Pest on Rose Stem
Sun, Feb 8, 2009 at 5:49 PM
Hello! My sister-in-law gave me this segment of a stem from her rose bush growing in California’s central valley in hopes I could identify it. Can you please hekp me? I realize the photo isn’t very good but I am reluctant to take the stem out of the baggy for fear of further spreading whatever the pest is. Thanks so much!
HHoneybee
San Joaquin Valley, California

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Hi HHoneybee,
These are Katydid Eggs, and though Katydids eat the leaves from plants including roses, we have a difficult time considering them to be plant pests. They do not do any lasting damage to the plant and they do not spread diseases. Katydids are attractive grasshopper-like insects that are generally green, which camouflages them against the leaves they feed upon. Occasionally we find Katydids eating the blossoms of our roses, but we never kill the insects. At most, we relocate them to another plant. Adult Katydids are sometimes attracted to lights, and many species are among our most “vocal” insects, producing mating calls by a method known as stridulation. We are uncertain which species of Katydid produced the eggs in your photograph.

Thank you so much!
I have given them back to Daisy and she plans to put them back in her garden and watch them hatch.
I have a fear of bugs and I LOVE your website because you not only educate us (and fear is usually a reaction to what is not known) but also encourage a non-lethal way of dealing with them. You are doing a wonderful service with your ‘art project’!
Thanks again,
Heather
“HHoneybee”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some kind of Leaf Footed Bug?
Sun, Feb 8, 2009 at 11:55 PM
I’ve found the attached bug on one of my rose bushes and on a pine tree. I can’t seem to figure out what kind of bug it is. Any help would be most appreciated.
Thanks in advance!
Greg R.
Bristow, VA

Wheel Bug Nymph

Wheel Bug Nymph

Hi Greg,
Often the identification of immature insects can be very difficult and your specimen is a nymph.  It is not a Leaf Footed Bug, but rather an Assassin Bug.  We are relatively certain this is a Wheel Bug, one of the larger Assassin Bugs that is quite distinctive as an adult because of the coglike “wheel” on the thorax that is not evident in the nymph.  Assassin Bugs are beneficial predators, but they will also bite humans if mishandled, and the bite is quite painful.

Mating Orange Beetles
Sun, Feb 8, 2009 at 12:17 AM
Many of these beetles were mating this fall amongst the wildflowers here in Colorado Springs.
Nick DeBarmore
Colorado Springs, CO

Mating Soldier Beetles, possibly Colorado Soldier Beetles
Mating Soldier Beetles, possibly Colorado Soldier Beetles

Dear Nick,
These are some species of Soldier Beetle or Leatherwing from the genus Chauliognathus.  There is a very common eastern species, Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, the Goldenrod Soldier Beetle, but according to BugGuide, there have been no reports from Colorado.  There are several species that have been reported from Colorado, but exact species identification is difficult due to your camera angle.  Were we to hazard a guess, we would say these are most likely  Colorado Soldier Beetles, Chauliognathus basalis, but the distinguishing features according to BugGuide:  “head, antennae, legs black; pronotum and elytra reddish-orange; pronotum with semicircular or U-shaped black mark on posterior half; elytra with triangular black patch at base and rectangular black patch at tip color of elytra is apparently variable (polymorphic) and is the subject of research papers ” are not visible in your image.  As a general note on the excellent macro photographs you have sent to us for identification:  images showing only the specimens’ heads makes identification very difficult for us.  We would request that you only send images of the entire insect in question for identification purposes.

Update
August 10, 2009
This copulating pair of soldier beetles is most likely C. pennsylvanicus and not C. basalis.  The color and elytral markings are much more consistent with that of C. pennsylvanicus and do not resemble those of C. basalis.  See the image from the Mating Pennsylvania Leatherwings post of Dec. 16, 2006 and you will see that these two images represent the same beetle species.  I grew up collecting copulating C. pennsulvanicus from wild sunflowers in SD and have seen thousands of them.
snethen

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

a moth
Sun, Feb 8, 2009 at 3:54 AM
i just saw a moth in our locality that needs to be identified please help me out with it the moth had green colouring with stripes of purple and light pink.
ketul.barot
mumbai,maharashtra,india

Oleander Hawk Moth

Oleander Hawk Moth

Dear Ketul.Barot,
Your moth is an Oleander Hawk Moth, Deilephila nerii or sometimes Daphnis nerii , according to Bill Oehlke’s wonderful web site which indicates the range as “the southern Mediterranean region,  North Africa and the Middle East  to Afghanistan.”  The species has also been introduced to Hawaii and the use of the cultivated food plant oleander in many areas will no doubt result in additional range expansion beyond the current reports of Southeast Asia and the Philippines.

Yellow fly with a big red bottom
Sun, Feb 8, 2009 at 12:12 AM
This fly I found going between dandelions in Colorado Springs. It has big red eyes and a big red bottom with black hairs, and a more yellowish head. What is it?
Nick DeBarmore
Colorado

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Hi Nick,
This is a Tachinid Fly, probably in the genus Adejeania which can be substantiated on BugGuide.  One on the submissions to BugGuide mentions the huge palps of the genus as being distinguishing features, and your photo illustrates this nicely.  Tachinid Flies often visit flowers as adults, and the larvae are parasitic, often on caterpillars.  Here is what BugGuide has to say about the parasitism of Tachinid Flies:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other insects. Almost every order of insects is attacked by tachinids, including a few types of non-insect arthropods. Some tachinids are very specific and others can parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars.
Life Cycle
Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. When fully developed it leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

what is this????
Wed, Feb 4, 2009 at 12:21 AM
We found this in our backyard this past summer, it makes a high pitched screech when you get near it, my family and I were wondering if you would know what it is…
sls
Northeast PA

True Katydid

True Katydid

Dear sls,
The reason your specimen, Pterophylla camellifolia, is known as the True Katydid is because it is the first species in the family to have its song transcribed into the familiar “katy-DID” and “katy-DIDN’T” according to our Audubon Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders. The True Katydid can be visually distinguished from other Katydids by the shape of its wings and the many conspicuous veins which truly give it the appearance of a leaf, aiding in its camouflage. The True Katydid is also somewhat unique in that both sexes call out, while in most Orthopterans, only the male sings. Your specimen is a female, as evidenced by the pointed ovipositor at the tip of her abdomen. The species is more often heard than seen, because of the camouflage as well as their preference for living it the tree canopy. Your specimen seems a bit traumatized, and we are guessing it was perhaps preyed upon by a bird or other predator, and eventually abandoned.

Sex Correction: From a Katydid Expert
Tuesday, February 15, 2009
This is indeed Pterophylla camellifolia, but this individual is a male, not a female. The long element at the end of the abdomen is the subgenital plate. Notice also the brown area at the base of the wings, a part of the stridulatory (sound producing) apparatus.
Piotr Naskrecki