Pre Historic Roach?
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 6:31 PM
This bug was found by my father in the laundry. We don’t have trees and bushes, nor earth in our house, but my neighbor has. Hmm.. this is all i know =[
Hope you can tell us what’s this bug! It really impressed us. Thanks
Reinaldo Hartmann
Brazil – Porto Velho – Ro

Giant Water Bug in Brazil

Giant Water Bug in Brazil

Hi Reinaldo,
This is actually a Giant Water Bug.  In the U.S., they are commonly called Toe-Biters since they have been known to bite people who swim in lakes and ponds.  They don’t aggressively bite humans, but they can deliver a very painful bite if carelessly handled.  Giant Water Bugs can fly quite well, and they are attracted to lights, hence the other common name Electric Light Bug.  Perhaps there was a light in the laundry room that attracted this specimen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Can you identify this tropical cricket?
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 12:41 PM
The cricket shown in the photo about is about 7 cm long. The distinctive features of this insect include the turqoise eyes and the long antennae. The specimen shown had just been disabled after being struck by a shoe. My young children cowered in fear after it alighted on a balcony ledge.
Solar
Saint Lucia, West Indies

Blue Eyed Katydid from West Indies

Blue Eyed Katydid from West Indies

Hi Solar,
We are more inclined to think this is a Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae as opposed to a Cricket in the family Gryllidae. To be safe, we would only classify down to the suborder Ensifera, the Long-horned Orthoptera until we get some input. We would think that this is a well documented species due to its unusual eye coloration which almost seems to have been enhanced through PhotoShop, but we didn’t have much luck with our web search.

Someone sent me this pic from Botswana
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 2:26 PM
Dear bugman:
I don’t have much to go on here. All I know is the photo is from Botswana. Not even sure what part of the country. Thanks in advance.
Alex
Botswana

Shield-Back Katydid from Botswana

Shield-Back Katydid from Botswana

Hi Alex,
This is a Shield-Backed Katydid in the subfamily Tettigoniinae. Other than that, we would need the input of someone familiar with the species in Botswana. Some Shield-Backed Katydids are carnivorous, but most are plant eaters.

BTW, I love your site. You guys are what the web is supposed to be.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this bug?
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 11:18 AM
Hi, I have lived in CA 25 years anf have never seen this before, what is it?
Roger Turney
Dana Point CA

Brochymena

Brochymena

Hi Roger,
This is a Predatory Stink Bug known as a Brochymena.  You can find additional information on BugGuide, which states:  “Predatory on other insects, especially caterpillars. May feed some on juices of leaves as well” and that it is generally found in “Spring, fall (adults overwinter, so adults typically absent in mid-summer) .”  Since adults hibernate, they may enter homes in the fall.

Can you identify this annoying, swarming bug?
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 12:08 PM
Hi. Noone I’ve talked to knows what these are. The bloom in late summer and are enormous pests through sheer numbers. They crash-land on everything and march around, but otherwise exhibit no behavior. They seek cracks and shelter and crowd together to winter, I suppose. I very rarely see them mating. They are a hideous annoyance that, at peak times, make it impossible to work outside. They get into EVERYTHING. Everything you open has them inside it. They are masters are penetration.
Ian Macky
Yreka (rural Northern California)

Hyaline Plant Bugs

Hyaline Plant Bugs

Hi Ian,
We did some research on BugGuide, and have concluded that you are being infested by Hyaline Grass Bugs, Liorhyssus hyalinus. There is considerable information on BugGuide on how to properly identify the species, but no information on its habits. We have not had much luck locating other information except a vague reference that they are pests on Sorghum. We would question if perhaps there are Sorghum fields near your residence.

Hi Daniel…
That certainly looks to be it!  Thanks so much.  I will find out if sorghum is grown around here.  I’m in the middle of acres of “buck brush” in scrub country, no crops are grown within a couple miles at
least.  Hmm…  I read up some and it said they eat sorghum and pistachio fruit– two very different things– which makes me wonder if there are others things it eats, something very common around here. Anyway, thanks again for the ID, that really helps.  If you like, I
can send you a few trillion for your collection.
ian

Thanks for the offer Ian, but our entire collection of bugs is online.

Caterpiller
Sun, Nov 23, 2008 at 1:10 PM
Hello, I found this really cool caterpiller in my garden and I can’t find any pictures that match him it seems most are green. I live in central Florida and would like to know what it is and what it eats. Any information you have would be great.
Thank you in advance!
P.S. my kids and I love your website!!!!
Felice Gilmartin
Central Florida

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Hi Felice,
This is an Imperial Moth Caterpillar, Eacles imperialis.  Most specimens of caterpillars of this species are green, but in order to better ensure the survival of the species, there are also blue-green, brown, and orange color variations of this caterpillar.  Many caterpillars change color right before pupation.  Imperial Moth Caterpillars pupate in the soil, and we suspect this individual left the tree upon which it was feeding, and was searching for a nice plot of dirt in which to pupate when you encountered it.  Imperial Moth Caterpillars are not real fussy about their food.  Specimens are found on a large variety of deciduous trees and they will even feed on some coniferous trees.  Adult Imperial Moths do not feed.