Subject: Masonry Bee?
Location: London, South East England.
April 11, 2014 1:15 pm
Hi! I would just like some clarification please! We noticed today that we had what appear to be bees flying in and out of a hole in the wall on our flat. We’ve lived here for years & it’s the first year we’ve noticed it. We’ve done googling and suspect them (it?) to be Masonry Bees but would love clarification as we’re both wimps when it comes to flying stinging things and would love to know where we stand for our own sakes but also that of the cats who seem to think the hole provides them with flying toys! And we obviously don’t want either to get hurt. It doesn’t look quite right for a masonry bee but doesn’t look like honey bees / bumble bees / hornets etc so we turn to your expertise! Thank you!
Signature: Tofu K

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

Dear Tofu K,
This is a harmless Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax, and we were puzzled by your observations that is was “flying in and out of a hole in the wall,” and we learned something very interesting on Nature Spot where it states they can be observed:  “Virtually all year round. The female hibernates in buildings and crevices but will emerge on warm days in late winter, leading to it being seen in virtually every month of the year.”  Larval Drone Flies are known as Rat-Tailed Maggots.  More information is available on UK Safari.

Daniel,
Thank you for your prompt reply! I was expecting to wait a little while as the websites state you may have to.
Thank you for putting our minds at ease! I was concerned it was some beastly giant buzzing bee we were going to have to live with! And very “pleased” that they sometimes mimic bees – it means we’re not going completely crazy!
Glad you learnt something new about them too!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found a bunch of these guys under my sink
Location: San Ramon, CA
April 11, 2014 11:55 am
I live east of Berkeley California and have been finding these winged bugs around my hallroom bathroom. Are they flying termites?
Thanks for any help you can provide!
Signature: Andy

Termite Alate

Termite Alate

Dear Andy,
You have an image of a winged Termite Alate as well as Termite Damage.  You should get some professional assistance.  A leaky pipe may have played a part in your infestation.

Termite Damage

Termite Damage

Subject: Spider Found In Nelson, BC, Canada . Never Seen It Before
Location: Nelson, BC, Canada
April 11, 2014 4:57 pm
today during a walk i stumbled apon a spider that made my skin crawl just looking at it!! i have lived in Canada my whole life and have never seen one like this. unfortunatly some of these pictures were taken as it posed “belly up” but its legs are tucked and short and has some yellow marking on the lower underside.. im very curious into discovering what type of spider it is! please help
Signature: Regan

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Dear Regan,
This is a Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus Ummidia, and despite it making your skin crawl, it is a harmless species.  The spots on the underside of the abdomen are quite distinctive.  You can see a matching image on BugGuide.
  Spring rains may have flushed it from its burrow.

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you ID these and their nest
Location: Northern Texas
April 11, 2014 8:02 pm
I found some of these nymph stage bugs on my Live Oak tree last year and then this year i found several of their nests on my trees and house. The 1st picture is from this year, one up close to the eaves of my house on the bricks as they were hatching out. The 2nd picture is of them on my tree last year. I could not find anyone to ID them so sadly, I did spray them. The 3rd one is the bugs I collected off the tree after I sprayed them. (Sorry for that but I thought it would be better to err than have destructive bugs around. ) I just need to know what they are and if harmful or helpful. It looks like there are about 100 or so per nest. Hopefully the pictures are useful. If you use a viewer that can zoom in they looked good on my PC. Thanks for your help.
Signature: Dan in Texas

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Dear Dan,
We hope our response this year prevents a similar carnage to that from last year.  These are beneficial, predatory Wheel Bug hatchlings, and they will help keep your trees and garden free of unwanted insect pests, eliminating the need to use pesticides.  Wheel Bugs are Assassin Bugs, and most are beneficial, and exception being the Blood Sucking Conenose Bugs.  Some other Assassin Bugs are prone to biting humans, and though the bite is painful and may cause local swelling, it is not considered dangerous, again the exception being the Blood Sucking Conenose Bugs.  We very rarely get reports of Wheel Bugs biting.  Adult Wheel Bugs are large, somewhat prehistoric looking creatures with a coglike “wheel” on the thorax. 

Wheel Bug Nymph Carnage

Wheel Bug Nymph Carnage

Daniel,
Thank you so much for the information and education.  I have seen a lot of the adult versions of these “armored wonders” around the house but never saw them in their early stages.  I must have found about 8 or 10 of these nests around, some already empty and I assure you now that I know what they are will not do them harm in the future.  I had contacted my agriculture agent about the adults I saw around and he informed me that they were beneficial insects but he could not identify the nest and nymph stages.
Thank you again for all your time and help.

Subject: Identify bug
Location: Coimbra, Portugal
April 12, 2014 9:01 am
Hi,
I’m from Portugal, and I live in a village where you can find a lot of this kind of bug. Usually they’re in windows or walls, and they barely move. Sometimes I see one and in the next day it is in the same exact place. They look like they have wings but I never saw it fly, even when you lightly touch them. But they move! They look like they have two really big needles (but thin) on the bottom but they look inoffensive.
Signature: David

Mayfly

Mayfly

Hi David,
This is a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera, and winged adults do not eat and only live a few days, long enough to mate and reproduce.  Larval nymphs are aquatic and they are known as naiads.  Since adults are weak fliers, they are generally found near the water source that spawned them, so we expect there is a sluggish stream or pond nearby.  The threadlike tails or cerci are not harmful.  See Encyclopedia Britannica for more information on Mayflies.

Yes, there is a water source nearby. Thank you for your answer! Keep up the good work!

Subject: Bee/Wasp??
Location: Medway, Kent, UK
April 10, 2014 5:28 am
Hi, I’m from Medway, Kent in the UK.
Whilst on my lunch break today in the park I noticed this bug hoovering by my feet. It had 6 legs, wings, was orangey in colour, with a pointy thing (to collect nectar??) at the front of it’s face? and it’s body when viewed from above was triangular.
I’ve never seen this before? The weather here has been a misture of cloudy sun and rain with an average temperature of 13 degrees. It was approx the size of an average bee or wasp.
Signature: Claire

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Hi Claire,
This is a Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, a fly that mimics bees and it does gather nectar with that long proboscis.  You can read more about the Greater Bee Fly on the Natural History Museum website.