Subject: Hey
Location: Nc
April 25, 2016 8:28 pm
I was outside and I found this wired bug and was wondering if you could tell me what it is that would be cool thanks Mr bug man :)
Signature: Chris

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Hey Chris,
This is a Camel Cricket.  They are fond of dark, damp recesses, and they are frequently found in basements.  According to BugGuide:  “Most are omnivorous and will feed on most anything organic. Many (if not most) will catch and eat other smaller animals when they can. In houses may chew on paper products, occasionally fabric.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the hell is this
Location: Cambridge oh
April 25, 2016 2:00 pm
what is it. Never seen one Before
Signature: don’t care

Hickory Borer

Hickory Borer

This is a Hickory Borer.

Subject: These aren’t salamanders!
Location: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
April 25, 2016 9:32 am
Hi BugMan,
I was recently on a salamander hunt in an urban forest environment when I came across the following nest under a rock. I leaned in close and was surprised to see that the round white ones had legs (and antennae) and were not just larvae as I had thought. I’ve included two photos: the first being the overall view of the hole beneath the rock and the second a closer view of the larvae (?).
We’ve had some issues in the recent past in the Halifax region in Nova Scotia with fire ants creeping up and I thought I may have come across one of their nests while in the woods (“woods” used very loosely as I can see houses if I squint and hear the highway in close proximity). After spending awhile searching through the life cycles of various ant types, I then wondered if perhaps I had happened across ants feeding upon the larvae of another insect. I’m hoping you’re able to clear up my my confusion, but in the meantime I’ll keep searching – maybe the actual paper insect ID book might be helpful.
If it makes any difference, the area where I found the nest is a few metres away from a small area of wetland and we have had a relatively mild winter so there was not a lot of snow melt.
Signature: NatureGirl

Citronella Ants tend Root Aphids

Citronella Ants tend Root Aphids

Dear NatureGirl,
You have happened across Ants, but instead of “feeding upon the larvae of another insect” they are harvesting honeydew from Aphids.  We did not recognize either your yellow ants or the white Aphids, so we searched on the web and quickly found the Cornell blog New York State IPM Program and a posting of Citronella Ants caring for or tending Root Aphids.  The site states:  “The life and habits of citronella ants aren’t well-studied, but they do have one fascinating trait. They tend herds of underground aphids, known as root aphids as if they were cattle, and harvesting sweet honeydew excreted by the sap-loving aphids. Root aphids feed on the roots of shrubs and plants.”  Additional images and information can be found on Wild About Ants, Scientific American and BugGuide.  

Citronella Ants tend Root Aphids

Citronella Ants tend Root Aphids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: scary, shiny black insect with yellow antennae
Location: Fayette County, Illinois
April 25, 2016 11:47 am
I came across this scary looking, very shiny dark blue/black insect with yellow legs and antennae while mushroom hunting in April. I had my camera ready and he was very cooperative, although afterwards I realized I probably shouldn’t have been so close. I have tried to google his description but I can’t find anything that looks exactly like him. I’m very curious. Any help would be appreciated!
Signature: Jilla Young

Sawfly

Sawfly

Dear Jilla,
This is an Elm Sawfly, and it appears to be on an elm twig.  The Elm Sawfly,
Cimbex americana, is the largest North American Sawfly.  Though it is related to stinging bees and wasps, it is incapable of stinging, so though it appears formidable, it is actually quite harmless.

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Philadelphia
April 24, 2016 11:59 am
I have been getting small bites on my hands sporadically since January. I had bed bugs in September of 2015 and got treatment for them and everything seemed to be fine until January. In January, I found another bite on my hand so I had the treatment again, although this time the exterminator said he did not see any signs of bed bugs. In March 2016 I found another bite on my hand so I called a new exterminator and although he said he didn’t see any sign of bed bugs, he treated my apartment anyway. I found a new bite on my thumb last week (April 2016) and a second bite on the same hand this morning (4 days later). I found this bug dead on the floor at the foot of my bed and immediately called my exterminator, who said it is not a bed bug. Do you know what this insect is?
Signature: Totally Losing It!

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Totally Losing It!,
This looks like an Earwig.  They are considered more of a nuisance than a pest.

Subject: What is this
Location: Hillsdale, Michigan
April 25, 2016 5:42 am
This bug was crawling in my sons college house in southern central Michigan – approximately 15 miles from the Ohio line. Can you identify it?
Signature: Mama Chase

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Mama Chase,
This Western Conifer Seed Bug probably sought shelter indoors when the weather cooled to hibernate, which is why they are frequently found in homes and other buildings.  This is a harmless species.