Subject: are these cicadas nymphs?
Location: United States, Missouri
July 17, 2014 3:01 pm
so I was digging at the site of a rotten, dead tree that fell down and discovered these lil things! I thought they might be cicadas, but after looking at pictures I’m really not sure.
Signature: Stolz

Scarab Beetle Pupae

Scarab Beetle Pupae

Dear Stolz,
These are not Cicada Nymphs, but rather beetle pupae.  They are most likely Scarab Beetle Pupae.  The larvae of some Scarab Beetles feed on rotting wood, and they will pupate in the immediate vicinity.  You can compare your images to this image from Insect Images.

Scarab Pupa

Scarab Pupa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this beetle
Location: Northern California
July 17, 2014 9:05 am
I viewed this beetle outside my kids daycare this morning. I picked it up and brought it inside and put it in a nice hermit crab aquarium (crab is not there anymore). My thinking is that it would be nice for the kids to look at and learn something about before setting it free. Any response will be relayed to the daycare staff.
Thanks
Signature: Jeff Reynolds

Ten Lined June Beetle

Ten Lined June Beetle

Hi Jeff,
Because of its large size and striking markings, the Ten Lined June Beetle is a common identification request from western states.  The Ten Lined June Beetle is capable of stridulation, which is rubbing body parts together to make a squeeking noise, and the beetles will stridulate when handled.  You can try feeding this captive Ten Lined June Beetle the fresh needles from conifers (according to Hogue) while it is in captivity.

Subject: Egg Mass on Window
Location: Denver, Colorado
July 17, 2014 6:33 am
Good morning,
This morning I discovered an egg mass on the outside of one of our windows. Wondering what it might be? The closest I found was the Colorado Potato Beetle, but the eggs don’t look quite right. The mass is probably the size of a couple of quarters. The eggs are very small – pencil tip diameter, perhaps.
Signature: The Greens

Moth Eggs

Moth Eggs

Dear Greens,
These are Moth Eggs, most likely those of a Tiger Moth or those of a Giant Silkmoth.  The links that we provided are not necessarily species found in Colorado, but rather they are used as examples from the respective families.

Thanks!  We’re experiencing a Miller Moth invasion!!  Maybe that’s it…  Thanks!!

We do not believe these are Miller Moth eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Michigan
July 17, 2014 4:13 am
Can you tell me what kind of moth this is? From Michigan and I used to see them a lot when I was a kid. Wing span is about 4.5 inches
Signature: Melanie Wilson

Five Spotted Hawkmoth

Five Spotted Hawkmoth

Hi Melanie,
Your moth is a Five Spotted Hawkmoth, and we are speculating that there is a vegetable patch near where the sighting occurred as the caterpillar, known as the Tomato Hornworm, feeds on leaves of tomato and related plants.  More information on the Five Spotted Hawkmoth is available on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Subject: microlep?
Location: Midland, MI
July 17, 2014 6:47 am
Hi bug man,
…  For fun and unrelated, I am sharing a photo of hatching cecropia eggs that I took yesterday :)
Signature: Elly

Hatchling Cecropia Caterpillar

Hatchling Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Elly,
The newly hatched Cecropia Moth Caterpillar is a wonderful addition to our archives.

Subject: microlep?
Location: Midland, MI
July 17, 2014 6:47 am
Hi bug man,
I’m stumped! I have a microlep that I am struggling to ID. A homeowner recently dropped this moth off as one captured from her yard. She indicated this spring much of their ground cover and other assorted plants were being eaten by caterpillars, and suspects this moth as the adult.
This is not a critter I am familiar with. I also have to admit that these tiny moths are my least favorite thing to ID! Is this in the family prodoxidae?
I am also curious as to what to tell this lady… “this is a small moth. it’s a species I am not familiar with as there are thousands of tiny moths in Michigan that are no fun to key out. This species isn’t one that we see as a common insect pest, and chances are it is probably not polyphagous– eating so many different kinds of plants in your yard. It’s hard to help you ID caterpillars from months ago without seeing them nor knowing what KIND of plants they were eating.”
For fun and unrelated, I am sharing a photo of hatching cecropia eggs that I took yesterday :)
Signature: Elly

Unknown Microlepidoptera

Unknown Microlepidoptera

Dear Elly,
We agree with you fully that identifying Microlepidoptera is not easy, and we might spend hours on this and still be unsuccessful.  Your letter did not indicate why you are the point person for this identification, so we can only surmise that your work for a nursery, an extermination company or perhaps a museum.  We are posting your images and we hope that one day there might be an answer.  We suspect this moth is not related to the caterpillars that are feeding on the woman’s plants.  The hatching Cecropia Caterpillar will get its own posting.

Unknown Microlepidoptera

Unknown Microlepidoptera