long winged fly
June 5, 2009
Found this last night sitting on the window sill near the side porch. It was not alarmed by me getting quite close to it, it did not move much at all. It was between 1.5 and 2 inches long.
J Reben
Fairfield, Maine, USA

Caddisfly:  Hydatophylax argus

Caddisfly: Hydatophylax argus

Dear J,
We are catching up on old mail, and there are some gems we never had the time to address.  Your photo is one of those.  This is a Caddisfly in the order Trichoptera.  The adults are often compared to moths, and the aquatic larvae are known as Caseworms.
We believe your large Caddisfly is Hydatophylax argus, a species with no common name, but in the family Limnephilidae, the Northern Caddisflies.  You can see some matching images on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown bug from Costa Rica
June 4, 2009
This bug was found in a box of bananas from Costa Rica! Any information would be great!
K. Yoder
Pa. from Costa Rica

Green Banana Cockroach

Green Banana Cockroach

Dear K. Yoder,
This is a Green Banana Cockroach, Panchlora nivea.  The species is native to Central America and Cuba, and it has become established in Florida and Texas.  According to BugGuide:  “acitve at night and may be attracted to artificial light; does not breed indoorspresumably found on bananas in its native Cuba; two early records from Mississippi are considered to be adventive introductions along with shipments of bananaspopular as a pet ($25.00 a doz.) here due to its bright green color and because it is not an invasive indoor species”
Since it is not invasive, you need not worry about it becoming established in Pennsylvania where the climate is too harsh for this tropical species.

green bug from aquarium
June 3, 2009
found this bug swimming in my aquarium (oteh residents are pimelodus pictus (4), Chromobotia macracanthus (3), Ancistrus dolichopterus (2). i’m feeding my fish with sera mix chips and live bloodworms larve. it’s app. 1 inch in lenght, swimming by moving it’s body left and right.
help
Ljubljana, Slovenia, Europe

Damselfly Naiad

Damselfly Naiad

Dear In need of Help,
This is a Damselfly Naiad, the larval form of a winged insect similar to a Dragonfly.  Damselfly Naiads are predators, but they cannot handle adult fish.  Hatchlings and small fry might get eaten.  We suspect this Damselfly Naiad was introduced with the live Bloodworms.  We have been feeding our Angelfish live Mosquito Larvae we catch in the birdbath and in various places we keep water in the yard.  We suspect we have introduced a predator that ate some of our fry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wings or no?
June 2, 2009
I came across this guy in my kitchen and immediately snapped a picture of it. I then got it in a jar and released it outdoors. The wing-like tentacles on its back moved around almost like an octopus. I’ve never seen an insect like this.
Curious Dude
Western NC USA

Molting Harvestman we believe

Molting Harvestman we believe

Dear Curious Dude,
Those are not wings, and this is a Harvestman in the order Opiliones, but we need to seek advice on what is actually happening in this photo.  We believe you have photographed the molting process, but we need confirmation on that.  Harvestmen are sometimes called Daddy Long Legs.

Update from Eric Eaton
Hi, Daniel:
The harvestman looks like it has succumbed to a fungal attack.
Eric

small black and yellow beetle
June 1, 2009
small black and yellow beetle
I took this on May 31 near Tampa FL on one of my yard patrols. I would say the body was approximately one cm in size. As southern transplants, we’re trying to figure out what all these strange, new bugs are that didn’t show their face in the midwest. I think it’s a beetle but?? it was in an oak tree that’s showing some damage and we’re trying to figure out whats killing/eating the leaves. It kept circling the leaf to avoid being photographed and the branch wouldn’t hold still so this is as clear as I could get it. Any help is appreciated. Thanks for such a great site.
Linda
Tampa, FL

Bassareus brunnipes we believe

Bassareus brunnipes we believe

Hi Linda,
With the speed of our new computer, we are trying to respond to some old mail that arrived when we were quite busy with the end of the semester and a pending trip to visit family.  Your letter was a pleasant surprise.  We have researched your Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae, and we are confident it is either Bassareus brunnipes or a very close relative.  BugGuide
indicates it is widely distributed in the Eastern U.S., but all the submissions are from Florida and Louisiana.  This is a new species for our website.

A black and white striped insect with rust colored legs.
May 31, 2009
I found this insect crawling on me while gardening. It seems inoffensive; despite me picking it up several times, it never tried to bite. The body was about 7mm long; with legs fully extended, it was about 1cm long. It has wings, but seems reluctant to use them; it never tried to escape by flight, only by crawling. I apologize for the poor photograph; my camera needs a macro lens to take better shots this close, and I have not yet purchased on. This was in late May of 2009, 70 degree temperatures, in central Maryland.
CommanderBalok
Central Maryland (suburb of Baltimore)

False Potato Beetle

False Potato Beetle

Dear Commander Balok,
This is a False Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa juncta.  According to BugGuide, it can be distinguised from its close relative, the notorious plant pest the Colorado Potato Beetle, in the following manner:  “Similar to Colorado Potato Beetle (1), but elytral punctures are regular instead of irregular. Also, a brown stripe at the center of each elytron (wing cover) and on the inner edge of each elytron (where they meet down the middle) distinguish this species.”
BugGuide has this to say about the similar looking Colorado Potato Beetle:  “Before the introduction of the potato in the US this beetle was confined to Colorado and neighboring states feeding on some native species of Solanum (night shade), now it has spread to most potato growing areas.  It has been transported to Europe where it has become a serious pest.”
Of the False Potato Beetle, BugGuide indicates:  “According to the University of Florida, the False Potato Beetle ‘is found primarily on the common noxious weed, horse-nettle, Solanum carolinense. It also feeds on other solanaceous plants, such as species of ground cherry or husk tomato, Physalis spp., and common nightshade, Solanum dulcamara.'”