Subject: A Beautiful something…
Location: Hardeeville South Carolina
September 17, 2016 9:41 am
Hello Mr.Bugman! My brother told me about your page after I asked him if he had ever seen the bug in my picture. My name is Brittany, I work at a self storage facility out in the middle of nowhere. Every morning as I check the property and there are so many bugs outside. I think they must be attracted by the lights on the property at night. I always take pictures if i find new ones for my “collection”. I can normally identity them via google but this one has me stumped! This i am guessing was some type of moth, as after i took the picture he/she flew away. I know you are a busy bugman but I would love to find out what this beautiful somthing was. Thank you for your time!
Signature: -Brittany

Heiroglyphic Moth

Hieroglyphic Moth

Dear Brittany,
This lovely little Owlet Moth is commonly called a Hieroglyphic Moth,
Diphthera festiva, and we don’t think that common name needs any explanation.

Awesome! Thank you so much I cant wait to tell my brother!
p.s. What a perfect name!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it ?
Location: Ashford ct
September 17, 2016 7:29 am
Hello. I found this cool guy crawling along the road. He looks almost scaley. I’d love to know what it is. Thank you
Signature: Nicole Whitney

Ello Sphinx Hornworm

Hermit Sphinx Hornworm

Dear Nicole,
We believe this is the Hornworm of an Ello Sphinx,
Erinnyis ello, but according to Sphingidae of the Americas, it is only listed as a stray in Connecticut, meaning adult moths sometimes are found.  If there are caterpillars, it is naturalized.  According to Sphingidae of the Americas:  “Larvae can be quite varied.”  There is an image on BugGuide of a similarly colored Ello Sphinx Hornworm.  The Ello Sphinx Hornworm is described on BugGuide as being:  “Horn reduced to a low point, arising from an elevated angular hump.  In the last instar, the horn is reduced to a nub.  Eyespot over the third thoracic segment is hidden in the resting caterpillar.  Ornately banded thoracic and prolegs.  Length to 7cm.”  We will check with Bill Oehlke if he agrees with our identification.

Bill Oehlke Provides Correction:  Hermit Sphinx
Lintneria eremitus.
I wish permission to post

Ed. Note:  See Sphingidae of the Americas for information on the Hermit Sphinx.

Subject: Flying insect
Location: Canarian island
September 17, 2016 4:05 am
I foundation this insect on my Windows in Gran Canaria
Thatcher insect is +/- 4cm long.
It is dangerous?
Signature: Insect

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

This is a Robber Fly, and here is a very similar looking individual posted to Getty Images.  While a large Robber Fly might bite a person if it is carelessly handled, they are not aggressive towards humans, but they are predators that frequently hunt on the wing.  Based on this Alamy image, your individual might be Promachus latitarsatus.  The species is also pictured on Biodiversidad Virtual, and an image on Diptera Info shows a large Robber Fly eating a Dragonfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Easter tiger swallowtail, light and dark
Location: Troy, VA
September 16, 2016 11:55 am
I thought you might like these photos I took of female Eastern tiger swallowtails in their light and dark variations. A couple of weeks ago when the Joe Pye weed was blooming we had an extraordinary display of butterflies, particularly swallowtails. If people want to know how to attract butterflies, get some native weeds.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Female Tiger Swallowtail: Dark Form

Female Tiger Swallowtail: Dark Form

Dear Grace,
We love your images of dark and light female Tiger Swallowtails, and we totally agree about Joe Pye Weed, Goldenrod, Milkweed and other native plants being perfect for attracting butterflies.  We hope you will be able to provide us with an image of a male Tiger Swallowtail in the near future.  We managed to get a few images several summers past of a very wary male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, who can be recognized because of the absence of blue coloration on the lower wings.

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Female Tiger Swallowtails

Subject: Male tiger swallowtails
Location: Troy, VA
September 17, 2016 10:30 am
Hi Daniel,
I went through my photos and only had a couple of images with males. They were either not as plentiful as the females, or they were shyer. In two of the images you can see ailanthus webworm moths and in one the webworm moth and a skipper. I haven’t seen any swallowtails lately, so I don’t know if I will be able to get any other images. I hope you like these. What I have been seeing lately are skippers and crescent moths.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Hi Grace,
Thanks so much for rounding out your Eastern Tiger Swallowtail posting with a few images of the male, who lacks the blue scales on his lower wings.

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail with Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Male Eastern Tiger Swallowtail with Ailanthus Webworm Moth

 

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Black Hills National Forest SD
September 15, 2016 6:30 pm
Hello, these bugs were swarming around our house, falling on the roof like rain drops from the sky. We live in the Black Hills in South Dakota. Lots of ponderosa pine trees and some spruce. We saw them in September.
Signature: Dan

Backswimmer

Backswimmer

Dear Dan,
This is a Backswimmer, an aquatic True Bug that is also capable of flying.  Are you currently experiencing a dry spell?  It is possible that a nearby pond is drying out and these Backswimmers are seeking a new aquatic environment.  You can compare your image to this BugGuide image of
Notonecta undulata.  Of the family, BugGuide notes:  “Aquatic bugs that often swim upside-down. When resting at the surface, body is typically tilted with the head downward.”  BugGuide also notes that they are also commonly called “Water Bees, Water Wasps” because they occasionally bite swimmers.

Thanks so much. That’s exactly what it is. Not knowing was driving us crazy.  Dan

Subject: Flying beetle
Location: Penang Malaysia
September 15, 2016 7:15 pm
Recently when staying in Penang, Malaysia, I was ‘visited’ by this beetle. An interesting colour arrangement and was glad to obtain a photo of it before it flew away. Have tried to identify it but drawn a blank so far. Loved the orange tipped feelers.
Signature: Many thanks, Allen

Longicorn:  Pachyteria dimidiata

Longicorn: Pachyteria dimidiata

Hi Allen,
This gorgeous Longicorn is
Pachyteria dimidiata, a species found in Southeast Asia.  There is a nice image from Thailand on FlickR and it is also depicted on BioLib.