Looks like an Iron Cross Blister Beetle?
Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 11:44 AM
We found this beetle in El Cañon de Guadalupe which is between Tecate & Mexicali in Baja California 11-08-08. We saw alot of these getting together on rocks. We looked thru the archives and found the very similar Iron Cross Blister but the wing case doesn’t look the same nor the color of its head. It’s color is more of a dark rich red not a bright.
Macajr
El Cañon de Guadalupe which is between Tecate & Mexicali in Baja California.

Blister Beetle

Blister Beetle

Hi Macajr,
We agree that this is some species of Blister Beetle, but we do not recognize it. We can’t even decide what the genus is. We will try to contact Eric Eaton for assistance.

Blister Beetles

Blister Beetles

Hi:
I’m relatively certain this is a species in the genus Tegrodera, just not as ornate as the ones from the southwest U.S.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Creepiest bug/insect i have ever seen!!
Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 4:30 AM
Hi i came across your website whilst looking for information on a bug/insect that had crawled across our hardwood floors, My first instinct was to squash it, however i picked it up with a dustpan and after analizing it for at least 20 minutes, i decided to toss it outside over our verandah(i am a total girl when it comes to bugs etc) Anyhow i am from rathmines in lake macquarie, nsw Australia. Im hoping you can help me idenify it, i have attached a picture, it seemed to be gentle and moved slowly and did not try to scurry away when it was touched with my shoe LOL also when it walked the back end of its body seemed to sway from side to side, I would like to know if it is harmful to my family if so what can i do to prevent them from coming inside the home? I get he creeps just thinking about it…..
Kimberley :)
Rathmines, Lake Macquarie NSW Australia

Potato Bug?  In Australia???

Potato Bug? In Australia???

Hi Kimberly,
If you were writing from the American Southwest, we would say this is a Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket in the family Stenopelmatidae without a second thought. The closest relatives to Potato Bugs are in Australia and are known as Wetas. This doesn’t look like a Weta, it looks like a Potato Bug. Since there are so many Australian insect species established in Southern California, we wouldn’t discount that this is a North American Potato Bug that somehow invaded Australia. Since we must dash off to work, we really don’t have time to research if Potato Bugs have become established in Australia right now, but we are very curious. The more people travel the globe, the more chances that plants, insects, diseases and other species will be spread far from their native ranges along with people. Eventually we may have globally homogenized ecosystems.

Daniel:
Gee, I think your commentary is perfect. I have no idea, either! It just about ‘has’ to be a weta, “king cricket,” or “Cooloola Monster.” Someone at CSIRO could help, maybe. This one is beyond my state-side expertise I’m afraid….
Eric Eaton

Hullo Kimberly, Your bug looks like a King Cricket from the Stenopelmatidae family, subfamily Deinacridinae, genus Australostoma. They live in borrows  and tend to come out at nght when it is wet. Found in coastal NSW north to Brisbane. According to  David Rentz (“Grasshopper Country”), “when handled, they produce foul-smelling anal secretions that deter predators,” so perhaps you were wise to persuade it to go outside.
BTW I am just around the lake from you at Wangi and found a huge cricket last week when moving compost onto the vegie garden, so perhaps the big crickets are on the move!
Grev

What’s that bug?
Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 2:58 PM
Hi
Last August i found this interesting insect in Namibia. Its amazing the camouflage, is very difficult to see near the rocks.. Its near 1 cm and very quite.
Thanks so much
Greetings from Spain
Javi
Namibia

Masked Hunter

Masked Hunter

Hi Javi,
Your insect reminds us of a North American species called the Masked Hunter, Reduvius personatus.  The immature Masked Hunter is sticky and attracts dust and debris to its body as a form of camouflage.  Homemakers often encounter dusty specimens in their homes.  One of our favorite images from our archive was a Masked Hunter nymph that was blue because the carpet in its habitat was blue and the carpet fibers stuck to the bug.  If this is a closely related species and it doesn’t have a dusty home interior as a habitat, it would attract sand and small pebbles to its sticky exoskeleton.  Your creature is definitely a Hemipteran, probably a nymph and probably an Assassin Bug, and quite possibly in the same genus, Reduvius, as the Masked Hunter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

