Currently viewing the category: "Thread Waisted Wasps"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mud dauber sighting
Location: Oregon
August 6, 2016 8:39 pm
This lovely lady was singing while she worked, which is how I found her. I thought there was a wild animal trapped underneath the cabinet, but when I moved the towel IN the cabinet I found her working away at her nest, making the strangest sound. I should have gotten a video :/
Signature: Tonya

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber makes nest

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber makes nest

Dear Tonya,
We know exactly the sound you are talking about.  We too have located Black and Yellow Mud Daubers constructing nests because of their “singing”.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: One very strange bug….
Location: North of Seattle, Wa
July 30, 2016 4:10 pm
My cat was staring at this bug that got inside and first I thought it was a wasp so I picked it up and tossed it in the toilet and it started skeeting around
on the water so I took the below photos. I have no Idea what it is. Can you help?
I picked it up and put it outside
Can you help???
Signature: Don Everest

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Dear Don,
This Black and Yellow Mud Dauber,
Sceliphron caementarium, actually is a wasp, and we are curious how you “picked it up and put it outside.”  The Black and Yellow Mud Dauber is a solitary wasp, and it is not an aggressive species, however, females are able to sting.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults nectar at flowers; mud nests are built in all kinds of sheltered locations, incl. man-made structures, rock ledges, etc. Adults collect mud for nests at puddle/pool edges” and “nests are provisioned with spiders; adults common at flowers(3), especially parsnip and water parsnip, and visit hummingbird feeders.”  Because you took pity on this Black and Yellow Mud Dauber, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Iridescent Wasp?
Location: Cabot, VT
July 17, 2016 8:03 am
I just found this beautiful wasp-like flying bug, dead in my upstairs window (July). I live in central Vermont, in an old farm house surrounded by cow pastures and woods. We have a small second floor attic space, and I’ve seen both evidence of old wasp nests on the ceiling in there, and live wasps flying out of there. I haven’t seen one like this alive, though. I’ve never seen anything like it, even though I’ve lived in a number of New England farm houses throughout my life. I love your website, and I’m so excited to finally have a bug to send to you!
Signature: Lara

Blue Mud Wasp

Blue Mud Wasp

Dear Lara,
This looks to us like a Blue Mud Wasp,
Chalybion californicum, a species described on BugGuide as:  “A large, active, blue-black wasp with irridescent blue wings. Frequents flowers for nectar and buildings for nest sites.”  BugGuide also states:  “Females construct mud nests in sheltered areas, often under the eaves of buildings, and provision them with spiders. Sometimes refurbishes the nests of other mud-daubers, such as Sceliphron.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Long, flying insect with orange wings burrowing in sand
Location: Park Lake beach, Rockaway, NJ
July 14, 2016 9:18 am
Hi
Today on the beach we saw quite a few insects we haven’t noticed before (we were at a different beach). They were long – 2 or 2.5 inches, had orange wings, and were burrowing into holes in the sand. We’d love to know what they are ! (Could only get a picture of the bright orange wings in blurry pictures. The wings didn’t show up in the clearer pics)
Signature: Stephanie Kawalec

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Dear Stephanie,
The female Great Golden Digger Wasp creates a subterranean nest that she provisions with paralyzed Katydids that will provide fresh meat for her developing brood.  Great Golden Digger Wasps are a solitary species and they are not aggressive toward humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug id
Location: Virginia Beach VA
July 6, 2016 8:05 am
I am looking to identify this bug I have seen on my Threadleaf coreopsis. Can you help me figure out what this is and if he is a good bug? I am thinking some kind of thread waisted wasp.
Signature: Stacey Allin

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Dear Stacey,
This is a Thread-Waisted Wasp in the family Sphecidae, but we are not able to provide you with a species identification.  Thread-Waisted Wasps are solitary wasps and they are not aggressive.  Adults take nectar, but females prey upon insects to feed to the young.  They are considered beneficial.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of insect is this??
Location: Arizona
June 17, 2016 4:20 pm
Found this bad boy buzzing around the cab of my truck and it just wouldn’t leave, now i am very curious as to what it is and if it is dangerous because i was sure acting like it haha.
Signature: Mark V

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Thread-Waisted Wasp

Dear Mark V,
This is a Thread-Waisted Wasp in the family Sphecidae, and they are solitary and not aggressive.  It very much resembles the Great Golden Digger Wasp, but the coloration is wrong, especially in the face, so we believe it is a member of the same genus.  This image from BugGuide looks quite similar.  We will check with Eric Eaton to see if he can confirm our ID.

Eric Eaton Provides a Correction
Daniel:
I think the wasp in question is actually a female Prionyx foxi.  Great find if so, they don’t seem to be very common.
Eric

Ed. Note:  Here is the BugGuide page with additional images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination