Subject: Bug Love – Flies from Italy
Location: Italy (Lazio)
October 6, 2014 3:59 am
Hey Bugman,
These two flies were flying around one on top of the other, and they eventually landed on a plant.
I am not particularly curious of the species. I just wanted to send you this for the Bug Love section.
Ciao, Saverio
Signature: Saverio

Mating Tachinid Flies

Mating Tachinid Flies

Dear Saverio,
Our hunch was that these were mating Tachinid Flies, and upon doing some research, we found we are correct.  We initially identified them as
Ectophasia crassipennis on the Insects of France website where we learned:  “This fly lives in southern Europe and in the warm parts of Central Europe. Not in the Netherlands like some other members of the subfamily. … Males and females are different. The brownish yellow abdomen of the male has a wide black stripe.  The female lays the eggs directly into the host  the shield bug (Pentatomidae)  Length 5 – 9 mm. May – September.”  We verified the identification on another French site.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Larva
Location: Yesiluzumlu, Turkey
October 6, 2014 1:27 am
We found this larva in the road outside our villa in the foothills of the mountains near Fethiye in Turkey.
It was greatly extended from how the photos show it and extremely sensitive, seemingly to light and vibration, and whipped about surprisingly quickly when disturbed.
Signature: P Tucker

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear P Tucker,
We are surmising that there is oleander planted near the sighting as this is an Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar.

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Subject: Found this in my Aquaponics System
Location: Patterson, CA
October 4, 2014 1:47 pm
I cannot positively identify this bug. I have found things similar to it online, but nothing quite like this…
I have an aquaponics system and the are thriving in my duckweed grow bed. When I drained the bed today these things came out like spiders from the rocks at the bottom of the growbed. When I put in the duckweed there were small things swimming in the water, I actually assumed they were frershwater shrimp, but now I m guessing they have grown and this is what I have. What is this? should I get rid of it? Should I keep it? Can I eat it?
Signature: Nick

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Nick,
This is the naiad or aquatic nymph of a Dragonfly, and it is considered a beneficial insect that will eat mosquitoes and other small creatures in your aquaponics system.  We imagine you can eat it if you wanted to try, though we don’t believe we have seen any references regarding Dragonfly naiads being relished by entomophages.

Aquaponics System

Aquaponics System

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Borer Beetle??
Location: central New Hampshire
October 5, 2014 11:40 am
These beetles come into our house as the weather starts to get colder here in New England. Not sure how they get in. They are approx. 1-2 inches in length. I catch and release them back outside. My wife worries they are harmful to some of the native trees. What is this and is it a destructive critter?
Signature: bugged in NH

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear bugged in NH,
Your description of this Western Conifer Seed Bug is accurate.  When the weather begins to cool, Western Conifer Seed Bugs often enter homes to hibernate, and though they can be a nuisance, they will not damage the home, its furnishings or its inhabitants.  The Western Conifer Seed Bug is native to the Pacific Northwest, but in the 1960s, due to a variety of factors that might include climate change and human travel patterns, the Western Conifer Seed Bug increased its range to include all of North America except the southeast.  The Western Conifer Seed Bug feeds upon “sap from green cones, twigs, seed pulp, and sometimes needles of Pinaceae (pines, hemlock, spruce, Douglas-fir)” according to BugGuide, but they do not harm the trees themselves.

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Subject: Halyomorpha halys in Oregon
Location: Mulino, Oregon
October 5, 2014 9:40 am
Hi – this bug is a nightmare unfolding. It goes by the common names of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, BMSB, or Asian Stink Bug; it’s Latin name is Halyomorpha halys.
In the last three or four days, I’ve vacuumed hundreds off the outside of house and garage, windows – they’re everywhere – horrid lingering bug stink – aptly named – and they ruin an incredibly diverse variety of plants, fruits, nuts – and joy! Oregon weather allows TWO breeding cycles a year – these little beasts cannot be allowed to ruin everything !
Here is a link to an invaluable report that I hope the Oregon State University extension folks won’t mind my sharing with you, as word of this disaster needs to spread, and spread fast so everyone can do what they can to eliminate as many of these bugs as possible, by any means at their disposal.
http://oregonstate.edu/dept/hermiston/sites/default/files/7_nwiman.pdf
Signature: Cheryl Anne, The Hamlet Nursery, or maybe not…

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Sheryl Anne,
Thanks for all the information and the link on the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug infestation in the Pacific Northwest.

Subject: Michigan Funnel Web Spider
Location: Millington Michigan
October 4, 2014 1:54 pm
Will you please help me identify this spider for my sister? She was pulling tall-ish (around 2′ tall) weeds when this spider jumped at her. She told me that a thick, funnel web was located close to where the spider came from. I would like to be able to give her more information than “It’s a funnel-web spider sis.” . Especially since spiders have the ability to scare the bejeebers out of her! No one should have to go through life without their bejeebers. Thanks for your help.
Signature: SuziQ

Possibly Funnel Web Wolf Spider

Possibly Carolina Wolf Spider

Dear SusiQ,
With all due respect, we find it somewhat odd that your sister had the bejeebers scared out of her, but the spider appears to have died because of the encounter.  We actually think this looks more like a Wolf Spider than a Funnel Web Spider, and in trying to research its identity on BugGuide, we are struck with the similarity of its appearance to members of the genus
Sosippus, the Funnel Web Wolf Spiders.  BugGuide only has reports of the genus Sosippus from Florida and California, so we don’t really believe this spider is a Funnel Web Wolf Spider.  Our money is on this being a Carolina Wolf Spider, Hogna carolinensis, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Orange paturons (chelicera) and black around the the “knees” ventrally are characteristics of the species.(Jeff Hollenbeck)” and your individual does appear to have the orange chelicerae or fangs.  BugGuide also notes:  “Considered to be the largest wolf spider in North America.”  Large Wolf Spiders may bite, but they are considered harmless.  Somehow, no matter what we have to say about the harmless and beneficial attributes of spiders, we would not be able to convince your sister to attempt peaceful cohabitation.  If our suspicions about how this individual met its fate are correct, our Unnecessary Carnage tag is duly warranted.  If we are wrong and this spider met with a natural death, let us know and we will remove the tag.  

Possibly Funnel Web Wolf Spider

Carolina Wolf Spider we believe

This was definitely an “Unnecessary Carnage” incident.  My sister has been excessively frightened by spiders her whole life.  Thank-you for the I.D.  I have let her know what the result was and that she should not kill them in the future.  Hopefully she will just run away if she encounters any other creepy crawlies.

 

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