Currently viewing the category: "Potter and Mason Wasps"
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Btw… Do you know the number of Bugs Anonymous?…. I think I have a problem.  I dreamt about this wasp last night. lol.  I was dreaming I was back at the spot where I photographed it, trying to get a better picture of it’s abdomen!
True! : ))
Until next time… happy bug watching!
Best regards,
J

Possibly Mason Wasp

Possibly Mason Wasp

Dear J (name withheld to maintain anonymity),
We are creating a special Featured Posting of your plea to connect Bugaholics from around the world.  Let this posting become the beginning of the forum.
  A better view of this Mason or Potter Wasp’s (location withheld to help maintain anonymity) would surely help contribute to a correct identification.

 

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Subject: what’s that wasp?

Location: Oldbury, Western Australia
December 5, 2014 1:53 am
Hi again,
I took this pic of a wasp the other day on my property near Perth Western Australia and have been unable to make a positive identification. The T shaped marking on it’s thorax and the black and orange head markings are what have me perplexed. If you have time maybe you can help me. I do like to establish a positive ID on my photographic subjects.
Thanks,
Best regards,
Signature: Jill

Mason Wasp, we believe

Potter Wasp

Dear Jill,
Your impressive wasp resembles a Potter Wasp or Mason Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae, and it does bear a similarity to a species pictured on the Brisbane Insect Site that is identified as a Mason Wasp,
Abispa ephippium.  We believe your wasp may be a close relative as the markings are similar, but distinctly different.

Possibly Mason Wasp

Potter Wasp

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for you help once again.
When I first saw the wasp my immediate assumption was that it was a Potter Wasp or Mason Wasp. It was just those markings that had me confused, when I tried to confirm my assumption, as I couldn’t find any wasp, pictured or described, on the net with the same markings.
However I have since read there are many different species of Eumeninae, although the thorax marking of the Mason Wasp normally seems to be described and pictured with a distinct triangular black marking.  I think I will have to put it down to being a Mason Wasp as you suggest.  If I ever find do happen to find out it is something else, I will let you know.
Btw… Do you know the number of Bugs Anonymous?…. I think I have a problem.  I dreamt about this wasp last night. lol.  I was dreaming I was back at the spot where I photographed it, trying to get a better picture of it’s abdomen!
True! : ))
Until next time… happy bug watching!
Best regards,
Jill

Update
Hi again Daniel,
Today I sent the query of the T marked wasp to the Perth, Western Australia, Museum Entomology Dept and they say it is a Potter Wasp
Potter Wasp (Abispa ephippium)
So we can all sleep easy tonight. ; )
Thanks again for your help.
Best regards,
Jill

Hi Jill,
Thanks for confirming that the wasp you captured in images is a well documented species that usually has an entirely black thorax.

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Subject: black wasp with white bands
Location: Fairfax, VA
July 27, 2014 12:27 pm
I photographed this attractive wasp (at the same time as a Great Golden Digger Wasp) on 7/27/14 in Fairfax, Virginia. I haven’t been able to find a reference to ID it. Can you help?
Signature: Seth

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

Dear Seth,
Your images of the Four Toothed Mason Wasp,
Monobia quadridens, are positively gorgeous.  According to BugGuide:  “Usually nests in wood borings, but sometimes burrows in dirt banks. Sometimes takes over abandoned nests of carpenter bees or ground bees, also Sceliphron (mud dauber) cells. Nest is provisioned with caterpillars, and cells of nest are separated by mud partitions.”

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

Four Toothed Mason Wasp

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Subject: wasp ?
Location: Amherst Nova Scotia Canada
May 23, 2014 5:45 pm
I took this picture May 22 2014 on our front deck, I have tried to identify this insect but cannot
Signature: Charles W Linney

Mason Wasp

Mason Wasp

Hi Charles,
This is a Mason Wasp or Potter Wasp in the family Eumeninae.  We are having trouble identifying it to the species level since so many species and genera look so similar, so we will leave that to an expert.  Members of the family, according to BugGuide:  “prey mainly upon moth larvae” and they provision their nests with the caterpillars to provide food for the developing larval wasps.  The nests often resemble small ceramic pots and they are constructed of mud.

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Subject: Found on ficus
Location: Southern NY
February 10, 2014 7:08 pm
Hi Bugman,
We had a ficus plant on our porch this summer. We brought it in last September when the weather started getting colder. I noticed what I thought was a cocoon, but my friend said it was an egg sac. It looks like something hatched out of one side. What kind of bug would make this?
Thank You Bugman,
Signature: Perplexed in NY

Potter Wasp Pots

Potter Wasp Pots

Dear Perplexed in NY,
These are nests of a Potter Wasp.  According to BugGuide:  “Females lay egg in mud nest (built on twig, etc.), then provision with small caterpillars esp. cankerworms. Also reported to provision with sawflies.”
  BugGuide also indicates:  “There are at least two generations in a year, from late spring to early fall. Overwintering takes place at the prepupal instar, in the mud pots built by last generation mother females. Emerging adults will be the first generation of next year.”

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Subject: New Wasp to the Back
Location: Hawthorne, CA
September 3, 2013 4:32 pm
Hi Daniel,
I caught this wasp foraging about in the Mexican Sunflower blooms yesterday and don’t recognize it. I thought I’d seen and identified them all. Can you please help?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Possibly Mason Wasp

Possibly Mason Wasp

Hi Anna,
We believe your wasp is in the subfamily Eumeninae, the Potter and Mason Wasps.  There are many genera on BugGuide that look similar, including
Ancistrocerus, Euodynerus and Pachodynerus, but we cannot say with any certainty that your wasp is a member of any of them.  We will try to get additional information for you.  Our archives are populated with quite a few Potter or Mason Wasps from your garden.

Hi Daniel,
I think it is most likely Euodynerus.  Thanks, and I’ll keep trying to narrow it down.
Anna

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
I agree….This is Euodynerus hidalgo in all likelihood.  I’m absolutely positive at genus level anyway.
Eric

Eric and Daniel,
Thanks for the work on this.  It didn’t seem as brightly colored as Euodynerus hidalgo.  Can we be sure it is not Euodynerus pratensis?  I would appreciate further input and thank you again for your time.  Gads, I’m questioning experts!  Just trying to learn more and more . . .
Anna

Hi Anna,
We cannot say for certain and Eric’s response was not definitive. 
Euodynerus hidalgo, according to BugGuide has: “Thin, lamellate, reflexed hind margins of 2nd and 3rd urotergites is diagnostic for this species.  The amount of black is highly variable in this species and other vespids. The eastern subspecies (boreoorientalis) is mainly black. Some specimens of this species from one locality in Florida have practically no red while others are almost completely red. In general, structural characters are more reliable and play a more important role in identification, though some species also show significant structural variation.”  We are not even certain what the first sentence in that quote means.

Update from Anna:  September 6, 2013
Hi Daniel,
I got a better shot of the same(?) wasp today and do agree with Eric’s determination that this is most likely Euodynerus hidalgo.  Thanks for everything!
Anna

Potter Wasp

Potter Wasp

Thanks for the update and the new photo Anna.

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