Subject: White Admiral
Location: Perinton, NY
August 15, 2016 6:38 pm
Here are some pics of a beautiful White Admiral that was on the right-of-way behind our home. This has been an amazing summer for finding a variety of different butterflies, all on the right-of-way, which is allowed to grow wild each year (in late Fall, the power company that owns it cuts everything down, but allows it to grow untouched in the Spring and Summer!). My son took the pic of the butterfly on my phone, it decided to land there as I was attempting a close-up shot of it! Enjoy!
Signature: Jennifer

White Admiral

White Admiral

Wow Jennifer,
This really is a gorgeous White Admiral.  Where we grew up in Ohio, we only saw the southern subspecies, the Red Spotted Purple.

White Admiral and Bumble Bee

White Admiral and Bumble Bee

Hi again Jennifer,
Once we posted your images, we realized that there was much more red on your White Admiral than on the individual from Ontario that we linked to, and that your individual actually looked more like the Western White Admiral, the subspecies
Limenitis arthemis rubrofasciata that is described on BugGuide.  There is a fourth, but somewhat unclear division for the species.  Here is the explanation on BugGuide for this color variation:  “There has been resistance to calling these subspecies rubrofasciata, yet they look very much the same. They replace typical subspecies arthemis at high elevation in the northeast U.S. and northward in eastern Canada, and form an eastern end to a continuum of similar looking insects that occurs right across Canada, barely lapping into the U.S. An interpretation that is becoming more and more widely accepted is that these northern insects (east or west) represent the main population of “White Admirals”. What we call typical subpsecies arthemis actually represents the intermediates or a cline (= transition) between White Admirals and Red-spotted Purples. They have the white band, but they also have increased bluish/purplish reflective area above, and less orange/red on the hind wing both above and below.
Because of all the confusion and discussion that has occurred to date, the northern types from the east are separated (probably temporarily) here to make the comparisons easier to make. They will perhaps eventually be officially called subspecies rubrofasciata, but alternately may receive their own subspecies name. It is impossible to draw a line between east and west (here, rather arbitrarily it is Ontario and Minnesota east, and Manitoba and North Dakota West). The line to the south is somewhat arbitrary too, since the northern and more southern “types” blend into one another, but generally northern insects with prominent submarginal reddish coloring on the upper hind wing and more extensive orange below are included here. This also emphasizes the point that the transition from White Admiral and Red-spotted Purple involves more features than just the presence or absence of a white band. It starts well into the populations that have white bands, and extends southward well into populations that mostly lack white bands entirely.”

White Admiral

White Admiral

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: OK Long Horned Beetle
Location: Owasso, Tulsa County, Oklahoma
August 15, 2016 7:56 pm
Dear Bugman,
Hoping you can help with identification of this longicorn. I looked through all the sub-families and tribes under “Cerambycidae” on Bug Guide and did not find this one… rather frustrating, but a good use of time, nonetheless.
Many thanks,
Signature: Critterphile

Banded Hickory Borer

Banded Hickory Borer

Dear Critterphile,
We were expecting this to take quite a chunk of time, but we got lucky quickly.  We have correctly identified your Longicorn as a Banded Hickory Borer,
Knulliana cincta, thanks to this and other Bugguide images.  This BugGuide posting highlights many of the distinctive features:  “spines on thorax, apex (tip) of elytra, and legs (femora). These are mentioned as distinguishing features in field guides.”  BugGuide also notes:  “There are no other NE longhorns of similar size and coloration that have strong spines on the femora, pronotum, and elytral apices.” 

Subject: Black or Spicebush Swallowtail?
Location: Perinton, NY
August 15, 2016 6:31 pm
Hi! This beauty was enjoying the thistles on the right-of-way behind our home. I apologize, I could only get closed wing shots, as it wouldn’t sit still for long! From what I can tell from Google, it looks like a Spicebush, but after viewing your website, I could be wrong. Thanks for any help you can give me! (Both photos are if the same individual )
Signature: Jennifer

Spicebush Swallowtail

Spicebush Swallowtail

Dear Jennifer,
This is a Spicebush Swallowtail,
Papilio troilus, which is described on BugGuide as:  “Adult: Upper surface of forewing is mostly black with ivory spots along margin. Upper surface of hindwing has orange spot on costal margin and sheen of bluish (female) or bluish-green (male) scales. Underside of hindwing with pale green marginal spots.(1) Median spotband on underside of hindwing missing one orange spot.”  The missing orange spot is visible in your image.  If you notice the inner band of spots, where the third from the bottom should exist, there is instead a dusting of blue-green scales that matches the pattern on this BugGuide image of a Spicebush Swallowtail, as opposed to this BugGuide image of a Black Swallowtail.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: leaf looking with no legs
Location: Auburn, NY
August 15, 2016 6:07 pm
I live in Auburn, NY and this was on the table underneath a black walnut tree. We thought it was a shriveled leaf, but it was soft and moved.. Looking closer, it has a soft whitish underbelly and no visible legs, just star like legs of the leaf looking back.. But they don’t move. Very slow moving, What is it?
Signature: Pat P

Monkey Slug

Monkey Slug

Dear Pat P,
The Monkey Slug is the caterpillar of the Hag Moth.  Handle the Monkey Slug with caution.  It is a stinging caterpillar.

Thanks so much. We were all surprised by it and did not touch. Are they a nuisance moth  should they not be killed ?
Thanks again.
Have a truly wonderful day!
Pat

This is a native species, not a pest species.  We do not support killing either the Monkey Slug caterpillar of adult Hag Moth.

Thanks again. I was careful to let it go in the brush. I don’t kill critters unless they are a danger. Good to know they aren’t harmful. It was very interesting to watch.
Have a truly wonderful day!
Pat

Subject: Maybe an Appalacian Brown butterfly?
Location: Troy, VA
August 15, 2016 9:36 am
This somewhat the worse for wear butterfly was on the house bricks last night. He only stayed for a short while and then flew off. I realize lacking a chunk of wing makes it more difficult to identify, but his other wing was in even worse shape. Fortunately for the butterfly, the missing wing pieces didn’t impair its ability to fly. I think perhaps it’s an Appalacian brown?
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Appalacian Brown

Appalacian Brown

Dear Grace,
We had our doubts, but we now concur that this is an Appalacian Brown,
Lethe appalachia, after reading this BugGuide description:  “Adult: wings medium brown. Lower side of forewing with the two end eyespots larger than the middle two; spots may not touch. Dark line inside the hindwing row spot is sinuous or gently curving (not zigzagged, as it is in the Eyed Brown).”  Once we compared BugGuide images of the two species, we agree that the line on the hindwing is sinuous, not zigzagged.

Subject: Confused About This Moth
Location: Northeast Ohio
August 15, 2016 3:56 pm
Hi! My son found this large moth in our yard, and all of our research indicates that it is Orange Underwing Moth, but that same research places this species in the UK, and we’re in Northeast, Ohio.
Can you help us ID it? Thank you!
Signature: Colleen

Underwing

Underwing

Hi Colleen,
Your Underwing is in the genus
Catocala, a large genus with many similar looking species.  We believe it might be a Sweetheart Underwing, Catocala amatrix, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of several species of poplar (Populus spp.) and Black Willow (Salix nigra).”