Subject: Identifying wasp-like insect
Location: North East England
August 15, 2014 4:39 am
Hello there, I spotted a strange bug in my kitchen earlier today and took some pictures of it before I let it go out into my back garden. I was wondering if you could help me on the front of identifying it, as I’ve not seen anything like it before and I’m intrigued (I’m a biology student, so it has really got me wondering!). I live in the North East of England. Thank you in advance for any help!
Signature: Ryan Simmons

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Ryan,
If you look closely, you will see that this insect has only one pair of wings, indicating that it is a fly and not a wasp.  It is a Crane Fly in the family Tipulidae.  It looks very similar to this
Ctenophora pectinicornis that is posted on this Dutch website.  Some Crane Flies are attracted to lights, which might explain why it was in your kitchen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug to be identified ASAP
Location: pathanamthitta, kerala, india
August 15, 2014 4:43 am
I’m from Kerala, India. What insect is this? Please find it out. It is some sort of grass hopper or cricket?
Signature: daniel

Grasshopper Nymph

Grasshopper Nymph

Dear Daniel,
This is an immature Grasshopper in the suborder Caelifera, and we will attempt to provide you with a species identification, however, often nymphs look very different from adults, and often it is the adults that are documented in images.  We found a very similar looking pair of Grasshoppers identified as Painted Grasshoppers, but with no scientific name, on the Samyak Photography Macro page.
  Another similar looking individual is posted to TrekNature, and again, it is identified as a Painted Grasshopper with no scientific name indicating the genus or species.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with an identity than we have had.

Subject: Belizean coffee caterpillar
Location: Toledo District, Belize
August 14, 2014 7:08 pm
This was climbing on a coffee bush in coastal southern Belize. What is it and what does it turn into? It was only about an inch long.
Signature: Tanya

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Tanya,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae.  Many species in this family will deliver a very painful sting that sometimes also produces an allergic reaction if they are carelessly handled or accidentally brushed against.  We have not been successful in locating a matching image, so the best we can do at this time is to provide the family
.

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for this very speedy response.  We have seen quite a number of different stinging caterpillars here over the years, but never this one.  Not only can one be stung by spiny caterpillars, but also by brushing against the cocoons which also have stinging hairs.  No one has had an allergic reaction (thank goodness), but it’s good to be aware that it can happen.
Sincerely,
Tanya

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Another Southern Bee Killer?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
August 14, 2014 9:55 am
I saw that you had many robber fly inquiries last week. Here is mine. :-)
You kindly identified a Southern Bee Killer for me several years ago. Is this insect the same? It was hiding in plain sight, holding perfectly still on a young crepe myrtle tree, which is a bee magnet due to its many fragrant clusters of blossoms.
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Southern Bee Killer

Southern Bee Killer

Dear Ellen,
Taking a closer look at your previous submission from 2009, we now believe neither is a Southern Bee Killer,
Mallophora orcina, as the individuals pictured on BugGuide all have black-tipped abdomens.  Your individual appears to have a yellow abdomen all the way to the tip, which is why we believe it is a different species in the same genus, Mallophora fautrix.  Compare your images to this individual on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it ranges from:  “Texas west to California, southward through Mexico.”  We would really love to get an expert opinion on this identification.

Subject: Painted Lady Butterfly?
Location: Coryell County
August 14, 2014 9:34 am
This beautiful – and quick!- butterfly visited our pentas as I was watering them this morning. It tended to feed upside-down, perhaps to show its eyespots to the world. Is it a Painted Lady? If so, it’s the first I’ve photographed in our yard. It has such beautiful colors! I darkened the exposure a bit.
Warm, sunny morning today.
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Dear Ellen,
We agree that this is a Painted Lady,
Vanessa cardui.  There are several other butterflies in the genus that look quite similar, and this excellent comparison from BugGuide illustrates the difference between the Painted Lady and the American Lady.  We are thrilled that you were able to capture views of both the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the wings.

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

 

Subject: Moss mimic Katydid
Location: Atta Canopy Walkway, Potaro-Siparuni, Guyana
August 13, 2014 2:23 pm
Hi!
I found this chap at Atta Canopy Walkway in Guyana, it was right outside my cabin hiding in the bushes at head height, during the day.
There are very few pics online to attempt an ID (I was searching Acanthodis and Haemodiasma) so I was hoping your experts could help!?
Thanks in advance!
Signature: Charlotte

Katydid

Katydid

Hi Charlotte,
We are attempting to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can assist in your identification request of this magnificent Katydid.

Katydid

Katydid

Fantastic, many thanks in advance! :)