Subject: What kind of beetle is this?
Location:  Marmaris, Turkey
September 20, 2014 3:59 pm
Hi, I am on holiday in Marmaris, Turkey and woke up to find quite a large beetle on my balcony. I took many photos and was just curious to learn what type it was. I have scoured the web and can’t seem to find it anywhere. Any help?
Signature: Joshua

There is no image attached.

Yeah because your website has no email or any way of attaching photos I shall send them to you now. I was just waiting for your reply so I could do so. Thanks!  I was particularly interested to find out what if those were eggs it was carrying?

Red Palm Weevil

Red Palm Weevil

Dear Joshua,
You can send identification request with images by using our Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.  This is a Red Palm Weevil,
Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, a species that is doing significant damage to cultivated palm trees throughout the Mediterranean region.  According to BugGuide:  “native to so. Asia and Melanesia, since the 1980s spread into many warm coastal areas around the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean.”  The UK Food and Environment Research Agency has an excellent pdf on the Red Palm Weevil.

Red Palm Weevil with Passengers

Red Palm Weevil with Passengers

We suspect that the passengers on your Red Palm Weevil are Mites, but we don’t know if they are parasitic or if they are phoretic, meaning they use the Weevil for transportation purposes and pose no harm to the tranporter.  The Iberia-Natur site includes images of a Red Palm Weevil with mites and it includes the following statement:  “that mites are transported on the legs of the bug. This process is called phoresy, which means the temporary use of another animal (in this case a bug) for transportation to another fee lot.”  Krishna Mohan PHotography also has images of Mites on a Red Palm Weevil and the statement:  “that mites are transported on the legs of this weevil. This process is called phoresy, which means one animal attaching to another for transportation only.”

Mites on Red Palm Weevil

Close-up of Mites on Red Palm Weevil

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: West Viriginia
September 20, 2014 11:42 am
I was wondering if you could tell me what kind of bug this is. Found it crawling out of the ground. Can you help me. Please and thank you.
Signature: Bobbi

Hickory Horned Devil

Hickory Horned Devil

Hi Bobbi,
This is a Hickory Horned Devil, the largest North American Caterpillar, and despite its fearsome appearance, it is perfectly harmless as it neither stings nor bites, and it is not venomous or poisonous.  We typically receive numerous reports of sightings in the late summer and early fall, but this year we have received very few reports.  Since this individual was on the ground, we assume it was searching for a likely spot to dig beneath the surface to begin pupation.  The adult Hickory Horned Devil is the spectacular Royal Walnut Moth.

Thank you for the information. I was wondering because my husband and a couple of his friends found it. And they touched it so we was hoping it wasn’t poisonous. Will they live if it had been moved. They didn’t want to kill it and it was near a dead tree they was cutting on.

Your husband and his friends will live.  Relocating the Hickory Horned Devil should not have a negative impact on its survival.

 

Subject: Spider
Location: Barbados
September 20, 2014 1:21 pm
Has been in my bathroom in Barbados for the last few days. Shows no fear of me but tends to stay high on the wall.
Signature: Huh?

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear Huh?,
This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.  These are hunting spiders that do not build webs, and their presence is frequently tolerated in warmer climates as they help to control the populations of Cockroaches and other undesirable insects inside the home.  We believe this is a female
Heteropoda venatoria.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stick bug?
Location: Fairview ,PA
September 20, 2014 8:57 pm
Hi bugman!,
Here are a couple of photos from Erie county Pennsylvania. We assume it is a stickbug of some type, but we’ve never seen one around here before. We were hoping that you could give us more info on it.
Signature: Joe S.

Northern Walkingstick

Northern Walkingstick

Dear Joe S.,
This is a Northern Walkingstick,
Diapheromera femorata.  According to BugGuide:  “This species is native to the US and Canada. It is the most common species of Phasmid in North America.  When very numerous, they can severely defoliate trees.”

Northern Walkingstick

Northern Walkingstick

Subject: Nepali beetle
Location: Kathmandu valley
September 21, 2014 12:02 am
This beetle (?) was the largest I saw in Nepal. It’s about 4 inches long and had scary-looking mandibles. Taken in July.
Signature: Bug curious

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Bug Curious,
This is some species of Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and we will attempt to determine the species for you.  Beetles in this family have very powerful mandibles and large individuals might draw blood should they chomp down on a finger.

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Daniel,
thanks for the ID on this and the tiger moth. If it helps, here is a link to my a post on my blog with a short film of the beetle.
http://miakt.wordpress.com/2014/09/20/lives-of-the-monster-insects/
I posted some random photos of large insects and other creatures I saw while teaching English in a monastery outside Kathmandu. I managed to identify a couple by googling, but some I couldn’t, so thanks for your help! I will update the blog with your information.
Mia

Subject: Nepali moth
Location: Nepal
September 20, 2014 11:58 pm
Dear bugman,
here is a small day-flying moth taken in June, in the Kathmandu valley of Nepal. It’s about an inch long. Can you tell me what it is? It looks like a lady singing an aria.
Signature: Curious

Footman Moth

Footman Moth

Dear Curious,
The markings on the thorax of this Tiger Moth do indeed resemble the face of a woman with a mouth opened wide in song.  Having guessed correctly that the subfamily is Arctiinae, we quickly found a matching image on FlickR that is identified as a Footman Moth,
Barsine orientalis.  We then located an image on SinoBug that supports the initial identification, but we realized is was another view from the same location taken by the same photographer, so we decided to search for a unique verification.  We found verification on the Moths of Thailand site. 

Dear Daniel,
thank you so much for the quick reply and the accurate identification!
Mia