Possibly a Grasshopper ?
Mon, Nov 24, 2008 at 7:49 AM
This group of several dozen bugs was seen early afternoon. They would move a few centimetres then stop (all on top of each other) and then move again in unison. We inotially thought they were on top of and eating something but this was not the case as when they moved there was no trace of anything where they had been.
Peter St Clair
St Lucia Wetlands Park, South Africa

Grasshopper Herd in South Africa

Grasshopper Herd in South Africa

Hi Peter,
These are immature Grasshoppers or Nymphs. We are not certain of the species however. They resemble North American Lubber Grasshoppers in the family Romaleidae. We especially like your vivid description of the “herd’s” method of locomotion.

Immature Grasshoppers in South Africa

Immature Grasshoppers in South Africa

Hi, Daniel:
Wow, you have been very busy posting!  I turn my back for a week and….wham!  LOL!
The “grasshopper herd” are nymphs of something in the Pyrgomorphidae most likely, being that colorful and all.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

desperately seeking damselfly
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 8:50 PM
Hello again Bugman. I realize that damselflies are murder but can you help us get close on this one? This is another shot from Sam,11, taken near a pond by our house. Is this some variation of female Eastern Forktail? Hope you have a great Thanksgiving. We give thanks, among other things, that you are here! Jimmy
Sam and Daddy Jim
Pond, wetlands, 35 miles west of Chicago

Probably Eastern Forktail Damselfly, female

Probably Eastern Forktail Damselfly, female

Hi Sam and Daddy Jim,
Male Damselflies are difficult enough for us to distinguish from one another, but the drabber females are really a challenge.  We hope that by posting your image, a reader can comment.  A female Eastern Forktail, Ischnura verticalis, seems like a very good bet based on imagery posted to BugGuide.

black bug, white spots, red butt,
Fri, Nov 21, 2008 at 1:50 PM
I found this bug in the parking lot at work. I have never seen it before and it seemed odd because it is currently around 45 or so degrees in Savannah right now and not the type of weather to see relatively large insects like this one.
CPJ
Savannah, Georgia

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Hi CPJ,
This is a Polka Dot Wasp Moth, Syntomeida epilais, and its caterpillars feed on the leaves of oleander, so it is also called the Oleander Moth. BugGuide has no reports from Georgia, but it does have reports from South Carolina and Florida, and since Georgia is in the middle, one can assume that the moth’s range includes Georgia.  The Polka Dot Wasp Moth is also reported from Texas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Papua New Guinea, saturnid moth
Mon, Nov 24, 2008 at 6:17 AM
Papua New Guinea, saturnid moth
We were on a diving trip in Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea and some great moths appeared on the boat every night. We missed getting a photo of the big saturnid moth with long tails, but we did get a good photo of this yellow moth. It was quite common in that area of Milne Bay. Any idea what it is?
Thanks
Bruce Carlson
Papua New Guinea, Milne Bay

Syntherata janetta from New Guinea

Syntherata janetta from New Guinea

Hi Bruce,
We identified your moth as Syntherata janetta on the World’s Largest Saturniidae Site which is membership only and run by Bill Oehlke. It is also found in Australia, and you may read about it on OzAnimals website where it is called an Emperor Moth. There are several color variations and the caterpillars feed on the leaves from a variety of trees, including citrus and guava.

Thanks!  If you’re ever in Atlanta, look me up.  I’ll show you around the Georgia Aquarium.
Bruce

Pre Historic Roach?
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 6:31 PM
This bug was found by my father in the laundry. We don’t have trees and bushes, nor earth in our house, but my neighbor has. Hmm.. this is all i know =[
Hope you can tell us what’s this bug! It really impressed us. Thanks
Reinaldo Hartmann
Brazil – Porto Velho – Ro

Giant Water Bug in Brazil

Giant Water Bug in Brazil

Hi Reinaldo,
This is actually a Giant Water Bug.  In the U.S., they are commonly called Toe-Biters since they have been known to bite people who swim in lakes and ponds.  They don’t aggressively bite humans, but they can deliver a very painful bite if carelessly handled.  Giant Water Bugs can fly quite well, and they are attracted to lights, hence the other common name Electric Light Bug.  Perhaps there was a light in the laundry room that attracted this specimen.

Can you identify this tropical cricket?
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 12:41 PM
The cricket shown in the photo about is about 7 cm long. The distinctive features of this insect include the turqoise eyes and the long antennae. The specimen shown had just been disabled after being struck by a shoe. My young children cowered in fear after it alighted on a balcony ledge.
Solar
Saint Lucia, West Indies

Blue Eyed Katydid from West Indies

Blue Eyed Katydid from West Indies

Hi Solar,
We are more inclined to think this is a Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae as opposed to a Cricket in the family Gryllidae. To be safe, we would only classify down to the suborder Ensifera, the Long-horned Orthoptera until we get some input. We would think that this is a well documented species due to its unusual eye coloration which almost seems to have been enhanced through PhotoShop, but we didn’t have much luck with our web search.