Subject: Unidentified bug
Location: Batavia, OH
May 10, 2016 4:49 am
I found this (dead) in the basement garage. I also saw one like this outside recently. It was a little smaller and also dead.
Signature: Dale Vanselow

Crayfish

Crayfish

Dear Dale,
This is a Crayfish, a freshwater crustacean, so you must be very near to a body of water.

Ok!  Thanks Daniel!
There are some ponds in the area but none right by our property.  We do have a couple drainage ditches that run through our property and it has been raining quite a bit recently in our area.
Thanks again!
Dale

We bet they are living in the drainage ditches Dale.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flying bug
Location: Boston, MA
May 9, 2016 10:18 am
Help, see the attached photo. These flying insects seem to have appeared after I just moved 20 yards of straight compost into my back yard. They are there all day swarming around not sure about at night. They appear to be mating. TThey have not gone away and now its been close to 2 weeks. Anyway to remove them or at least limit the amount of them!
Signature: DaveLaf

Mating March Flies

Mating March Flies

Dear DaveLaf,
These are mating March Flies in the family Bibionidae, and probably in the genus
Bibio that is represented on BugGuide.  The male is the one with the larger head.  We do not provide extermination advice.

Subject: Uhler’s or Great Grig
Location: Premiere Ridge, British Columbia
May 9, 2016 7:59 pm
I’m a forester working the Kootenays, British Columbia. We exposed this guy under some loose bark. I did a bit of research and figured it’s a Uhler’s or maybe a Great Grig or a hump winged cricket. Are these all interchangeable names for the same insect?
Signature: J. Rynierse

Great Grig

Great Grig

Dear J. Rynierse,
We believe this is a Great Grig,
Cyphoderris monstrosa, whose name means “MONSTROSA: like a monster; very large and abnormally shaped or hideous (this species is the largest of the 3 in North America)” according to BugGuide,  though we would not rule out one of the other species in the genus identified on BugGuide.  We are not certain where you found the name Uhler’s Grig, but there is one image of a Great Grig on BugGuide that mentions the name Uhler’s Grig.  According to BugGuide, Hump Winged Crickets belong to the family Prophalangopsidae, and there is but one North American genus in the family, so globally, it is fair to say that all Great Grigs are Hump Winged Crickets, but there might be other Hump Winged Crickets elsewhere in the world that are not Grigs.  For your purposes in British Columbia, the two names are synonymous, though one is a family name and the other a species name.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2007/08/14/indian-moon-moths/Subject: Looks like moth
Location: Rock island, il
May 10, 2016 3:37 am
Found this bug. Not sure what it is
Signature: Barb

Luna MOth

Luna Moth

Dear Barb,
Though it has similar looking relatives in other parts of the world like the Indian Moon Moth, no other North American species looks remotely like your Luna Moth.

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Valley
May 8, 2016 5:51 pm
Hello i live in california bakersfield and saw this bug and couldnt find out what it is can you identify it?
Signature: Caleb

Male Western Horse Fly

Male Western Horse Fly

Dear Caleb,
This is a male Western Horse Fly,
Tabanus punctifer, a species with pronounced sexual dimorphism, meaning the males and females can be mistaken for different species.  Here is a matching image from BugGuide.  The males have larger eyes with no spacing between them.  Only female Horse Flies feed on blood.

Subject: Brown striped caterpiller
Location: SW Ohio
May 9, 2016 6:48 am
I live near Dayton, OH, and found this caterpiller on my patio table. I have never seen one like this. Can you help ID it?
Thank you.
Signature: Jennifer

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Dear Jennifer,
This distinctive caterpillar is a Forest Tent Caterpillar,
Malacosoma disstria.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of alder, basswood, birch, cherry, oak, poplar, willow.”