Currently viewing the category: "Thread Waisted Wasps"
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Subject: What kind of insect is this??
Location: Arizona
June 17, 2016 4:20 pm
Found this bad boy buzzing around the cab of my truck and it just wouldn’t leave, now i am very curious as to what it is and if it is dangerous because i was sure acting like it haha.
Signature: Mark V

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Dear Mark V,
This is a Thread-Waisted Wasp in the family Sphecidae, and they are solitary and not aggressive.  It very much resembles the Great Golden Digger Wasp, but the coloration is wrong, especially in the face, so we believe it is a member of the same genus.  This image from BugGuide looks quite similar.  We will check with Eric Eaton to see if he can confirm our ID.

Eric Eaton Provides a Correction
Daniel:
I think the wasp in question is actually a female Prionyx foxi.  Great find if so, they don’t seem to be very common.
Eric

Ed. Note:  Here is the BugGuide page with additional images.

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Subject: Believe to be blue wasp
Location: chandler AZ
June 6, 2016 10:15 am
Thinking it’s a blue wasp or mud wasp; didn’t mind the photo shoot wasn’t aggressive at all/
Signature: Doc

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Dear Doc,
This is one of the most beautiful images we have ever received of a Steel Blue Cricket Hunter,
Chlorion aerarium, and the second image you provided where the Wasp is exiting the frame nicely illustrates the Thread Waist distinctive in the family Sphecidae.  According to BugGuide:  “Although generally not closely associated with humans, they are found wherever their hosts (Gryllus crickets) are found, which could include close proximity to homes … . Chlorion is usually found in open areas such as meadows, overgrown fields, dunes, beach edges, etc., although they may not necessarily hunt in the same habitat as they nest. ”

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Daniel;
Thank you for the feedback I deeply appreciate it , I have to admit it is one of my favorite shots of the many I take around my yard. Please feel free to use the picture if you like.
peace

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Subject: Isodontia mexicana?
Location: South Central Texas
June 6, 2016 6:26 am
Howdy Bugman – I think we have the Frank Lloyd Wright of Grass-carrying wasps. Can’t think of anyone else that will appreciate this as much as me – happy Monday. 😀
Signature: Debbie Littrell Ventura

Grass Carrying Wasp Nest

Grass Carrying Wasp Nest

Dear Debbie,
That is one impressive Grass Carrying Wasp Nest.  Will you be suspending use of your hose until after the emergence?

Sure going to try. My garden hose using spouse is not nearly as impressed, but I’m working on his sensibilities. Have a fab week, Daniel. 😀

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thread waisted wasps?
Location: Statesboro GA
September 21, 2015 4:28 pm
Hi,
I took this photo today at Garden of the Coastal Plain at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro GA. I believe it’s two thread waisted wasps mating, but would like confirmation from an expert. Thanks for a great website and resource.
Signature: eddie l

Mating Thread-Waisted Wasps

Mating Thread-Waisted Wasps

Dear Eddie,
Your image of mating Thread-Waisted Wasps is quite beautiful.  We quickly identified them as
Eremnophila aureonotata thanks to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are found in:  “Old fields near deciduous or other(?) woodlands. The wasp is commonly found on wildflowers with large clusters of blossoms, such as Queen Anne’s Lace. Mating pairs on flowers are common.”  The female provisions an underground nest with caterpillars.

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Subject: blue bee??
Location: Palm Springs, CA
August 15, 2015 12:01 am
This is a pretty poor picture due to the fact that a spider got to this bug first. Its brilliant blue color and huge white eyes really caught my attention. I don’t know if this is a fly or a bee but I’ve never seen one like it before. It was about three quarters of an inch long.
Signature: Gehr

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Thread-Waist Wasp, not Bee.

Thanks Daniel! Found one blue one in Google images, though none with white eyes.

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Hi Again Gehr,
We wrote to Eric Eaton to get his opinion on this matter and this is what he wrote back:
“Daniel:
Steel Blue Cricket Hunter, Chlorion aerarium.  I suspect death has something to do with the white eyes. :-)  Maybe the spider sucked them dry.  No, seriously.
Eric”

Thanks for the update!  I agree, definitely most likely the Cricket Hunter.  Interestingly, one Google image I found had one with the white eyes. I suppose could be due to dehydration a la arachnid!
Gehr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help! What is this bug?
Location: Riverside, California
August 15, 2015 8:56 am
We found this weird bug on our patio and we don’t know what it is. Is it a kind of wasp? We didn’t see any other ones. Can you tell us what is please?
Thanks!
Signature: Hope (6 yrs old)

Thread-Waisted Wasp:  Sphex lucae

Thread-Waisted Wasp: Sphex lucae

Dear Hope,
This is indeed a wasp, more specifically a Thread-Waist Wasp in the family Sphecidae.  These are solitary wasps and they are not aggressive.  We believe your individual is in the genus
Sphex, and though the genus is well represented on our site because of the Great Golden Digger Wasp and the Great Black Wasp, your lovely red and black individual is a different species, probably Sphex lucae, based on the images on BugGuide.  This is a new species for our site.  BugEric has an excellent description of this species.

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