Jumping Bug
Tue, Oct 21, 2008 at 8:35 PM
Hi,
These tiny insects, no longer than an 1/8 inch, appear on my drawing desk while I work. They seem most prevalent in the summertime, hopping from out of nowhere onto my white paper at a rate of at least 1 per hour. They’re not particularly bothersome, but they jump faster than the eye can see… and I figure they’ve got to be coming from somewhere. Sorry for the bad pics, but I was lucky just to photograph it. Thanks!
Paolo
Brooklyn, NY

Springtail

Springtail

Hi Paolo,
This is a Springtail.  It looks to be an Elongate Bodied Springtail in the Suborder Arthropleona – Elongate-bodied Springtails, Family Entomobryidae, Genus Entomobrya, and possibly Species Entomobrya griseoolivata  as evidenced by an image on BugGuide. If Springtails get numerous, they can be an annoyance, but they are basically quite benign.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mating blister beetles
Fri, Oct 24, 2008 at 10:31 AM
Hey fellows, love the new website design! Here are the mating blister beetles from Shilo, Manitoba, Canada
Sherry
Shilo, Manitoba, Canada

Mating Blister Beetles

Mating Blister Beetles

Hi Sherry,
WE have received images of these Blister Beetles from Canada in the past, and we have not had any success with identifying the species. We have matched the images to the genus Lytta on BugGuide, though the indication is that the species might be Lytta nutalli or Lytta cyanipennis.

Mating Blister Beetles

Mating Blister Beetles

Hello Again ! Can You Help?
Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 10:39 AM
I found this beetle walking along the wall around my porch lights. I discovered it in the spring at night time, where all sorts of insects appear! It is one of the weirdest beetles I have ever seen. (note the thorax). I’ve had quite a lot identified on your website, and hope you can continue to help the poor, helpless public. Thanks!
Luke
Murrayville, Georgia

Long Necked Ground Beetle

Long Necked Ground Beetle

Hi Luke,
This is a Long Necked Ground Beetle, Colliuris pensylvanica.  According to BugGuide, it is found :  “In leaf litter and under logs and stones, and on vegetation in wet areas”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Walking Stick on Maui but where’s it from?
Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 12:53 PM
Walking Stick on Maui but where’s it from?
Aloha from Maui again. Here’s a walking stick found earlier this month in the late afternoon. The folks at BugGuide and the Bishop Museum, Honolulu seem to be stumped about where this guy/gal came from. It was attached to my back window. About 5-6″ long. Love how the long legs have the antennae tucked between them in the front of the body. It was gone in the morning. About 2 weeks later, another one showed up on the other side of the house. Will send that separately. Imagine my surprise to see this second walking stick on the front door of my house. This one was shorter about 4-5″, much more ‘awake’ than the other one. They do not appear to be the same kind of walking stick from their leg position and coloring, unless this is an earlier version in their life cycle. Mahalo nui loa – Thanks for all!
Eliza
Ha`iku, Maui

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Hi Eliza,
If your local museum and BugGuide are stumped, we don’t know what more we can do but to post your photos and hope a reader can provide an answer. With the proliferation of exotic pets from around the world, many of which are insects, it isn’t entirely impossible that this is some exotic species that escaped or was released. The leg position in your first photo is a common resting posture of Phasmids.

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Update:  December 15, 2008
Hello
I would just like to let you know IDs for some of the phasmid (walking
stick) pics you have on your site:
entry 23. 0ctober 2008 – this phasmid from Hawaii is Sipyloidea sipylus.
This species is not native to Hawaii, but to south east asia (like
Malayisa for example). But it has been introduces to several new
locations, like Madagascar and Hawaii
wishing you all the best
Dr. Bruno Kneubühler  (Switzerland)

Hi WTB !
Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 10:25 AM
I found this bug on a Ragweed plant during spring, but have also seen it around lights at night and also other ragweed during summer. It looks closest like a Plant Bug, but not quite. I live in Northeast Georgia, around the mountains. I cannot find it anywhere on the internet ! Please help me!
Luke
Murrayville, Georgia

Plant Bug

Plant Bug

Hi Luke,
We agree that this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae based on the long thin antennae and slender legs.  We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he can provide a genus or species since the matching image we found on BugGuide was not identified.

Plant Bug

Plant Bug

Some sort of blister beetle?
Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 1:34 PM
We were out walking Jester again and nearly tripped over this fellow walking down the road. Unfortunately, I didn’t have a macro lens or adapter with me so the photos aren’t all that good, but I couldn’t resist.
There do seem to be rather a lot of these beetles around lately — I don’t actually remember ever seeing them at all, before.
Have I mentioned lately how much I enjoy this site?
Thanks,
Pat
Southwest Michigan (about a mile or so from Lake Michigan)

Oil Beetle

Oil Beetle

Hi Pat,
Your Blister Beetle is in the genus Meloe, the Oil Beetles.  The common name refers to the oily substance that is emitted by the joints of the leg.  This oily substance contains cantharidin which is a skin irritant explaining the common name Blister Beetle used for the entire family Meloidae.  The infamous aphrodisiac Spanish Fly was originally derived from a European relative Lytta vesicatoria.