Currently viewing the category: "spider wasps"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider wasp’s (rescued) victim
August 22, 2014 9:14 am
I saw a wolf spider being attacked by a blue spider wasp today, and I managed to chase away the wasp and rescue the spider. I know some species only temporarily paralyze the victim, and I’ve seen the spider twitch, so…does he have any chance of recovering? I feel bad for intervening, especially since it’s probably too late for the spider, but the poor guy was trying very hard to get away, and I wanted to help him out.
I don’t know what kind exactly the wasp was, but it’s a Michigan variety.
Signature: Kitt

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Dear Kitt ,
We have heard of a Tarantula recovering from the sting of a wasp, but the whole purpose of the sting is to paralyze the spider so that it will provide food for the wasp larvae.  We are uncertain if it will recover.  We have illustrated your posting with an image from our archives.

Thanks for responding, and I’m glad you could answer my question. I’ll keep an eye on the spider. who knows? He might recover soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Orange ?
Location: Claremont & Upland California
May 3, 2014 10:39 am
Area found Claremont and Upland, Ca
Found in April and May 2014
One was about 1/2 the size of a dragonfly and the other was a little over 1 ” long.
25 years of gardening and I have never seen this bug, any idea what it is?
Signature: Dee

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

Hi Dee,
This is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and it appears to be a small Tarantula Hawk.
  You can see some examples on BugGuide that are classified in the genera Hemipepsis and Pepsis.  The female Tarantula Hawk preys upon Tarantulas and other large spiders including Trapdoor Spiders, not to eat, but to feed her young.  The Tarantula is paralyzed and buried with a single egg.  When the larval wasp hatches, it feeds on the fresh meet of the living, but paralyzed Tarantula.  Adult Tarantula Hawks are nectar feeders, and the sting is reported to be quite painful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge Waspe
Location: Adelaide, Australia
April 2, 2014 7:28 pm
I walked outside and felt a pain in my foot and saw this huge thing guarding the bin. Its the biggest I have seen in Adelaide – what is it a potter wasp?
Signature: Andrew Perrott

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

Dear Andrew,
We find it amusingly ironic that the “huge thing” which is the “biggest [you] have seen in Adelaide” is also one of the tiniest images we have ever received for identification purposes.  We would love to post a larger version of this image of a Spider Wasp if you have one and can provide it in a subsequent email.

Yes i figured out its a spider wasp through google – we have never seen one like this here

Thanks so much for attaching a higher resolution image.

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

i no have a red itchy foot – i am not sure what it did to me, either bit me or stung me

We would suppose you were stung.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug!!!!
Location: Sydney
December 12, 2013 5:54 pm
Howdy,
My wife took a photo of this and after a bit of searching, could it be a Spider Wasp?
I have 2 kids under the age of 2 who love to play outside, are they a pest and should i try to exterminate them?
Signature: Michael

Spider Wasp stalks Spider

Spider Wasp stalks Spider

Dear Michael,
You are correct that this is a Spider Wasp, and it is stalking a Spider in one of your photos.  You do not need to fear this Spider Wasp attacking your children unless they look like spiders, which we highly doubt.  Female Spider Wasps are more concerned about providing food for their broods than they are about stinging innocent children, though we would not entirely discount the possibility of getting stung if the Spider Wasps are handled or stepped on.  Again, we want to stress that they are not aggressive toward humans and we don’t believe there is any need to take the steps to exterminate them, which would probably be nearly impossible anyways.  Social Wasps pose a much greater threat because they try to defend their nests, while solitary wasps like Spider Wasps do not have the same defense instincts.  We will try to identify both the wasp and the spider after we do some yardwork in our own neglected garden.  Alas, you photo does lack critical detail, but the spider appears to be a Wolf Spider.  We have nice photos in our archive of a Spider Wasp preying upon a Wolf Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red wasp? Puple-blue wings
Location: Northeast Texas
July 11, 2013 12:55 pm
Hi! Thanks for reading, its a very commendable service you offer to us regular folks who know nothing about bugs. I live in Northeast Texas (Hopkins County) and I am no stranger to the red wasp, and have been stung so many times I can identify them in my sleep. We were INFESTED with them last year and I had an exterminator come at the beginning of the year and thankfully I have not seen any of the typical red paper wasps that we have (the meaner than hell boogers). Now for some reason, we are infested outside with these! They look like a red wasp, but they are faster, have bluish wings and like to crawl on the ground a lot. They don’t seem to be as aggressive as the paper wasp, but I haven’t given them much of a chance to chase me, but they seem more like the aggression of a dirt dauber because they don’t just stalk you down with the intent to kill. What are they?
Signature: Texas lady

Possibly Spider Wasp

Possibly Spider Wasp

Dear Texas lady,
We believe this is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae.  We will do additional research.

Update:  July 12, 2013
We believe this might be a member of the genus Tachypompilus based on photos posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Wasp
Location: White River, South Africa
April 19, 2013 6:58 am
Hi Bugman
Thanks for your reply. As it happens I did take some photographs. My wife has most of the shots and it going to try and upgrade the quality of the photos, but I have attached three in their original state for your perusal.
Signature: Steve

Spider Wasp with Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp with Huntsman Spider

Dear Steve,
Thank you so much for writing back and providing photos to the comment you posted on the Spider Wasp from South Africa posting.  Many Spider Wasps have a
metallic sheen and we are curious if your personal observations included the purplish color of the posting you commented upon.  We get most of our Spider Wasp and Huntsman Spider submissions from Australia.  We are running a bit late this morning, but we will try to identify this species of Spider Wasp in the near future.  Your photos are wonderful.  We believe that the Spider Wasp might be dragging the Spider up the wall in an effort to glide as far as possible.  The wasp could never get off the ground with such a heavy payload, but by taking off from a higher elevation, she can still make use of flight to return to her burrow.

Spider Wasp with Rain Spider

Spider Wasp with Rain Spider

Thank you for reminding us that Huntsman Spiders are known as Rain Spiders in some parts of their range.  Your previous comment mentioned the pain of the sting.  Do you know this firsthand.  North American Tarantula Hawks, another large group of Spider Wasps, are also reported to have among the most painful stings of any insect.

Spider Wasp with Rain Spider

Spider Wasp with Rain Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination