tiny fly in bathroom
Hello, i can’t eradicate these tiny flies/gnats from my bathroom. I have no idea what it is nor why it and dozens of it’s brethren over the last few months desire my shower. Please help in identifying this freeloader and what steps i can make to have him/her look for lodging elsewhere. Thanks,
Logan
Tennessee

Bathroom Fly

Bathroom Fly

Hi Logan,  
Your fly is actually called a Bathroom Fly, Clogmia albipunctata.  The larvae live in the sludge that accumulates in sink and tub drains.  Removing the sludge accumulation should help reduce the numbers of flies that are present.

Bathroom Fly

Bathroom Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big Beetle
Hello Bug Man!
My husband and I came across this beetle while camping in San Diego county. It was early August, 2005 and this bug flew into our camp two nights in a row, but we only saw it at night. I didn’t see anything that resembled this one in your “Beetle” section. It was also very hard and heavy… at least it sounded that way when it would land.
BTW… LOVE this website!!
Excitedly Awaiting a Response!
San Diego, CA

California Root Borer

California Root Borer

Hi Excited,
Your large beetle is a California Root Borer or California Prionus, Prionus californicus. The antennae on your specimen indicates that it is a male. Our edition of Charles Hogue’s Insects of the Los Angeles Basin indicates that adults emerge in early summer. The late appearance of this specimen might be a sign of impending climactic changes. The California Root Borer is attracted to lights. The large grubs were eaten by Native Americans and there is a growing interest Entomophagy, of the consumption of insects, so we will also file your letter under Tasty Morsels, our Edible Insect section.

Giant winged earwig, maybe?
Since I’ve moved into my house about 5 years ago, every year there has been one or two of there vicious looking bugs on a half dead tree in the middle of my driveway from late spring to late fall. Same looking bug, near the bottom of the tree. The tree is 80% dead, with all the leaves being at the very top.
I never see it eat or fly around. I just sits on the tree and…pulsates. That’s about the best way to describe it. It doesn’t mind the lawnmower. Only ever seen it on the tree. It’s about 4 or 5cm long. I don’t see any holes that it’s living in.
At first I thought it was some sort of wasp because of the way it’s colored, but the more I looked at it, it reminded me of an earwig. One of my friends said, “That’s what wasps looked like when I was young.” Of course, I have the bug identification skills of a cinder block, so that’s why I thought I’d send it to you.
Thanks for any help, it’d be nice to finally put a name to whatever that is.
Thanks
Northwest Ohio

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Your insect is a Pigeon Horntail, a type of Wood Wasp. This non-stinging species lays eggs in dying and dead trees and the larvae bore into the wood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug Love Frenzy! And a Little Hitchhiker!
I just went out again to check on the bumblebees and a number of others have joined in the fun!
Can you let me know what the little hitchhiker is on the highest bumblebee?
Thanks,
Roberta
Andover, MA

Bumble Bee mating frenzy

Bumble Bee mating frenzy

Bumblebee Love
I thought you would enjoy this picture of the “bumblebee love gathering” in my garden. I always thought bees mated in the air so I was very surprised to see this in my garden today :)
Roberta
Andover, MA

Bumble Bees Mating

Bumble Bees Mating

Hi Roberta,
After sifting through all the Bumble Bees in the genus Bombus posted on BugGuide, and all the identification drawings on the Bumblebees of North America website, we don’t feel confident enough to give you an exact species identification.  Perhaps one of our readers can assist in this matter.  We are curious about this group mating behavior.  The detail on your photo is not sufficient for us to identify the small fly hitch-hiking on the top Bee.

Daniel:
The bumble bee mating behavior is typical of many ground-nesting bees.  Virgin queens are a hot commodity, so males flock to them and compete for an opportunity to mate.
I can’t make out what the fly is, either, but it might be a “no-see-um,” family Ceratopogonidae, most species of which do not feed on people, but suck the blood of other insects.
Eric Eaton

Green darner dragonfly
I’ve identified this as a green darner, Anax junius, based on Peterson’s “eyes in contact for a considerable distance” and “taget-like mark on upper part of the face”. And of course the size, more than 3 inches long.I though you might like the photo for your files. I took this photo at Murphy’s Point Provincial Park in Ontario, halfway between Ottawa and Kingston. She was sunning herself on a tree in a clearing fairly early in the morning. Pat in Montreal Ontario, Murphy’s Point Provincial Park

Green Darner

Green Darner

Hi Pat,
Thanks for sending your perfectly lovely image of a Green Darner Dragonfly to our website.

Spotted in Southern California
This bug caught my roomate and boyfriend’s eye near our front door. It was about 1/2″ long, resembled a house fly and had wings and long antennae. It’s legs were orange and in the sun the body had a blueish sheen. It killed another bug possibly a cricket, grasshopper or potato bug (something much larger than it) by biting it, then dug a fairly large hole compared to the two bugs, dragged the other bug into the hole and stayed in there for several minutes. Then the unidentified bug emerged and began covering the hole (these are pics of the bug covering the hole). Once the hole was filled it flew away. When I came home my friend’s showed me where the hole was and it was pretty well-covered, almost invisible if you were not aware it was there. What the heck is it?
Tara S.
Hawaiian Gardens, Ca

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Hi Tara,
We wish you were able to provide us with an image of this Great Golden Digger Wasp with its prey, but we will have to content ourselves with the dirt flying in your nice action shot and the description of what you witnessed. The Great Golden Digger Wasp, Sphex ichneumoneus, feeds on pollen and nectar as an adult, but a female wasp stings and paralizes crickets and katydids to provide food for her progeny.

Daniel:
The “great golden digger wasp” from southern California looks like Sphex nudus to me, but I’m not sure that species is supposed to occur there. Also, half an inch is very small for any species of Sphex, so it could be a different wasp altogether! A shot of the prey animal would have been conclusive.
Eric Eaton