Subject: Net-Wing Beetle
Location: Oak Openings Region, Ohio
August 16, 2014 4:02 pm
Hello! Found this cute little guy today, thought I’d share.
Signature: Katy

Banded Net-Wing Beetle

Banded Net-Wing Beetle

Hi Katy,
Thanks for thinking of us.  We haven’t posted a new image of a Banded Net-Wing Beetle since last September.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Male Queen Butterfly?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
August 16, 2014 11:27 am
Hello, I hand-watered our very dry lawn this morning, and immediately some butterflies came to drink. Is this a male Queen butterfly?
You kindly identified one for me last September. That one had survived a drenching downpour.
I darkened the exposure a bit. Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Queen Butterfly

Queen Butterfly

Hi again Ellen,
You have correctly identified the sex of this Milkweed Butterfly by the scent patch on the male’s hind wings.  We wanted to confirm that this was in fact a Queen, so we checked BugGuide which indicates the difference between the Queen and the Soldier as being that the Soldier has:  “Ventral, black veins on both FW and HW, Queen only has black veins on HW. Soldiers are the only one in the genus that has pale squarish spots forming a concentric postmedian band.”  The ventral wing surface view does not have strong, black veins on the forewing, indicating this is a Queen.

Queen

Queen

 

Subject:  Western Tiger Swallowtail
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 16, 2014 11:59 AM

We had to stop pulling weeds long enough to clean our hands and grab the camera.  Several Western Tiger Swallowtails were flying about the garden and nectaring from the plumbago on the neighbor’s hill.  It wasn’t so long ago that we lamented that we couldn’t get a decent image of the large Swallowtails sailing about as they never seemed to alight.

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

We even managed to get shots showing both ventral and dorsal surfaces.

Western Tiger Swallowtail

Western Tiger Swallowtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetle
Location: Hesperia, California
August 13, 2014 1:03 pm
what kinda of beetle is this.
i have alot of mealworm beatles
running wild from my own breeding.
could it have bred with a wild beetle
Signature: Brian

Stout's Hardwood Borer

Stout’s Hardwood Borer

Dear Brian,
Your image is not terribly clear, but this sure looks like a Stout’s Hardwood Borer,
Polycaon stoutii, to us.  We got that common name from Charles Hogue’s Insects of the Los Angeles Basin, but BugGuide refers to it as the Black Polycaon and has very little information about it.  Hogue on the other hand writes extensively about the Stout’s Hardwood Borer.  Hogue writes that they “appear in the fall (September) in unlikely places, such as in the hallways and rooms of new buildings, in warehouses, and in homes.  Their occurrence is explained by their breeding habits.  The larvae are wood borers that feed within various hardwoods such as oak, California Laurel, alder, maple, and eucalyptus — construction woods that are often used in building boxes, shipping crates, storage racks, and the slats used behind scoustic ceiling tiles;  the larvae will also infest finished wood products such as cupboards, cabinets, and furniture.  The adult Stout’s beetles may emerge from these products after the construction is completed and even after the product has been finished. … There is no evidence that the species reinfests lumber or manufactured wood products once the adults have emerged from them.”

Subject: Vancouver Suburb Apartment Bug
Location: Vancouver, BC
August 15, 2014 12:19 am
Hi there,
I’m wondering if you can help me identify this bug? I started noticing them about a year ago, approx once every few weeks, mainly in the bathroom in the middle of the night or early morning. They scurry away when the lights go on. The one in the picture attached is approx the length of a penny, but I’ve started to notice babies!!!! Noooooo! We live approx 30 mins east of Vancouver, BC in a ground floor apartment building. The building itself is approx 20 years old, made with concrete and wood (so I wondered if it is a wood-dwelling bug). They tend to scurry under the baseboards. I’ve seen a few in the kitchen now and I need to stop this scourge! Thanks in advance!
Signature: Shannon

Silverfish

Silverfish

Dear Shannon,
The Silverfish is a common household pest that can be extremely difficult to eradicate.  Silverfish will feed on a wide variety of organic substances in the home, including some unconventional items like the glue binding of books and wallpaper.  Your observations that they are found in the bathroom and at night are very accurate.  They prefer damp surroundings, especially near sinks.

Subject: Kissing Bug?
Location: Cabot, AR
August 16, 2014 8:13 am
Found this bug on my patio. We live in a state where the “kissing bug” is making the news. I have gotten several conflicting answers and photos on Google are making me even more confused. I just want to know for sure what it is!
Signature: Don’t kiss me!

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Dear Don’t kiss me!,
Your confusion is understandable because this predatory Wheel Bug is in the same family, the Assassin Bug family Reduviidae, as the Kissing BugWheel Bugs prey upon other insects and they feed using their sharp proboscis that they use to pierce the prey and then suck the fluids from the body.  Kissing Bugs in the genus
Triatoma feed in a similar manner, but they feed on the blood of birds and mammals, including sleeping humans.  The problem with Kissing Bugs is that they can spread Chagras Disease when they bite.  Though there is a chance that carelessly handling a Wheel Bug will result in a painful bite, there is no negative, lasting health problem associated with the bite, merely local swelling and tenderness.