Subject: Strange Bug
Location: Bogotá, 2.600 mts above sea level
February 8, 2015 10:24 pm
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I found these strange bugs in my garden, lots of them in a tree (Alcaparro in spanish). Nobody can tell me what kind of bugs they are, if harmful or poisonous. I live in Bogotá, Colombia. S.A. Will
you please tell me about it?
Thank you,
Signature: Silvia Riaño

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs

Dear Silvia,
Though your image is blurry, we are pretty confident these are Giant Mesquite Bugs in the genus
Thasus.  They are not poisonous and we even received a report that they are edible.

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Subject: Tailless Whipscorpion
Location: Mexican border with Guatemala
February 8, 2015 11:08 am
I took this picture on 1/29/2015, identified by the guide as a whip scorpion. But I think it might actually be a tailless whipscorpion, as it has no tail. The picture was taken with a flash inside a Maya ruin at Yaxchilan. I think that the flash has caused shadows so that the legs look “double”. Yaxchilan is on the Mexican side of the Usumacinta River – the border to Guatemala.
From another of your articles, it appears that this creature is from the order Amblypygi , but I was wondering if the species can be identified. “BUG GUIDE” is only for US & Canada, and this creature is Mexican/ Central American.
Signature: Thanks, Bob Williamson

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear  This Bob,
We don’t generally attempt to identify Tailless Whipscorpions beyond the order, but perhaps one of our readers will write in with more information.
  We did locate a pdf entitled LOS AMBLIPÍGIDOS O TENDARAPOS DE MÉXICO (ARACHNIDA: AMBLYPYGI) by Luis F. de Armas that contains the following information:  “The whip spiders or tailless whipscorpions of Mexico (Arachnida: Amblypygi)  Abstract: The Mexican fauna of whip spiders or tailless whipscorpions contains 20 species belonging to the genera Acantho- phrynus Kraepelin, 1899 (one species), Paraphrynus Moreno, 1940 (11 species) and Phrynus Lamarck, 1801 (8 species) (Phrynidae: Phryninae). Only five (25%) of these species are not Mexican endemics, whereas six Paraphrynus species are troglobites. Paraphrynus and Phrynus have 82% and 50% of endemic species, respectively. The highest specific richness and endemism are concentrated in the southeastern states (Chiapas, Oaxaca and Quintana Roo).”

Hey Daniel:
Thanks for the quick response.  As I look closer at my photo, I can see some banding on the legs, which I previously missed.  I know that the Amblypygi name ending in “Mexico” (which of course I cannot relocate on the web now that I want to again) did not look like this one, mainly because of the light brown and banded legs.  Maybe the flash is hiding that a little.
This was the first time I have seen one and because of the size, it is certainly scary looking.  I was surprised to find out it can neither bite nor sting humans.
Thanks for your help.
Later, This Bob.

Hi again This Bob,
Tailless Whipscorpions do not have venom and they do not have stingers, so they pose no threat to humans.  We thought we once read that a large specimen might bite, but according to BugGuide:  “No venom glands, and do not sting or bite. If disturbed, they scuttle sideways.”

 

 

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Subject: Wasp?
Location: Wantirna, Victoria
February 6, 2015 8:03 pm
Hello,
I found this wasp in my melbourne backyard yesterday. It’s very bright and colorful, orange looks fluro bright and wings have a purple tinge to them. I looked up a few wasps on your site, some of the potters wasps look similar but none have the same markings. Do you know what it is?
Signature: Catherine

Probably Mason Wasp

Probably Mason Wasp

Dear Catherine,
We agree that your individual resembles the Potter and Mason Wasps in the subfamily Eumeninae, and though it resembles several individuals posted on the Brisbane Insect website, it is not an exact match for any of them.  We will continue to research this identification.  The antennae on your individual, which appear to arise from a light colored stalk, are quite distinctive.

Probably Mason Wasp

Probably Mason Wasp

Hi Daniel,
My father found a pic online which looks similar. It’s called a wasp-mimic bee
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Hyleoides+concinna#tab_gallery
However there isn’t must information about them online.
Very interesting for suburban Melbourne!

We do not believe the Wasp Mimic Bee is your species.  Based on images on the Brisbane Insect website, the closest match we can find is a Black Headed Mud Nesting Wasp, Pseudabispa or Epiodynerus sp.

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Subject: Identification of termites
Location: Benin West of Africa
February 7, 2015 10:54 am
Please i need your help to identify four (4 ) termites that i collected from different Geographical site in the country Benin (West Africa).
I collected them for a scientific research and i need to identify them to discuss my result.
I thank you in advance and i look forward to have any feed-back.
Signature: Best regards, Dima

Soldier Termites

Soldier Termites

Dear Dima,
We are posting your images of Soldier Termites, and we will attempt some research.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with a comment, and it is not unusual for us to get an identification many years after posting images, so we would advise you to comment on the posting so anyone writing in can reach you more directly.

Soldier Termites

Soldier Termites

Soldier Termites

Soldier Termites

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Subject: Insect in my raspberries
Location: Found in Glasgow, Scotland, raspberries originated in South Africa
February 6, 2015 8:11 am
On a shopping trip to tesco I bought raspberries which originated in South Africa. There was a green insect in the container, I’m just curious to know what it was! It was still alive too!
Signature: Curious raspberry lover

Immature Grasshopper

Immature Grasshopper

Dear Curious Raspberry Lover,
This is an immature Grasshopper.  Finding live insects in organically grown produces is not uncommon.

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Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Cabazon, ca
February 6, 2015 3:42 am
I’m house hunting and have found this bug in the bathroom while viewing. Wondering what type of bug? And if it is harmful? I have small children, will this bug continue to go inside the house with us living inside? Or did it only go because the home is vacant? Thank you
Signature: To anna

Desert Centipede

Desert Centipede

Hi Anna,
This is a Tropical Centipede in the order Scolopendromorpha.  We believe it is
Scolopendra polymorpha which is pictured on BugGuide.  Your individual looks young, as they grow to about 4 inches in length.  Though Tropical Centipedes often enter homes, they are not a group that is generally found indoors.  Tropical Centipedes are venomous, and the bite is reported to be quite painful, but unless there is an allergic reaction, the bite is not deadly, though some Tropical Centipedes from tropical areas are considered more dangerous.  Individuals from Texas and Oklahoma, Scolopendra heros, are reported to grow up to 8 inches in length.