Subject: Is it a walking stick?
Location: Montgomery, TX
September 26, 2014 7:03 am
Found this little one on the back of a big one. Trying to determine:
1, Is it a walking stick?
2. Are they mating? or
3. Is it a mama taking a baby out?
Thanks for any information . . I also found this HUGE crazy bright red fuzzy ant, I’ll send photos later.
Kelli Lowery

Mating Muskmares

Mating Muskmares

Hi Kelli,
Commonly called Muskmares, these are indeed mating Walkingsticks.  There is a pronounced difference between the size of the female versus that of her diminutive mate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this Critter?
Location: Freeport, ME (Southern Maine)
September 26, 2014 5:54 am
Hello Bugman, I spied this critter the other day – it was trying to dig a hole in the compacted dirt road. It was about 4 inches long and about the width of my little finger. I’m in Freeport, ME…southern Maine on the coast. The dirt road leads to a campground..there is also a farm — cattle, goats, chickens, turkeys….
I wish I had turned it over with a stick to see what the legs were like.
Thanks so much for your time!
Signature: Annie

Gallium Sphinx

Gallium Sphinx

Dear Annie,
We just finished posting another image from Idaho of a Gallium Sphinx Caterpillar or Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles gallii, and you may read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  According to the Butterflies and Moths of North America, its range is “Newfoundland south through Maine to Pennsylvania; west to Alaska, Yukon Territory, and California. Also found in Eurasia.”

Subject: First time I have ever seen this
Location: Ashton, ID.
September 25, 2014 11:39 am
Hi, Stepped outside and almost stepped on this caterpillar? Since I have never seen this type before, just wondering what it could be. It is 3″ to 3.5″ long. It is Fall here with record high temps. Tomorrow we are headed downhill as far as temperatures and rain go. We are at about 5400 feet above sea level, just outside of Yellowstone.
Signature: Maggie

Gallium Sphinx Caterpillar

Gallium Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Maggie,
This striking caterpillar is a Gallium Sphinx Caterpillar or Bedstraw Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Hyles gallii, and you may read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hong Kong Beauty bug
Location: Stanley, Hong Kong
September 25, 2014 3:58 pm
Hi
Recently moved to HK, and found this in my Hibiscus yesterday, 24 Sept. It is the tail end of summer, about 33C. About 1 inch long. We are quite close to the beach, although this bug appeared on a plant that I recently purchased and moved here from Kowloon. I have had the plant about 3 weeks.
Would love to know what it is, and if I should remove it to another plant to spare my garden. (There is a nearby undeveloped, jungley lot for the bug to emigrate to.)
Thanks
Signature: Margaret

Cotton Stainer

Cotton Stainer

Dear Margaret,
This is a Cotton Stainer or Red Bug in the family Pyrrhocoridae and we located a matching image on FlickR that is identified as 
Dysdercus cingulatus.  We then found a reference where it is called a Hong Kong Stink Bug and the information:  “Found mating and feeding on Ipomea on September 11, 2002 at Braemar Hill, North Point, and on Hibiscus.on August 10, 2003 at Pak Tam Chung, Sai Kung, Hong Kong SAR.”  The latter link is not very accurate as the family is listed incorrectly.  It is also pictured on iNaturalist.

Cotton Stainer

Cotton Stainer

Subject: Tortoise Bug?
Location: Western Australia
September 24, 2014 12:03 pm
Hi There, We’re on the South Coast of Western Australia and found this little fella in our kitchen- it’d obviously flown in.
At first we thought it was a Ladybug/Ladybird but after some research now think it’s some kind of Tortoise Bug but don’t know for sure.
After taking a couple pics we let him go outside. :)
Signature: Jo

Tortoise Beetle

Leaf Beetle

Dear Jo,
We agree with you that this is some species of Tortoise Beetle, but we had no luck attempting to identify it to the species level.  We could not find any matching images on the Insects of Brisbane website.
  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck.

Update:  Cesar Crash provided a comment with this FlickR link of a Leaf Beetle in the genus Paropsisterna that looks like it is correct.

Tortoise Beetle

Leaf Beetle

 

Subject: Not a clue what it is.

Location: Natural Bridge, VA
September 24, 2014 4:06 pm
Our family found this “caterpillar” walking across a trail near the Natural Bridge in Virginia. We don’t know what it is. It’s about 5 1/2 half inches long and as big around as a grown man’s thumb.
Signature: VS

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Dear VS,
The Hickory Horned Devil is the largest North American Caterpillar.