Subject: Is this a fan horn?
Location: Kununurra Wa
February 14, 2015 2:30 pm
So we found this fella in the washing up pile. We live in the kimberley region of WA and no one we knew had seen this before, can you please tell us some more!
Signature: Ben

Featherhorned Longicorn

Featherhorned Longicorn

Dear Ben,
We are relatively certain your beetle is a Featherhorned Longicorn,
Piesarthrius marginellus, which is relatively well represented on our site compared with the rest of the internet.  Your Western Australia sighting is beyond the sighting range reported on The Atlas of Living Australia.

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Subject: species of the bug
Location: West Malaysia
February 13, 2015 12:26 pm
Hello, I would be very thankful if anyone could tell me what is this bug, I found this red bug with a small red head and colorful yellow and black dots on the back next to my door (West Malaysia).
Signature: thank you

Red Bug

Red Bug

It is appropriate to refer to this insect as a Red Bug because it is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera and because it is red, and we believe it is also a member of the family Pyrrhocoridae, commonly called the Red Bugs.  This matching image on FlickR is in agreement with our supposition.  At this time, we cannot provide a more specific identification.

Red Bug

Red Bug

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Subject: Unusual nest?
Location: Childers, Queensland Australia
February 14, 2015 4:46 am
Hello Bugman,
I was hoping that you would be able to tell me what insect this ‘nest’ might be from. I found it attached to my Queensland Lace Tree and I am intrigued by the intricacy and the absolute neatness of the weave, to me it is a masterpiece of engineering, it looks and feels like a ‘loofah’.
Any help would be very much appreciated
Signature: Cheers, Dianima

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Hi Dianima,
We are quite certain this is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Mantis.

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

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Subject: Beetle ID
Location: Childers, Queenslad, Australia
February 14, 2015 4:59 am
Hi Bugman
My husband found this bug, unfortunately drowned in our rain gauge after a heavy downpour, I wondered if you could tell us what it s called, I absolutely loved the vivid green markings on its back.
Signature: Cheers, Dianima

Fiddler Beetle

Fiddler Beetle

Dear Dianima,
This beautiful Scarab Beetle,
Eupoecila australasiae, is called a Fiddler Beetle because of the patterns on its dorsal surface.  We often receive several images of Fiddler Beetles from Australia each year.  Though you didn’t ask, you other images appear to be of the ootheca of a Mantis.

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Subject: Query of insect
Location: South West Rocks NSW
February 13, 2015 8:16 pm
Found this visitor in the garden at South West Rocks NSW and cant identify it. Can you help
Signature: Phil Young

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Dear Phil,
This is a beneficial predatory Assassin Bug in the family Reduviidae, but we cannot find an exact visual match on the Brisbane Insect website.  Assassin Bugs should be handled with caution as they can deliver a painful bite. We found a close match on FlickR that is identified as the Common Assassin Bug,
Pristhesancus plagipennis.  The Common Assassin Bug is well represented on the Brisbane Insect Website, but the coloration looks different, so there may be regional variations, of something may be misidentified.

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Thanks so much for the help with this. Not what I’d thought of. An always careful with insects and let them come and go. Glad to know it’s a beneficial predator. Again thank you. Phil

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Subject: Sphingidae, Hawkmoth, possibly Hemaris? caterpillar
Location: Nagoya, Japan
February 12, 2015 6:22 am
Here is a hornworm, found in November in Nagoya, Japan, which I have been trying in vain to identify for a few months. I thought it might be a Hummingbird Clearwing Hawk-Moth, but it has slightly different coloration. It was found on a night time walk near a thickly wooded and planted city park. It was across the street from any foliage and walking down the sidewalk toward a noodle restaurant. Assuming it was looking (in the wrong direction) for a place to pupate, I picked it up and carried it back into the park. It tried to ‘burrow’ between my fingers until I gave it a leaf.
I apologize for the night flash photos, but I didn’t have anything to carry it home in, and I wanted it to have a chance to pupate if possible. I placed it under a bush and when it lay passively, I gave it a poke with a leaf. It immediately displayed a defensive flail that gave us both a heart attack! I have been searching through Sphingidae of Japan, but there is very little information and I have only found one other photo that matches the pale green sides with darker green stripes, tiny red lateral spots and blue ‘horn’. Any hints would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: James

Hornworm

Hornworm

Dear James,
We have posted your Hornworm image, and we hope to be able to provide you with an identification very soon.

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