Comments for What's That Bug? http://www.whatsthatbug.com Are we experts yet? Fri, 25 Apr 2014 02:45:55 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.3 Comment on A Pair of Stump Stabbers by dorwageld@aol.com http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2013/09/22/pair-stump-stabbers/#comment-941532 Fri, 25 Apr 2014 02:45:55 +0000 http://www.whatsthatbug.com/?p=70620#comment-941532 Thank you, thank you, thank you for that fascinating update! I am so looking forward to all manner of life springing forth around here soon!

]]>
Comment on Crayfish from Australia by Joshua http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2012/10/29/crayfish-from-australia/#comment-938249 Thu, 24 Apr 2014 15:41:20 +0000 http://www.whatsthatbug.com/?p=51237#comment-938249 Just looking through the archives for fun, and I had to find out what this unusual crustacean was. This looks a lot like the endangered Warragul burrowing crayfish. http://theconversation.com/australian-endangered-species-victorian-burrowing-crayfish-19658
Poor thing lost its claws.

]]>
Comment on Rabid Wolf Spider by Kathy http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2010/07/07/rabid-wolf-spider-4/#comment-933460 Thu, 24 Apr 2014 00:51:31 +0000 http://www.whatsthatbug.com/?p=26349#comment-933460 Ahh I just saw a huge one on my porch nice to know there harmless but I think I won’t be letting my girls play outside for a few weeks.. They are huge to me too a lil bit bigger than a hlf dollar

]]>
Comment on Ladybird Beetle: Birth defect or normal metamorphosis????? by bugman http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2007/07/09/ladybird-beetle-birth-defect-or-normal-metamorphosis/#comment-929891 Wed, 23 Apr 2014 14:16:18 +0000 http://new.cheshirecat.net/wtbblog/2007/07/09/ladybird-beetle-birth-defect-or-normal-metamorphosis/#comment-929891 Wow, thanks for your fascinating account of raising Lady Beetles.

]]>
Comment on Ladybird Beetle: Birth defect or normal metamorphosis????? by Humberto http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2007/07/09/ladybird-beetle-birth-defect-or-normal-metamorphosis/#comment-928212 Wed, 23 Apr 2014 09:48:43 +0000 http://new.cheshirecat.net/wtbblog/2007/07/09/ladybird-beetle-birth-defect-or-normal-metamorphosis/#comment-928212 To add to the comment by shaunotd, I also recently observed agressive behavior from an adult ladybug toward a freshly hatched one, also resulting from a lack of prey. The older one chewed on the younger one’s wing elytra. I promptly separated them, but the damage was done. I learned that when a ladybug has just emerged from its pupa, the elytra are incredibly soft, about as soft as shopping bag plastic, and very easily damaged/dented. I’m sure the poor ladybug in the photo above was attacked by something immediately after emerging, before the elytra could harden. Ladybugs don’t normally attack each other, but when they run out of prey, even if just for a few hours, they start to consider each other fair game. And that includes adults, larvas, and eggs too. I raised around 25 of them in an enclosure recently. As larvas, together they would easily devour around 300 aphids every 24 hours! It was a huge challenge to feed them properly in their final days before pupating, when they were largest and hungriest. I did not see any pupas get harmed, but I did see many eggs get eaten, as well as larger larvas eating their much smaller larva siblings when I wasn’t looking. Sometimes they would run out of prey late at night, and they wouldn’t wait until the next morning to get their new batch of aphids. I couldn’t have fed any more of them, so the loss of many of the eggs from cannibalism was okay, but I really went to great lengths to protect the first 25 ladybugs. Only one of them died (the one that was attacked just after emerging). I don’t know why, it looked like only the elytra had been hurt, and I could still have fed it, but it still died.

]]>