mystery bug in thailand
Location:  n.e. thailand
August 6, 2010 10:52 pm
hi, i found this odd creature resting on leaf in n.e thailand near mekong river. it seems to be some sort of bug. it seems to have very long antenna folded back. Im totally confused due to its strangeness. to make matters worse or better if one likes confusion I then found another creature similar in form but close up of eyes make me think weird spider. I will forward that one when processed. p.s really appreciate your educational site and thanks for IDing my leaf cricket as katydid nymph.
heiden999

Assassin Bug

Hi heiden999,
This is an Assassin Bug in the family Reduviidae.  It really is an unusual looking specimen.  We will try to determine the species.

Assassin Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dragonfly
Location:  Bismarck, North Dakota
August 7, 2010 2:53 am
I looked through your photos of dragonflies. Took time to read some of the letters and replies. Such an interesting group of creatures. I may have missed it, but don’t recall seeing this type of dragonfly. I photographed it in my garden last year. It was patiently resting while I ran back inside to grab my camera. This was such a pretty color combination. Just thought I’d share since the photos turned out so well.
Doreen

Mosaic Darner

Hi again Doreen,
This Mosaic Darner in the genus
Aeshna is quite the beauty.  You can see the numerous species in the genus posted to BugGuide.

Mosaic Darner

Fly, Dragonfly, Bee Killer wasp?
Location:  Bismarck, North Dakota
August 7, 2010 1:39 am
I took photos of this insect today. It originally flew around my flowering basil, mimicing the bees, going from flower to flower. Then I saw it grab a bumble bee, to eat it. I wrote about it on my blog today: http://sewartfullyminded.blogspot.com/2010/08/bee-fight-and-bee-killer.html
At first glance I wondered if it was a dragon fly because of the long tail, but it behaved differently. It is fuzzy like a bumble bee but has such huge eyes. I followed it taking photos. It didn’t seem to like that and tried to evade me. It landed on the grape leaf and as I continued to take photos it eventually retreated behind the leaf.
Doreen

Robber Fly eats Bee

Hi Doreen,
This adept predator is a Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, and we believe, due to its size, that it is in the subfamily Asilinae, but we haven’t the time to research the species at the moment.  You may view some possibilities on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Type of Grasshopper
Location:Cheyenne, WY
August 3, 2010 9:46 pm
Thank you for looking at my photos. Could you tell me what kind of grasshopper is in my photos? He’s about 3” long and has what looks like a stinger coming out of his backside. We live in Cheyenne, WY.
Daniel Wright

Sword Bearing Conehead

Hi Daniel,
The “stinger” that resulted in the common name of Sword Bearing Conehead is actually the ovipositor of the female.  The Sword Bearing Conehead,
Neoconocephalus ensiger, is a Katydid and you can read more about it on BugGuide.

The Hermit
Location:  Austin, TX
August 2, 2010 12:59 pm
Not sure what this bug is but I’ve seen them a couple of times. They’re tiny and the stuff on it’s back is carcasses/carapaces of dead bugs. It’s like a hobo carrying around it’s home. These shots were taken at almost 5x magnification with a 35mm Canon 5D.
The bug’s head is out and visible in both shots. It’s hard to make out which parts are the bugs and which parts are detritus being carried along.
Steve

Lacewing Larva

Hi Steve,
You excellent photos of a Lacewing Larva should help our readership to identify this formidable predatory that camouflages itself with the carcasses of its prey.

Lacewing Larva

What is this?
Location:  Winston-Salem, NC
August 2, 2010 6:13 pm
Found this bug on my house and just wanted to know what it is?
David

Cicada

Hi David,
Now that the dog days of summer have arrived, we expect to be getting numerous requests to identify the Annual Cicadas in the genus
Tibicen, which are sometimes called Dog Day Harvestflies because of their resemblance to flies (though much larger) and their appearance toward the end of summer.  You may also hear the din the males create as they call to mates from the tree tops, sounding like a chainsaw.  We can hear our own Southern California Cicadas in the trees right now, though they are nowhere near as loud as the eastern species.