Subject: Ecuador cloud forest bugs
Location: mindo, ecuador
March 15, 2015 8:39 am
Both of these were found on the same morning in my house.. Any clues as to ID?
Signature: PB

Longicorn

Longicorn

Dear PB,
Now that we have correctly identified your moth, we can concentrate on the Longicorn, a beetle in the family Cerambycidae.  It reminds us greatly of a Longicorn from Barbados we identified as
Chlorida festiva that ranges from Central America to Argentina as well as many islands, but the coloration and pattern of the thorax is different.  We believe we have correctly identified your beetle as another member of the same genus, Chlorida cincta, which we found on the Cerambycidae Genus website.  We located another image on BioLib, and that individual is from Costa Rica.  Chlorida cincta is listed on Cerambycidae de Colombia, so it stands to reason it might also be found in Ecuador.

Longicorn

Longicorn

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Subject: Ecuador cloud forest bugs
Location: mindo, ecuador
March 15, 2015 8:39 am
Both of these were found on the same morning in my house.. Any clues as to ID?
Signature: PB

Possibly Automeris abdomiorientalis

Possibly Automeris argentifera

Dear PB,
We are splitting your two requests apart so they can be better archived on our site.  We believe your moth may be
Automeris abdomiorientalis, and we are going to check with Bill Oehlke to get his opinion.  There are not many images of this species online, but you can compare your individual to the images posted on BOLD Systems Taxonomy.

Bill Oehlke Responds
Hi Daniel,
It is Automeris banus argentifera which has now been given full species status as Automeris argentifera.
Very nice image. Can you get permission for me to use image??
Thanks,
Bill

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Subject: Orthopteran? Wingless Crane Fly? in Alameda, California
Location: Alameda, California USA
March 14, 2015 9:59 pm
I have been trying to figure out what bug this is all day. Body and legs seem vaguely Orthopteran, but then the back legs aren’t really bigger like they are in grasshoppers and crickets. The head looks a bit like a crane fly, but then where are the wings? I’m stumped. This bug is approximately one inch long, spotted bayside in Alameda, California.
Signature: msLaura

Wingless Crane Fly

Brachypterous Crane Fly

Dear msLaura,
This is most definitely not an Orthopteran, and we agree with you that it appears to be a Crane Fly.  We have posted images of wingless Crane Flies also known as Snow Flies in the past, but your individual does not look much like a member of the genus
Chionea.  Your individual may have experienced some type of trauma causing the loss of wings, or there may be another explanation.  We will attempt to contact Dr. Chen Young of The Crane Flies of Pennsylvania to see if he has any ideas.  We will also contact Eric Eaton.

Dr. Chen Young responds
Hi Daniel,
This is a normal brachypterous form (small winged, short winged) female crane fly, most likely in the Tipula (Triplicitipula) group, it will need a male specimen to know the identity of this female.

Thanks,
Chen

Fantastic, thank you very much!
Warmly,
Laura

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Subject: Costa Rican bug
Location: Southern Costa Rica
March 12, 2015 11:36 am
this guy was on a kitchen counter on Playa Cacao by Golfito Costa Rica and is unlike anything I know of, anybody know?
Signature: T Olesen

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear T Olesen,
This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and because of the long front legs, we would bet that it is a male.  Jumping Spider are harmless to humans.  They do not spin webs to snare prey.  They are hunting spiders.

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Subject: Katydid Classification
Location: Central Texas
March 14, 2015 9:02 am
Hello,
I took a photo of a very green katydid with black spotted eyes. Have searched several sites with no success at getting an exact match for identification. Any help would be appreciated.
Signature: JB

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Dear JB,
This is an immature Grasshopper in the family Acrididae, not a Katydid.  Our best guess at this time is that this may be a Bird Grasshopper in the genus
Schistocerca as it looks similar to this individual posted to BugGuide.

Thank you for your quick response.  So many varieties just in my back yard, need to spend some early mornings getting more shots of them.

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Subject: Big catrepillar -moth
Location: côte d’ivoire
March 12, 2015 11:19 am
Hi,
Just found a few of these moths in my garden in Abidjan,
Close to our Ylang Ylang tree,
Size of a finger !
Thanks for helping in identifying them.
Signature: brucama

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Dear brucama,
These are Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars,
Bunaea alcinoe, and they can be very plentiful at times.  They are considered edible.  The adult Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth which is pictured on iNaturalist is quite beautiful.

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

Cabbage Tree Emperor Moth Caterpillars

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