Please identify this HUGE butterfly
April 12, 2010
Bugman, thanks for taking the time to read this and seeing if you can ID this HUGE butterfly (or moth) in my backyard. It is orange white, and truly beautiful. I’ve never seen such a big body before. So large, it could not fly away
Dr. Pournaras
Horry County, South Carolina, USA

Cecropia Moth

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Interesting Costa Rican Wasp Moths
April 11, 2010
On our recent trip to Costa Rica we spent a few days at the Las Cruces Biological Station/Wilson Botanical Gardens, a magnificent preserve and research facility run by the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS). Part of my daily routine was to go night-lighting for bugs after dinner, a practice I would highly recommend to anyone who is interested in insects and isn’t too squeamish about tramping around in the dark. The station also provides a UV light screen for guests that are interested in viewing nocturnal insects, and this beautiful moth showed up one night on the underside of a nearby leaf. I am fairly certain the species is Histioea meldolae (Arctiidae: Ctenuchinae) and its startling appearance caught me a little off guard. Such brightly colored moths are usually diurnal (day fliers), the colors intended either for sexual communication or sending a warning to potential predators of toxicity or bad taste (aposematic coloration). This is indeed very common among Tiger Moths (Arctiidae) in general, including many Ctenuchid moths. Many Ctenuchids are also very good a mimicking menacing wasps, hence the common group name “Wasp Moths”. This one, however, didn’t look much like a wasp to me and appeared to be nocturnal, or perhaps crepuscular (dusk or dawn flier) which could explain the bright colors. It was also very difficult to identify and I eventually tracked it down by digging deeply into some very old scientific literature.  I could find no photos of this beautiful species on the internet, a fact that I took as further indication that it probably hides by day and is probably uncommon and/or very secretive. If anyone out there knows anything about this moth I would greatly appreciate a comment. Regards.
Karl

Wasp Moth: Histioea meldolae

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Green Acrida bicolor from Israel
April 12, 2010
Hi WTB,
I sent you a set of brown Acrida bicolor a couple years ago and you posted them:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2008/12/24/grasshopper-from-israel/
So here’s a green one to complete the series.
Ben
Eastern Samaria, Israel

Acrida bicolor

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Water bug of some sort
April 12, 2010
Hi WTB,
On my hiking trip to Eastern Samaria (north-east of Jerusalem, Israel) on April 9-10, 2010 I came across this hemipteran. There were lots of them skating on the water of a spring, but they don’t look like water striders and I wasn’t able to find out what they are. Any ideas?
Ben
Eastern Samaria, Israel

Water Cricket

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Butterfly from Israel
April 12, 2010
Hi WTB!
Me again from Israel, and still in love with your website!
On my latest hiking trip, this time to Eastern Samaria (north-east of Jerusalem, Israel) on April 9-10, 2010, I saw and photographed loads of bugs. Everything is waking up after the winter, the hills are green and alive!
My first bug is this Melanargia titea titania, who was patiently waiting for me to get my camera out.
Ben
Eastern Samaria, Israel

Leventine Marbled White

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unusual looking snout nosed insect
April 11, 2010
Hi Bugman
We hope you can identify this strange looking insect that we found in our back garden today.
I must admit, when I first saw it it was curled up and lying on its side in one of our bird feeding dishes, and as it’s six legs were all curled up with the body I initially thought it was very small yound bird that had died. However, when it went to move it I saw the legs move, and eventually the insect righted itself and stood up as per the attached photos (apologies as the second photo is a little bit blurred). Length is approx 1.4-2cm long.
A short while later it had climbed from the dish into the tree branch above, where it is now well camouflaged against the wood.
Cheers
Royston & Tania
Adelaide, South Australia

Elephant Weevil

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