Subject: pink caterpillar w front spine dorsal chevron
Location: 49°08’58.11″ N 123°10’26.48″ W
August 11, 2015 4:47 pm
My wife found this walking on paving in our back yard in Vancouver, British Columbia. May have arrived on new plants brought from nursery. We have looked at every single caterpillar pic on the web (feels like) but have failed to see anything even close. It doesn’t want to eat or spin a cocoon, but we’re hoping it will pupate so that we can see what emerges. But in case it doesn’t, we’re hoping you can tell us what it is.
30mm long (sorry for not including scale in photo)
Signature: Pierre van Aswegen

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Prominent Moth Caterpillar

Good Morning Pierre,
This is a Prominent Moth Caterpillar in the family Notodontidae, probably in the subfamily Heterocampinae.  We have not had a chance to do a more thorough search for its species identity, but we are posting the image in the meanwhile.  Many caterpillars turn pink just prior to pupation, and the color is not necessarily diagnostic.  See BugGuide for possibly genera in the subfamily.

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Subject: Bee with Huge Mandibles
Location: Courtice, ontario CANADA
August 12, 2015 7:54 am
Hi Again
Found another type of Bee. This one I have no idea but it was so fuzzy like a teddy bear, really cute until it woke up and it has huge mandibles. Kind of scary but so beautiful.
Seems to be alot of different types of Bees living near this Arena (courtice), Courtice , Ontario off of Prestonvale road.
Signature: Terri

Unknown Bee

Leafcutter Bee

Dear Terri,
As usual, your images are stunning.  We are having difficulty identifying your Bee in the limited time we have this morning, so we have put our energy into creating a posting.  We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he can assist in the identification and meanwhile our readership may weigh in with comments.

Unknown Bee

Leafcutter Bee

Knowing us, we decided to give it one more try this morning.  The golden color and very furry front legs are interesting features, and we believe we found a matching image on the News Today blog where a similar image is identified as Megachile melanophaea and the following information is provided:  “HE MAY look soft and furry – but don’t be fooled. ‘Out of all the species of bees that I’ve photographed during this project, this little guy was the only one that actually looked up at me and bared its mandibles,’ says photographer Clay Bolt. … Female leafcutter bees chew small circles from the edge of leaves, and use these to form tubular cells. Into each tube, she deposits a ball of pollen and an egg. The larva will feed on the pollen when it hatches.  And the flamboyant gold leg manes? “Some males in this group have very furry front legs, which are used to cover the eyes of females during mating,” says Bolt. He speculates that this is to stop the females being distracted by other males during copulation.”  BugGuide indicates you live in the range of the Broad Banded Leafcutter Bee.

Unknown Bee

Leafcutter Bee

Eric Eaton Provides Input
Daniel:
Wow, spectacular images!  All I know is that it is a MALE Megachile sp.  I’ll leave it to John Ascher to determine what subgenus or whatever.  Males of some megachilids have those “fluffy” front legs.
Eric

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Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Delaware, USA
August 13, 2015 6:27 am
Would like to identify the bug in the attached photo. It was flying around a butterfly bush.
Signature: Pete

Snowberry Clearwing

Snowberry Clearwing

Dear Pete,
This is one of the diurnal Sphinx Moths in the genus
Hemaris, and we believe it is most likely the Snowberry Clearwing, Hemaris diffinis.    According to BugGuide, it can be differentiated from other members of the genus because:  “legs black; underside mostly black.”  The flower looks like an Agapanthus, erroneously called a Lily of the Nile as they are not lilies and they originate in South Africa.

Daniel,
Thank you for the information. The Snowberry Clearwing is about two inches in length. I’ve never observed a flying bug with those markings. And yes that is an Agapanthus which is next to my butterfly bush which the Snowberry Clearwing frequents as well. I was taking photos of a hummingbird when the SC appeared. I looked for it on your site and could not find it there. Do you have it listed? The photo was taken in Delaware.
Again, thank you for the information. I will try to capture additional photos for my collection of insect photos.

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Subject: Please can you help me to identify this?
Location: South América Ecuador Pichincha near LLoa “town”
August 12, 2015 9:54 pm
Hi thank you so much for reading this. I was wondering if you. can help me with this. I found this by a river in South América it was found in LLoa about 30 minutes from Quito the capital city of Ecuador. It was found on the. higlands at about 3000meters near the rainforest.
Signature: Ecuador identification

Pelecinid

Pelecinid

This is a Pelecinid, a parasitic wasp in the family Pelecinidae, and it is the first example we have ever received from outside North America.  According to BugGuide:  “One North American genus with only one species: Pelecinus polyturator Drury 1773. Worldwide, there is only one extant genus, Pelecinus, with three recognized species (Johnson and Musetti, 1999):
Pelecinus polyturator (North America, Central America, South America)
Pelecinus thoracicus (western Mexico)
Pelecinus dichrous (South America)
The family was much more diverse during the Mesozoic era (Beetles in the Bush).”
We are not certain which of the South American species your individual represents.  Pelecinids prey upon the subterranean larvae of Scarab Beetles, and the female uses her long, flexible abdomen to lay eggs underground in proximity to the Scarab larva.  Beetles in the Bush has a very nice posting on the genus with this information:  “
Pelecinus polyturator is the only North American member of the family Pelecinidae, which itself contains only two additional species that are restricted to Mexico and Central/South America. It wasn’t always this way—fossils assignable to the family and representing 43 species in a dozen genera have been found as far back as the early Cretaceous (121–124 mya) across North America, Europe, and Asia (Grimaldi & Engel 2005). Surely this represents just the tip of the iceberg of Mesozoic and early Cenozoic pelecinid diversity, making today’s three species the last representatives of a once great lineage—’living fossils’ some might say.”

Thank you so much for your answer!
I will definitely make a donation for you guys.
thank you again.

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Subject: What is this?
Location: Central Oklahoma
August 13, 2015 6:06 am
I found this at work. I live in central Oklahoma. It is slightly over 3″ long, moves very quickly, and uses its antenna looking things to help it walk. The pointed thing on its rear appears to retract when it runs.
Signature: F. Black

Giant Water Bug

Giant Water Bug

Dear F. Black,
This is a Giant Water Bug, commonly called a Toe-Biter, and it is an aquatic predator capable of flying from pond to pond.  They are attracted to light, which might explain why you found it at work.  Like other True Bugs, their mouths are adapted to pierce and suck fluids from the bodies of their prey, and they are reported to deliver a painful, but not dangerous bite, if carelessly handled or accidentally encountered while swimming or wading.

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Subject: Larvae on Milkweed leaves
Location: Haldimand County
August 12, 2015 12:05 pm
These little guys.., about a third of an inch long, had eaten several Eastern Milkweed leaves into skeletal tubes.. they seem to live in a colony on the underside of the leaves and are covered in their own webbing.. I want to know if they are predacious on the Monarch Larvae.. The Monarchs are truly struggling here in Haldimand County, Ontario, Canada..
Signature: Bill from Heaven Farm

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar Hatchlings

Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar Hatchlings

Dear Bill,
We believe these are early instar Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars, and you can compare your image with this image from BugGuide.   Milkweed Tussock Caterpillars feed on milkweed, as you observed, and we do not believe they pose any threat to Monarch Caterpillars.

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