Subject: Critter emerging from skeletal shell
Location: Sturbridge,Ma.
September 11, 2014 5:40 am
This critter was observed attached to a maple tree right at sunset so the lighting was tricky. I observed it for 25 minutes before darkness took over. I posted the picture on Facebook but no one was able to identify it. I was not sure if this guy was just shedding it’s shell or going through a transition stage.
Signature: Michael Edick

Metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada

Metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada

Dear Michael,
This is a spectacular image of the metamorphosis of an Annual Cicada in the genus
Tibicen.  For several years, the Cicada Nymph has been living underground feeding on nourishment from the roots of trees and shrubs.  When maturity time approaches, it digs to the surface, climbs up a tree or other vertical feature and molts for the final time, emerging as a winged adult and leaving behind the exoskeleton of the nymph or exuvia.  You are probably familiar with the clamor produced by male Cicadas in the treetops during the dog days of summer.  When they are plentiful, the loud buzzing sound is quite a cacophony.  One common eastern species is known as the Dog Day Harvestfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of caterpillar?
Location: Pennsylvania butler area
September 9, 2014 4:09 pm
I found this caterpillar while cleaning out my woods
Signature: Jessica

Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar

Pandorus Sphinx Caterpillar

Hi Jessica,
This is the caterpillar of a Pandorus Sphinx, and the adult is a gorgeous green moth.  The caterpillars can be green, orange or brown.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.  We have been doing some site maintenance and we were unable to respond earlier.

Subject: Weird Bug From Pond
Location: Lake View, AL, 35111
September 9, 2014 11:00 am
Hey Bugman,
I have some strange bug crawling around my pond and sidewalks. They seem to move like worms.
They’re greyish brown and I haven’t been brave enough to pick one up and check it out.
I live in Lake View, AL
Thanks,
Jared
Signature: McCalla Bugster

Horse Fly Larva

Horse Fly Larva

Dear McCalla Bugster,
This looks to us like the immature stage of a fly, possibly a Horse Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Robber Fly
Location: Greenbrier Tennessee
September 8, 2014 6:36 pm
Took this today at work with my Samsung phone in Greenbrier Tn 37073
Signature: Jason Littlejohn

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Hi Jason,
We have never posted more images of Red Footed Cannibalflies than we have this year.

Subject: Bewildering Fungus eater
Location: Singapore
September 9, 2014 6:39 am
Hi Daniel
Hope you’re well.
Was wondering if you could help me narrow down an ID for the attached insect. It was on a dead log together with a lot of fungus weevils and fungus beetles so I suspected it liked the fungus too. I’ve never seen anything like it before. As usual when I see something bewildering I think of you :-)
Thanks,
Signature: David

What's That Beetle???

What’s That Beetle???

Dear David,
Your images are spectacular, and this is truly an odd looking beetle, and we haven’t even a guess at its identity at the time of posting.  Alas, we cannot research this at this time because we must rush off to work.  Perhaps one of our readers has a clue or the time to investigate.  It does appear to be carrying some Mites on the elytra.  The placement of the eyes is quite unusual, almost like those of a frog that lies submerged with only its eyes visible above water.

Beetle from Singapore

Bark-Gnawing Beetle from Singapore

Hi Daniel and David:
My first impression was that it looked like an odd Jewel Beetle (Buprestidae) but I could find nothing similar online. I believe this is actually a Bark-gnawing Beetle (Trogossitidae), a relatively small and obscure family of beetles. The dorsal markings resemble some Leperina (=Lepidopteryx) species, but I think there are too many dissimilarities for that to be the correct genus. I believe it is probably a species of Xenoglena, for which the lack of elytral scales and dorsally placed eyes are diagnostic. Information is generally lacking for Asian Trogossitidae, but Kolibáč (2009) provided a very complete (and technical) description of the family. Google Books provides access to this document – see page 46 for discussion and page 37 for representative pictures of Xenoglena sp.  I have a feeling it could be X. deyrollei, but I have found no image for that species so I really can’t be certain.  If you have difficulty accessing that site the same information for Xenoglena sp. is also provided atspecies-id.net.  Despite the common name for the family, these beetles are actually predatory. According to Kolibáč (2009) “Adults dwell on fallen trees and dry branches, hunting for xylophagous insects. They fly and run at great speed and appear very like some jewel beetles in body shape.”  Regards. Karl

 

Subject: bug in Boquete Panama
Location: Boquete, Panama
September 8, 2014 1:27 pm
We spotted this bug on our house wall and have never seen one before. From top to bottom it is around the size of a drink can! It has been there for hours and shows no signs of going anywhere soon.
Best regards
Carol Slater
Signature: Carol

Harlequin Beetle

Harlequin Beetle

Hi Carol,
Most images that we receive of Harlequin Beetles,
Acrocinus longimanus, are very poor quality, but your image is stunning.  Your beetle is a male which can be distinguished by the extremely developed front legs.  According to Encyclopedia Britannica:  “The common name refers to the beetle’s gaudy pattern; the Latin longimanus of the species name refers to the extremely long forelegs of the males. These legs are usually longer than the beetle’s entire body, which can measure nearly 76 mm (3 inches). In addition to serving as a sexual advertisement to females, the long legs help the males to traverse the branches of trees (the beetles fly as well as crawl). Despite the seemingly conspicuous colours, the harlequin hides itself effectively among the lichen- and fungus-covered trunks of tropical woods such as fig trees.”