Dragonfly Nymph?
I was out on the back porch with my kids when I saw a wasp land on the screen, a minute later I looked up and saw another bug fly up and land on the wasp. I had my camera taking pictures of the kids so I walked outside and snapped a few of the bug with the wasp.. just a moment later it flew off with the wasp. I have no idea exactly what kind of bug this is, as it’s the first time I’ve ever seen it around here. Someone said it might be a dragonfly nymph but the google image search I had didn’t look like it. Any idea what it is?
Nick Young
Charleston, SC

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Wasp

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Wasp

Hi Nick,
Our favorite aspect of posting your letter and wonderful photo is that we learned the common name of this Robber Fly.  It is a Red Footed Cannibalfly, Promachus rufipes.  The unusual composition of the name brings something interesting to question.  Generally, when “fly” is tacked onto a word like butterfly or dragonfly, the insect is not a true fly.  Crane Fly and Robber Fly would be true flies.  This naming is something of an anomaly since the Red Footed Cannibalfly is a Robber Fly, hence a true fly.  Your photo is a lovely addition to our Food Chain section.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown Bug, Sorry
Hi WTB,
you hear it all the time, however, I’d just like to say what a fantastic library of data you have, really outstanding. I have searched the majority of your database, various other websites, and a book that I have, however, I cannot for the life of me find this creature. It looks like several things, but I’m not going to say what to make a fool of myself if they are way off the mark haha. Could you please help? This photo was taken in an area filled with overgrown plants, moist ground and no human interference. The creature is shown on the leaf of a gipsywort plant, a full sized plant specimen (or near full size).
Taken 10/09/2008 in Newport, South Wales, United Kingdom.
Dont mind ?

Hymenopteran

Hymenopteran

Dear Dont Mind,
We know this is the second time you have submitted this query, and we don’t know the answer. We haven’t the time to research at the moment, but we hope by posting your letter and photo, someone may write in with an answer. All we know for certain is that this is a Hymenopteran, the order that contains wasps and bees. We suspect it may be a wood wasp or sawfly, but we are not certain.

Karl provided us with a comment identifying this as an Ichneumon but he was unable to link to an image of Amblyteles armatorius. When we did a web search on the name he provided, we encountered this matching image.

Aquatic Mantid Like Creature from Australia
Hi guys,
congratulations on the new site. I came across this guy on the edge of a dam at my property. At first I thought it was just a leaf sticking out of the water but then noticed the eyes. I have never seen anything like it. Any ideas Queensland, Australia
aussietrev

Water Scorpion from Australia

Water Scorpion from Australia

Hi Aussietrev,
What a crazy looking photo of a Water Scorpion.  We believe it is in the genus Nepa.  Water Scorpions are related to Giant Water Bugs, also known as Toe-Biters.  The stinger-like appendage is actually a breathing tube.  We hope you have checked out our new site feature, What’s That Bug Down Under? that features our many Australian submissions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Do you know what this is?
My daughter found this caterpillar (I think) in our driveway this afternoon. It is about 1.5 inches long. I looked on several websites and couldn’t find anything exactly like it. Do you know the species of caterpillar (if that is what it is) this is?
Metropolis, IL (Southern)
Just curious

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Spicebush Swallowtail Caterpillar

Dear Curious
Your photo depicts a Spicebush Swallowtail just prior to metamorphosis.  Many typically green caterpillars change colors like brown or orange just before molting into the chrysalis or pupa stage.  The false eyespots help protect the tasty caterpillar by fooling predators into thinking the caterpillar is much larger and possibly dangerous.  They make the caterpillar look like a snake.

What is this?
I was playing around taking macro shots this one day in Sept and I came across this blue looking hoverfly. I have no idea what it is, first time I’ve seen this and I was curious to know what it was??
Whistler, British Columbia, Canada
seb

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Hi Seb,
We cannot find an exact match on BugGuide, but we believe your Hover Fly looks similar to one pictured that is identified as being in the genus Melangyna. We hope one of our readers can provide a better match or identification.  Eric Eaton wrote in with this:  “Daniel:  I don’t have anything to say about that one!  I do wonder if the blue is an artifact of lighting, a symptom of a fungal infection, or something else abnormal….Glad you got the Thai ‘bycid ID. Eric”

Caterpillar ID please!
Hello Bugman.
Would love it if you could help me id this beauty. I found her in the garden in Chelsea, QC. Isn’t she stunning?
Thanks for your help!
Celine
Québec, Canada
Much appreciated

Introduced Pine Sawfly

Introduced Pine Sawfly

Hi Celine,
This isn’t a caterpillar. It is a Sawfly Larva, a relative of wasps. We believe it is the Introduced Pine Sawfly, Diprion similis. According to BugGuide, the species was “First recorded in Canada in 1931 near Oakville, Ontario, and has not spread naturally much beyond there. There were light infestations in other parts of Ontario in the 1970s and one in southern Quebec in 1940. “