Centipede Red Head
Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 7:48 AM
Just wanted to show off a little something that we found on our latest camping trip at Canyon of the Eagles in Burnet, Texas. One of my daughters saw it and yelled “centipede”. We all gathered to see it and were just amazed at the size and speed of this little creature. I identified it on your website and thought you would like to know of our sighting!
Rana
Burnet, Texas

Giant Redheaded Centipede

Giant Redheaded Centipede

Hi Rana,
Thanks so much for sending us your photo of a Giant Redheaded Centipede, Scolopendra heros.  There are several different color variations of this species.  You didn’t indicate how large your specimen is.  We have gotten reports of individuals as large as 8 inches, and for some reason, the largest reports are from Oklahoma.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

6 legged bug with distintive red pattern on the back
Sun, Mar 29, 2009 at 2:34 AM
I’ve never seen this bug. My parents don’t recognize it.
The bug’s body is 7 (+/-1)mm long and has a well defined red pattern on the back.
I’ve found 2 in the kitchen at spring start. The weather was dry, cold and windy for 2 days after 15 days of (beautiful) warm spring days.
thanks for the help !
Francisco
Northern Portugal

Stink Bug from Portugal

Stink Bug from Portugal

Sun, Mar 29, 2009 at 3:45 AM
Found it !
The photos matches almost exactly the Eurydema ornatum
http://www.britishbugs.org.uk/heteroptera/Pentatomidae/Eurydema_ornatum.html
The links on your site where precious.
Many thanks.
Francisco

Hi Francisco,
We are quite pleased that you were able to properly identify your Stink Bug using our site and links.  This is relevant right now because for some reason, our less than ideal internet provider, Time Warner, is far from consistent with our service.  It has taken us over a half an hour to do this one posting.  We hope our readership will bear with us since we cannot answer our mail as this is taking way too much time right now.

Same colours as the German flag!
Mon, Mar 30, 2009 at 12:41 AM
Hi,
My backyard has heaps of these bugs. They tend to hide behind bark. I have never seen them fly. I always have a seed bell hanging from a tree to attract mostly rainbow lorrikeets. The bugs swarm over the bell when the birds have gone. What are they and most importantly are they a danger to plant and tree life ?
Regards Henry Janten
Deer Park Victoria Australia

Unknown Australian True Bug

Harlequin Bug from Australia

Dear Henry,
We didn’t have any luck identifying your True Bug in the order Hemiptera on the Brisbane Insect website. The behavior you describe is similar to North American Boxelder Bugs in the family Rhopalidae, the Scentless Plant Bugs. Other good candidates are the family Lygaeidae, the Seed Bugs or Largidae, the Bordered Plant Bugs. Hopefully one of our readers will write in with an identification.

Update: Unidentified True Bug from Australia
Tue, Mar 31, 2009 at 9:20 AM
Daniel:
I believe this beautiful true bug is in the genus Dindymus (Pyrrhocoridae), probably D. versicolour . The common name in Australia is Harlequin Bug (sometimes Fire Bug), although that name also seems to be applied to several related species. They are considered a plant pest, particularly on fruit trees. As the species name suggests, they show considerable variation on color. Another possibility might be D. ventralis. Regards.
Karl
http://www.ento.csiro.au/aicn/name_s/b_1393.htm

Thanks Karl,
Seems we overlooked the Fire Bug on the Brisbane Insect Website because of the coloration not matching the photo we received.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Long, bright orange beetle with black wings
Sun, Mar 29, 2009 at 4:12 PM
I found a bunch of these orange and black beetles while airsofting in Arizona and I am not exactly sure what they are. They were in large groups in the grassy areas crawling on eachother. Is it a type of desert beetle?
JKAZ
Arizona, United States

Master Blister Beetles

Master Blister Beetles

Hi JKAZ,
Every year in the spring, we get numerous inquiries about Blister Beetles, especially from the desert areas of the Southwest. When Blister Beetles appear, it is often in prodigious numbers, and then suddenly, they vanish. This is a Master Blister Beetle, Lytta magister. It is well represented on BugGuide. This is one of the largest of the Blister Beetles. The adults eat foliage, flowers, pollen and fruit, and according the BugGuide: “Larvae live in bee nests.” Some species of Blister Beetles feed on grasshopper eggs. The beetles in the family Meloidae are known as Blister Beetles because they secrete hemolymph (blood) from their joints when handled, and the hemolymph contains cantharidin which can cause blisters. A European relative is the infamous Spanish Fly. Congratulations on having your letter and image chosen as our Bug of the Month for April 2009.


blue green centipede
Sat, Mar 28, 2009 at 5:22 PM
I caught this wonderfull little guy in El Dorado Hills California while on a job. I have had him/her for nearly a year and feed it tiny crickets. Just buying more when i notice no more crickets in the cage,
I think it is a giant centipede but have not been able to find one of similar color that should be living in this part of the world.
Ryan
El Dorado Hills, California, USA

Multicolored Centipede

Multicolored Centipede

Hi Ryan,
Though El Dorado Hills is several hundred miles north of Los Angeles, we believe your beautiful centipede is a Multicolored Centipede, Scolopendra polymorpha.  Here is what Charles Hogue writes in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “This is a fairly large enctipede, attaining a maximum length of 3 to 4 inches (7 to 10 cm).  It varies in color from clear or dark olive yellow to greenish brown; the rear borders of the back plates are mostly dark green.  Practically nothing is known about its biology, other than that its general habitat is the same as for most centipedes – secluded places in contact with logs, rocks or the ground.  The bite of this species may be painful.  Although there are no data on the effects of its poison on humans, it is probably harmless.  Contrary to popular belief, the sharp claws on the legs are not poisonous. although the last pair of legs is capable of pinching.”  BugGuide reports this species from several western states and has numerous photos that look very much like your specimen.

 

Multicolored Centipede

Unknown bug pictures included
Sat, Mar 28, 2009 at 6:26 AM
We are finding these bugs at our house. A few weeks ago we found 2 very small bugs (babies) that flew into the house. They appeared to be attreacted to lampshades or light fixtures. We are now seeing larger ones outside hanging out on the outside of our sliding glass door and windows. This particular bug is 3/4 of an inch from tip of ‘tail’ to tip of anntenae. They look like ants with wings, but with long anttenae and a possible stinger from the back portion. It is straight and does not ever appear curved or fluid in movement. We are not seeing a tremendous amount, and only one at a time seems to be around.
Vickie
Maryland

Ichneumon:  genus Pimpla???

Ichneumon: genus Pimpla???

Hi Vickie,
This is an Ichneumon, a family of parasitic wasps that prey on a variety of host insects and arthropods.  Ichneumons will not harm you nor your home, and they are important biological controls for keeping insect populations in check.  We believe your example may be in the genus Pimpla as evidenced by images posted to BugGuide.