Greeen asssassination with wings
Thu, Nov 20, 2008 at 11:55 AM
I found this bug on my screen that’s on my window. I didn’t want to have this bug roaming around my house before i knew what it was so i close the window and as soon as i did that it hiked up its front legs like a mantis. I saw on your page that it might be an assassin bug? So what is this creature and what does it do?
G-Money
texas

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Hi G-Money,
Yes, this is an Assassin Bug.  It is difficult to tell from the angle, but we suspect it is in the genus Zelus.

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Turquoise Bug That Looks Like a Bee
Wed, Nov 19, 2008 at 5:54 PM
I was taking pictures of bumblebees in my yard and saw this beautiful blue bug that hovered by the same yellow flowers. Do you know what it is? It looks like a mutant bumblebee in shape! The color is amazing. Thank you in advance for any information you can provide me. Hopefully it is not a pest that I have to worry about in the garden.
Sandi
Boca Raton, FL

Green Orchid Bee

Green Orchid Bee

Hi Sandi,
When we first posted a photo of a Green Orchid Bee, Euglossa viridissima, a few years ago, it created quite a stir.  Now according to BugGuide, this tropical species is well established in Florida.

Twice-stabbed Ladybug?
Wed, Nov 19, 2008 at 10:21 AM
I believe this is a twice-stabbed ladybug. I did not see a photo on your ladybug page of this species. It was photographed in southern Utah.
Mieander
Southern Utah

Ladybird Beetle

Ladybird Beetle

Hi Mieander,
While it is possible that this is a Twice-Stabbed Ladybird Beetle, Chilocorus stigma , there is another species in the genus that is found in your area that has larger spots.  According to BugGuide, Chilocorus cacti, is found in Arizona and New Mexico, but it looks like a better match.  The species is associated with Prickly Pear cactus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

This spider jumped out at me on the trail.
Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 11:15 AM
I was hiking in Arizona just south of the Grand Canyon in the Kaibab National Forest when this spider ran out into the trail, front legs in the air and jumped around for a bit. The spider was about 2 1/2 inches long. I let him put his threatening display on for a bit, and snapped this picture. I love how the spider blends in with the sticks on the ground.
Sirena
About 15 miles south of Grandview Lookout Tower, Grand Canyon, Arizona

Spider in Arizona

Spider in Arizona

Hi Sirena,
We are going to try to identify your spider and may seek assistance. We love your photo and hope to have a proper identity for you very soon. We are entertaining the possibility that this might be a Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.

Daniel:
Sorry to be late in replying….
The “threatening spider” from Arizona is a harmless wolf spider, family Lycosidae, probably in the genus Hogna.
Eric Eaton

Woolly caterpillar ID?
Mon, Nov 17, 2008 at 10:16 PM
Hi, Bugman!
I love your site, and I’ve used it many times to identify creepy and not so creepy crawlers, hoppers and fliers that I’ve found while out photographing the wonders of nature. However, I browsed your caterpillar category all the way back to 2005, and didn’t see one of these. The closest was the ‘Laugher’.
This past September, I noticed something white and fluffy on a tree or bush (sorry! I can’t now remember which). On close inspection, it turned out to be a caterpillar, and there wasn’t just one, but many.
They looked for all the world as though they were covered in cotton wool shag carpeting. I wish I could tell you what sort of bush or tree they were feeding on, but I know as much about horticulture as I do entomology, and that’s not a whole lot. Plus I kinda, sorta forgot to take note.
These pics were taken at ~15:40 on the 7th of September in Southwestern Ontario, in an area with diverse habitats nearby. Lots of woods, open spaces, small marshy spots.
I severely reduced the size of the images to save bandwidth, but they should be large enough to identify the subject. If you do want larger ones, you need only ask!
Thanks in advance!!
Frank
Southwestern Ontario, Canada

Butternut Woolly Worm

Butternut Woolly Worm

Hi Frank,
Though it looks like a caterpillar, the Butternut Woolly Worm, Eriocampa juglandis, is actually a Sawfly Larva. Sawflies are non-stinging relatives of wasps and bees. The Butternut Woolly Worm feeds on the leaves of black walnut, butternut and hickory.

Butternut Woolly Worm

Butternut Woolly Worm

What the…
Wed, Nov 19, 2008 at 3:55 AM
Hello.. Can you please identify this bug that we have been finding around. We have found it crawling on our body, laptop screen and even in the bathroom.
Help is required
Australia, Melbourne

Tropical Rat Mite, possibly

Tropical Rat Mite, possibly

Dear Help,
We believe you probably need a true specialist for this identification, but we are leaning toward the Tropical Rat Mite, Ornithonyssus bacoti. We first located an image on BugGuide, but it is very tiny. Then we found a wonderful informative website on Biting Mites in Homes. The website states: ”
Rat and bird mite infestations occur in structures where rat or bird nests are located. Infestations are sometimes first noticed following extermination, or after the natural hosts have died or left the structure. Infestations may also occur where heavy mite infestations have developed around a rodent or bird nest. Rat mites are small, approximately the size of the period at the end of this sentence. They move actively and can be picked up with a wet finger, brush or piece of sticky tape. Distinguishing between different species of Ornithonyssus mites to determine whether birds or rodents are the likely source is difficult and requires special expertise. The best first course of action, when faced with biting mite problem is to look for all potential bird or rodent sources.”

It could also be the tropical fowl mite or bird mite (Ornithonyssus bursa). For information check out: http://www.wsahs.nsw.gov.au/icpmr/pdf/0263.pdf Good luck.
KK