Subject: Dragonfly ID
Location: Butler, PA
August 13, 2014 7:14 am
I found this dragonfly at Jennings Environmental Education Center in Butler county, PA. Having trouble finding it in the books. Best I can come up with is Black Meadowhawk, a young one.
Thanks,
Signature: Glenn

Skimmer Dragonfly, but which species???

Skimmer Dragonfly, but which species???

Dear Glenn,
We cannot say for certain that your identification of a Black Meadowhawk is correct, however your individual does look very similar to this female Black Meadowhawk,
Sympetrum danae, that is posted on BugGuide.  We do believe you have the family Libellulidae, the Skimmers correct.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide some information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified spider
Location: Delphi, Central Greece, Southern Europe
August 13, 2014 7:57 am
This spider was seen in Delphi, Greece, on 10th May 2014. I haven’t seen one before… It is about 3 – 4 cm long, black and hairy with an orange ring on its back which covers its belly. I moved it with my leg and it felt endangered, so it lift its forelegs to attack. Pretty scary and amazing! I would be delighted if you could send me feedback with the species of this spider as to search for further information. Thank you in advance!
Signature: Demetrios Grigoropoulos

Ladybird Spider:  Eresus ruficapillus

Ladybird Spider: Eresus ruficapillus

Dear Demetrios,
This is a Ladybird Spider in the family Eresidae,
and it is a male spider.  The males and females exhibit pronounced sexual dimorphism, and they don’t even resemble the same species.  Most examples of male Ladybird Spiders we have seen have bright red abdomens with black spots, and their coloration and markings resemble those of a Ladybird Beetle, hence the common name.  We located an image of the Eresidae, Lady bird spider page that looks very much like your individual, and you must scroll down to Eresus ruficapillus to view the images.  Another individual is pictured on the Arachnofilia forum.  Ladybird Spiders are not commonly encountered and there is much evidence that they are endangered. 

 

Subject: Spider-like bug with a “skirt”
Location: Northern indiana
August 11, 2014 1:49 pm
We live in northern Indiana. We found what at first glance looked like a spider, but upon closer inspection appears to be an insect. It even behaved like a spider, running gracefully along a web. These photos were taken on August 11, 2014 around 5:00 pm. The bug was about a half inch long. I would love to know what it is.
Signature: Louann

Spined Micrathena

Spined Micrathena

Hi Louann,
This is a Spiny Orbweaver in the genus
Micrathena, commonly called the Spined Micrathena, Micrathena gracilis.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are mostly white or pale yellow, mottled with black or brown. They have ten spines on the chunky abdomen. Size 8 – 10 mm.”  Your individual is a female.  She is perfectly harmless to humans. 

Thank you so much! I’ve never seen one before!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Miss identified
Location: Almost all over the USA
August 12, 2014 11:12 pm
Hey guys! I was looking through your posts and noticed you miss identified a beetle I’m very fermiliar with. You claimed the beetle to be “a June bug on staroids” when it was intact a female eastern or western herculese beetle. It may have been hard to identify because when they go into the soul their shells absorb the moisture and turn dark brown. I know this well because I have recently been rearing this specious. I will include a photo of the original post and my own photo of the species (although in the photo she is light colored because she hadn’t been in moist soil)
Signature: Best regards, Nikki

Female Hercules Beetle

Female Hercules Beetle

Hi Nikki,
Thanks for providing a comment on our Scarab Beetle posting.  For the record, we did not claim it was “a June bug on staroids” but the person who submitted the image called it “a june bug but on steroids.”  We informed Cathy that it was a Scarab, but we couldn’t identify the species because of the camera angle.  Thank you for recognizing the genus for us.
  Since you have provided us with images, we are also creating a unique posting for your comment, but we would love to be able to provide a more specific location for your Hercules Beetle that “almost all over the USA.”

Oh, I appolagize, I’m still getting used to the website format. Well I can’t tell weather that is an eastern or western herculese so the range would be different.
Oh :3 my little girl was found in st.louis Missouri

Subject: Big, scary fly?
Location: Montclair, NJ
August 13, 2014 8:22 am
Hi there,
Every sunny day this summer I have had to run a gauntlet up and down my stairs, which are outdoor deck stairs, past two or three yellowjackets and one or two of these guys. At first, seeing them in flight, I thought they were black and white hornets but then I saw one landed and it rather looks like a huge fly with delta-shape wings. They buzz threateningly as they fly past. I’m wondering if they bite. I’m terrified to walk past them, but I found a very dead one on the pavement to photograph.
Signature: Amanda, Montclair NJ

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Amanda,
While Yellowjackets defending a nest might be cause for concern, this Tiger Bee Fly,
Xenox tigrinus, is perfectly harmless.  See BugGuide for additional information.  This dead individual may have fallen prey to another impressive and scary but harmless fly, a Robber Fly.

Thank you very much!  I was afraid it was like a horsefly that bit me once, and I won’t forget that!

Subject: Long fangs
Location: Western PA
August 13, 2014 4:49 am
This spider was on my car the length of the spider was about two inch when it was laying flat. I don’t scare easy when getting close to spiders that made webs but he was quick. This guys fangs are very long easy to see without my macro lens on my camera.
First time iv ever see one like this I was unable to if any info on the net with my descriptions. Hope you can help.
The last picture is with a flash to better see the patterns on it’s back.
Signature: Ashley

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Ashley,
This impressive spider is a Long Jawed Orbweaver,
Tetragnatha elongata, and according to BugGuide they:  “Usually construct their webs in the shade above water.”

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver