Subject: catepillar, bug, and spider
Location: Shore of Hells Canyon Reservoir, Oregon side
May 18, 2016 8:32 am
My son took these photos of some interesting invertebrates in our campsite. The vegetation is blackberry, rose, and common hackberry for trees.
We would love to know what species these are or any information you could give us.
Signature: Barbara Webb

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Mourning Cloak Caterpillar

Dear Barbara,
This is a wonderful image of a Mourning Cloak Caterpillar, and we will be posting it to our site to help our readership identify them in future encounters.  Your other insects are an immature Katydid and an Orbweaver spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck, HELP.
Location: Northern California
May 19, 2016 9:07 am
I’ve lived in Northern Ca all my life and never seen something so strange and scary looking. What the hell is it?
Signature: Kimberly

Cicada Metamorphosis

Cicada Metamorphosis

Dear Kimberly,
This is not a scary event.  You were lucky to have witnessed the metamorphosis of a Cicada.  The nymph has been living underground, feeding on fluids sucked from the roots of plants.  As the nymph neared maturity, it dug to the surface where it molted for the last time, emerging as a winged adult.

Subject: Peculiar bug with eggs
Location: Phoenix, Arizona. urban setting
May 19, 2016 3:24 pm
I just noticed this bug on a leaf in my Arizona Ash tree, guarding its eggs. What the heck is it?! It’s pretty small about 2 centimeters in length.
Signature: Damaris

Lacewing Larva eats Eggs

Lacewing Larva eats Eggs

Dear Damaris,
This is NOT and insect guarding its eggs.  The insect is a Lacewing Larva and as it is not mature, it is not currently capable of laying eggs.  Lacewing Larvae are predators that feed on small insects, including Aphids, and we suspect it is eating these eggs, which appear to possibly be the eggs of a moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

aSubject: Hopping Bug
Location: Bluffton, SC
May 21, 2016 4:28 am
What are these hopping bugs that have come out at night under my porch light? The next morning a lot of them have died. These are in Bluffton SC .
Signature: R McLain,

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Dear R McLain,
This looks and acts like a Lawn Shrimp or House Hopper,
Arcitalitrus sylvaticus, a species described on BugGuide as being from “Southeastern Australia (New South Wales and Victoria), as well as nearby areas of the Pacific, but introduced into New Zealand, the British Isles, Florida and California” and preferring habitat that is “Moist soil and organic matter within 13 mm of the surface, often among ivy or other ground covers, mostly eucalyptus. Their exoskelton has no waxy coating to keep moisture in, so they can’t survive dryness. They drown in water, though, so they need continuously moist, but not waterlogged conditions.”  Based on this BugGuide posting, they are spreading from Florida to nearby Georgia and your posting indicates they have now spread north to South Carolina.

Thank you Daniel.  I thought they resembled shrimp!

Lawn Shrimp and true Shrimp are classified together as Crustaceans in the same subphylum.

Subject: Cool looking lady bug do you know what this bug is?
Location: Meadville Pennsylvania 16335
May 20, 2016 1:02 pm
I just wanted to know if you knew what this bug is i know it’s a type of beetle maybe a dart beetle? I’m at work but as soon as I saw it i was amazed of how it looked and wanted to know if it’s rare for my location. I’m 25 years old and never seen a bug this cool looking from Pennsylvania. I’m a eagle scout and did have a lot of outdoors experience and did get a insect study merit badge. But if you can find out and let me know thanks.
Signature: By Samuel Juracko

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Clavate Tortoise Beetle

Dear Samuel,
This is a Tortoise Beetle in the tribe Cassidini, most likely the Clavate Tortoise Beetle,
Plagiometriona clavata , which is pictured on BugGuide where it states it feeds upon:  “ground-cherries (Physalis), Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium), and Solanum spp. (Solanaceae).”

Subject: Name That Nope!
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
May 20, 2016 2:26 pm
I found this neat little guy running around my smoker 2 days ago (May 18, 2016). I live in Chesapeake, VA. I’ve reached out to the internet via Facebook and Imgur as well as searched through a spider database i found with no matches. Suggestions were a Juvenile Orb Weaver (which we’ve had a few of over the years) or theridion grallator.
Signature: -Anthony T.

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver

Dear Anthony,
Orbweaver is a general name for a Spider from the family Araneidae and according to BugGuide:  “There are approximately 3,500 species worldwide, with 180 occurring north of Mexico.”  But for the eerie pair of blind eyespots on your individual, we thought it resembled, especially in the true eye arrangement,
Araneus alboventris pictured on BugGuide and described on BugGuide as “Carapace, sternum, legs greenish yellow. Bright yellow rings around posterior median eyes. Abdomen dorsum with black patch bordered by crimson red border on golden yellow background.”  Then on BugGuide we found a male, recognizable because of the enlarged pedipalps, the first pair of appendages that are used to transfer sperm to the female.  A comment compares this individual to Araneus alboventris.  We suspect this is a white spotted color variation of Araneus alboventris and we propose the common name Blind Eyed Orbweaver.  We love the many views you provided, including the lateral view that reveals the spinnerets.

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver revealing spinnerets

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver revealing spinnerets