Beetles, I think…
Hi!
All 61 pages of beetles on your amazing site have been viewed to no avail. Thought I had one of these beetles (they are beetles, right?) identified on BugGuide but, alas, no. The first, the long solid black one with the chunky hind legs, was moving very quickly on the front porch wall one day last summer. The other, the black and red one was quite a pest this last spring. I saw, felt, three of them inside my house which was built of rough-cut pine from the trees off the land here in the Great Smoky Mountains. By pest I mean that it lets you know it’s there by nipping, not tickling as most bugs seem to do, but leaves no mark. Each, in turn, was escorted outside, unceremoniously. Any ideas? I’d love to be able to name them properly.
Thank you,
R.G. Marion
East Tennessee

Eastern Blood-Sucking Conenose Bug

Eastern Blood-Sucking Conenose Bug

Hi R.G.,
You couldn’t locate the Eastern Blood-Sucking Conenose Bug on our beetle pages since it is an Assassin Bug. The black and red pattern is quite distinctive. According to BugGuide, the Eastern Blood-Sucking Conenose Bug, Triatoma sanguisuga, is also called the Big Bed Bug or Mexican Bed Bug. It normally feeds on “Blood of mammals, especially Eastern Wood Rat, Neotoma floridana . Also feeds on bed bugs and other insects. Feeds at night.” Also regarding its habitat: “Natural habitat is nests of small mammals. Sometimes invades houses.” BugGuide also notes that it “Sometimes bites humans, and the bite may be severe, causing an allergic reaction ” but there is no mention of Chagas Disease which is spread by the related Western Conenose Bug. Chagas Disease is primarily a problem in tropical climates. We are still working on an identification for the other insect you sent in.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beetles, I think…
Hi!
All 61 pages of beetles on your amazing site have been viewed to no avail. Thought I had one of these beetles (they are beetles, right?) identified on BugGuide but, alas, no. The first, the long solid black one with the chunky hind legs, was moving very quickly on the front porch wall one day last summer. … Any ideas? I’d love to be able to name them properly.
Thank you,
R.G. Marion
East Tennessee

Cockroach

Cockroach

Hi Again R.G.
We thought your other insect looked like a Cockroach, more specifically, a Cockroach in the Family Cryptocercidae as pictured on BugGuide. We wrote to Eric Eaton to get his opinion, and here is what he wrote back: “Daniel: Your ID of Cryptocercidae is right on! This must be from somewhere in the Appalachians, as the species has a disjunct distribution: Pacific Northwest and Appalachia. Then it picks up again in Japan or something. LOL! I’m serious. Eric”

Eyed Click Beetle, Red River Gorge, KY
I was able to identify this bug, but thought you might be interested in the photo. I found it while hiking in Red River Gorge in east-central KY.
Incidentally, I was using your site today to identify a big spider I found in my bedroom (and accidentally killed in the attempt to catch and release it- which is a big step for me as a recovering bugophobe). The spider turned out to be a brown recluse, so I feel less bad about its demise. But yall have definitely helped turn me from a indoor bug smusher (if they’re outside they’re okay) to a live-and-let-liver or a return-to-the-outdoors-er. So thank you!!
Carrie
Central Kentucky

Eyed Elater

Eyed Elater

Hi Carrie,
Thanks for sending in your photo of an Eyed Elater, one of the largest Click Beetles in the U.S.  We are also quite pleased to hear that our site has contributed to your insect tolerance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Itty bitty crumb spider
Hi again! You were so wonderful to identify my folding door spider! I have registered for your site, and logged in numerous times, but it won’t allow me to comment, says that I am not logged in, or else I would have thanked you right away! This little bitty guy is very cute and lives on our computer monitor, he’s only slightly bigger than a jumping spider size wise, and that’s only because of his leg span. I found he tended to hold out his 2 front legs like a tiny crab.
Holly Claire
Victoria, vancouver island, BC

Bark Crab Spider

Bark Crab Spider

Hi Holly,
It is interesting that you compared your spider’s appearance to that of a crab, because it is definitely a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae. We believe it may be a Bark Crab Spider, as it is a pretty convincing match to an image of Bassaniana versicolor posted to BugGuide. We are not sure why you are having problems with posting comments. We will refer your problem to our web host to see if he has a solution.

crane fly?
You have one of my all-time favorite sites on the internet. I really appreciate what you guys do.
I’m attaching two pictures of a large insect that appears to me to be a kind of crane fly. I couldn’t locate one on your site (though I know I may have just overlooked it), and tried a few others before sending it to you. I found it on our back door in north-central Arkansas at the beginning of October, 2008. Excluding the legs, its body was a good 5 centimeters long. Its antennae are interestingly-segmented, and its oversize thorax really caught my attention. I’d love it if you have the time ID this one for me.
Thanks!
Kurt Grafton
Batesville, Arkansas, USA

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly

Hi Kurt,
We believe your Crane Fly is a Giant Crane Fly, Tipula abdominalis. We searched the best Crane Fly identification site, the Crane Flies of Pennsylvania, and located it, and the double checked on BugGuide. According to BugGuide, the: “large size coupled with black velvety patches on thorax is diagnostic feature.” The Crane Flies of Pennsylvania site indicates: “The largest crane fly in the state of Pennsylvania, the adult of this species has a brownish gray thorax with a velvety black area on the dorsal side. The abdomen is orange with a black line on the side, and the posterior end of the abdomen is black. The wings are semitransparent with several brown areas along the front edge. The females reach about 40 mm in size, while the males are slightly smaller. The larvae of this species are aquatic and among the largest and most common aquatic invertebrates in streams of wooded areas, and are sought out as bait for fish. Larvae feed on decomposing leaves, thus playing an important role of breaking down organic matter in the water. Two generations occur, more numerous in late summer than in spring.”

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly

Spider in Adirondacks
Hello, While camping in Saranac Lake, NY in August 2005, I was sitting around the camp fire with friends when this spider ended up on my shoulder somehow. I quickly shooed it into a cup and snapped a quick picture before dropping it back off in the woods. We always wondered what kind of spider it was and why its abdomen area was so large. Hopefully the cup should give you a reference to its sizeThanks
James
Lake Saranac, NY

Shamrock Orbweaver

Shamrock Orbweaver

Hi James,
In the autumn, from all over the country, we receive requests for Orbweaver Spider identifications. Those requests just might outnumber all others at this time of year. The main reason is that the female Orbweaver Spiders have attained adult size and become quite noticeable. Often the gorgeous orb webs are in strategic locations. We have three healthy females stretching webs nightly in close proximity to our porch light. Each night they spin a new web and wait for the insects that are attracted to the light, and the spiders have grown quite fat due to the good trapping. When the Orbweaver is in the genus Argiope, we can, with a degree of certainty, provide a species name, but when the Orbweaver is in another genus like Araneus or Neoscona, this is often quite difficult for us. There is much similarity between species, and much variation within an individual species. We believe this is Araneus trifolium, sometimes called the Shamrock Orbweaver. Glancing at the photos posted to BugGuide for this species should provide some idea of the individual variation.

Daniel:
I’m fairly certain that the “shamrock orb weaver” posted recently is actually a color phase of the “marbled orb weaver,” Araneus marmoreus.  They are very closely allied to the shamrock spider (A. trifolium), so it is easy to get confused!
Eric