Subject: What is this??
Location: Golfe juan, South of france
July 25, 2015 2:00 pm
Hi, I’m currently in the south of France and saw this in my sink??? Any ideas? Thanks
Signature: Mr johnson

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Mr johnson,
This House Centipede is a common, cosmopolitan predator that has adapted to cohabitation with humans.  They are not considered dangerous, though large individuals might bite if carelessly handled.  According to BugGuide, the House Centipede is:  “Native to the Mediterranean region, this species has spread throughout much of Europe, Asia, and North America.”

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Subject: Pelidnota punctata mating
Location: Minneapolis Minnesota
July 25, 2015 7:12 pm
I saw these grapevine beetles mating in Minneapolis Minnesota on July 19 2015. They were beside an urban sidewalk in a residential area not far from a lake. The pictures turned out nicely, so I thought you might like to have them.
Signature: Mary

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Hi Mary,
Technically, your images are documenting the courtship of Grapevine Beetles rather than the actual act of mating, but that is really splitting hairs with us.  It is also awesome that this courtship is taking place on a grapevine.  Your images are an excellent addition to our archives.

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

Mating Grapevine Beetles

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Subject: ID Stinging Slug Caterpillar, MD, USA
Location: Northern Baltimore County, Maryland, USA
July 25, 2015 5:09 pm
Can someone ID this caterpillar found this week in northern Baltimore County, MD, USA? It was found on a winterberry holly bush (Ilex species). I suspect that it’s a stinging slug caterpillar of some kind, but I can’t find a species that that matches the coloration.
Signature: K Smith

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar

Dear K Smith,
The coloration of the Spiny Oak Slug Caterpillar,
Euclea delphinii, appears to have considerable variation.  This image from BugGuide is quite close to your individual.

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Subject: Scary looking tail end…
Location: Northern IL
July 25, 2015 3:42 pm
Dear Bugman,
I just finished reading your book and never would have imagined that I would enjoy a book about bugs so much! Then lo and behold, I have an opportunity to submit a bug question. We are in northern Illinois and this scary looking critter just appeared on our window screen. Can you please tell me what it is?
Signature: JP

Giant Ichneumon

Giant Ichneumon

Dear JP,
How nice to hear you enjoyed Daniel’s book.  This fascinating creature is a Giant Ichneumon, sometimes called a Stump Stabber, in the genus
Megarhyssa.  We believe your individual, because of both the patterns in the wings and the striped abdomen, is Megarhyssa macrurus, and you may compare to this image on BugGuide.  The Giant Ichneumons prey upon Horntails or Wood Wasps, including the Pigeon Horntail.  The long ovipositor of the Stump Stabber is required to correctly deposit eggs into branches infested with larval Wood Wasps.

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Subject: Googling “olive green beetle” only brings up car pictures….
Location: Milton Keynes, UK
July 25, 2015 3:21 pm
Dear Sir
My friends found this beetle in their house today (25/07/15). They can’t find an exact match in any book…could you help satisfy our curiousity?
Signature: J

Leaf Beetle

Leaf Beetle

Dear J.,
We found a pretty close match to your Leaf Beetle online, but we are not certain if the black thoracic region on your individual is accurate, or a result of the lighting, because all the images of
Lochmaea capreae that we found have lighter coloration, including the ones on Diptera Info and on Insects of Scotland where the thorax is described as:  “a slightly yellowish pronotum with three uneven black markings on it.”  So, we are not certain if we have correctly identified your beetle to the species level, but we are confident it is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.

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Subject: What is this?
Location: Essington Pa
July 25, 2015 9:38 am
Noticed them around the carpenter bees..which seem to be dying. Noticing bee carcasses. And no more carpenter bees…
Signature: Kristi Stewart

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Kristi,
This is a Tiger Bee Fly,
Xenox tigrinus, and according to BugGuide:  “Larva is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees, Xylocopa.  Adult food unknown. An adult has been observed on damp mud, lapping up fluids (pers. observation, P. Coin).”  What we do not know and what we plan to research is at what point the adult emerges from the host Carpenter Bee.  Were we Tiger Bee Flies planning responsible parenthood, we would wait until the adult Carpenter Bee (see image of western Valley Carpenter Bees) emerges from the wood to complete metamorphosis because Tiger Bee Flies, unlike Carpenter Bees, do not possess the necessary mouth parts to chew their way out of the wood.  If the adult Tiger Bee Fly emerges after the adult Carpenter Bee emerges and begins to fly, that would explain the Eastern Carpenter Bee carcasses you are finding and it might also explain this previous mystery posting from our archives.

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