Subject: Dragonfly Love
Location: Taggery, North East Victoria, Australia
November 18, 2014 2:31 am
Just thought you might be interested in theres, i think they ate egg laying?
Signature: Cait O’Pray

Bluets Mating

Damselflies Mating

Dear Cait,
These are Damselflies, not Dragonflies, but your mistake is understandable because they are classified in the same insect order, Odonata.  When we have more time, we will try to identify the species on the Brisbane Insect website.  They are in fact mating and in the act of depositing eggs.

Thank you for the response, I’ll have to tell me parents what is living in their dam. They’ve let it go seminative so there are at least 5 types of frogs and so many more insects. I recently just bought the book advertised on the website and am starting to read it. It’s all very fascinating!

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny brown bugs everywhere!
Location: Central California
November 17, 2014 4:26 pm
Woke up this morning to hundreds (!!!) of these little bugs at our back door. They are teeny tiny, only barely bigger than a flea. Others in the area have noticed they are swarming too, starting yesterday. If it helps any, we are located along the Central Coast of California
Signature: Morgan

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Hi Morgan,
These appear to be immature Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Sometimes when fields are cleared, there is a migration of insects to gardens.  We are not certain of the species, but you can read more on the Dirt Colored Seed Bugs on BugGuide.

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Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider

Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider

Subject:  Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
November 18, 2014
This weekend while working in the garden, I finally decided to pull out the camera and shoot the Egg Sacs of the Bolas Spider that lived on the pole in the garden all summer.

Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider

Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Species name
Location: Kimberley Sout Africa
November 17, 2014 1:37 am
Hi!
I am trying to make preserved specimens of bugs in our area for a laboratory. It is important to have information of the specimen which will enable the students to learn from these specimens. I was hoping you could help me with the species name of each.
Signature: Odette du Plessis

Red Driver Ant

Red Driver Ant

Dear Odette,
The quality of your images is quite poor, and we do not believe we will be able to give you an accurate species identification on either the Scarab Beetle in the family Scarabaeidae or the Preying Mantis.  Your third insect looks very much like a male Driver Ant or Sausage Fly in the genus
Dorylus.  You can view additional images of Red Driver Ants on the iSpot website.  As an aside, we find it curious that you are mounting your specimens on glass slides like microscope specimens instead of on pins like most insect specimens.

Hi! Thank you for trying to help me identify the species. I am sure your information will steer me in the right direction. They are on glass slides as I intend placing them in glass jars filled with alcohol. I found this recipe for mounting insects. I would have sent it to you just to show you, unfortunately the information is in afrikaans. How do you prevent insects that are mounted with pins from going mouldy and becoming brittle and breaking? Thank you once again for the information. Odette

Hi again Odette,
Insects do dry out when they are mounted on pins.  We do not have a collection, so we are not prepared to relay the necessary steps for mounting insects, but that information should be readily available in books or online.

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Subject: Vaejovis carolinianus Scorpion in Georgia
Location: Columbus, Ga
November 17, 2014 7:03 am
Hi! I was cleaning the bathroom yesterday and found this little guy lounging behind the…uh…facilities. with his tail stretched out he’s almost an inch long. Growing up on the island of Guam, I developed a respect for bugs. This was due mainly to the fact that so many of them wanted to sting, bite, or just generally crawl all over me!
Anyways, with the help of your website I’ve tentatively identified my little houseguest as Vaejovis carolinianus, and am wondering if you concur. He’s living comfortably in a tupperware until I find a suitable home outside for him. We have a little woodpile outside and I plan to release him there once the rain, tornados, and flying mutant undead air-shark attacks stop.
Signature: Geographer

Southern Unstriped Scorpion

Southern Unstriped Scorpion

Dear Geographer,
We concur that this is most likely a Southern Unstriped Scorpion,
Vaejovis carolinianus.  According to BugGuide, it is “‘The only scorpion native to much of the Appalachian states: Kentucky, West Virginia (S), Virginia (SW), North and South Carolina (W), Georgia (North, not coastal or southern, where Centruroides hentzi is found), Alabama (N), Mississippi (NE), Louisiana (tiny, disjunct, area NE of Baton Rouge near MS border), Tennessee (E 2/3).’ – Kari J McWest”

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Subject: Eastern Province Saudi Arabia Bug
Location: Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia
November 16, 2014 10:49 pm
Hello, we’d be grateful to know what this is. It was seen last Tuesday, 11th November on a tennis court built on reclaimed land sticking out into the Arabian Gulf at Al Khobar. It was about 2 inches long. It was near where small children play so an idea as to whether it is venomous or not would be helpful. The immediate concern was that it was a scorpion but it has no claws and apparently a double stinger apparatus.
Signature: Catharine

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Catharine,
This is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera and Earwigs are frequently called Pincher Bugs because of the cerci at the tip of the abdomen that resemble forceps.  Your individual is in a threat position, but as Earwigs do not have venom and are not considered dangerous, the threat position is more of a bluff.

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