Subject: Unique Insect
Location: Western India
June 3, 2015 11:19 am
Today evening, I spotted am extremely unique insect in my apartment. Due to there being a forested area near my residence, insects are frequently visitors.
However I have never seen anything like this before. I have been unable to locate anything similar online.
I would like to bring your attention to it. It may be an undiscovered species.
The insect was roughly 5 cm long. It was not moving, even when I blew air on it. When I picked it up using a piece of paper, if clung to it. I dropped him back into the forested area.
I would really like if you could identify it for me. Looking forward to hearing from you.
Signature: PD

Unknown Weevil

Unknown Weevil

Dear PD,
This is some species of Weevil, a member of a very large family of beetles.  We tried unsuccessfully to identify it online, and we hope to get some assistance from our readership, but we are postdating this submission to go live in mid June while we are out of the office.

Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown insect
Location: Ronald Twp, Ionia Cnty, Michigan
June 5, 2015 5:40 pm
We live on a small lake , located in the center part of Michigan.
Can you help me with this incects identification.
I have attached photo.
Signature: Terry Mcpherson

Phantom Crane Fly

Phantom Crane Fly

Dear Terry,
This amazing creature is a harmless Phantom Crane Fly,
Bittacomorpha clavipes.  We will be postdating your submission to go live next week while we are away from the office.

Sue Dougherty, Melissa White McNamara, Amy Gosch, Alisha Bragg, Amy Hussin liked this post

Subject: What eggs are these? Or are they not even bug eggs?
Location: North Andover, ma
June 5, 2015 5:33 pm
Hi,
Went on a hike with my 2 kids today and came across two plants with these long green vertical eggs* I was curious to see what bugs laid these eggs or if they were even eggs at all.
Thanks!
Signature: Maggie

Galls, we believe

Galls, we believe

Dear Maggie,
We believe these are Galls, and though they are theoretically not eggs, many Galls are produced when insects, like Gall Wasps, lay eggs and the developing larva causes a growth on a plant leaf, stem, root, or other plant part.  The growth acts as food for the larva, and the Gall does not harm the plant.  Other Galls can be caused by mites, viruses or injuries.  Knowing the plant species is often helpful in the identification of the insect that produces the Gall.  Though your Galls resemble those on the maple leaf on the Little Nature Museum site, your plant is not a maple and Galls are often very plant specific.
  We are postdating your submission to go live on our site next week while we are away from the office.

Probably Galls

Probably Galls

Alisha Bragg liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Gentle Readers,
The editorial staff of What’s That Bug? will be on holiday for the next two weeks.  We will not be responding to your numerous identification requests until the end of June, but because we do not want our loyal readership to go through any withdrawals, or to suffer separation anxiety, we have prepared postings to go live to our site daily during our absence.  We anticipate that upon our return, our mailbox will be stuffed with hundreds if not thousands of identification requests, and we are certain we will not be able to respond to more than a tiny fraction.  Meanwhile, please use our search engine to attempt to self identify any sightings that pique your curiosity.  We hope we will get to see Fireflies in Northeast Ohio this June.

Firefly

Firefly

Update:  June 27, 2015
We’re Back, and the Fireflies were spectacular.

Carmen Thompson liked this post

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Tokyo
June 10, 2015 6:25 am
Hello Bugman,
I’ve searching the internet for two hours trying to ID this bug but I can’t find it at all…
I found it in the playground where my 2 year old loves to play everyday but now Im not sure if I should let her play there anymore!
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: Paula

Clearwing Moth from Japan

Clearwing Moth from Japan

Dear Paula,
Though we have not been able to determine the species, this is a Clearwing Moth in the family Sesiidae, a family with many members that mimic stinging wasps as a defense.  This individual is not pictured in the Clearwing Moths of Japan pdf we located, and it also bears an uncanny resemblance to the female Peach Tree Borer,
Synanthedon exitiosa,  a species that is native to North America and an excellent example of pronounced sexual dimorphism.  We cannot at this time determine if this is a species native to Japan, or if the North American Peach Tree Borer has been accidentally introduced to Japan.  This moth poses no threat to your daughter.

Heather Duggan-Christensen, Diana Yochem liked this post

Subject: what is this
Location: tinton falls,nj
June 10, 2015 6:58 am
I think this bug flew inside, found in my monmouth county, tinton falls nj next to the woods apartment.
Moves quickly walking, possibly flies
As its still its long and narrow
Not sure if that’s a stinger?
Please help!!
Signature: -P

Graphisurus fasciatus

Graphisurus fasciatus

Dear P,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and what you have mistaken for a stinger is the ovipositor, and organ that is used by the female when laying eggs.  We did a web search using the key words “Cerambycidae, ovipositor, New Jersey” and we were led to Green Art and an image of
Graphisurus fasciatus and the information that it:  “is well camouflaged when moving about on tree bark. The best way to find it is near lights in the night. The larvae are boring into hardwood. Note the large ovipositor of the females.”  We verified the identification on BugGuide.