Subject: Australian Beetle
Location: East Fremantle, Australia
December 3, 2014 3:54 pm
Here’s one that’s quite distinctive — in my eyes it looks like an Aboriginal painting — but I can’t find anything like it on the web.
It’s about 12mm (1/2″) long, without the antennae. The picture was taken on Dec. 3, 2014 (beginning of summer), on an indigenous tree in an urban park rather late in the day (4:20pm).
Signature: Norm Jackson

Beautiful Cockroach Nymph

Beautiful Cockroach Nymph

Dear Norm,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Beautiful Cockroach nymph,
Ellipsidion australe, which we identified on the Insects of Brisbane website, or it is a related species of Cockroach in the genus EllipsidionThis is not a species that infests homes. 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Elephant Beetle?
Location: Sayulita, Nayarit Mexico
December 2, 2014 7:03 am
Hello, I live in Nayarit, Mexico on the Pacific Coast and came across this large beetle on my brick wall the other morning. The body is only a little smaller than the palm of my hand, the arms are barbed and it has two “toes” at the end of each arm. It has furry blondish color hair near the underside of its shell, but otherwise almost all black. The weather has been cooler 80s during the day and low 60’s at night, otherwise a fairly typical tropical environment.
Signature: Thank you for your assistance

Scarab Beetle

Female Hercules Beetle

Subject: Large Beetle found in Sayulita, Mexico
Location: Sayulita, Mexico
December 3, 2014 11:59 am
Hello Bugman!
A friend of mine found this lovely being just a couple of days ago. She lives in Sayulita, Mexico. She said his body is just smaller than the palm of her hand. Facebook folks are speculating that he may be a she, a female Rhino Beetle. We welcome any assistance. And yes, she too is a guardian of all things living, so this little (big) fellow/gal will be safe in her space. She simply would like to know what to call him/her.
Many thanks, and I remain a devoted evangelist for your fabulous site!
PS: Something odd happens when I share your link on FB. The image and initial paragraph that emerge with the link look like they belong to another site called “UM Travels”. See attached screen shot.
Signature: Kenda

Dear Kenda and friend,
Since you both submitted the same image, we are posting both of your emails with the image of this female Hercules Beetle or Rhinoceros Beetle in the genus
Dynastes.  In addition to the species found in the U.S., which also range into Mexico, this might also be a female Dynastes hercules, the true Hercules Beetle, which may be viewed on BeetleSpace.  According to Animals A-Z:  “The Hercules beetle is the largest and most well known of all of the rhinoceros beetles, a group of large beetles that are closely related to the famous scarab beetle.  The Hercules beetle is found throughout the tropical jungles and rainforests of Central and South America, where the Hercules beetle spends the majority of it’s time foraging through the leaf-litter on the forest floor in search of something to eat.”  The range map includes Nayarit.

Thank you Daniel for your reply. I posted this picture on the local FB page here in Sayulita and everyone had a fun time taking guesses as to what it was. A friend had recently come across the male Hercules Beetle while hiking in the jungle, with the wonderful horn on its head, so we suspected this might be the female with all of the other similarities. Thank you for confirming.
I’m glad Kenda shared your site with me, living in the tropical jungle of Mexico provides me with an endless supply of “what’s THAT?” and strangely enough my house seems to attract an abundance of rare creatures – much to my joy and amazement.
attached is a picture of one of my favorite visitors – the harlequin beetle – what a beauty…
Thanks again.
Katie

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Subject: What is this?
Location: NC
November 30, 2014 6:36 pm
I took this photo a few years ago and came across it again today. I can’t figure out what these bugs are. Can you help?
Signature: Mike

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Hi Mike,
We love your image of mating Red Footed Cannibalflies.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Starship Trooper Bug
Location: South Carolina
November 30, 2014 6:55 pm
So I’m pretty sure that I stumbled across the predecessor to the bug that starred in the movie Starship Troopers today. *But slightly smaller.
We had several sightings of this same type of bug throughout the day today so I wasn’t completely shocked when one showed up right in my face while I was hanging Christmas lights. I collected myself (no girlish screams I promise) and knew what Casper Van Deen’s character must have felt like.
My 5 yr old son was with me and of course demanded to know what type of bug it was… so far “not a cockroach” is the best I can come up with. Stink bug was also a suspect but google thinks not.
Signature: Johnny Rico

Big Legged Bug

Big Legged Bug

Dear Johnny,
This Big Legged Bug, probably Acanthocephala declivis based on this image on BugGuide, does somewhat resemble the Starship Trooper Bug, but not as much as this Wheel Bug nymph.

Starship Troopers Bug

Starship Troopers Bug

 

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Subject: Dock spider?
Location: Troy, Michigan
December 2, 2014 11:26 am
This spider was found in the shop where I work, keeping warm by the wood stove. S/he is SO large, his abdomen about the size of a quarter, that he created quite a crowd of spectators. I thought s/he looked a lot like the dock spiders I’ve seen while camping up in Canada, especially the striping and rasps on the legs. Is that what we have here and do you know what kind it might be?
Signature: DaleShannon

Probably Cross Orbweaver

Probably Cross Orbweaver

Dear DaleShannon,
This is not a Dock Spider, a common name for a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, but rather an Orbweaver in the genus Araneus.  Our best guess is that this is a Cross Orbweaver, Araneus diadematus.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.  Your Orbweaver is a female.  Male Orbweavers are considerably smaller.

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Subject: Can’t quite identify this caterpillar
Location: Florida
December 2, 2014 1:19 pm
Hello, I found this guy sitting outside my house and decided to take a picture, upon trying to identify him I ran into some trouble as the closest I could find was the Buck Moth Larvae or the Spiny Elm Caterpillar but both of these describe spots as the primary pattern and my buddy here has what seem to be long white and orange stripes, which is a feature neither have mentioned! I live in central Florida.
Signature: -Curiouser and Curiouser

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear Curiouser and Curiouser,
This looks like a Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar,
Agraulis vanillae, a species that feeds on the leaves of passionflower vines, and it is generally not found far from the food plants.  This is a color variation with lavendar stripes and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae are generally orange with black branched spines and greenish-black stripes. There is a larval variant with purple/lavender stripes, seen mostly in Texas.”  Adult Gulf Fritillaries are pretty orange butterflies with silver spots.

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