Subject: Our black/orange friend from São Paulo, Brazil
Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil
April 9, 2016 4:14 pm
Hello,
We really would like to identify our little friend from the image.
Photo taken in São Paulo, Brazil.
Signature: David Lynch

Shield Bug:  Pachycoris torridus

Shield Bug: Pachycoris torridus

Dear David,
We quickly located a Shield Bug on Insetologia that greatly resembles your individual, but it is green instead of black.  We tried researching that name, and we found this image on FlickR that looks like a very good match.  Images on Biodiversidade Teresopolis indicate this is a highly variable species.  This image on FlickR documents the maternal behavior of some species in the family.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sawfly or ant drone?
Location: Brazos County, Texas, USA
March 27, 2016 4:37 pm
Hello! I had asked Texas A&M as well but I’ll ask here as well. We did a catch-and-release of what looked like a sawfly last night (well, failed release because the door was still open and it flew back into the light, so we’re still checking the house for a body).
My stepfather is still moving his own photos and videos off his cameras, but the jaws seem to match a sawfly, the eyes seemed proportionately large, and the thorax was prominently hunched. I compared to other photos I saw of sawflies, but the abdomen was longer. It was maybe an inch and a half long.
A&M agreed that it looked like a sawfly, so we narrowed down our own image searches for an exact match; but when we did happen to find an exact match, the page did not say “sawfly,” it said “red driver ant.” We looked that insect up, and it did indeed match the dorylus drone perfectly… except, that’s an African army ant… so now I’m really hoping we didn’t just catch and release evidence of an invasive species.
Any input you have will be greatly appreciated, and if you respond, I’ll try to send you the macros from my stepfather as soon as possible.
Signature: M. Sidney Beal

Legionary Ant

Legionary Ant

Dear M. Sidney Beal,
Please forgive us the long delay.  Our tiny staff cannot answer all the mail we receive and we are currently going through older identification requests for interesting postings, and your posting has us quite excited.  We are also struck by the resemblance to the Middle Eastern Sausage Fly, a male Driver Ant in the genus
Dorylus.  Searching that lead, we believe this is a male Legionary Ant in the genus Neivamyrmex, based on this and other images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, Legionary Ants and other Army Ants in the Tribe Ecitonini have “huge, wingless queens and wasplike males unlike those of any other ants.”  We would not discount that it is another member of the family, but the Legionary Ants seem to be the most common.

This is actually great timing! My suspicions were right that it died inside the house, and my stepfather just today found the body. Minus one antenna, it seems to be otherwise intact, and we now have it in a jar for safekeeping. When we have new photos taken, I’ll forward any my family sends me.
After I last responded to A&M, their ant expert also seemed to agree that it’s most likey a neivamyrmex. Thank you for responding.

Subject: Help!
Location: Central Texas
March 26, 2016 4:48 pm
Can you please help us identify this bug?
Signature: Abby

Possibly Scorpionfly

Possibly Scorpionfly

Dear Abby,
We believe this is a Scorpionfly in the order Mecoptera, but we cannot find any images of individuals with black wings and an orange body on BugGuide other than
Panorpa lugubris, which is definitely not your species.  We are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton.  If possible, can you send additional images showing the insect from a lateral view that would show details of the head and mouthparts?  Thanks.

Eric Eaton poses another possibility
Daniel:
I am thinking this is a caddisfly of some kind.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Creepy thing I found in my bAthroom
Location: Manitoba Canada
March 27, 2016 3:13 am
Found this bug in my seasonal home. Year or 2 back I found one filled with eggs, I thought I ended my battle with these creepy things. But they’re now back. My 3yo freaked out cause she found one in her potty. Now she won’t use a toilet unless it’s pristine cause “there’s spiders in it.”
Help.!
Signature: Elegantly

Pseudoscorpion

Pseudoscorpion

This is a harmless Pseudoscorpion.

K, but where are they coming from ? What do they survive on?

They come from a previous generation of Pseudoscorpions.  According to BugLife:  “Using a gland in their jaws pseudoscorpions can make disc shaped cocoons which can be used for mating, moulting or to provide shelter in cold weather. The males of some pseudoscorpion species use an elaborate mating dance by tapping their legs and abdomens to ensure that the eggs of the female become fertilised. The female will make a nest from silk and debris and will lay between 2 and 50 eggs into a brood pouch under her abdomen. Pseudoscorpions moult several times before they reach adulthood and once they reach this stage can live up to three years.”  They are predators that feed upon small insects and other Arachnids and they are considered beneficial.  More information can be found in our archives and on BugGuide.

Subject: Wasp identity
Location: Napier, New Zealand
March 26, 2016 7:31 pm
Hello ‘What’s That Bug’!
I was in Napier town centre the other day and saw this beautiful wasp on a car roof. Can you enlighten me as to what type of wasp this is please?
Many thanks,
Signature: Chris Atkinson

Parasitic Hymenopteran

Parasitic Ichneumon

Dear Chris,
This is a Parasitic Hymenopteran, and our initial guess would be that it is an Ichneumon Wasp, however we cannot find a matching image on the Land Care Research site.  Those orange antennae are quite distinctive, and we hope one of our readers will be able to assist with the identification.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for getting back to me with that! I enjoyed checking out the website too:-)
Regards,
Chris

Karl Provides the Identity:
Hi Daniel and Chris:
Your Ichneumonid wasp is probably Eutanyacra licitatoria (Ichneumonidae). The genus is represented on the Land Care Research site, along with information, but the sample image looks like a different species. In any event, it is difficult t recognize because the images are all of desiccated pinned specimens. You can also check out the Naturewatch NZ and BoldSystems sites. Regards.  Karl

Gee thanks Karl.  At first we didn’t register that the southern in Southern Alps signified the southern hemisphere rather than southern Europe, but we realized that the site is devoted to New Zealand once we researched that Otago is a southeastern region on New Zealand’s South Island.  Images of living insects are so much nicer than images of specimens.

Subject: What is this
Location: Arizona
March 29, 2016 12:34 pm
Just curious to know what this is. I found it on one of my tomato plants.
Signature: Andrew Chace

Aphids

Aphids

Dear Andrew,
You have Aphids on your tomato plants.