Spider carrying orange orbs
Sun, Oct 12, 2008 at 6:53 AM
I found this spider while digging a trench in my lawn in April, 2008. There was no web in sight. The spider seemed to be just walking along. My first thought was that it was carrying it’s eggs somewhere. I took a few pictures, then continued with my trench. After a few days, I began to wonder exactly what kind of spider it was and what it was doing, but haven’t been able to find out any more information. Thanks for your help.
TJ1028
Coastal southern California

Harvestman with Parasitic Mites

Harvestman with Parasitic Mites

Hi TJ1028,
Your spider is actually another type of Arachnid in the order Opiliones, commonly called a Harvestman or Daddy-Long-Legs.  The orange orbs appear to be Parasitic Mites in the genus Leptus.  We originally thought the Mites were merely hitching a ride, a phenomenon known as Phoresy, but a search of BugGuide revealed the parasitic nature of the Mites.  There is some good dialog contributed by the BugGuide readership on the genus Leptus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beetle-like bug
Sat, Oct 11, 2008 at 2:11 PM
Hi Bugman!
I live in Northeast Illinois near the Wisconsin border, and I’ve noticed a “new” bug hanging aroung on my house, my deck, and some plants. I’ve never seen a bug like this, and I’m hoping you can tell me what it is. It has hair on it’s legs and around it’s head, and I’m pretty sure this bug can fly.
Thanks!
Tracy Spidyweber
Midwest

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Hi Tracy Spidyweber,
This is a Western Conifer Seed Bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis.  Perhaps the reason it is a new species for you is that in the past decade, its range has greatly expanded from the Pacific Northwest.  This range expansion may be partially explained by climate changes, but human mobility and the ease of accidentally transporting unknown passengers is doubtless a contributing factor.

praying mantis eating a wheel bug, unknown eggs
Sat, Oct 11, 2008 at 9:12 PM
HELLO BUGMAN!
… We are also including a hatching photo we took this August. The eggs were stuck to the brick wall outside our classroom and we watched daily to see what was going to happen. We’d loved to know what was coming out! Thank you so much for your help!
Always looking for bugs,
Fours and fives in PA
Southeastern PA

Imperial Moth Eggs Hatching

Imperial Moth Eggs Hatching

Dear Teacher of Fours and Fives,
We are most certain the eggs are those of an Imperial Moth.  BugGuide shows good life cycle images and your first instar caterpillar, except for being a bit lighter, looks quite close to those images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

praying mantis eating a wheel bug, unknown eggs
Sat, Oct 11, 2008 at 9:12 PM
HELLO BUGMAN!
Just wanted to share this week’s playground “show” of a praying mantis DEVOURING a wheel bug. The class watched in horror/amazement. We had just seen our first wheel bug of this school year the day before.
We are also including a hatching photo we took this August. The eggs were stuck to the brick wall outside our classroom and we watched daily to see what was going to happen. We’d loved to know what was coming out! Thank you so much for your help!
Always looking for bugs,
Fours and fives in PA
Southeastern PA

Preying Mantis eats Wheel Bug

Preying Mantis eats Wheel Bug

Dear Teacher of Fours and Fives in PA,
We are gladdened to see that you have taken your classwork home and that your students will be able to find their answers online next week.  Our only request is that in the future, you please don’t include multiple postings in one letter as it jumbles our already voluminous archives.  Your Mantis photo is awesome in that it shows the Mantis devouring another beneficial predator.  If the statistics were available, they might reveal that, since it pretty much sits higher up on the food chain, the Mantis may eat more beneficial insects than problematic ones.  Since Mantids are often found on flowering plants, they consume their share of pollinators.

Cicada Killer Having Snack in WV
Sat, Oct 11, 2008 at 6:30 PM
These killers surrounded us this summer in Springfield, West Virginia. They like to burrow (?) in the ground – they make little holes like moles and they seemed to have made their home about 50 yards from the river, in a field, with fruit & nut trees. They like to fly at us, but then swerve real quick. We’ve seen them close to 3 inches in length! This little bugger brought down the cicada right in front of me. LOVE THE SITE! I’ve learned sooooooo much!
Julie & Steve
Wild, Wonderful, West Virginia

Cicada Killer and Prey

Cicada Killer and Prey

Hi Julie and Steve,
Thanks for your contribution to our archive of a Cicada Killer and its prey. We should clarify though that that adult Cicada Killers feed on nectar and that the Cicada is not food for the adult. The female Cicada Killer provisions her nest with a paralyzed Cicadas and then lays a single egg on each. The Cicada is a meal for the developing larva. The life cycle is expained on BugGuide in the following manner: “In two or three days after egg laying, a wasp larva will hatch from the egg. The larva immediately begins eating the cicada. When the larva finishes the cicada, leaving only the outer shell (about two weeks), it will then spin a coccoon and hibernate until the following Spring. In the Spring, the larva will leave its coccoon and become a pupa (resting stage). From the pupa, an adult Cicada Killer will hatch. It will dig its way out of the ground and look for a mate. Male wasps die shortly after mating. Females die after laying all of their eggs. “

Spider
Fri, Oct 10, 2008 at 5:30 PM
Hello!
I found this spider yesterday outside my bedroom window.  It’s not one that I’ve seen where we live before (SW Missouri) – hoping you can identify it!
Thank!
Kris

Golden Orb-Weaver

Golden Orb-Weaver

Hi Kris,
Argiope aurantia, the Golden Orb-Weaver, has numerous common names, including Yellow Garden Spider, Yellow Garden Orbweaver, Writing Spider and Black & Yellow Argiope.  Here is a BugGuide discussion on the common names for this species.  Your photo nicely illustrates the stabilimentum, the zig-zag structure in the web that gives rise to the common name of Writing Spider.