A Fabulous Bug on a Screen Door
Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 11:49 AM
A Fabulous Bug on a Screen Door
This bug was sighted on a screen door at our home in San Martin Sur, Costa Rica–nearest larger town–Dominical, February, 2007. I love this bug and wonder if you can identify it for me.
Sincerely, Georgia Moen
San Martin Sur, Costa Rica

Flag Footed Bug

Flag Footed Bug

Hi Georgia,
While we are not certain of the species, we are thrilled to post your image of a Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae from Costa Rica.  There is a species in Central America commonly called the Flag Footed Bug, Anisocelis flavolineata, that we identified in the past, but it is not the same as your specimen.  Interestingly, when we searched that scientific name, we found an image that matches your specimen, but it is on a photography site, not a science site.  We doubt it is the same species, but now we are a bit confused.  There is much questionable information posted online.

Update:  August 5, 2012
While trying to clean up old unidentified posts, we decided to see if we could find a matching photo for
Diactor bilineatus, and we were lucky with this TrekNature image where this information is provided:  “Diactor Bilineatus Percevejo d Maracujá:  Bug DIACTOR BILINEATUS the insect is the Diactor bilineatus, says the researcher of the Biological Institute of São Paulo, Sergio IDE It explains that it is about a species of chinch-bug popularly known as chinch-bug-do-maracujá. The adults reach up to 20 millimeters of length, are of green-dark coloration, with three orange lines that go of the head until escutelo. The posterior legs present an expansion in the tibia in leaf form of dark coloration and with orange points. The eggs are placed in the inferior face of leves, being that each position is composed in the maximum of ten eggs and the incubation period is of 15 days. The nymphs (young forms), say the researcher, suck the seiva of the aerial part of the plants during a period of 45 days and before if transforming into adults the nymphs they pass for urging. The longevity of the adult is of 30 days, of form that the complete cycle of the species they live approximately two months, depending on the climatic conditions. The nymphs of this species suck the seiva of the floral buttons and new fruits, and the adults also attack leves, branches and fruits of any age. The floral buttons and attacked new fruits generally fall and the greaters become wrinkled. The control can be made with the manual removal of eggs, nymphs and adults. Use of gloves sends regards to it to remove them.”

Slug with long tail
Sun, Nov 9, 2008 at 7:08 PM
I have found about 4 of these sluglike things in my home in the last couple of weeks and have no idea what they are. When I spray them with insect spray their skin seems to burn and turns a dark color. The photo attached is after I sprayed it. It is normally a brown/grey color. Should I be concerned that they are in my house?
Unsure
New Zealand

Rattailed Maggot

Rattailed Maggot

Dear Unsure,
We believe this is a Rattailed Maggot, the larva of a Drone Fly in the family Syrphidae.  We aren’t really familiar with your species in New Zealand, but Drone Flies are beneficial pollinators.  Their larvae, the Rattailed Maggots, are aquatic and live in stagnant water.  The Rattailed Maggots are not troublesome, but finding our why they are in your home in another questions.  We have read that Rattailed Maggots can be found in liquid cow manure in agricultural areas.  We haven’t the time to research if Drone Flies are found in New Zealand, or if your Rattailed Maggot is from a related genus.

dont know what this is.
Sat, Nov 8, 2008 at 11:17 AM
hi, i’m in new york. suffolk county long island. i found this bug on my cucumber leaves. their was a whole bunch in july. i still got cucumbers, but these bugs were eating the leaves. thanks for any info you can give me.
christine
suffolk county long island NY

Unknown Cucumber Pest

Unknown Cucumber Pest

Hi Christine,
Seeing as your cucumber leaf lover is immature, it is a bit more difficult to properly identify. We must confess that we aren’t entirely sure of the order. We wish the mouth parts were visible in your photo or that you had described the leaf damage. Were they chewed or did they wither?
The reason we would like to know about the mouth parts or leaf damage is that our first inclination is that this is some type of Hemipteran, the insect order containing insects with sucking mouthparts like Aphids and True Bugs. We couldn’t find a match on BugGuide. We might also entertain that this might be the larva of one of the Leaf Beetles though we favor a Hemipteran. Many Tortoise Beetles are covered with projections, but we couldn’t find a match on BugGuide. We will contact Eric Eaton to get some assistance.

Hi:
Peculiar as it is, it is the larva of a leaf beetle (family Chrysomelidae).
Eric