Currently viewing the category: "Thread Waisted Wasps"
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Subject: blue bee??
Location: Palm Springs, CA
August 15, 2015 12:01 am
This is a pretty poor picture due to the fact that a spider got to this bug first. Its brilliant blue color and huge white eyes really caught my attention. I don’t know if this is a fly or a bee but I’ve never seen one like it before. It was about three quarters of an inch long.
Signature: Gehr

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Thread-Waist Wasp, not Bee.

Thanks Daniel! Found one blue one in Google images, though none with white eyes.

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Hi Again Gehr,
We wrote to Eric Eaton to get his opinion on this matter and this is what he wrote back:
“Daniel:
Steel Blue Cricket Hunter, Chlorion aerarium.  I suspect death has something to do with the white eyes. :-)  Maybe the spider sucked them dry.  No, seriously.
Eric”

Thanks for the update!  I agree, definitely most likely the Cricket Hunter.  Interestingly, one Google image I found had one with the white eyes. I suppose could be due to dehydration a la arachnid!
Gehr

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Subject: Help! What is this bug?
Location: Riverside, California
August 15, 2015 8:56 am
We found this weird bug on our patio and we don’t know what it is. Is it a kind of wasp? We didn’t see any other ones. Can you tell us what is please?
Thanks!
Signature: Hope (6 yrs old)

Thread-Waisted Wasp:  Sphex lucae

Thread-Waisted Wasp: Sphex lucae

Dear Hope,
This is indeed a wasp, more specifically a Thread-Waist Wasp in the family Sphecidae.  These are solitary wasps and they are not aggressive.  We believe your individual is in the genus
Sphex, and though the genus is well represented on our site because of the Great Golden Digger Wasp and the Great Black Wasp, your lovely red and black individual is a different species, probably Sphex lucae, based on the images on BugGuide.  This is a new species for our site.  BugEric has an excellent description of this species.

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Subject: Ground wasp?
Location: Grand Junctoon , CO
August 7, 2015 3:22 pm
We have an interesting wasp that is excavating a small hole in a crack in the driveway. He does not seem aggressive ….similar in behavior to a cicada killer.
Signature: Patrick

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Dear Patrick,
This sure looks like a Steel Blue Cricket Hunter,
Chlorion aerarium, to us, and we believe SHE is making a subterranean nest that she will provision with Crickets for her brood.  See BugGuide for more information on the Steel Blue Cricket Hunter.

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

Steel Blue Cricket Hunter

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Subject: bugs nest
Location: Miami,Florida
July 29, 2015 10:27 am
Please help me figure out what this is.
Signature: Tiffany

Mud Dauber Nest

Mud Dauber Nest

Dear Tiffany,
This is the nest of a Mud Dauber, a solitary wasp that builds a nest of mud that is comprised of numerous cells provisioned with paralyzed spiders.  Each cell contains a single egg.  By the look of your nest, the adult Mud Daubers have already emerged to forage, pollinate flowers and possibly begin building a new generation of mud nests in sheltered locations, often in the corners of windows and under eaves.  Mud Daubers are not an aggressive species that can often be found collecting mud in gardens and other areas that are watered.

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Subject: what kind of wasp is this?
Location: Kingston,NH
July 27, 2015 11:06 am
I live in NH and saw this bee and thought it looked strange. I’m not sure if they are native to this area but i have been seeing them the past two years. Please, help me identify this bug.
Thank you.
Signature: Wendy

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Dear Wendy,
The Great Golden Digger Wasp, Sphex ichneumoneus, is native throughout North America and if you have had a sudden increase in populations, we suspect it has something to do with food supplies.  Adult Great Golden Digger Wasps are pollinators, and in our own garden, they are very fond of the flowers of onions, but we have also seen them visit the blossoms of carrots, so we suspect they are also attracted to other plants with umbel blooms.  The female digs a nest that she provisions with paralyzed Katydids, Crickets and other longhorned Orthopterans which provide food for the larvae.  Years when Katydids are especially plentiful will likely result in more Great Golden Digger Wasps.

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Subject: Scary flying wasp ant??
Location: Arizona
July 23, 2015 10:51 pm
I woke up this morning and went downstairs to find this frightening critter crawling on the ceiling. My husband tried to kill it but lost it somewhere downstairs so we were forced to give up so we could go to work. Later that night it was captured and after much deliberation we decided to let it go outside. Did we make the right decision? What is this bug? Is it harmful or helpful?
Signature: Jenna

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Dear Jenna,
When it comes to insects, “harmful or helpful” are kind of relative terms, but we would have to say that the Black and Yellow Mud Dauber in your image is helpful.  This solitary wasp is not aggressive, and the female constructs a nest of mud and provisions it with paralyzed spiders to feed her brood.  Fans of Spiders might not like wasps that feed on spiders, but the food chain with predators and prey is necessary for the web of life on our planet.  Because of your thoughtful actions, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination