Subject: 1,000 species challenge
Location: Brighouse, West Yorkshire, England
January 12, 2015 6:57 am
Hello bug man. I have set myself a challenge to get a good photograph of 1,000 species of animal life before I die. Occasionally, as would be expected, I come across a few I cannot identify. I have just identified an elongate bodied springtail from photos on your website, but there are still 2 photographs from the same date I have not yet identified. I was wondering if you could help me identify them. The first (evil brown looking thing) was discovered under a rock with 2 woodlice, the elongate bodied springtail and a garden slug. The second (little yellow bug) was discovered under a damp piece of wood less than 50 meters away. There were several individuals, all very very small. I understand that I may not get a response, but I thank you all the same. God bless,
– Jay
Signature: I’ve no idea what this field means

Elongate Bodied Springtail

Elongate Bodied Springtail

Dear Jay,
First we hope you are planning a long life that would extend beyond the 1000 species goal as that is not a terribly large number of species.  We believe both of your images are of Springtails, even the “evil brown looking thing” which somewhat resembles the large Springtail in the image on the Royal Horticultural Society site.  The yellow critter looks like a Globular Springtail which is pictured on the Matt Cole Photography site.

Globular Springtail

Globular Springtail

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your help. Having looked at images of your suggestions, I believe you are most likely right :) Thank you very much. Yes, I know there are far more than 1,000 species out there, and I’d shoot them all if I could :P With your identifications, I have now reached 201 species. Thank you so much for taking the time to identify the bugs.
God bless,
– Jay Zeke Malakai

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: luna moth release
January 12, 2015 1:05 pm
Hello Mr. Daniel Marlos,
My sister, Louise  has been releasing Luna moths into the wild as part of an annual event called “A Midsummer Night’s Garden” at her greenhouse Auburn Pointe, in Chagrin Falls, Ohio.   After only 3-4 years her neighbors started reporting Luna moth sightings on their screen windows.  My dad even spotted one at his house which is 20+ miles away.
The event is 2 weekends, check website, usually the last weekend in July/first weekend in August.  auburnpointegreenhouse.com.  Please join us for this spectacular event!
My sister, single-handedly is successfully reintroducing Luna moths into the wild with great success.  You could try this in your own backyard!
Signature: Anne Reiling

Mating Luna Moths (from our archives)

Mating Luna Moths (from our archives)

Dear Anne,
Thanks so much for relaying information about this wonderful program.  We are sure our readers will be very interested.  We removed your telephone number from the message you sent as a courtesy.  Please let us know if you want to be contacted by phone and we will include the telephone number.

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Subject: mantis
Location: Argentina
January 16, 2015 1:11 pm
Hello bugman,
We love your site. Wonderful fauna we have in the world and great you let us share in the variety. Now we know a lot better what we see in the house and around it.
We found this beauty in our garden the day before yesterday. We have never seen a mantis like this one before! Have you ever? What is the name of it?
Thank you for your answer.
Signature: Audrey

Mantis

Mantis

Hi Audrey,
Thanks so much for the compliment.  We are posting your submission and we hope to be able to determine the species of your Mantis in the near future.

Mantis

Mantis

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bed bug
Location: My arm
January 19, 2015 9:22 am
Please help me,I don’t know if this is a bed bug,it was on my arm I was sitting on my couch ..thanks so much
Signature: Bug man

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

You are correct.  This is a Bed Bug.

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Subject: Unknown winged insect
Location: SE Baton Rouge, Louisiana
January 19, 2015 7:50 am
I was refilling my bird feeders when this insect dropped off the remains of a seed block onto my trash container. The critter measured about .75 inch from front feet to tail.
From the looks of those antennae my guess is that he navigates by scent or vibration rather than vision.
Any idea what it is?
Signature: Russ Norwood

Male Midge

Male Midge

Dear Russ,
This is a male (yes those antennae enable him to locate a female) member of the order Diptera that includes Flies and related insects with two wings.  We suspect this is a male Midge or male Gnat and it looks quite similar to this image of
 Apsectrotanypus johnsoni that we located on BugGuide, however, BugGuide indicates a size of 4mm, which is considerably smaller than the 3/4 inch you have indicated.  We will try to determine the species identity of your large male Midge.  Of the Lake Midge from further North, BugGuide indicates:  “Wing length typically 5.9 mm, occasionally as long as 7.5 mm. Male body length typically 10, occasionally as long as 13 mm. This is the largest member of the family.”

Thanks for the rapid reply as well as for your very interesting response.  My estimate of size was rough, so is probably best taken with a grain of salt.  I included everything from the tip of the (abdomen?) to the tips of the two extended front legs.
Thanks to your kind response I looked up the species elsewhere.  This reference on wikipedia mentions that some may feed on sugars.  For what it’s worth, the seeds in the block remnant on which I found him were glued together with sugars.
I’ve made a donation Daniel.  Thanks again.
Russ Norwood

Thanks for your kind donation Russ.  We are still awaiting a response from Eric Eaton to see if he recognizes you Midge.

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:

It is indeed a male midge, family Chironomidae, and some can get pretty large.  There is somebody that has written a book about midges of the southeast, … John Epler.  Here’s his web page link:
http://home.comcast.net/~johnepler3/index.html
Eric

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Subject: Mystery Eggs – Australia
Location: Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia
January 17, 2015 11:50 pm
Hi Guys,
Found this under the awning on my back patio. Found another pic of this on this site from 2006 which hasn’t yet been identified (now 2015). Location – Coffs Harbour NSW.
Looks very similar to lacewing but in this odd configuration.
A fine hair/filament radiates outwards from each “node” and support the structure roughly 10mm from the surface. Another set of hairs support each “node” vertically, from surface to egg. Each filament looks as if it has “droplets” attached along the length, in the same way a spider leaves sticky drops along their sticky strands.
Please note, the eggs are solid white, with the filaments being transparent. All dark areas in the pictures should be considered shadows cast by the cameras flash.
Signature: Grey

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Dear Grey,
Interestingly, the person who submitted those Neuropteran Eggs in 2006 was named Grev.  Your submission has led us to an identification of Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs,
Nymphes myrmeleonides, thanks to Project Noah. There are also images on the University of Sydney Entomology page and the Brisbane Insect website.  The larvae of Lacewings are predators with ravenous appetites, and this type of egg configuration helps to ensure that the hatchlings do not devour one another as they must first climb away from the other eggs. 

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

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