Subject: Velvet ant In Central Spain
Location: Ocaña, Toledo
July 10, 2014 3:15 am
Hi, I found a female velvet ant yesterday just south of Madrid. Later on I saw what looked like a winged male. I am unfamiliar with Mutillidae of Spain and have failed to find any information on the species these may be.
I have sent a photo of each, but the camera I used was somewhat poor. Another photo I found online, that seems to be of an identical animal is here: http://farm8.static.flickr.com/7049/6863722301_1a4c21453a.jpg
I appreciate that it is pretty much impossible to get a definitive species level ID without the actual animal, but any information would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Signature: Bec

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Dear Bec,
Thanks for sending your Velvet Ant image.  We found a very similar looking Velvet Ant on FlickR that is identified as
Sigilla dorsata and then we found an image on Invertebrados Insectarium Virtual to support that identification.  Velvet Ants are flightless female wasps reported to have a very painful sting, and nonstinging male Velvet Ants have wings.  Your winged insect is in the order Hymenoptera, which included Ants, Bees and Wasps, but we cannot confirm that it is a male Velvet Ant.

Unknown Hymenopteran

Unknown Hymenopteran

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: black and orange scorpion looking spider
Location: east coast of Pennsylvania
July 10, 2014 2:56 am
This spider was on my husband. When I went too get him off, the spider actedas if it wants to fight me. Its orange under butt, curled upwards like a scorpion tail does. Also the antennas parted and acted like swords to fight me. What is it? ??
Signature: Michelle Troxell

Wheel Bug Nymph

Wheel Bug Nymph

Dear Michelle,
This is an immature Wheel Bug, and though they are not considered aggressive, they will bite if provoked or carelessly handled, and the bite is reported to be quite painful.

Subject: unknown colorful bug
Location: baltimore maryland
July 9, 2014 9:59 pm
I was working on this barn and I saw it on the side of the barn had to take a picture and could not find out what it was kinda looks like it might b some kind of assassin bug but it has 12 legs so i dont know
Signature: thanks, shane

Molting Assassin Bug

Molting Assassin Bug

Hi Shane,
You are correct that this is an Assassin Bug and the reason it appears to have twelve legs is that you have captured the molting process.  The cast of exoskeleton or exuvia is the darker half and the newly emerged insect is lighter in coloration.  It will soon darken as its new exoskeleton hardens.
  We believe this is an immature Wheel Bug.

Molting Assassin Bug

Molting Assassin Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bees in Compost!!
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
July 9, 2014 8:28 pm
Hello!!! I’m in Calgary, AB, Canada and have had some bees move into the compost in my backyard. It’s now mid July and I noticed them about a week ago, but I have no idea how long they have been there. I’m honestly curious to learn as much about them as I can. They don’t appear aggressive, and I know bees are on the decline. The compost is a large plastic bin which at this time only has grass clippings in it. They are all old, dead grass clippings from last year so are more straw-like in consistency. It has a lid and is closed and dark.
I apologize that the pic is a bit blurry, please let me know if you need a clearer one (That was terrifying, I stayed pretty far away and used a great deal of zoom lol)
Signature: Thank You So Much! Elena

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

Hi Elena,
This is a native Bumble Bee and we have gotten other reports of Bumble Bees nesting in compost piles, birdhouses and other man-made refuges.  Bumble Bees are not aggressive, but they are capable of stinging.  The bees getting all the publicity lately because of Colony Collapse Disorder are domestic Honey Bees.  Honey Bees are domesticated and not native, however, there are wild hives that are formed when new queens create new colonies in chimneys, hollow trees and other protected locations.

Thank you so much for your prompt reply! Let the research commense!

Subject: Large black bug in Mesa, AZ????
Location: Mesa, AZ
July 9, 2014 8:12 am
What a wonderful website!
I have been finding one of these bugs in my pool or in the grass almost every day. Last night one flew into my pool. I think they are around 3″ long. The underside has horizontal stripes and is brownish colored and fat. Is this a cockroach?
Signature: Jane K.

Probably Palo Verde Borer

Probably Palo Verde Borer

Dear Jane,
This is a Longicorn in the subfamily Prioninae, and even though your image lacks the kind of clarity we prefer for a species identification, based on your location and the time of year, we would bet that this is a Palo Verde Borer,
Derobrachus hovorei.  More information on the Palo Verde Borer can be found on BugGuide.

Subject: Brown moth?
Location: Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia
July 8, 2014 9:52 pm
Dear bugman,
I found this little fella almost everyday with broken wing on my floor. It’s a pitiful sight and I’m wondering if there is anything I can do for these moths besides moving them away from the floor? (My house-mates always tried to kill them if I don’t) I didn’t touch their wings though; instead I let them climb on my hands by their own before moving them away from the floor. I lived in a city, but these moths are literally everywhere. The wind is harsh too since the location is very near to the coast and because of the monsoon season and stuffs.
Signature: Concerned bug-lover

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Dear Concerned bug-lover,
Thanks for resending the image.  The first attempt resulted in a corrupted file that we were unable to open.  This is a Tropical Swallowtail Moth,
Lyssa zampa, and we first published an account of a sighting this year in April, and then in May, we made a second report from Singapore a featured posting that we just demoted to a normal posting in our archives after getting 153 Facebook “likes” on the posting.  This year appears to have been and continues to be a year of numerous sightings.  There are significant increases in the population of Tropical Swallowtail Moths every few years.  Because of your concern for the disabled moths you keep finding, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Sadly, once the wings have been mangled, either by a human with a vendetta or a hungry predator, the moths will be unable to fly.

Tropical Swallowtail Moth with broken wing

Tropical Swallowtail Moth with broken wing