Subject: Spider
Location: Pennsylvania
November 10, 2014 2:03 pm
Hi, I found this spider outside while I was stacking wood. It’s pretty big, about the size of a silver dollar or bigger. I was wondering what it was and if it was venomous.
Thanks!
Signature: -Marissa

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Marissa,
You encountered a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  They have venom, but they are not considered dangerous to humans.  Fishing Spiders are generally found not far from water.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Conenose Nymph
Location: San Diego, CA
November 9, 2014 12:48 pm
Hello! Well, I am fairly certain what you see in the picture is a ConeNose Nymph that was found on my daughter’s mattress today in San Diego. Is it possible for you to approximate the age of the nymph?
Here’s a little background: My family returned to our home in San Diego from a mini-vacation in Disneyland 3 weeks ago and the morning after returning my wife found and killed a large fully grown Conenose bug filled with blood on my 4 year old daughter’s pillow. I was able to identify the bug pretty quickly by just googling blood sucking insects in Southern California (never heard of this bug before). We have subsequently killed 3 very small conenose bugs on my daughter’s mattress (all containing blood) and my daughter has at least 3 bites with swelling and redness. We called our pest control service yesterday and they came out and sprayed my daughter’s room, but we found the one pictured on her mattress this morning alive.
Out of extreme precaution, I took her fairly new mattress and box springs to the dump this morning and my daughter has been sleeping in my son’s room for the last couple nights. I’m hoping you can determine the age and possibly provide information on whether it is possible the eggs hatched in the mattress or box spring.
Seeing news stories pop-up today at the same time this is happening to us in regards to the “kissing bug” and Chagas disease has us quite concerned.
Thank you for any information you can provide!
Signature: Robert

Immature Blood Sucking Conenose Bug

Immature Blood Sucking Conenose Bug

Dear Robert,
We concur with your identification.  This appears to be a very young Blood Sucking Conenose Bug or Kissing Bug in the genus
Triatoma.  We suspect it was recently hatched.  There is only one image on BugGuide of an individual that looks similar, though most likely in a later instar or developmental stage.  Based on the information you have provided, we would speculate that this youngster is the offspring of the adult yu found several weeks ago.

Immature Kissing Bug

Immature Kissing Bug

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Subject: Evil Looking Wasp

Location: Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica
November 10, 2014 2:23 pm
Hi There,
We are on the Caribbean side of Costa Rica and are planning on moving into a new apartment. These wasps were seen building a nest on one of the poles, and I’m just wondering
a) what are they?
b) is their sting as painful as it looks?
c) how would we exterminate them?
Thanks so much!
Signature: Concerned in Costa Rica

Warrior Wasps build new nest

Warrior Wasps build new nest

Dear Concerned in Costa Rica,
Regarding c):  We do not provide extermination advice.  We thought your wasps looked like Paper Wasps in the genus
Polistes, and following that lead, we came to the Photo Gallery of Eusocial Paper Wasp Genera and Research page where Polistes atterimus (Monteverde, Costa Rica) is described as being “mimics of Synoeca septentrionalis,” so we followed up on that species and genus.  Of the genus, we learned on the same page, the Photo Gallery of Eusocial Paper Wasp Genera and Research, that “These wasps are infamous for their painful stings and ferocious colony defense. When mildly disturbed, they produce an ominous rushing sound, with synchronous rhythm, by rubbing against their corrugated nest paper. Watch out.”  We found an image of Synoeca cyanea on FlickR of the start of a new colony that looks remarkably like your image.  Though we typically do not quote from Wikipedia, we did learn there that members of the genus Synoeca, “Commonly known as warrior wasps or drumming wasps, these insects are known for aggressive behavior, a threat display consisting of multiple insects guarding a nest beating their wings in a synchronized fashion, and an extremely painful sting. Synoeca is one of only three insect types (the others being the bullet ant and the tarantula hawk) to receive a rating of 4 or higher on insect sting pain indices such as the Schmidt sting pain index.”  That takes care of your questions a) and b), and we found further support on the Vespa bicolor page where it states of the genus Synoeca:  “These wasps are known for their aggression, and also for their extremely painful stings (possibly most painful of any social wasps!) Upon any threat near the nest, the workers are able to produce sound by “drumming” on or rubbing against the inner surface of the nest envelope. If the disturbance continues, the wasps rush out and sometimes pursue the intruder for long distances.”

Thank you very much for the information. I have passed it along to my landlord :)

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Subject: Spider in Cape Town
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
November 9, 2014 1:55 pm
We found this next to our home in Cape Town near table mountain – can you identify it?
Signature: Regards

Probably Trapdoor Spider

Probably Trapdoor Spider

We believe this is a Trapdoor Spider, a primitive group classified along with Tarantulas in the infraorder Mygalomorphae.  We believe it might be a Common Baboon Spider, Harpactira atra, which we found on iSpot.

Common Baboon Spider, we believe

Common Baboon Spider, we believe

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Subject: What kind of spider is this?
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
November 10, 2014 11:38 am
Hello Bugman. What kind of spider is this? Our guess is a type of Huntsman, but there are so many different types of Huntsman photos online, and none really match well. The purple leg segments are beautiful. There is the tip of a standard chopstick in the photo for scale: The spider is 2 to 2 1/4 inches long. Thank you.
Signature: Doug

Possibly Male Crevice Weaver Spider

Tengellid Spider

Dear Doug,
We do not think this is a Huntsman Spider.  We are not certain, but your spider resembles a male Crevice Weaver in the genus Kukulcania.  See this image from BugGuide for comparison.  At least one member of the genus is found in California.  We are going to seek assistance from Eric Eaton and Mandy Howe on your spider’s identity.

Possibly Male Crevice Weaver Spider

Tengellid Spider

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
This is something in the family Tengellidae (no common name), maybe in the genus Titiotus.
Eric

Very cool!  Thanks Daniel and please thank Eric for us.  It sure looks like a Titiotus.  It’s wonderful to learn this Genus is native to CA and bite is harmless.  Sorry, we did not get a close-up of features to identify the species.  It is now roaming around our home in places unknown.  I found other Titiotus observations close-by and around CA on iNaturalist Genus Titiotus after getting Eric’s email.  Also see you have a Tengellid post from almost exactly 1 year ago, ironically from Doug, but not me, and near where we have relatives.  Thank you too for the very fast replies.  Most ironically, my last name is Titus!  Oh the web of coincidence.  Cheers, Doug

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Subject: green catipillar
Location: southern arizona
November 9, 2014 7:41 pm
do you know what kind of catapillar this is. I have alot of orange butterflies around, but this one is different. It started making a coccoon right before my eyes. It’s in a weed I was pulling out of my yard. I have some great butterfly pics. I’ve included a few.
Signature: babbs greg

Mating Gulf Fritillaries

Mating Gulf Fritillaries

Dear Babbs,
There is not enough detail for us to identify your caterpillar, but as it is spinning a cocoon, we are speculating that it is a moth.  Your mating Gulf Fritillaries image is a nice addition to our site.

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