Subject: Preying Mantis?
Location: Lorgues, South France
June 8, 2016 3:32 am
Hi,
We took this photo of a preying mantis? In south of France last week, beg of June, it was attracted to a garden light in a boules area but the garden was in Provence and surrounded by lots of scrub land. Can you identify it? It had its wings out but fluttered about it didn’t really fly.
I am including a second photo of a really pretty moth same location too! Because it’s so cool!
Signature: Many Thanks Ali and Richard

Mantis

Conehead Mantis

Dear Ali and Richard,
We just returned to the office after a short holiday, and though we opened your email over a week ago and did some preliminary research, we did not identify your Mantis species.  We will continue to research the matter, but we will be posting it as unidentified until we have more time to research.  We have over a week of identification requests to begin sorting through.  We believe this may be a Conehead Mantis in the family Empusidae based on images posted to BioDiversity Explorer where it states:  “Empusids are slender and are identified by the spines on their protibia which have alternatively one long spine and two to four shorter spines. They also have leaf-like lobes on the femora. The antennae of the males are elongate and doubly pectinate (comb-like) rather than thin and bare as usually found in the mantids. The Empusidae is made up of eight genera with a small number of species scattered across Africa, the Mediterranean region and Asia.”  According to El Mirador del Sol:  “The mantis in the photo is Empusa Pennata, common names conehead mantis in English and mantis palo in Spanish, is a species of praying mantis in genus Empusa. It can be found in Spain and parts of Portugal, France, Lebanon,Central and Southern Italy and Greece.”

Wow that’s amazing I could not find it anywhere! Thank you so much, it looks great in the professional photos I am so pleased we took the photo and followed it up.
Thank You.
Best Wishes
Ali and Richard.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar
Location: pretoria
May 30, 2016 4:53 am
Halo bugman :-)
I found 3 of these on a daisy type flower bush. sorry I’m a keen gardener but don’t remember the plant names. can you identify this and what kind of buuterfly does it become. is it a pest?
Signature: René

Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillar

Dear René,
It was not until we searched through North American species of Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars from the genus
Cucullia on BugGuide that we realized you were writing from South Africa.  BugGuide describes the caterpillars as:  “usually smooth (hairless) and very colorful, with mixed patterns of spots, stripes, and/or patches of mostly yellow, red, green, blue, and black – the range of variation between species is too complex to describe in general terms.”  We did find an excellent visual match to your Caterpillar on iSpot, but it is only identified to the genus level.  Adult Moths from the genus Cucullia are generally drab and brown, and it seems the caterpillars are the beautiful stage of development.  Your submission will not go live to our site until mid-June while we are away from the office. 

Good morning
Thank you for your prompt reply. I just assumed it’s a South African website. Where are you guys situated?
I asked all of our nurseries in the area and nobody knew that such a beautiful caterpillar turns into such a dull moth. I relocated all of them into the fields close to my house. Now they can leave my flowers alone!!! I’m a very novice gardener and plants EVERYTHING that looks pretty. I did not appreciate these guys ravishing a WHOLE bush in 3 days!!! So far it looks like only the earthworms are welcome in my garden.
Thanks again for the help!
Vriendelike groete / Kind regards
René

Our offices are in Los Angeles, but we are a global website.

Subject: Bug in south florida
Location: South florida
May 27, 2016 4:14 pm
I just need to know what big this is. Every once in a while I see these in my bathroom. I live in south Florida
Signature: Rick

Bathroom Fly

Bathroom Fly

Dear Rick,
The Bathroom Fly or Drain Fly gets its common name because the larvae develop in the sludge that forms in plumbing.  Your submission will go live in June while the editorial staff of What’s That Bug? is away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying stinger bug
Location: Fort Worth, TX
May 29, 2016 8:15 pm
This flying insects just painfully bit my husband. No itching or welt left behind. We are in North Texas in early Summer.
Signature: B.Mann

Stinging Ichneumon

Stinging Ichneumon

Dear B. Mann,
This is a Short Tailed Ichneumon in the genus
Ophion, and we believe these are the insects that folks write about when they claim to have been stung by a Crane Fly.  According to BugGuide:  “Most all Ophion larva are parasites of caterpillars.”  Your submission will not post live to our site until mid-June during our annual absence from the office.

Subject: Unknown group of bugs
Location: Coastal NC
May 28, 2016 4:55 am
We live on the mainland of Holden Beach, NC. I have never seen this bug but all of a sudden this week I have noticed several clusters of bugs on several of my live oak trees. It is May 28th.
Please help me to identify these creatures. Some clusters are smaller than others. Do I need an exterminator and will they destroy my trees? Some of these clusters are like 8×8 inches. This is creeping me out, I’m not a bug lover, just a bird lover, but yet I havent seen any birds eating them. I wish they would.
Thank you!
Signature: Loretta

Tree Cattle

Tree Cattle

Dear Loretta,
These benign Barklice are sometimes called Tree Cattle because of the large aggregations of winged adults and wingless nymphs that they form on trees with lichen growth.  They feed on the lichens, and they do not damage the trees.  Though we are responding to you on the day you submitted your request, we will not be posting your submission until mid-June while our editorial staff is away from the office.

Thank you Daniel!  I did look at your description of Barklice earlier, but just wasn’t sure.  So glad I asked.  Thank you for your quick response.
Have a good weekend.
Loretta

Subject: What is it?
Location: Northern Indiana
May 29, 2016 6:57 pm
My niece found this on her property and we can’t identify it!
Signature: Susan Helwig

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Susan,
Though you did not specify, we are speculating that your friend found this Dragonfly Naiad very near to a pond or other body of water on her property.  This BugGuide image and this BugGuide image both look very similar, though we are unable to provide you with an exact species identification.  We will be postdating your submission to go live to our site in mid-June while we are away from the office.