Unknown Naiad, Firefly larva, and Dipluran? Sat, Oct 18, 2008 at 4:59 PM
Hi BugMan,
I love your website, I’ve been interested in insects since I was younger and always dreamed of being an entomologist. When I entered high school I drifted away from my hobby but in the past few years my inner insect passion has returned.
While looking for insects to photograph at the Kalamazoo Nature Center in SW Michigan I found this strange insect on a tree beside the trail. At first I thought it might be some kind of true bug nymph based on its appearance but an entomologist at the Nature Center thought it looked like some kind of naiad. I found it several yards away from a small marsh/pond, but we had recently experienced a heavy rain storm and flooding at the time I took the photo back in July/August so it may have washed away from the pond after the waters receded if it is aquatic. If I remember correctly it was fairly small maybe a quarter of an inch or less. I went back a few hours later to study it more but it was gone.
The next two photos I took a few days ago in my grandparents’ woods just outside of Scotts, Michigan. The first insect I found under the bark of a rotting log, to me it looks like some kind of firefly larva but I have no idea what it’s holding, remains of a slug perhaps? The second I also found under bark of dead log, it looks like a Dipluran but I don’t really have any idea. I’m not an expert by any means but if you can better identify it, I’d greatly appreciate any of your help.
Thanks for your time,
Phillip “SITNAM7″ in Climax, Michigan
SW Michigan, in Kalamazoo and Climax woods

Firefly Larva eats Slug

Firefly Larva eats Slug

Hi Phillip,
Thanks for your wonderful letter.  We are only posting your image of the Firefly Larva eating the Slug at this point.  It really complicates our confusing system of archiving if there is more than one specimen in a letter.  We are most excited about the Firefly Larva because it is the only image we have of it feeding.  We sometimes have problems distinguishing Firefly Larvae from Netwing Beetle Larvae, but the former feed on snails and slugs, and the latter feed on fungus.  This is an excellent addition to our Food Chain series.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

filament bearer caterpillar
Sat, Oct 18, 2008 at 9:22 AM
Hi Buggies,
I love your website. I searched for this species of caterpillar, but couldn’t find it on your site–thought you might like to see this filament bearer, Nemocampa resistaria (according to my Caterpillars of Eastern North America by David L. Wagner, a book no Eastern North American bug lover should be without). I took this photo in my back yard in northwestern New Jersey in early June of 2008. When I saw the caterpillar inching across the picnic table, my first thought was, “There’s no breeze; why is that twig moving?” It does look just like a piece of Virginia Creeper vine, or the wild grape vines that also grow around here.
Enjoy!
Jeannie
Newton, New Jersey

Horned Spanworm

Horned Spanworm

Hi Jeannie,
BugGuide also refers to this interesting inchworm species as the Horned Spanworm.  Your wonderful photo with its dramatic shadow is a perfect Halloween image.

nais metalmark
Sat, Oct 18, 2008 at 7:40 PM
it’s me again,
this was another first for me this summer and i was so thrilled to see and to photograph this little beauty. i didn’t know what it was at first and i had fun looking thru my books to find it. it’s small and didn’t stay still hardly at all, but i managed to get a dorsal and ventral photo’s, which is what i love to do when the bitterflies let me. i just love how he’s using his antennae to check out the flower in the ventral view.
hope you can use these in your archives.
as always, thanks for all your help,
venice

Nais Metalmark

Nais Metalmark

Hi Venice,
Your contribution of the Nais Metalmark, Apodemia nais, is greatly appreciated.  The green eyes help with this species identification.

Nais Metalmark

Nais Metalmark

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

phoebus parnassians
Sat, Oct 18, 2008 at 7:25 PM
hi daniel,
attached are male phoebus parnassian photo’s taken this past july. the one with the little dark hook like lines on the rear wing i believe is a high elevation parnassian.

Parnassian

Parnassian

the other two photo’s are also a male parnassian but according to glassberg they are low elevation. however i took the photo’s at roughly the same elevation (9,000 feet)but on different days.
enjoy, venice

Parnassian low elevation

Parnassian low elevation

Hi Again Venice,
We are always reluctant to post location photos for Parnassian Butterflies since they are endangered and since collectors are quite rabid about catching them.  The Phoebus Parnassian, Parnassius phoebus, is highly variable, and isolated populations are often quite different from other populations.  We would hate to have your mountain decended upon by Japanese and German butterfly collectors, but we are thrilled to post your gorgeous photos.

Parnassian

Parnassian

Some kind of fly?
Fri, Oct 17, 2008 at 6:02 AM
I spotted this small insect this afternoon in the garden. It’s about 8 mm long and first I thought it was some kind of beetle, but zooming in on the picture I think it’s a fly, but one with a very large tongue that moves like the trunk of an elephant ;) I’ve checked out all the flies on your website, but can’t find this one. Hope you can give me a hint! Cheers, Monique
Monique Simons
Koh Samui, Thailand

Unknown Fly from Thailand

Unknown Fly from Thailand

Hi Monique,
This is a fly, but we have no idea how to classify it beyond the order Diptera.  We are reluctant to do any internet research at the moment as our internet connectivity is quite mercurial recently, and we never know from moment to moment if we will be able to connect.  Time Warner, our internet provider, has been less than reliable lately.  Perhaps a reader will be able to provide a more exact identification.

Beetle in Basement
Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 6:10 PM
I am finding these beetles in my house. What are they? While I have found one on the main floor, most are appearing in my finished basement playroom. The living ones I have found seem to be trying to burrow in the carpet. In our utility room (unfinished basement space) I have found several carcases that spiders seem to have killed. Can you identify this bug from the attached image? Do I need to be concerned about finding these in my kids playroom?
Long Island, NY

Ground Beetle

Ground Beetle

Dear Long Island, NY,
This is a Ground Beetle in the genus Scarites.  It will not harm you, your children, or your home.  This Ground Beetle is a nocturnal predator that feeds on other insects.  You can read more about them on BugGuide.