. night time not very active didn’t move even after a substantial amount of shooting. was the only one of its kind i have ever seen and i do look. February 2008.
esthar2001@yahoo.com
Trivandrum, India

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle: Batocera species

Hi esthar2001@yahoo.com
This is a Longhorn Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae. Sorry we can’t be more specific than the family.

Hi esthar2001@yahoo.com. Most longhorn beetles (Cerambycidae) are fairly drab so I thought yours would be relatively easy to track down – not so. I suspect that your beetle is either uncommon or hasn’t made itself and agricultural or forestry pest. I took several approaches and all trails seemed to lead to the genus Batocera (sufamily Lamiinae). This genus includes several notorious pests, perhaps most notably the mango stem-borer (Batocera rufomaculata), which is a serious problem in India and many other parts of south Asia. The genus also includes a number of species with brilliant red markings. I was able to find one internet site that featured a Batocera sp. that looks very similar to yours at: http://albumo.com/photo/212955/Longhorn-Beetle—Batocera-sp..html. The photos are from Malaysia, but many Asian species are quite widespread. I suspect this may be a closely related species. Cheers. K

Mystery larvae (or pupae?)
Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 7:55 AM
I was visiting one of our local natural areas and I found these dense clusters of insects on the lower stems of several woody plants in a small area. They didn’t move at all when prodded. They were found in a mixed hardwood/pine woods with dense leaf litter on the ground. I haven’t done a lot of research on what these might be, but I’m wondering if this is some sort of beetle?
G.P.
Alachua County, Florida

Netwing Beetle Larvae maybe

Beetle Larvae

Hi G.P.,
We believe these are Netwing Beetle Larvae in the family Lycidae. There is an image on BugGuide that looks quite close. We want to get an opinion from Eric Eaton on this curiosity.

Daniel:
Before you ask:
I suspect that the beetle larvae may be of the pleasing fungus beetle family Erotylidae rather than the net-wing beetles.  I could very well be wrong, of course….
Eric