Aloe Vera Nesting Spider
Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 5:13 PM
Hi Bugman, I stumbled across a good sized spider in my Aloe Vera plant. It is amber colored with darker ribbing on the legs, and cream and tan spikes on the back. I also have amber colored fangs. It seemed fairly docile, but I didn’t get too close.
Thanks!
To Ben, Ashley, and Elijah
Coastal San Diego

Argiope argentata

Argiope argentata

Hi Ben, Ashley and Elija,
Your spider is a Silver Garden Spider, Argiope argentata.  This species is found in California, the Gulf states and the Southeast US, and south into Mexico and Central America.  The spiders in the genus Argiope are quite docile in that they spin an orb web and remain in the web.  The web is spun anew daily and the webs often contain a stabilimentum.  The stabilimentum is a zigzag pattern woven into the web, and according to BugGuide:  “The function of the stabilimentum is not fully understood.  Hypotheses are; that it stabilizes the web, or makes it more apparent to birds which will thus not fly into and wreck it, or it reflects light to attract insect prey, or perhaps most likely helps to camouflage the spider in the web. ”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Thu, Oct 16, 2008 at 7:25 AM
Hi Daniel,
Thank you for identifying my “Spined Micrathena.”  I recently moved from New Hampshire to Mexico and keep finding bugs that I have never seen before.  Doing a Google search for “Spined Micrathena” I noticed that mine was the most colorful I could find.
I hope you can also identify this grasshopper – He is somewhat similar to this one I found in Tanzania in 1993 –
Sincerely,
David Brownell

Horselubber Grasshopper from Mexico

Horselubber Grasshopper from Mexico

Hi David,
The Mexican Grasshopper is a Horse Lubber Grasshopper, Taeniopoda eques, and we suspect the Tanzanian Grasshopper is one of the toxic milkweed grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  It is not an exact match to this specimen we found online, but it has similarities.

probably Milkweed Locust from Tanzania

probably Milkweed Locust from Tanzania

Nice antennae
Wed, Oct 15, 2008 at 5:03 PM
What IS this? We shared our picnic table with it stopping for lunch on a long road trip from Texas to Oklahoma. Looks a little like a grasshopper, but I couldn’t easily identify it at bugguide.net . Love the antennae. Any idea?
My four kids and I love bugs and your site. Thanks for all you do to keep our budding entomologists busy.
Shannon
South OK

Long Horned Borer Beetle

Long Horned Borer Beetle

Hi Shannon,
This is a Long Horned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, most probably in the genus Monochamus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

wonderful UFO b-fly
Wed, Oct 15, 2008 at 8:24 AM
hi daniel,
what a wonderful new format on your website. thanks for doing that. and here i am again with a question. i got this UFO butterfly picture that i thought you might be able to id, or know someone who can. the photo was taken last june 25, 6 miles north of nederland colo. this b-fly got away from me so fast i was surprised i even got this photo.
in my quest for identification, i have searched thru my books and i also took the photo down the mountain to a butterfly pavilion. they didn’t know who this was either.
i appreciate any help you might offer, and i appreciate your work always. i’m on your website all the time, it is such fun.
thanks so much,
venice kelly

Uhler's Arctic

Uhler

Hi Again Venice.
We have done copious amounts of research on this and are confident that we can supply you with something akin to an answer. First, all indications are that this is one of the Satyrs, in the Nymphalidae subfamily of Satyridae. We believe this to be one of the Arctics in the genus Oeneis. Our edition of Jeffrey Glassberg’s Butterflies Through Binoculars The West indicates: “chasing arctics over rocks at 12,000 ft. in order to get a good look at them is not for the faint of heart.” The species we are most set on is Uhler’s Arctic, Oeneis uhleri. Glassberg writes that they are “usually with four or five small, dark eyespots spread along the HW submarginal line. HW usually with ‘strata’ pattern, like sedimentary rock. Habitat: Dry prairies, ridgetops, and other dry, open, grassy situations. Abundance: Mid May-mid July. Food: Grasses. Comments: Flight is generally high off the ground, but slow, making them easy to follow.” We then turned to the www and found the following websites and information. The USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center website for North Dakota Butterflies has photos that look quite close, and lists a flight time that agrees with your sighting. The Butterflies and Moths of North America website lists you in the range and the flight times also agree. Repetitive information and photos that don’t seem to match your specimen can be found on the Butterflies and Skippers of North America website. We eagerly welcome all challenges to this identification.

Daniel,
OMG! thank you so much. i can’t tell you how happy i am to finally know who this guy is. i have been so lucky this season, to have photographed and identified 63 species of butterflies (and a few that i hadn’t id) mostly with in a mile of my mountain home. i still have a couple more i’ll send along to you sometime.   i’m glad you liked the green comma too.  thanks again soooo much, i just love your art project.
cheers, venice

What kind of spider is this?
Wed, Oct 15, 2008 at 8:03 AM
I found these two similar spiders on different sides of my house spinning traditional circular webs.
David Brownell
Lake Chapala, Mexico

Spined Micrathena

Spined Micrathena

Hi David,
What a gorgeous photo of a Spined Micrathena, Micrathena gracilis. In addition to Mexico, this species is also found in much of North America.

water creatures
I found these two water creatures in a creek. It looks like they may besome stage of a dragonfly or damsel fly. I don’t know? What do youthink they are. The small one is about 1/2 inch long and the larger oneis about an inch
Ryan

Naiads

Naiads

Hi Ryan,
The larger creature is most definitely a Damselfly Naiad, but the smaller creature is questionable. Perhaps one of our readers will be able to supply an answer.