What's That Bug? http://www.whatsthatbug.com Are we experts yet? Fri, 24 Oct 2014 15:13:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 Hornworm http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/hornworm-5/ http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/hornworm-5/#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 15:10:20 +0000 http://www.whatsthatbug.com/?p=77183 Subject: caterpillar Location: Northwest Houston, TX October 24, 2014 5:51 am I found this in a parking lot in Houston, TX. I’ve lived here all my life and have never seen anything like it. It looks like some of the Sphinx Moth caterpillars I’ve seen in Google Image Search, but it doesn’t quite match any [...]

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Subject: caterpillar
Location: Northwest Houston, TX
October 24, 2014 5:51 am
I found this in a parking lot in Houston, TX. I’ve lived here all my life and have never seen anything like it. It looks like some of the Sphinx Moth caterpillars I’ve seen in Google Image Search, but it doesn’t quite match any of them. Could you help me identify it?
Signature: Jeremy

Hornworm

Hornworm

Hi Jeremy,
We agree that this is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae, even though it appears to be lacking a horn.  Our first impulse was that this resembles a pre-pupal Waved Sphinx Caterpillar, but the lack of a horn and the orientation of the light slashes behind the spiracles and running from front to back in orientation would eliminate that as a correct identification.
  A prepupal Modest Sphinx Caterpillar pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas also has the white slash marks oriented the opposite direction.  As we must leave for work now, we are going to write to Bill Oehlke to get his assistance.  We wonder if it might be an unusually colored Ficus Sphinx, Pachylia ficus.

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Zebra Jumper http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/zebra-jumper/ http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/zebra-jumper/#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 14:50:22 +0000 http://www.whatsthatbug.com/?p=77180 Subject: Zebra Jumper Location: Toledo, OH October 23, 2014 3:40 pm Hey there! Fall is thoroughly set in over here in Toledo, and the bugs are getting harder and harder to track down and enjoy. This little guy was kind enough to hang around in the cold though for me to test my new macro [...]

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Subject: Zebra Jumper
Location: Toledo, OH
October 23, 2014 3:40 pm
Hey there!
Fall is thoroughly set in over here in Toledo, and the bugs are getting harder and harder to track down and enjoy. This little guy was kind enough to hang around in the cold though for me to test my new macro lens on. Thought you might enjoy him!
Signature: Katy

Zebra Jumping Spider

Zebra Jumping Spider

Hi Katy,
Your images of this Zebra Jumping Spider,
Salticus scenicus, are quite nice.  We like the results of your new lens and we look forward to spring and new submissions from you.

Zebra Jumping Spider

Zebra Jumping Spider

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Questions about Orbweavers http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/questions-orbweavers/ http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/questions-orbweavers/#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 14:39:21 +0000 http://www.whatsthatbug.com/?p=77178 Subject: Argiope Aurantia – Question about Life Cycle October 23, 2014 11:37 am Dear Bugman and friends, We have been lucky to have had three yellow garden spiders in our yard this year build webs where we could easily observe them. Our family watched all three build daily webs, eat, and grow for a few [...]

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Subject: Argiope Aurantia – Question about Life Cycle
October 23, 2014 11:37 am
Dear Bugman and friends,
We have been lucky to have had three yellow garden spiders in our yard this year build webs where we could easily observe them. Our family watched all three build daily webs, eat, and grow for a few weeks. One spider got very large (in our opinion), perhaps a body of about an inch, not counting her legs. The other two were a bit smaller than that. One seemed to have a mate after some time, a little fellow that hung out on the edge of her web and crept closer over time (although we don’t know if there was ever any “action”). They all followed the same pattern, web building, eating, growing, and then disappearing. We are wondering if you could tell us why they just disappear…They are around for 2-3 weeks. The first one who disappeared possibly did not get enough to eat at the end; however, we did feed her a few flies the night before she disappeared, which she declined to eat (although she had eaten other flies we had gotten her previously). The other ate a really great meal one day,
at least 3-4 decent sized bugs (in fact, she had another bug caught in her web that she didn’t get to), and then disappeared two days later. What we noticed on the two we were able to observe closely is that they ate fine one day, but didn’t rebuild their webs that night, hung around kind of crooked the following day, and then were gone the next day. We were just wondering if you could let us know if this is typical for their life cycle. It did not get cold, it seemed like they had enough to eat, we didn’t see a dead spider on the ground under the web, no one walked into the webs, two were high enough that the only predators would possibly be birds (but one was right up against our window so it seems like it would have been very hard for a bird to get her without smacking against the glass). We got attached to all three, which may sound silly, and were really sad when they disappeared. So, I thought I would write you to find out if you could offer any insight. I know you are busy,
but just wanted to try. Any thoughts you have would be greatly appreciated. We have looked online and have been unable to find anything ourselves. Thanks again in advance.
Linda, Steve, and Gage
Signature: Linda Vincent

Golden Orbweaver from our Archives

Golden Orbweaver from our Archives

Dear Linda, Steve and Gage,
Sadly, we don’t know what happened to your Golden Orbweavers.  We have had similar experiences with individuals in our own Los Angeles garden.  They seem to just vanish one day.  The life cycle of Golden Orbweavers is a single season, and even if the weather if fine, it is still nearing the end of the year.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide you with some information.

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Tolype http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/tolype-6/ http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/tolype-6/#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 14:26:14 +0000 http://www.whatsthatbug.com/?p=77176 Subject: Bird Dropping Moth? Location: Coryell County, Texas October 23, 2014 9:39 pm Hello, I spotted this moth near the garage when I returned home today. It was clinging to the Malvaviscus arboreus for hours. I haven’t had any luck in finding its genus or species. I’m guessing that it’s a Bird Dropping Moth, for [...]

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Subject: Bird Dropping Moth?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 23, 2014 9:39 pm
Hello, I spotted this moth near the garage when I returned home today. It was clinging to the Malvaviscus arboreus for hours. I haven’t had any luck in finding its genus or species. I’m guessing that it’s a Bird Dropping Moth, for obvious reasons. :-D
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Tolype

Tolype

Hi Ellen,
Your moth does resemble bird droppings.  There is a moth that is commonly called a Bird Dropping Moth and our readers frequently write in that Wood Nymphs in the genus
Eudryas resemble bird droppings, but neither is your moth which is in the genus Tolype and has no common name.  Seems looking like bird droppings is a good way to protect against getting eaten.

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Newly Metamorphosed Elegant Sheep Moth from Canada http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/newly-metamorphosed-elegant-sheep-moth-canada/ http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/10/24/newly-metamorphosed-elegant-sheep-moth-canada/#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 07:06:10 +0000 http://www.whatsthatbug.com/?p=77174 Subject: Beautiful bug Location: north calgary Alberta Canada October 23, 2014 8:54 pm i live in calgary Alberta and in July some friends were camping and saw this bug. Any idea what it is? Signature: jaynerama Dear jaynerama, This Elegant Sheep Moth, Hemileuca eglanterina, has just emerged from an underground pupal state.  Here [...]

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Subject: Beautiful bug
Location: north calgary Alberta Canada
October 23, 2014 8:54 pm
i live in calgary Alberta and in July some friends were camping and saw this bug. Any idea what it is?
Signature: jaynerama

Elegant Sheep Moth freshly eclosed

Elegant Sheep Moth freshly eclosed

Dear jaynerama,
This Elegant Sheep Moth,
Hemileuca eglanterina, has just emerged from an underground pupal state.  Here is a matching image from BugGuide.  The Elegant Sheep Moth is even more beautiful after its wings fully expand, enabling it to fly.

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