Wasp?
Sat, Dec 20, 2008 at 9:11 AM
This was taken at night in Ontario Canada while camping at a provincial park.
Brett
Ontario Canada

Giant Ichneumons

Giant Ichneumons

Hi Brett,
We have a sneaking suspicion that this observation did not happen while camping this week.  These are Giant Ichneumons in the genus Megarhyssa, most likely Megarhyssa macrurus.  Giant Ichneumons are related to Wasps since they are in the same insect order, but they are in a different family.  These are females and they are ovipositing.  Giant Ichneumons are parasitic on the larva of wood boring insects, especially the Pigeon Horntail.  The female Giant Ichneumon locates the tunnel of one of the wood boring larvae and uses her nearly five inch long ovipositor to deposit an egg deep inside the infested tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown bug
Sat, Dec 20, 2008 at 5:05 PM
Found this bug in the kitchen one day, around Thanksgiving. Can’t find in my entomology books. Appears similar to an Assassin Bug. Red on upper wing, under wing pale green, red and green body, green and brown legs, antennae 3 segment, eyes dark red, head green, proboscis like a weevil, but long green with dark tip. Length from end of body to front of head approx. 14mm. Proboscis about 5mm. Can’t see in picture as it curves under head. Enclosed photo and sketch of details for clarification.
Bill Heald
Sanger, California

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Hi Bill,
We are relatively certain that this is a species of Assassin Bug, but we are not certain which species. We are posting your photo and drawing and hope a reader can provide a correct identification.

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Update December 24, 2008
Hi, Daniel:
The assassin bug image, and the accompanying drawing (quite good, I might add!) is of a species of Zelus.  I’m having a hard time getting that particular kind down to species.  There are at least three in California, with lots of variability in at least one of those!
Take care, best to Lisa, too.
Eric

“T”-shaped tan insect (able to fly?) with manits like head and walking stick thinness.
Sat, Dec 20, 2008 at 7:36 PM
Dear Bugman,
I saw this insect on my screen door last summer and took a couple of pictures (admittedly they are not very clear). It hung around for the better part of a week and did not move. I touched it to see if the protrusions on its upper back were wings but it gave no indication of being so. It was mostly a camel color and about 2″ across at the “T” and about half that for the length as well. What you see in the picture is all that I know. I have looked extensively on bug identification sites but nothing has really come close to what it truly looks like. Is it native to Oregon? Thanks for any insight you may have.
Curious in Oregon
Portland, Oregon

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Dear Curious in Oregon,
This is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae.  You may look at many different species on BugGuide. The Pterophoridae of North America website by Deborah Matthews lists 154 species in North America.  We are not skilled enough to identify this specimen to the species level.  Many people call this a T Bug when requesting an identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bumble Bee – Australia
Sat, Dec 20, 2008 at 11:38 PM
I took this picture on the 21/12/2008 in my garden. Is this a Bumble Bee or a Carpenter Bee? What would be the common name and scientific ID? The bee was moving from flower to flower on a Purple Duranta. It had a loud slow wing beat so that when I took photo’s in flight I could actually get a still picture of the wing.
Nat
Mid North Coast New South Wales Australia

Carpenter Bee

Carpenter Bee

Hi Nat,
This is a Carpenter Bee, Xylocopa aruana, which we identified on the Insects and Spiders of Brisbane website, which indicates:  “Body length 25mm  They are very large and hairy bees, with black abdomen and yellow thorax.   Theirs wings are dark brown in colour. They are solitary, i.e., living on its     own, not like the Honey Bees that living in group. In late spring, we found it     resting on a footpath, could not fly nor walk, seemed having some problems.     We took it home, for the next day it seemed become normal. We let it go. It     flied away and disappeared within seconds. They feed on pollen. Females make     tunnel and lay eggs in decaying wood, including dry flower sticks of grass-trees Xanthorrhoea .”

Odd Spokane Resident
Sat, Dec 20, 2008 at 10:12 PM
Odd Spokane Resident
While tilling a flower bed this last summer (May/June), my wife found this bug under a top covering of pine needles. I have never seen anything like this.
It has a beautiful black with orange outlines. Its wings are huge!
Spencer Morley
Spokane, WA, USA

Giant Stonefly

Giant Stonefly

Hi Spencer,
This is a Giant Stonefly in the family Pteronarcyidae.  According to information posted to BugGuide, we believe this is probably a California Salmonfly, Pteronarcys californica .  BugGuide indicates:  “The California Salmonfly ( Pteronarcys californica ) is common in western United States and southwestern Canada; it is an important food of trout and salmon, and a favorite bait of anglers.”   These aquatic insects are often attracted to lights.

Pair of Beetles in Northwestern Sydney, Australia
Sat, Dec 20, 2008 at 4:44 PM
Hey guys!
This is my second time writing in, only not for a few years. I was ratting around in a rotten wood pile in my backyard in Galston (which is northwestern outskirts of Sydney), and found this glorious pair of beetles. I’m assuming by the difference in mandible size that I have a female and male, but for the life of me I cannot find them anywhere on any site. Have you got any clues for me?
Ps: In my last letter, I mentioned getting a bug themed sleeve- well it’s 90% done and I even got the botany bay weevil included in there :)
Ash
Sydney, Australia

Unknown Beetle

Stag Beetle

Hi Ash,
We need to do some research on the identity of your interesting beetles, but we need to rush out of the house right now. We will post the images and research later, but we are also hoping one of our readers can provide a proper identification as well.

Unknown Beetle

Stag Beetle

Update December 24, 2008
Hi, Daniel:
The “unknown Australian beetles” are stag beetles, family Lucanidae. I’ll see if I can’t find out more…..Do I rock or what?! LOL! I found the species of those “unidentified Australian beetles.” They are stag beetles, family Lucanidae, specifically Rhyssonotus nebulosus. Great name for a really cool insect.
Take care, best to Lisa, too.
Eric Eaton

December 29, 2008
That’s fantastic! I feel really proud of myself as a budding entomologist that I was able to guess (by body structure) that they were some sort of stag beetle. Thanks heaps.