Love This Site!!
July 27, 2009
Just wanted to say thanks for this AWESOME site! Everyday at work I spend all day (between customers of course) looking at and reading about the fascinating bugs on your website! My co-workers try to avoid my desk, complaining that the bug pics give them the heebeejeebees. I admit, I used to be one of them. That was, until my mom introduced me to WTB when she wanted a wasp identified. I have always been curious about creatures (big and small), and you have an endless supply of information to satiate my appetite! Now when I see a bug, instead of smashing it or ignoring it, I just try to figure out what it is! I can’t wait to visit my folks in Ohio next week, and share with them all my newly aqcuired knowledge any time we run across an interesting bug! Thanks for all that you do!
Cassie Shaw
Cleveland MS

Hi Cassie,
Thanks so much for your kind letter of support.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tan Cecropia Moth?
July 27, 2009
I work at a quarry in south central kentucky. Generally finding large silkmoths is relatively easy each year approaching fall. One day there was a large polyphemus male, and the next another smaller moth i initially mistook for a polyphemus. When the wings spread.. well, the rest is history!
I have no idea what kind of moth this is. Its pattern is very similar to a cecropia. This is a small male, its wingspan only about 4 inches or so. Much smaller than previous polyphemus that i’ve found. We have found one large expired ‘black type’ cecropia here. But i’ve never seen one like this. A cousin perhaps?
Thanks for the help!
A Lover of giant silk moths
warren county Kentucky

Tulip Tree Silkmoth

Tulip Tree Silkmoth

Dear Lover,
WE believe this is a Tulip Tree Silkmoth, Callosamia angulifera, and we believe it is a female and not a male based on the coloration and antennae.  You can compare your moth to images posted to BugGuide.

Nivosus Monarch
July 27, 2009
I do alot of butterfly and dragonfly photography in the summer and was surprised by this butterfly when we came across it. I’m by no means an expert on identification, but it appeared to me to be an odd colored monarch. I looked for information online and read about nivosus or white monarchs. My understanding is that the color difference is caused by a recessive trait and affects less than 1% of the US monarch population. I think this is what I have here, can you confirm it for me? If this is rare it may have some interest for your readers.
Cindy
SE Wisconsin

Monarch Butterfly:  Nivosus or just faded???
Nivosus Monarch Butterfly

Hi Cindy,
Your Monarch Butterfly surely is a light individual, but it is not as white as the individual pictured on the Monarch Watch website illustrating the paper written by Lawrence Gibbs and Orley R. Taylor
.  That individual is truly white.  We believe your individual may have a genetic predisposition for lightness, but we also believe it shows evidence of worn wings, perhaps due to old age and perhaps due to traveling long distances.  As the wing scales are lost, the coloration of the butterfly appears more faded.  It is also possible that this might be an intermediate coloration between the usual orange Monarch and the pale Nivosus Monarch.  Perhaps an expert will be able to chime in and solve the question.

Thanks so much for your response.  I followed up with your link to Monarch Watch and sent them an email and download of the photo.  I received a response from them which also included some additional links within their site.  Although they would need to see the actual specimen for 100% accuracy, they said it definitely appears to be a nivosus.  After doing some reading on the site and looking at more photos, it appears there is a range of nivosus coloring such as the one I found to the very black and white which you noticed at the top of the article.
Cindy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What kind of bug is this?
July 27, 2009
We walked outside of the apartment to find this big huge green bug. We could not figure out what kind of bug it was. At first we thought it might be some sort of cricket or locus, but we could not find a picture online similar to it. Our town is between a city and country.
Athena
Portland, TX

Greater Arid-Land Katydid

Greater Arid-Land Katydid

Hi Athena,
We just love that according to BugGuide, the Greater Arid-Land Katydid, Neobarrettia spinosa, is also known as a Red Eyed Devil.  Unfortunately, your photo that shows the red eyes is quite blurry, but we are posting it anyway.  The ovipositor indicates that this is a female.  This is a predatory species.  Also according to BugGuide, it may bite and draw blood.

Red Eyed Devil

Red Eyed Devil

can you identify this please?
July 25, 2009
hi
this bug found in my kitchen in north London United Kingdom.
however have recently returned from central America / Caribean holiday.
for scale one picture contains a shaving razor handle.
thank you
john
j davey
london U.K

Whipscorpion

Whipscorpion

Dear j davey,
First off, this has to be the smallest digital file we have ever had sent to us.  Despite our feeble eyesight, we have no doubt that is is a Whipscorpion in the order Uropygi.  It is not native to England and it is found in the Caribbean.  It is also a nocturnal hunter that may take shelter in a suitcase or other dark place.  It would seem customs did not do a thorough search.  Whipscorpions are perfectly harmless to humans despite the fierce appearance as they have no venom.

thank you
yes, looks just like it
sorry about the size of the file, didn’t realise it was so small, it was taken using the camera on the phone.
thank you for your help
any idea of a good home for it?
john

We would recommend a local pet store that sells Tarantulas.

assassin bug nymph
July 25, 2009
Greetings WTB,
This long red bug was an unwelcome surprise in my kitchen! I thought you’d get a kick out of the picture. In looking around, I think it is an assassin bug nymph. Is it a milkweed assassin bug? I ask, because I’ve been trying unsuccessfully to grow milkweed!
Julie
Savannah, GA

Milkweed Assassin Bug Nymph

Milkweed Assassin Bug Nymph

Hi Julie,
You are right on both counts.  This is an immature Milkweed Assassin Bug and we do find your photos highly amusing.

Milkweed Assassin Bug Nymph

Milkweed Assassin Bug Nymph